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ROMAN CATHOLIC
The first Catholics in Cleveland were the German and Irish immigrants who came in the late 1820s to build the Ohio and Erie Canal. The first permanent priest arrived in Cleveland in 1835 and the first church was built - St. Mary's On The Flats, dedicated in 1840. The Diocese of Cleveland was established in 1847.
1847 - St. John's Cathedral - Superior and Erie Streets, Rev. Louis deGoesbriand
1848 - 1868 - St. John's Cathedral - Superior and Erie Streets, Rev. Amadeus Rappe
1869 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie Streets, Rev. A. Rappe, Rev. J.F. Gallagher, Rev. James Reilly
1870 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie Streets, Rev. A. Rappe, Rev. J.F. Gallagher, Rev. Edward Mears, Rev. M. Ivers
1871 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie, Rev. E. Hannin, Rev. E. Mears, Rev. M. Ivers, Rev. T.J. Conlin
1872 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie, Rev. R. Gilmour, Rev. T.J. Conlan, Rev. C.J. O'Callaghan, Rev. M. Ivers
1874 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie, Rev. R. Gilmour, Rev. F.M. Boff, Rev. T.J. Conlan, Rev. C.J. O'Callaghan, Rev. F. McGovern, Rev. P.O. Mazutet
1877 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie, Rev. R. Gilmour, Rev. F.M. Boff, Rev. F. McGovern, Rev. Charles Chevereaux, Rev. T.F. Mahar
1879 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Superior and Erie, Rev. R. Gilmour, Rev. T.P. Thorpe, Rev. Charles Chevraux, Rev. T.F. Mahar
1883 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Erie and Superior, Rev. R. Gilmour, Rev. T.p. Thorpe, Rev. Charles Chevraux, Rev. J. O'Connor
1887 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Erie and Superior, Rev. T.P. Thorpe, Rev. J. O'Connor, Rev. J. Treacy
1891 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Erie and Superior, Rev. T.P. Thorpe, Rev. D.J. Stafford, Rev. George Vaney, Rev. T.F. Mahon
1894 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Erie and Superior, Rev. Ignatius Horstmann, Rev. G.F. Houck, Mgr. T.P. Thorpe, Rev. George Vahey, Rev. James Halligan, Rev. Patrick Farrell
1898 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Erie and Superior, Rev. George Vahey
1902 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ Erie and Superior, Rev. Patrick Farrell
1906 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ 583 Superior, Rev. Ignatius Horstmann
1908 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ E. 9th at Superior, Rev. Thomas Fahey, Rev. F. Duffy, Ref. J.T. Farrell
1913 - 1924 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ E. 9th at Superior, Rev. Thomas O'Reilly
1928 ­ St. John's Cathedral ­ E. 9th at Superior, Rev. Joseph Smith

ANNUNCIATION
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
On August 21, 1924, Bishop Joseph Schrembs recognized the need for a parish in the Rockport area and established Annunciation Parish. The first Mass was celebrated by Rev. Peter Hyland in a tent in Cimperman's Grove. A brick church-school building was begun in October of 1924. Today this church is located at 4697 W. 130th Street, Phone 216-671-2015.

1924 - 1927 ­ Annunciation Blessed Virgin Mary ­ 4505 W. 130th, Rev. Peter Hyland
1927 - 1945 ­ Annunciation Blessed Virgin Mary ­ W. 130th at Bennington, Rev. John Kelly
1945 ­ 1952 ­ Annunciation Blessed Virgin Mary ­ W. 130th at Bennington, Rev. Edmund Kirby
1952 - ???? ­ Annunciation Blessed Virgin Mary ­ W. 130th at Bennington, Rev. John J. Farrell

ANNUNCIATION (FRENCH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Bishop Amadeus Rappe purchased a lot on Hurd (W. 22nd) and Moore Streets in 1868 in order to build a church for the French immigrants in Cleveland. A church was built and the first Mass was on October 16, 1872. On March 18, 1892, a house was purchased on Moore Street for the rectory. On May 1896, ground was broken for a new church. It was dedicated on September 25, 1898. In the area, St. Wendelin Parish and St. Emeric Parish were formed. Father McInerney of Annunciation did not speak French and the French-speaking population had declined. In 1916, Father McInerney was appointed pastor of St. Malachi Church. The parishioners and the church records were transferred to St. Malachi and the Annunciation Church was taken over by St. Emeric Parish, whose church had been burned in February of 1916. In July, 1924, the Van Sweringen brothers purchased the church to obtain right-of-way for train tracks leading to Union Terminal, and the church was demolished.

1870 - 1877 ­ Church of the Annunciation ­ Hurd and Moore, Rev. Andrew Sauvadet
1878 - 1896 ­ Church of the Annunciation ­ Hurd and Moore, Rev. Augustine Gerardin
1896 - 1903 ­ St. Mary's of the Annunciation ­ Hurd and Moore, Rev. A. Gerardin
1903 - 1906 ­ St. Mary's of the Annunciation ­ Hurd and Moore, Rev. Raymond Mylott
1906 - 1916 ­ St. Mary's of the Annunciation ­ W. 22nd at Moore, Rev. John McInerney

 

ASCENSION OF OUR LORD
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Ascension was founded in 1946 in the West Park area of Cleveland. The parish originally met at John Marshall High School. In July, 1954, the parish purchased a Lutheran Church adjacent to its property. Today this church is located at 14040 Puritas Avenue, Phone 216-671-5890

1946 - ???? ­ Rev. Martin Gallagher
1959 - ???? - Rev. Matthew Fogarty
???? ­ Rev. John Lesniak
???? ­ Rev. Yahner
1994 - ???? ­ Rev. Joseph Fortuna

BLESSED SACRAMENT
Blessed Sacrament, a parish just northwest of Brooklyn Centre at 3381 Fulton Road, is an offshoot of St. Patrick's. It was established in 1903 for Catholics living in the southern end of St. Patrick's territory. Today this church is located 15 3381 Fulton Road, Phone 216-741-8338

