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Arrival of the Queen of The Age
Daily Southern Cross
March 3rd 1874

The ship Queen of the Age, from London, dropped anchor in the harbour last night at eight o'clock, after a passage of 104 days. She comes consigned to the New Zealand Shipping Company, and brings, besides a general cargo of merchandise, 165 Government immigrants and several passengers. There was very little sitkness during the voyage. One death occurred amongst the immigiants and one birth. It will be seen by the captain's report that on the 14th January some of the sailors broached the cargo, and broke open one or two cases of flannel and Crimean shirt patterns, distributing the contents amongst the female immigrants. They were given in custody to the police soon after arrival. The following is the captain's report of the passago:- Left Gravesend on the l6th November, 1873; landed the pilot in Tor Bay at 6pm on the 18th November, wind 1ight from the eastward with thick hazy weather. Passed the Start Light at 10.30, wind veering to the S. E and freshening. The following day at noon was about 30 miles to the N and W of Ushaut, wind light from the N.E. On the 28th passed to the westward of the Island of Mideira, wind light from the south. Passed also the westward of the Canaries. Got the N E trade wind, but it remained very light, passed to the eastward of the Cape de Verdes and had nothing but light winds to the Equator which was crossed on the 18th December, in 26 47 West longitude, 32 days from Gravesend. Got the S E trades on the 20th, but they continued light all through. Passed the meridian of the Cape on the 12th January in 42 13S. On the previous day lost one of the men, Frederick Holmes, overboard. It was blovwng an increasing gale at the time. The ship was rounded to, and the lifeboat cleared away, but the man had disappeared and could not be seen from aloft. As there was no chance of saving him, and as it was blowing a gale from the S W with heavy squalls, thought it prudent not to send a boat away from the ship and risk other lives. On the 14th January some of the crew broke open the coal hole scuttle and the bulkhead, and got amongst the cargo. They broke open several cases and stole some of the contents, consisting of flannel and Chrimean shirt patterns. Discovered what had taken place through seeing some of the women making shirts. They said, when asked, that they got the material from the sailors. Secured the material from the women, and ascertained the names of the sailors. One case of salmon was entirely emptied, and a box of candles. One of the immigiants, named William Penny, agcd 44 years, died at 3.30 am on the 24th of February, after a long illness, of dysentery and general debility. - Dr. Philson, the Health Officer, proceeded on board the ship shortly after her arrival, and, finding everything all correct, gave the ship a clean bill of health.

Arrival of the Queen of The Age
New Zealand Herald March 3rd 1874

CREW ARRESTED ON CHARGE OF BROACHING CARGO
The New Zealand Shipping Company's ship Queen of the Age, in command of Captain Montgomery, arrived in harbour last night after an average passage of 106 days. On coming up the harbour our reporter put off to her, but was unable to get on board of the ship until Dr Philson had visited her. He was however informed that there had been no sickness on the passage. Captain Montgomery kindly sent a written report of the passage down to the boat.

The Queen of the Age brings 165 immigrants. On the police going off, they were informed that some of the crew would have to be arrested on a charge of broaching the cargo. We cull the following particulars from the report supplied by the Captain:- Left Gravesend on November 16th and landed the pilot off Torbay on the 18th. Winds light from E, with thick hazy weather. Passed the start light at 10.30 p. m. the wind veering to S. E. and freshening. At noon of the following day was about 30 miles to N. W. p m. of  Ushant. Wind light from N. E. On the 28th passed to the westward of the Island of Madeira; winds light from the east. Passed  also to the west of the Canaries. The N. E. trades were very light and remained so. Passed to the eastward of the Cape of Verde Islands. Nothing but light westerly and easterly winds to the equator, which was crossed on the 18th December in Longitude 26. 47 west, 32 days from Gravesend. The S. E. trades were fallen in on the 20th; but they were also very light. Passed the meridian of the Cape on the 12th January in 42 deg 13 mins S. Passed the S. W. point of Tasmania on Feb 9th, 29 days from the Cape.

