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ARRIVAL OF THE ELIZABETH GRAHAM
The Star November 7th 1874

This barque, commanded by Captain J.J. Mordean, formerly of the barque Maori, arrived in harbour this morning from London, after a passage of 109 days. She brings 13 passengers, but no immigrants. No sickness occurred amongst the passengers during the voyage. The vessel was cleared by the Health Officer at 10 a.m. She brings a full cargo and comes consigned to Messrs Dalgety, Nichols and Co.

ARRIVAL OF THE ELIZABETH GRAHAM
The Star November 7th 1874

This barque, commanded by Captain Mordean, who formerly paid us a visit in the barque Maori, some three years since, was signalled on Nov.7, and came up the harbour at 7 o'clock. Owing to the vessel having powder in board, she was brought up to an anchorage off Rhodes Bay. The vessel, which is composite built brings 13 second cabin passengers, but no immigrants. As soon as the vessel has discharged the powder, she will be brought up to an anchorage off the town. The health officer, Dr. Donald, proceeded down to the ship, and as there had been no sickness on board, the vessel was at once cleared. This is the first time this barque has been in our port; although it may e stated that she arrived on Otago at the commencement of the present year, loaded and left on Feb. 25, arrived in London June 1st; loaded cargo, and left as stated. On board the vessel are three rams and four ewes, pure-bred Leicesters, for Mr H.J. Hall, in excellent order; there are also two pure-bred pigs, a boar and a sow, for transshipment to Messrs Bethune and Hunter, Wellington; in addition to these, there are two Setters, consigned to Mr A.L. Smith, Heathcote.
    The following is the captains report:- Left Gravesend on July 16, ran down the Channel, and finally took our departure from the Start Point on the 18th; thence had light winds and fine weather; experienced light N.E. trades, and crossed the Equator on August 23 in 15 deg W.; the S.E. trades were far southerly, and very light and shy; sighted the island of Tristan d' Acunha on Sept.12; passed the meridian of the Cape on Sept. 23 in 40 deg S., the meridian of the Lewin on Oct. 17 in 43 degs S., and the meridian of Tasmania on Oct. 27 in 49 deg S. The easting was run down in the parallel of 40 deg and 42 deg, from this meridian had light winds and baffling weather; the Snares were sighted on Nov. 2, the wind then veered round to the N., and it blew a heavy gale; on the 4th stood in towards Timaru. Banks Peninsula was made on Friday morning at 8 o'clock, when the wind chopped around to the N.W., and it blew a hard gale from that quarter; made the heads at 5 a.m.