1903 - 1907 ­ Blessed Sacrament ­ Rhodes at Storer, Rev. Thomas P. Lamb
1908 - 1917 ­ Blessed Sacrament ­ Fulton at Storer, Rev. T.P. Lamb
1917 - 1950 ­ Blessed Sacrament ­ Fulton at Storer, Rev. Stephen Wilson
1950 - 1966 ­ Blessed Sacrament ­ Fulton at Storer, Rev. Edward Hannon
???? ­ Rev. Carl Wernet
???? ­ Rev. Thomas Higgins
1972 ­ 1974 ­ Rev. John Lesniak and Rev. Joseph Yarnovic
1974 - 1987 ­ Rev. John Cregan
1987 - ???? ­ Rev. Matthew Ischay

CORPUS CHRISTI (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In 1931, the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis began teaching Polish-language classes at Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish. Three years later there was a petition for a new parish from a group of South Brooklyn's Polish-Catholics. The Diocese informed these Poles that they should celebrate mass at St. Barbara Parish on Denison. Communication continued and on August 9, 1935, Corpus Christi Parish was organized. The first mass was held at Pearl Road Recreation Center. The new church was completed in 1936. Today this church is located at 5204 Northcliff Avenue, Phone 216-351-8738

1935 - 1971 ­ Corpus Christi ­ Pearl Road ­ Rev. Anthony Orlemanski
1971 ­ 1974 ­ Corpus Christi ­ Pearl Road ­ Rev. Edmund Gackowski
1974 - ???? ­ Corpus Christi ­ Pearl Road ­ Rev. Joseph Jarzynski
???? ­ Rev. Ronald J. Szudarek

EPIPHANY
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Epiphany Parish was established on January 6, 1944. The first mass was celebrated in Novak's Hall on E. 130th Street and Union Avenue. Stores were secured on Union Avenue which were used as a chapel. Later stores were located on E. 126th Street and Kinsman Avenue. A permanent location was had when St. Cecilia Parish donated property at the corner of E. 120th and Oakfield Avenue. Today this church is located at 11901 Oakfield Avenue, Phone 216-561-3975

1944 - 1960 ­ Rev. John Dunn
1960 ­ 1963 - Rev. Edward Murphy
1963 - 1971 ­ Rev. Richard McHale.
1971 - 1979 ­ Rev. William Karg
1979 - 1982 ­ Rev. Russell Banner
1982 ­ Rev. Daniel Begin

1913 - 1918 ­ Holy Ghost ­ 2403 W. 14th, Rev. Mitro
1921 ­ Holy Ghost ­ 2403 W. 14th, Rev. Emil Burik
1924 - 1928 ­ Holy Ghost ­ 1413 Kenilworth, Rev. Joseph Hanulya
Today this church is located at 2420 W. 14th Street, Phone 216-861-2177

HOLY NAME (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
During the 1850's, people from Newburgh traveled to St. Mary on the Flats Church for Mass. Later, some priests traveled south to tend to the religious needs of the "Holy Name of Mary" community. In October of 1861, the Newburgh Catholics purchased two lots on the corner of Miles Park and Woodland Hills Avenue (now E. 93rd). Work began on a stone church and the cornerstone was laid in 1862. During construction, Father Francis A. Sullivan celebrated Mass with the renamed "Holy Rosary Parish" in the Newburgh Town Hall. In July 1863, Father Jacob Kuhn became the first pastor. Expansion of the parish continued and a campus soon continued with Father Daudet purchasing a former factory which was converted into a school. In 1871 Father Joseph Gallagher became the third pastor. He purchased property on Newburgh's Broadway Avenue in 1872 and in 1873 the cornerstone was laid for Gallagher Hall. Newburgh and Holy Rosary Parish grew and on 1879 the parish purchased addition property on Broadway and planned to construct a church. The cornerstone was laid on Sept. 3, 1882. The parish established a Holy Name Society and Father Gallagher had the parish rededicated in this name. The church was dedicated on May 22, 1887. Today this church is located at 8328 Broadway Avenue, Phone 216-271-4242

1863 - 1867 - Holy Name (IRISH) - Broadway and Jones, Rev. Jacob Kuhn
1867 - 1871 - Holy Name - Rev. John Daudet
1871 - 1886 - Holy Name - Rev. Joseph Gallagher
1887 - 1913 ­ Holy Name - Rev. John T. Carroll
1913 - 1922 ­ Holy Name ­ 8328 Broadway, Rev. Patrick J. O'Connell
1922 - 1943 ­ Holy Name ­ 8328 Broadway, Rev. Wm. Scullen
1943 - 1968 - Holy Name - Rev. Charles McDonough
1968 - 1973 - Holy Name - Rev. John Kilcoyne
1973 - 1993 - Holy Name - Rev. John Dalton
1993 - Holy Name - Rev. Vincent Moraghan

HOLY REDEEMER (ITALIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
By the middle of the 1920s a growing number of Italian-Catholics had migrated to the Collinwood section of Cleveland. Holy Redeemer Parish was established in June, 1924.
The first church was built on May 6, 1925. The first pastor was Rev. Martin Compagno. The second was Achilles Ferreri. Under his guidance, the parishioners converted the school hall into a new church. Rev. John Iammarino was the third pastor and he presided over the groundbreaking for the third church in 1958. It was dedicated on June 21, 1964.
Today this church is located at 15712 Kipling Avenue, Phone 216-531-3313

1924 - 1939 ­ Holy Redeemer (ITALIAN) ­ 16220 Kipling, Rev. Martin Compagno
1940 - 1942 ­ Rev. Achilles P. Ferreri
1942 - 1971 ­ Rev. John A. Iammarino
1971 ­ Rev. James Grandillo
???? ­ Rev. Martin Polito

HOLY ROSARY (ITALIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
A large number of Italian-Catholic immigrants had settled in the Murray Hill area of Cleveland. In 1891, the Little Italy community raised enough money to purchase property on Mayfield Road and East End Road (now East 120th). Work began on a temporary chapel. The first Mass was celebrated on May 1, 1892. One year later, the second pastor arrived, Rev. Joseph Riva. He was succeeded in 1894 by Rev. Antonio Gibelli. On June 29, 1905 the parish broke ground for a new church. Father Gibelli died in 1907 and Father Joseph Militello took over. The church building was dedicated on November 9, 1909. The next pastor was Rev. Francis Haley who died in 1918. Father Joseph Nolan replaced him and remained until 1920. Father Romeo Martorelli took over at that time and remained until 1928. Next was Father Joseph Trivisonno who remained until 1939. He was succeeded by Rev. Charles McBride who remained until 1945.
Today this church is located at 12021 Mayfield Road, Phone 216-421-2995

