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ARRIVAL OF THE CHARLOTTE GLADSTONE
The Press January 31st 1871

The ship Charlotte Gladstone, under the command of Capt. Fox, (late of the ship England), arrived at the Heads yesterday, at 6 a.m. from London, having made the run from land to land in 76 days, and from Gravesend in 85 days. She has arrived in excellent condition, and is a picture of cleanliness. The p.s. Novelty was chartered by the agents to go down to her, and proceeded at 12.30 from Lyttelton, having the health immigration officer, the Superintendent, and others on board. Upon her arrival alongside, the usual questions being answered satisfactorily, she was boarded, and all were kindly welcomed by our old friend Capt. Fox. The ship has made the fastest trip from home this year. The passengers are under the care of Dr Cortis (Curtis?), and are all in very good health. Capt. Fox brought out with him from London, thirteen hares, three of which are only now alive, and have been handed over to the agents of the vessel for the Acclimatisation Society. The following is the Captain's report of the voyage: - Left the docks on the 4th November; on the 9th landed the pilot off the Start, and sailed with a fine breeze; on the 28th were in lat 3.56 N., long 23.29 W.; boarded the ship Sydney 83 days out from Singapore to Liverpool, and took the advantage of sending letters home by her; was in company with the ship Princess Tomanatta - 30 days out from Shields to Bombay; crossed the Equator on the 30th Nov., in long 27.42 W.; spoke the barque Arcturas 36 days from Liverpool to Rio Grande; Dec. 4th, spoke the ship Norwood, 24 days from Falmouth to Bombay; on Dec. 10th in lat. 25.50, long 28.29 W. were boarded by the captain of the barque Faust from San Francisco, and supplied them with provisions and sent letters home; Dec. 11th, again spoke the ship Princess Tomanatta; on Dec. 13th spoke the ship John N Cashing, 54 days from Boston to Calcutta; sighted Gough Island on the 19th December, and on Christmas Day passed the meridian of the Cape of Good Hope, 50 days out; on the 29th spoke the barque Coldstream, 54 days out from Liverpool to Singapore; on the 5th January sighted Kirquelan's Land, and passed between Blyth's Cape and the Main Island; sighted the Solander on the 24th January, having a fine steady breeze; on the 25th, with light wind, backed the ship between Stewart Island and the Middle Island; on the 26th, when off the Bluff, signalled to be reported at Christchurch; got clear of the Straits the same evening, and had light winds and calms on the 28th until 4 p.m. when the wind shifted to the S.W., blowing strong; was becalmed nearly all day on the 29th, and was off Akaroa at 8 p.m.; made Lyttelton Heads on the 30th at 6 a.m.; and brought up anchor, there being a south-west wind blowing out of the bay.

The following testimonials were presented to the Captain and Doctor of the ship yesterday on the quarter-deck while the steamer was alongside. Three hearty cheers were given for the Captain and Mrs Fox, and for the Dr and Mrs Cortis: -
                Testimonial to Captain James Fox.
    We, the steerage passengers, feel it our duty, on completion of the voyage, to present you with this address as a token of the respect and high esteem in which you are held amongst us, for the kind treatment we have received from you and your officers, (it having been your constant study to make us comfortable and happy throughout the voyage), and for the many amusements in the shape of concerts, &c., you have taken the trouble to get up, also for the able manner in which you have conducted them. We have also to thank you for the care and attention which you have taken, by night and day, in navigating your vessel, and we congratulate you on the successful issue. We must not omit to mention the efficiency and civility of the crew, and we sincerely hope that you may have a safe and prosperous voyage back to England.
                                                      Signed by all the steerage passengers.

                 Testimonial to Dr Cortis, surgeon to the passengers and immigrants on board the ship Charlotte
                 Gladstone, on her voyage from England to Canterbury, New Zealand:-

    We, the undersigned, beg to offer you our united thanks for your medical attendance, marked attention, patience, combined with unremitting kindness through all our sickness. May every success and prosperity attend you through life.
                                                    Signed by all the steerage passengers and Government immigrants.
   A testimonial is also to be presented from the saloon passengers to the Captain.