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ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP COUNTESS OF KINTORE
The New Zealand Herald August 22nd 1873

The good ship Countess of Kintore arrived in harbour last night, from London. A report of her passage will be found in our shipping columns. She has brought several stock-sheep and rams, consigned to Messrs Owen and Graham. Having powder on board, the vessel anchored at the powder ground. She brought thirty passengers and a large cargo.

ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP COUNTESS OF KINTORE
The New Zealand Herald August 22nd 1873

The well-known and regular trading ship Countess of Kintore, under the command of Captain Henry Braddick,  arrived in harbour shortly before nine o'clock last night, from London. Her arrival has been expected for some days, in consequence of the notoriety of this vessel making rapid passages, but it is a positive proof that even clipper ships cannot make a rapid passage without a run of fair winds. It will be seen, however, from the report that the voyage has been made in 104 days from land to land. . She brings 11 saloon and 19 second-class passengers, a list of which will be found under the usual heading. The Countess on her passage spoke with several vessels, including the ship Lennox Castle, bound from London to Wellington, which vessel was sighted no less than four times. The barque Santa Rosa, bound from Liverpool to San Francisco, was also spoken with on the 5th June last, and her commander (Captain Windemere) wished to be remembered to his Auckland friends. (He was formerly in command of the barque Alice). The Countess of Kintore brings eight stock rams and six sheep, consigned to Messrs Owen and Graham; also a pair of bantam fowls for Captain Braddick. A pair of monkeys were also shipped, but the female died on the 12th instant, leaving Jacko to mourn his loss. We are indebted to Mr Menzies, the chief officer (who has made several voyages in the Countess) for preparing the following report of the passage for the HERALD:- The ship left Gravesend at 5 am on the 1st May, and passed through the Downs at noon on the same day. Landed the pilot off Dartmouth on the 6th may, from which she took her final departure, experiencing light variable winds. The north-east trades proved light; crossed the Equator on the 8th June, in long 25 deg west. The winds in the S E trades were strong and were lost in 25 deg south lat. On the 21st June the Martin Vass Rocks were sighted. A continuance of south easterly gales were encountered off the Cape of Good Hope, which was not passed until the 11th July. From thence had fine weather and light variable winds generally. The longitude was run down between between the parallels of 43 deg and 46 deg. The meridian of Cape Leuwin was crossed on Saturday, the 9th August. Experienced a heavy north-easterly gale on the 12th August, which lasted three days, with a heavy cross sea. The first land sighted was the Three Kings which were made on Thursday last, the 19th August, the vessel then being 104 days from land to land. At 8 am the next day was abreast of the Poor Knights. Experienced light airs from the south-west, and fine weather down the coast. The following vessels were spoken by the Countess of Kintore during the voyage:- May 17th, American ship Ellen Goudy, lat 40 N., long 13 W.; May 21, ship Superb, London to Melbourne, lat 27.41N., long 21 W.; May 23, ship Imperatrice, London to Adelaide, lat 23.30 N., long 23.10 W.; May 28, the French barque Colbert, Bathurst to Bordeaux lat 13 N., long 26.20 W.; May 29, ship Lennox Castle, to Wellington, lat 11 N., long 25.30 W.; June 5 barque Santa Rosa, Liverpool to San Francisco; June 24, barque Hopeful, Launceston to London, lat 27 S., long 28 W. The Countess, having powder on board, brought up at the powder-ground late last night. She arrives in port in good condition, and her passengers are all in good health. The vessel is consigned to Messrs L D Nathan and Co. A copy of her manifest appears under the heading of "Imports".