1892 - 1893 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Euclid opposite Lakeview Cemetery, Rev. Joseph Strumia
1893 ­ 1894 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at East End, Rev. Joseph Riva
1894 ­ 1907 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at East End, Rev. Antonio Gibelli
1907 - ???? ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at E. 121st, Rev. Giuseppe Millitello
1913 - 1918 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at Coitman, Rev. F.J. Haley
1918 ­ 1920 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield, Rev. Joseph Nolan
1921 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at E. 121st, Rev. J. Matturro
1921 - 1928 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at E. 121st, Rev. Romeo Martorelli
1928 ­ 1939 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at E. 121st, Rev. Joseph Trivisonno
1939 ­ 1945 ­ Holy Rosary ­ Mayfield at E. 121st, Rev. Charles McBride
1945 ­ 1961 ­ Rev. Ferdinand Tamburri
1961 ­ 1972 ­ Rev. Francis Gasbarre
1972 ­ 1977 ­ Rev. Francis Valentini
1977 ­ 1989 ­ Rev. Gaetano Menegatto
1989 - ???? ­ Rev. Philip Racco

HOLY TRINITY (GERMAN)
From: Jubilee Edition of Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902
The Holy Trinity German Catholic congregation arose in late 1879 when the German families belonging to Holy Family Church, now St. Edward's parish, whose pastor was Peter Becker, applied together with their parish priest to remove themselves from that parish and establish a German congregation. This request was approved in December, 1879 and Pastor Becker received the power to buy a lot to build a church on Woodland Avenue between Giddings and Brown Street. Since the young congregation had also received permission to hold services for the time being in the chapel of St. Joseph's Orphanage, they decided to build on one of the lots a wooden, two-story schoolhouse. In August, 1880 Father Becker was formally named its minister. After the erection of the schoolhouse, they passed in 1881 to building the church. The cornerstone was laid on April 24, and on August 24th it was consecrated. In September, 1899, the Ursulines took over the teaching of the parish school which had previously been handled by the Marian Sisters. Today this church is located at 7211 Woodland Avenue, Phone 216-431-1134

1879 - 1906 ­ Holy Trinity ­ Woodland near Giddings, Rev. Peter Becker
1908 - 1913 ­ Holy Trinity ­ Woodland at E. 71st, Rev. Peter Becker
1918 ­ Holy Trinity ­ Woodland at E. 71st, Rev. Joseph Hopp
1921 - 1928 ­ Holy Trinity ­ Woodland at E. 71st, Rev. Joseph Trapp

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In the early 1850s, Irish-Catholic families from the area of E. 41st Street and Superior Avenue celebrated Mass at the Chapel of the Nativity, a small building located behind St. John the Evangelist Cathedral. The diocese moved the building to a lot in the middle of the Irish neighborhood in 1856 and renamed it Immaculate Conception Church. The present church was dedicated on May 31, 1885. Today this church is located at 4129 Superior Avenue, Phone 216-431-5900

1865-1871 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior and Lyman, Rev. Andrew Sauvadet
1871 - 1877 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior and Lyman, Rev. Thomas P. Thorpe
1876 - 1894 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior and Lyman, Rev. A.R. Sidley
1898 - 1907 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior and Lyman, Rev. T.P. Thorpe
1907 - 1909 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior at E. 41st, Rev. Patrick Farrell
1909 - 1942 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior at E. 41st, Rev. George Murphy
1942 - 1945 ­ Immaculate Conception ­ Superior at E. 41st, Rev. William T. Moran
1945-1956 ­ Rev. Leonard Wheatley
1956-1958 ­ Rev. Caspar Heimann
1958 ­ 1961 ­ Rev. James Hernan
1961 ­ 1964 ­ Rev. Bernard Blatt
1964 ­ 1967 ­ Rev. Joseph Butler
1967 ­ 1969 ­ Rev. Bernard Tierney
1969 ­ 1976 ­ Rev. James Fortman
1976 - 1995 ­ Rev. Albert Mackert
1995 ­ Rev. Michael Troha

IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish was founded on May 3, 1894, by Father Anton F. Kolaszewski, a former pastor of St. Stanislaus. Bishop Horstmann relieved Kolaszewski of his pastoral duties in 1892 and Father Kolaszewski and twenty percent of his former parishioners decided to form an independent Church. By June, land had been acquired on Fremont Street (now Lansing Avenue) for a church and acreage was secured on Marcellin Avenue (now E. 71st St) for the parish's cemetery. Father Kolaszewski called for the establishment of a new religious denomination called the American Catholic Church. On August 19, 1894, independent Archbishop Vilatte of Wisconsin dedicated the first Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Bights broke out between the members of Immaculate Heart Parish and St. Stanislaus Church. The year 1908 was one of reconciliation. Monsignor Felix Boff succeeded in bringing Father Kolaszewski and his congregation into the Cleveland Diocese. Rev. Kolaszewski resigned. From 1908 until 1912 various administrators served the parish. In 1912, the first diocesan pastor was called, Father Marion Orzechowski. Today this church is located at 6700 Lansing Avenue, Phone 216-341-2734

1894 ­ 1908 ­ Immaculate Heart of Mary ­ Lansing near E. 71st, Rev. Anton Kolaszewski
1912 - 1932 ­ Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary ­ Lansing near E. 71st, Rev. M.J. Orzechowski
1932 - 1960 ­ Immaculate Heart of Mary ­ Lansing near E. 71st, Rev. John Mlotkowski
1960 ­ 1976 ­ Rev. Aloysius Dombrowski
1976 ­ 1991 ­ Rev. Francis Bartnikowski
1991 ­ 1996 - Rev. Stanley Klasinski
1997 ­ Rev. Ralph Hudak