A MAN LOST OVERBOARD
On the previous day one of the men names Frederick Holmes fell overboard. It was blowing an increasing gale at the time. The ship was rounded to and the life boat cleared away, but the man had disappeared and could not be seen from aloft. Captain Montgomerie thought it advisable not to risk losing other lives by sending a boat away from the ship as a heavy N. W. gale was blowing and night was coming on. On February 14th the same heavy squalls were met with. on the some of the crew broke open the coal-hole scuttle, as also the bulkhead and got amongst the corgo, where they broke open several of the cases and appropriated the contents of flannel and crimean shirting patterns. The Captain's attention was first drawn by seeing several of the woman making shirts. On being interrogated as to where they got the material from they said they had it from some of the sailors. The whole of the material was recovered, and the sailors were given into custody on arrival in harbour last night.

An immigrant named William Penny died at 3. 30 a. m. on February 24 after a long illness of dysentery and general debility. His age was 44 years.

Embezzlement of Cargo
Daily Southern Cross
March 4th 1874

William White, James Lambry, William Evans, Thomas Howry, J. D. Hines, Robert Lloyd, Rudolph Klunder, seamen of the 'Queen of the Age', were charged with embezzling various articles during the voyage from England. - On the application of Mr. Inspector Broham, the hearing of the case was adjourned till Monday next; and a charge of disobedience of orders against Howry, White, and Lambry, was also postponed.

Alleged Embezzlement of Cargo
Daily Southern Cross
March 7th 1874

Frederick Archer, was charged by Mr Montgomery, master of the 'Queen of the Age', with broaching cargo on board that vessel, and was remanded till Monday next in order that his case might be tried with the seven seamen of the samo ship, charged with a similar offence.

Breach of the Passengers Act 1855 No23
Daily Southern Cross
March 7th 1874

Patrick Jones, pleaded guilty to a charge of refusing to give up to the proper officer a revolver which was in his possession.- Prisoner was defended by Mr. Joy. - Mr. H. Ellis, Immigration Officer, deposed to having laid the information in his official capacity. Dr. Martin Payne, late Surgeon Superintendent of the immigrants per 'Queen of the Age', stated that prisoner was one of the passengers. He was aware of a regulation compelling all passengers to surrender all firearms to the master of the ship. Witness produced his journal of occurrences, from which it appeared that he with the lst and 2nd officers demanded that all firearas should be given up to Captain Montgomery. Defendant said he had none. The demand was made at a particular time because it was reported that a French passenger was carrying about him a loaded revolver. Defendant did not at that time give up his arms. Copies of the regulations had been posted about the ship. Witness knew that prisoner was employed during part of the voyage as ship's baker. He believed he was on the ships articles, but could not speak positively. He was disrated from his station as baker on account of his manipulation of the flour. - C. R. Cooper, chief officer of the 'Queen of the Age,' testified to having, in company with the surgeon and second officer, demanded that defendant should deliver up all firearms in his possesion. Defendant denied that he had any. It became known subsequently that he had a revolver. - R. Colven deposed to having seen a revolver in the possession of defendant, but could not say that he was the owner of it.  - John Clifford said he had seen defendant take a revolver from his box on the day subsequent to that on which the demand for the arms had been made. -  Mr Joy urged that there was no case against prisoner. It had not been proved that he was the owner of any fire arms; neither did it appear that the chief officer and surgeon had any authority to demand the delivery of the arms. - Mr. Brookfield, on behalf of the prosecution, replied. - His Worship held that the case had been proved, but, being the first offence of the kind which had been brought before the court, the defendant was fined in the mitigated penalty of 10s and costs, or, in default 24 hours' imprisonment.

Breach of Immigrant Regulations
Daily Southern Cross
March 7th 1874

The same prisoner was charged with being continually among the sailors in the forecastle - Captain Montgomery gave him a character for insubordination, and his Worblnp fined him 20s and costs, or 48 hours' imprisonment.