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ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP CHAPMAN
The Wellington Independent June 8th 1865

The ship Chapman, 750 tons, Captain Featherstonhaugh, from London, arrived in this harbour at 2.30am on Tuesday morning after a passage of 100 days from the Downs. The Chapman left Gravesend on Sunday the 19th February, and anchored in the Downs on the 22nd, left again on Thursday the 25th, and experienced bad weather during the run down the channel, which she finally cleared on the 2nd March. in the Bay of Biscay the Chapman again fell in with a heavy gale, which lasted 12 hours, the vessel shipping a quantity of water. During the gale, two cases of acid which were on deck commenced leaking, and for the safety of the ship were thrown overboard. The line was crossed on the 29th March, in longitude 260 west. Passed the meridian of the Cape on the 27th April in latitude 400 south. On the 24th May passed between two large icebergs. Sighted the coast of New Zealand on the 2nd inst, and arrived as above.

The Chapman brings a large and miscellaneous cargo, five saloon and four second class passengers, of which the following are the names: - Mr, Mrs, and Miss Bannatyne, Miss Stable, Mr Montgomery, and Mr Joseph in the saloon; Mr and Mrs Morgan, son and daughter in the second cabin.

In another column will be found full particulars relative to an emeute which occurred among the crew during the voyage. Immediately on the arrival of the vessel, Captain Featherstonhaugh hoisted the police flag, and sent the sailmaker and six seamen, named Morgan, Parkinson, Lawson, Gatacre, Mullins and Rushbrook to the lock-up. The prisoners will be brought up for examination on a charge of mutiny and embezzlement.

ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP CHAPMAN
Evening Post June 6th 1865

The ship Chapman, 750 tons, Captain Featherstonhaugh, from London, entered the harbour last night, bringing nine saloon passengers and a heavy cargo of merchandize. She left the Downs on the 25th February, experiencing bad weather in the Channel, and cleared it on the 2nd March. On the 6th had a heavy gale in the Bay of Biscay, which lasted twelve hours, the vessel shipping a quantity of water. During the gale two cases of acid which were on deck, commenced leaking, which for the safety of the ship were thrown overboard. Crossed the line on the 29th March. On the 16th May passed between two icebergs; and on the 20th encountered a heavy gale, carrying away some of her bulwarks. Sighted New Zealand on the 2nd instant. On the 1st June the first officer found some of the watch drunk, having broached cargo; he immediately secured the hatches. During the second mate's watch he was attacked by some of the crew, knocked down and beaten; on the circumstance being reported to the Captain, he proceeded, revolver in hand, to the forecastle to secure the ringleader, when the crew attacked him; he then fired, but without wounding anyone, and the shot having had the effect of intimidating the mutineers, the ringleader was arrested, and, on the vessels arriving at port he, with six others, was sent on shore in custody of the police. Passengers arrived in good health; no deaths on the voyage.