1928 ­ Little Flower of Jesus ­ Granger at E. 105th, Rev. Richard Gibbons

1921 ­ Our Lady of Czestochowa (POLISH) ­ E. 141st and Harvard
1924 - 1928 ­ Our Lady of Czestochowa ­ Harvard at E. 141st, Rev. Stanislav Rogosz

OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL (GERMAN)
4423 Pearl Road
St. Mary's In the Flats started a mission to Brighton in 1873. In October of 1874, the cornerstone was laid for the church called Sacred Heart of Mary. This church was located west of Pearl Road on Broadview, near the Brookmere Cemetery. In May of 1907, this church burned down and in 1909, Our Lady of Good Counsel was built. Today this church is located at 4419 Pearl Road, Phone 216-661-6450

From the Old Brooklyn News:
The Diocese of Cleveland in recognition of the high percentage of Germans in the congregation, asked a German-speaking segment of The Society of the Precious Blood to staff the parish. These priests had already been working with German Catholics in the west central part of Ohio since 1844. From stories he remembers having been told to him by his mother, John Baird was able to share with us that the first pastors and associate pastors at Our Lady of Good Counsel were German, that German was taught in the school, that some prayers and hymns in the school were in German, and that there were also sermons on Sundays in German. Similar to the recreation center we wrote about last month in conjunction with St. John Cantius Church, OLGC also provided an opportunity for its members to socialize at bowling alleys on the parish grounds. OLGC owned a gas station too; parishes were much more their own little communities in those days than they are now. With the passing of years though, OLGC in particular and South Brooklyn in general became much less German and much more Eastern European in terms of ethnic character. A 1956 survey cited in the parish's 1973 centennial history book stated that most parishioners were of Polish or Slavic background, with German and Irish being the next most frequent ethnicities, and Hungarian, Greek and Italian also represented.
John Baird also addressed OLGC's Polish roots ­ how; when Corpus Christ Church was established in 1935, that parish's first masses were held in OLGC's auditorium. Actually, in 1931, even before Corpus Christ existed, the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis began teaching Polish language classes at OLGC. The Corpus Christi masses at OLGC were in Latin, of course, but the sermons were in Polish. Over the years, some of the Precious Blood priests at OLGC (e.g., Andy Pollock and Ed Zukowski) spoke Polish too.

1894 - 1896 ­ Our Lady of Good Counsel ­ 4423 Pearl, Rev. Michael Becker
1896 ­ 1908 ­ Our Lady of Good Counsel ­ 4423 Pearl, Rev. Nicholas Weckel
1908 - 1918 ­ Our Lady of Good Counsel ­ 4423 Pearl, Rev. Luke Rath
1918 - 1947 ­ Our Lady of Good Counsel ­ 4119 Pearl, Rev. Sebastian Kremer
1947 ­ 1957 ­ Rev. Frank Laudick
1957 ­ 1960 ­ Rev. Anthony Gamble
1960 ­ 1971 - Rev. Victor Ranly
1971 ­ 1976 ­ Rev. Roman Rodak
1976 ­ 1981 ­ Rev. James Smith
1981 ­ 1991 ­ Rev. John Nagele
1991 ­ 1996 ­ Rev. Richard Friebel
1996 - ???? ­ Rev. Leroy Moreeuw

OUR LADY OF LOURDES (BOHEMIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The Diocese of Cleveland welcomed its first Bohemian priest, Father Anthony Krasny in 1858. While serving at St. Peter on Superior Avenue, Father Krasny celebrated Mass with members of the city's Bohemian community, many of whom had settled in an area which later would become known as "Little Bohemia". In 1882, Father Anton Hynek, pastor of St. Wenceslas, purchased property for a new parish at the corner of Hamm and Randolph (now E. 55th). The community soon welcomed its first pastor, Father Stephen Furdek. In April 1883, Our Lady of Lourdes celebrated the dedication of its frame church. Today this Church is located at 3395 E. 53rd Street, Phone 216-641-2829

1882 - 1906 ­ Our Lady of Lourdes ­ Randolph at Hamm, Rev. Stephen Furdek
1906 - 1915 ­ Our Lady of Lourdes ­ E. 54th at Hamm, Rev. Stephen Furdek
1915 - 1955 ­ Our Lady of Lourdes ­ E. 54th at Hamm, Rev. Oldrich Zlamal
1955 - 1959 - Our Lady of Lourdes - Rev. Francis Maruna
1959 - 1961 - Our Lady of Lourdes - Rev. Francis Habart
1961 - 1981 - Our Lady of Lourdes - Rev. John Andel
1981 - 1983 - Our Lady of Lourdes - Rev. Dennis Tomczyk
1983 ­ 1987 ­ Our Lady of Lourdes ­ Rev. James Sheil
1987 - ???? - Our Lady of Lourdes - Rev. James J. Masek

 

OUR LADY OF MERCY (SLOVAK) (Built 1949)
2425 W. 11th
216-781-8277
The Parish had been known as St. John the Baptist. The Slovak Catholics in the neighborhood of the present Our Lady of Mercy Church petitioned the Most Reverend Bishop John P. Farrelly in 1915 to be separated from St. Wendelin Parish that they might have a parish of their own. Among contributing reasons for their request was the distance children from certain parts of the parish were obliged to travel to reach the St. Wendelin school, and the danger of intervening street crossings. They had purchased a site with four frame buildings in anticipation of the new parish. But, the request was not granted and some of the people fell into a schism, placing themselves under the jurisdiction of an independent Polish bishop of Scranton. During this time services were held in one of the frame buildings, which had been remodeled for a church; another of the small buildings was used as a parish house. The school, with 150 children, occupied a third building. The congregation petitioned Bishop Schrembs for reinstatement shortly following his transfer to the Cleveland diocese. He appointed the Rev. Stephen Begalla, an assistant at St. Wendelin to take temporary charge of the congregation. Father Francis J. Dubosh, Our Lady of Mercy's first pastor was appointed on February 1, 1922. In 1927 the Rev. John W. Krispinsky became pastor and served until 1964. In 1949 the present church was built. The present pastor is Rev. Andrew Laheta. The crab-orchard stone structure, built in 1949 to replace an earlier wooden frame church is noted for its carved wooden statues and its shrines to St. Joseph, St. Cyril and St. Methodius. The structure features many traditional Slovak design elements such as elliptical arches and folk paintings. Architect: Stickle, Kelly, and Stickle.

