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ARRIVAL OF THE ADAMANT
Southland Times December 3rd 1875

The long looked for Adamant was signalled Wednesday afternoon. The harbourmaster boarded her in the straits. The wind failing, the vessel was unable to reach the usual shoreage grounds, and Pilot Smith was left in charge for the night, Captain Thomson returning to shore.

We have learned there were six deaths during the passage, one woman three children and the master of the ship, Captain Birch, who died six weeks before sighting Bluff. On arrival of the Express, due tomorrow, she will be engaged to tow the Adamant into port. As the vessel has not been passed by the health officer, we are unable to give particulars of her voyage out.

ARRIVAL OF THE ADAMANT
Wanganui Chronicle December 8th 1875

The ship Adamant had an extraordinary passage to the Bluff. Capt. Birch was much given to drink. He kept the ship sailing about the coast of Brazil for three weeks. He got on a sandbank within hail of shore, and the natives walked up to the ship and conversed with those oh board. The first mate at last took command, and the captain shortly after died. The provisions were nearly exhausted.

VOYAGE OF THE ADAMANT
Evening Post December 8th 1875

The Star, reporting the Adamant's voyage, says that the late Captain Birch was never a day sober up to the time of his death. He kept the ship sailing about the coast of Brazil for about three weeks, and at last got sideways on to a sand bank within hail of the shore, and so close that the natives walked up to the ship and conversed with those on board. The passengers, driven to desperation by his conduct, all signed a petition for him to give up the command to the first mate. On receipt of this Captain Birch came on deck, his first appearance for a week, and said that "before he was done with them, he would put them in the dark hole." Shortly afterwards he died, and the first mate took charge: When he brought the ship into port the provisions were nearly exhausted; as it was, they had run out of flour and other things.

THE ADAMANT
The Star December 11th 1875

We are pleased to learn of the long-earned promotion of Mr Bowling, chief officer of the ship Avalanche, who proceeds to the Bluff on Thursday to take command of the barque Adamant, vacant by the death of her captain on the voyage out from London. His brother, at present second officer, also being promoted to chief of the Avalanoho.— N.Z. Times Dec 7.