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ARRIVAL OF THE AGNES MUIR
Daily Southern Cross December 25th 1872

The fine iron ship Agnes Muir arrived off North Head at seven o'clock yesterday morning from London, with immigrants. Immediately on her being boarded by the pilot the Health Officer's flag was hoisted, but it was not until eleven o'clock that Dr Philson, accompanied by Dr Pollen (Immigration Agent), and Captain Burgess (chief Harbour-master), reached the ship in the Enterprise No 1. After a careful examination of the passengers, Dr Philson gave the ship a clean bill of health; and Dr Pollen informed Captain Anderson that the passengers had all expressed themselves highly pleased with the kind attention they had received from him and his officers during the voyage out, which, from what he could learn, seems to have been a very pleasant one. The passengers were under the charge of Dr Evershed. During the pasage no sickness or deaths occurred. The following is a report of the ship's passage, which it will be seen has occupied 109 days: - Left Gravesend on September 5, and experienced W and S W winds for the first few days. On the 9th passed Eddystone Lighthouse. On the 13th caught the N E trades, and lost them again on the 18th in latitude 16.39 N, longitude 16.5 W. Sighted Porto Santo on September 22, and on Sunday, the 29th, passed St Antonio. On October 14th crossed the Equator in longitude 20.28 W, 39 days out from London. In latitude 3.7 S got the S E trades, which proved moderate from the S S E to E. Lost the trades in latitude 22 S, longitude 31 W. From thence experienced variable winds to the meridian of the Cape of Good Hope, which was passed on November 8. On Tuesday, the 12th, passed in sight of Prince Edward Island, and on the 17th passed Kerguelen Island. On December 2 passed Cape Leuwin (Tasmania). From thence had variable winds till making the Three Kings on Saturday last. Thence down the coast easterly winds prevailed. The ship came up harbour yesterday afternoon and anchored off the wharf, alongside of which she will be berthed on Friday next. The Agnes Muir has arrived in port in a most cleanly condition, considering the number of passengers on board. Messrs Brown, Campbell, and Co. are agents for the ship. 

VALUE OF THE CARGO OF THE AGNES MUIR
Daily Southern Cross December 28th 1872

The Agnes Muir' arrived on Tuesday from London. Her cargo includes amongst other merchandise soft goods to the value of 4,322; boots, 932; saddlery, 341; blacking, 21 packages; stationery, 3,835; hardware, 763; paint and varnish, 520; canvas, 310; cement, 400 barrels; snuff, 100lb; brandy in bulk, 2,580 gallons; brandy in case, 200 gallons; geneva, 850 gallons; British spirits in bulk, 1,969; British spirits in case, 299 gallons; perfumed spirits, 182 gallons; red wine, 1,330 gallons; white wine, 60 gallons; beer in glass, 43 barrels of 36 gallons each; malt, 135 quarters; hops, 21cwt; oilmen's stores, 666; vinegar, 250 gallons; salad oil, 250 gallons; cpicee, 14cwt; isinglass, 42; mustard, 57; starch, 37; salt, 65 tons; soda crystals, 1 ton; candles, 235cwt; soap, 27cwt; ginger, llcwt.; sugar (refined), 65cwt; tea, lowt; apothecaries wares, 320; canary seed, l0cwt: total value of cargo, 21,700.

THE BEHAVIOUR OF CREW MEMBERS OF THE AGNES MUIR
Daily Southern Cross January 4th 1873

Before his Worship the Mayor: Abusive Language - James Campbell was charged with using abusive language with intent to provoke a breach of the peace. The prisoner pleaded guilty, and asked for mercy. In consideration of its being a first offence, the charge was withdrawn.

Assaulting the Police - James Campbell and Hector McKenzie were charged with assaulting Constable Naughton in the execution of his duty - Mr. Broham stated that the constable had been in the act of apprehending McKenzie when Campbell attacked him - The master of the "Agnes Muir" stated that Campbell belonged to his ship, and was steady and well-conducted - Campbell was sentenced to pay a fine of 5 and costs, or in default to suffer 30 days imprisonment. McKenzie was sentenced to pay a lino of 40s. and costs. - A further charge against the latter, for destroying the constable's coat, waa withdrawn, on his agreeing to pay for the damage done.