Our Lady of Mercy Church, 2425 W. 11th St., began as an offshoot of St. Wendelin Parish. The Slovaks living in Tremont objected to traveling through the industrial valley to St. Wendelin and wanted to establish their own parish. Though Bp. John P. Farrelly refused them permission, the Slovaks persisted. The Polish Nationalist pastor of Sacred Heart Church on W. 14th promised them a priest if they affiliated with the Polish National Catholic Church. They then organized the parish of St. John Baptist, which opened in 1915. The Polish Nationalist link drove many back to St. Wendelin's. Mounting problems finally forced the St. John parish to approach the Roman Catholic diocese for assistance. Bp. Joseph Schrembs agreed to accept the repentant congregation in 1922. Rev. Francis Dubosh was named pastor of the church, renamed Our Lady of Mercy. By 1927, when Fr. John W. Krispinsky became pastor, the congregation had grown from 60 to 326 families. It continued to grow, and, in 1942, the parish began a door-to-door collection to build a new church. By 1945 they had realized $50,000 toward their goal; construction began in 1948. The Romanesque-style church was dedicated on 23 Oct. 1949. The church's interior incorporates much of the Slovak peasant heritage, with a large mosaic featuring Mary, Our Sorrowful Mother, the patron of Slovakia.

From: "People of Faith", by Charles R. Kaczynski
For Slovak-Catholics living in the Tremont neighborhood of Cleveland in the early years of the twentieth century, celebrating Mass required traveling down Willey Hill or across the Abbey Road Bridge to St. Wendelin Parish in Ohio City. Hoping to erect a new church, the community petitioned Bishop John P. Farrelly. After consulting with the pastor of St. Wendelin Parish, Bishop Farrelly denied the request. In the wake of the Diocese's continued opposition, some of Tremont's Slovak-Catholics conferred with members of the Sacred Heart Polish National Catholic Church on West 14th St. Led by Bishop Franciszek Hodur of Scranton, Pennsylvania, the Polish National Catholic Church rejected the First Vatican Council's 1870 declaration of Papal infallibility and supported the substitution of the vernacular for Latin as the language of the Eucharist. Along with dissident Polish-Catholic communities, the Polish National Catholic Church also welcomed alienated Slovak congregations. In 1915, the Slovak community established an independent church, St. John the Baptist Parish. By 1919, the parish had secured property on West 11th St., converting existing buildings into a church, school, and rectory. In the next two years, the fledgling community, like many other independent parishes, struggled to meet its financial obligations. Soon after the installation of Bishop Joseph Schrembs, St. John the Baptist Parish petitioned to be recognized as a Roman Catholic congregation. Following the appointment of an administrator, Father Stephen Begalla, and a one-year probationary period, Bishop Schrembs officially recognized the community, renaming it Our Lady of Mercy Parish. Under the direction of its first pastor, Father Francis Dubosh, the parish erected a brick school and converted an existing house into a convent for the Notre Dame Sisters. In 1927, Father John W. Krispinsky succeeded Father Dubosh. With the departure of the Notre Dame Sisters in 1935, the parish welcomed teachers from the Vincentian Sisters of Charity. By the end of the Second World War, the parish had eliminated its entire debt. In 1948, the community converted its school hall into a temporary church and demolished its original church, making way for the construction of a Romanesque-inspired stone church with stained glass windows and an interior mosaic of Our Lady of Mercy. On October 23, 1949 Bishop Edward F. Hoban dedicated the new church. During the following decade, the parish launched a number of other construction projects, including a new rectory. With Father Krispinsky's retirement in 1964, the community welcomed Father Andrew Laheta, a son of Our Lady of Mercy Parish. The parish succeeded in retiring the church's mortgage in 1967. Our Lady of Mercy School closed in 1973. Following Father Laheta's departure in November 1988, the parish welcomed Father Gary Gresko. Over the next decade, Father Gresko and his successor and current pastor, Father Joseph Hilinski, helped the parish remain a vital part of Tremont's church community.

1924 - 1927 ­ Our Lady of Mercy (SLOVAK) ­ 2433 W. 11th, Rev. Francis J. Dubosh
1927 - 1964 ­ Our Lady of Mercy ­ 2433 W. 11th, Rev. John Krispinsky
1964 - 1988 - Our Lady of Mercy - Rev. Andrew Laheta
1988 - 1990's - Our Lady of Mercy - Rev. Gary Gresko
1990s - Our Lady of Mercy - Rev. Joseph Hilinski

OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL (ITALIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
During the first two decades of the 20th Century, Italian-Catholics living on Cleveland's west side disagreed over the location for their church. One group wished to built in the Fulton Road area and the other favored a location on Detroit Avenue between W. 65th and W. 69th. St. Rocco community on Fulton Road received recognition in February 1924. It's first pastor was Rev. Sante Gattuso. He celebrated Mass with the Detroit Road community as well. The home of the Fasino family became an unofficial chapel and by Spring 1926, the community moved to a new chapel in a former tavern. In 1932 they purchased a house on Detroit Avenue and converted it into a chapel. The mission purchased property on Detroit Avenue between W. 69th and W. 70th for a future church. In March, 1949 ground was broken for a new church. Permission was later granted for another new church and Our Lady of Mount Carmel was dedicated on April 19, 1953.
Today this church is located at 6928 Detroit Avenue, Phone 216-651-5043

1928-1970 ­ Rev. Caruso
1970-???? ­ Rev. Marino Frascati

OUR LADY OF PEACE
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The first community mass of this church was held in Luna Park's billiard room. They obtained a new building on Buckingham Avenue in 1920. In 1938, Our Lady of Peace parish purchased land at the corner of E. 126th St. and Shaker Boulevard. The first mass was said in this church on September 18, 1951. Today this Church is located at 12503 Buckingham Avenue, Phone 216-421-4211

1919 - 1928 ­ Rev. James F. Cummins
1940's - 1951 ­ Rev. Edward Reilly
1951 - ???? ­ Rev. Francis J. Joyce
1964 ­ Rev. William A. Bachmann
???? ­ Rev. Anthony Zepp
???? ­ Rev. Gary D. Chmura

1924 - 1928 ­ Our Lady of the Angels ­ 3644 Riverside Rd., Rev. Linus Koenemund

1924 - 1928 ­ Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament (COLORED) ­ 2354 E. 79th, Rev. Thos. McKenney

1908 ­ Our Lady of Sorrows ­ Stanard at E. 55th, Rev. K. Zakrajsek

1908 ­ Sacred Heart of Mary (POLISH) ­ 3529 Broadview Rd., Rev. N.P. Weckel
1913 ­ Sacred Heart of Mary ­ Pearl near Bucyrus ­ Rev. Luke Rath

SACRED HEART OF JESUS (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
During the last two decades of the 19th century, growing numbers of Polish immigrants migrated from the area of St. Stanislaus Church down Marcelline Avenue (now E. 71st St.) to the Brecksville Road ­ Harvard Avenue area. Recognizing the difficulties of traversing the area's numerous gullies, the community purchased land on Marcelline Avenue between Krakow and Kazimier Avenues. In the Spring of 1889, Father Anton F. Kolaszewski, pastor of St. Stanislaus, was appointed to supervise the construction of the first Sacred Heart of Jesus Church. The community remained a mission of St. Stanislaus until August 6, 1891 when it received its first pastor, Father Felix Orzechowski. Ground was broken for the current church in 1908. Today this church is located at 6916 Krakow Avenue, Phone 216-341-2828

1889 - 1891 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ Brecksville Rd. at Krakow, Rev. A.F. Kolaszewski
1891-1893 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ Brecksville Rd. at Krakow, Rev. Felix Orzechowski
1893-1895 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ Brecksville Rd. at Krakow, Rev. James Kula
1895-1899 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus - Marcelline at Krakow, Rev. Paul Cwiakala
1900 - 1906 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ Marcelline at Krakow, Rev. Victor Szyrocki
1906-1908 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ E. 71st at Krakow, Rev. Victor Szyrocki
1908-1916 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ E. 71st at Kazimier, Rev. Victor Szyrocki
1916 - 1921 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ E. 71st at Kazimier, Rev. John Czyzak
1921 - 1932 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ E. 71st at Kazimier, Rev. John Mlotkowski
1932-???? ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ E. 71st at Kazimier, Rev. Joseph Kocinski
1936 - 1953 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ E. 71st at Kazimier, Rev. Stanislaus Rybacki
1954-1975 ­ Rev. Francis J. Szczepanski
1975 -???? ­ Rev. Raymond Bartnikowski
Rev. Francis Bednar

 

ST. ADALBERT (BOHEMIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
During the late 1870's and early 1880's, rapid industrialization in the west Broadway neighborhood surrounding St. Wenceslas Church led a number of its Bohemian parishioners to move further east beyond E. 55th Street. The St. Adalbert Society was organized in 1882 in Stehlik's Hall at Garden and Lincoln Avenues. In 1883 permission was granted for the establishment of a church. A church was built and first mass was celebrated in 1912. Today this church is located at 2347 E. 83rd Street, Phone 216-881-7647

1888 - 1904 ­ St. Adalbert ­ Lincoln at Garden, Rev. John Malecha
1904 ­ Rev. John W. Becka
1906 ­ St. Adalbert ­ Lincoln near Central, Rev. Ladislas Kloucek
1908 ­ St. Adalbert ­ 2347 E. 83rd, Rev. Ladislas Kloucek
1913 - 1928 ­ St. Adalbert ­ 2347 E. 83rd, Rev. John Becka
1969 - 1978 ­ Rev. Gene Wilson
1978 ­ Rev. Jerome Steinbrunner

ST. AGNES (IRISH AND GERMAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Agnes began in 1888 when a group of Catholic women petitioned the Bishop to attend to the spiritual needs of the Hough neighborhood's growing Irish and German families.
On April 29, 1893, St. Agnes was established at Euclid Avenue and Hilburn Avenue (now E. 81st Street) with Father Gilbert Jennings as the first pastor. Construction of the new St. Agnes Church began and it was dedicated on June 18, 1916. By 1949, parish membership was decreasing. The isolation and frustration of the Hough Community soon escalated into violence. In July, 1966, the neighborhood exploded. The damage of the riots took a heavy toll on the St. Agnes community. In 1972 the school closed and in 1973 the building was destroyed by fire. The Diocese decided to raze the church and this took place on November 24, 1975. Without a church, the parish continued to serve the Hough community, sponsoring a crisis ministry for the poor. On March 30, 1980, St. Agnes Parish merged with Our Lady of Fatima Parish.

1893 - 1906 - St. Agnes ­ Euclid near Hillburn, Rev. Gilbert Jennings
1908 - 1941 ­ St. Agnes ­ Euclid near E. 81st, Rev. Gilbert Jennings
1941 - 1949 ­ Rev. Richard Gibbons
1949 - ???? ­ Rev. Floyd Begin

ST. ALOYSIUS (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Monsignor Joseph Smith received permission to establish a new Catholic parish in the Glenville area. In 1898 ground was broken for a church and school. A second church was erected at the corner of E. 109th and St. Clair Avenue. St. Aloysius parish later merged with St. Agatha parish. Today this church is located at 10932 St. Clair Avenue, Phone 216-451-3262

1898 - 1903 ­ St. Aloysius ­ 3090 St. Clair, Rev. Joseph F. Smith
1903 - 1913 ­ St. Aloysius ­ 3090 St. Clair, Rev. F.A. Malloy
1913 - 1937 ­ St. Aloysius ­ 652 Lakeview Rd., Rev. Francis A. Malloy
1937 - 1956 ­ Rev. James T. Daley
1956 ­ Rev. Thomas J. Murphy

ST. ANDREW (SLOVAK)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In the early 1900's, Catholics of Slovak ancestry began settling on Cleveland's northeast side. It was difficult to attend St. Ladislas on E. 92nd or St. Martin on Scovill. On May 6, 1906, the new St. Andrew community celebrated their first mass in St. Vitus school hall. In October they purchased property at Superior Avenue and E. 52st Street. The cornerstone was laid in November and the first mass celebrated on April 4, 1907. A second newer church was dedicated on May 30, 1926. Today this church is located at 5135 Superior Avenue, Phone 216-431-2057

1906 - 1908 ­ St. Andrew - 5135 Superior, Rev. Emil Sloupsky
1908 - 1922 ­ St. Andrew ­ 5135 Superior, Rev. Jas. Lisensky
1922 - 1928 ­ St. Andrew ­ 5105 Superior, Rev. Stanislaus Gmuca
1929 ­ St. Andrew ­ Rev. George Luba
1970 - 1976 ­ St. Andrew ­ Rev. William Novicky
1976 ­ St. Andrew ­ Rev. Raphael Zbin

ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA (ITALIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Italians first settled in the Ontario Street Market district known as the Haymarket in the vicinity of Central and Broadway Avenues. This area was known as "Big Italy" and extended along Woodland and Orange Avenues from E. 9th Street to East 40th Street. In July, 1886 Father Pacifico Capitani arrived from Rome and celebrated Mass in the chapel of St. John Cathedral. Soon after, a frame hall on Ohio Street (now Central Avenue) was bought from a German Society. This hall was blessed on May 8, 1887 and was dedicated to St. Anthony of Padua. In 1904, the congregation built a red-brick church at E. 13th and Carnegie Avenue. By the late 1920's, the Italian population of "Big Italy" began to disperse to other Italian neighborhoods. The decision was made to merge the parish with St. Bridget and to use the St. Bridget parish plant located at 2508 E. 22nd near Woodland. St. Anthony's Church building was transferred to the St. Maron congregation. The new St. Anthony-St. Bridget parish would close in 1961 to make way for the proposed innerbelt freeway.

1886 ­ 1889 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ Ohio near Brownell, Rev. P. Capitani
1902 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ 197 Central, Rev. Vincent A. Migliore
1906 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ 197 Central, Rev. Humbert Rocchi
1906 - 1913 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ Central at E. 13th, Rev. Humbert Rocchi
1913 - 1924 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ 1267 Central, Rev. Humbert Rocchi
1928 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ 1267 Central, Rev. Francis Clovis
1937 - 1956 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ 1267 Central, Rev. John Humensky
1956 ­ 1961 ­ St. Anthony of Padua ­ Rev. Nazareno DeAngelis

 

ST. AUGUSTINE CATHOLIC CHURCH
2486 West 14th at the corner of Howard
216-781-5530
The mission which later became St. Augustine Parish was instituted in 1860 to serve those communicants of St. Patrick's (Bridge Ave.) who lived in the vicinity of the Heights. A small frame church was built at Tremont and Jefferson Streets. In 1867 the mission became a parish with the Rev. Charles A. Grandmougin serving as pastor until his death in 1871. He died from smallpox contracted in attending a parishioner. He had built a parish house and started a school, which was placed in charge of the Sisters of St. Joseph. The church was enlarged in 1877, but this was inadequate and the former Pilgrim Congregational Church on Jennings at Howard Street was purchased and remodeled for Catholic worship in 1896. The school and pastoral residence remained on the original site until 1906 when a new parish house was built on W. 14th. The present brick school was built at the rear of the parish house in 1908.

This structure was built from 1865 to 1870 and is an excellent example of Victorian architecture. The designer was J.M. Blackburn. Some alterations were made in 1896. It is Victorian Gothic in style and features both rounded and arched window hoods and a high main entrance. Painted brick-red with buff trim, the church is most distinctive. The walls of the nave are faced with imitation stone; the timbered roof panels are green. The altars are of white, the frontal of the high altar carrying a bas-relief of the Last Supper. By the right altar, dedicated to St. Joseph with the Infant Jesus, stands a large statue of the church's patron, St. Augustine. On the wall to the right of this statue is a marble memorial tablet to Father Grandmougin. For some years the school and pastoral residence remained on the original site; and the old church was used as a chapel. In 1906 a new parish house was built on Jennings Avenue. The present brick school was built to the rear of the church in 1907 and a home for the Sisters in 1908. The church is now home to St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church. This parish is known for its Hunger Center and its community outreach program.

Catholic Universe 12/20/1895:
St. Augustine's New Church
The people of St. Augustine's parish on the South Side, are to be congratulated on the acquisition of the Pilgrim church property, a commodious and substantial church edifice, situated in one of the most beautiful sections of the city. Negotiations had been under way a long time, but the trustees and members of the Pilgrim congregation seemed disinclined to favor the idea of having a Catholic congregation for neighbors, and it is probably that the purchase would not have been effected, but for the fact that the agent of St. Augustine's congregation secured options on property in the immediate neighborhood. When this became known, the Pilgrim trustees evinced more willingness to discuss the sale, but insisted on placing restrictions upon the property, that the purchasers were not willing to accept, but finally this feature was satisfactorily adjusted. Some idea may be formed of the feeling existing among the Pilgrim congregation, from a statement made by the proprietor of the Jennings Avenue hall in which an A.P.A. lodge held its meetings, to the effect that their rental was being paid by one of the trustees of Pilgrim church and this man was one of those with whom negotiations had to be made for the purchase of the church. It is not probable that the pastor of St. Augustine's would have continued the negotiations after it was learned what kind of people had to be dealt with were it not that the price offered for the property was a great deal less than a new church could be built for. The church is located on the corner of Jennings Ave. and Howard St., and the lot is 80 feet extending back about 200 feet. The only alterations that will be necessary will be the changing of a part of the font of the church, the removal of the organ from the rear to the gallery and the construction of the alter. This church is furnished with upholstered pews, a large gallery extends half way around the sides, a bell of fine tone hangs in the belfry and the basement is high and has good light and was used for Sunday school purposes. The seating capacity is about 700. The purchase price of $20,000 includes a splendid pipe organ. $5000 has been paid and the remainder will be paid as soon as the trustees receive legal permission to make the conveyance.

Plain Dealer 5/19/1907:
St. Augustine's School, which is being built on 1413 Howard Ave. near W. 14th St., at a cost of $50,000 will be completed by the time the fall term of school opens. The building, 100 x 70 feet, is being constructed of concrete and steel, and will be of English architecture. It will have four stories. On the first floor will be bowling alleys, billiard and poolrooms, a gymnasium and baths. The second floor will be devoted to school rooms, four on each floor while an auditorium will be on the fourth floor. W.W. Hodges designed the structure.

 

Cleveland Leader 5/3/1908:
New school will open this week
St. Augustine's new school will be opened formally Thursday evening. The exercises will consist of a lecture on the "Ideal Citizen" by P.J. O'Keefe, attorney-at-law, of Chicago; readings by Miss Bessie Brennan of the Cleveland School of Expression. The school is built of selected shale brick, trimmed with sandstone. It is a strictly fireproof building, the interior being of steel and concrete. The entire basement space is set aside for club purposes and is supplied with bowling alleys, gymnasium, billiard rooms, bath, reading room and library. The first and second floors will be used for school rooms. The third floor is a commodious auditorium that will seat 800 people. The stage is thoroughly equipped and the acoustics admirable.

From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In 1860, to meet the needs of the growing Catholic population on Cleveland's South Side (Tremont), Bishop Amadeus Rappe purchased a lot on Jefferson Street and built a small frame church. St. Augustine Church was a mission of the Cathedral until February 1867, when Father Charles Alphonsus Grandmougin was named first resident pastor. He built a rectory on Tremont Street and started a school. On November 20, 1871, he died of smallpox contracted on a sick call. Parishioners erected a plaque in his honor which still hangs in the church. A new school building was erected in 1876 and the church was enlarged the following year. In 1877, the Sisters of St. Joseph began staffing the school. As neighborhood growth continued, it became evident that the parish plant was inadequate. In December, 1895, Father John O'Connor purchased the original building of Jennings Road Congregational Church (now Pilgrim Church) on the corner of Jennings Road (West 14 Street) and Howard Street for $20,000. The church was renovated for Catholic use and dedicated on April 26, 1896. Gradually, the parish erected facilities on their new site: a rectory (1904), a fire proof school (1907-08), and also purchased a house for the convent (1911). The Jefferson Street property was sold and the buildings demolished (except the still-standing rectory). The Great Depression began a period of struggle and decline at St. Augustine. Father Francis Collins organized special collections for the needy. His successor, Father William Walsh, and the parishioners struggled to keep the parish financially afloat through fund raising, especially a bingo game known throughout the city. After WWII people increasingly left Tremont for the suburbs. On February 27, 1964, Father John Wilson was appointed Administrator (rather than pastor), a sign, perhaps, of St. Augustine's fragility. That month, St. Augustine lost some territory to St. Emeric Church. In June, St. Augustine School closed. Then, Father Thomas Sebian left St. Augustine for the new Diocesan Mission Team in El Salvador and the Hispanic ministry he had begun at St. Augustine waned. With Father Wilson came the Catholic Deaf Community. At first, they remained separate, but in the last twenty years, they have become fully participating members of St. Augustine. Similarly, the Catholic Blind Community came in the early 1970's when Father John Krasen was Chaplain. After Father Joseph McNulty was named their Chaplain and Pastor of St. Augustine in 1977, they too became part of St. Augustine. In 1973, the St. Vincent de Paul conference was reorganized. In 1975, the holiday meal program began with Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter dinners. The weekly soup program begun in 1976 has grown into a daily meal program, with special attention to the last two weeks of the month when the need is the greatest. The parish celebration of its 100th anniversary on West Fourteenth Street in October 1996 was a pledge of continued ministry to all God's people.

ST. AUGUSTINE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH by R.K. Bankaitis
Westward expansion, and the opportunity for land investment (speculation), in 1832 attracted Nathan Baldwin and Associates, a Buffalo company and it's investors to form Ohio City. In 1835 Cleveland mayor, John Willey with Ed Clark and Richard Hilliard formed John Willey & Associates. Collectively they bought land and founded Willeyville, which was connected to Cleveland over the Cuyahoga River at the Columbus Street Bridge. This area, later known as Tremont, did not pan out and both Nathan Baldwin & Assoc. along with John Willey & Assoc. went bankrupt. Geographical factors had served to isolate this area with the Cuyahoga River along the north and east, with Willey Run (Walworth Run) along the north and west. (Orth, 1910; Klein, 2002)

Tree Mount, or Tremont was an area of Brooklyn Township and Ohio City currently located on Cleveland's near west side. In 1836 the boundaries were the Cuyahoga River in the north and east, dependant on the source, with Fulton Avenue or West 25th on the west, and Clark Avenue or Harvard Avenue and the Harvard-Denison Bridge. (Van Tassel; Grabowsky, 1987).

From 1836 to 1854, section by section, Ohio City was annexed to Cleveland. In the meantime, the area known as the "Hights" was annexed by Ohio City politicians. (Van Tassel; Grabowsky, 1987). On the verge of bankruptcy, Ohio City was finally fully absorbed by Cleveland. The area flourished, becoming an exclusive residential neighborhood known as University Heights.

By 1860 an existing mission was formed into St. Augustine Church. The communicants of St. Patrick's parish were too far away, and to serve the needs of a growing Irish population, a large lot was purchased at the intersection of Tremont Street and Jefferson Avenue. Initially the front half of a small frame church was built and as the congregation organized, the structure was enlarged to 110 feet by 40 feet. (Kaczynski, 1988). The Rev. William Walsh was assigned as the first pastor, but during the first six years, St. Augustine existed as a serving mission of St. Johns Cathedral. This English (Irish) congregation was served by priests from the cathedral; the Reverends T. Carroll, J.F. Gallagher, and T.M. Mahoney. St. Augustine served in this capacity until 1867. Being close to the backbone of the "Heights", Jennings Road assisted in the creation of a parochial school. This was first established in 1868 and for some time, classes were held in the church. As many as four schools were run from St. Augustine parish.

The future home of St. Augustine was built by the Pilgrim Congregational Church at the corner of Jennings Avenue and Belviour (Howard) Street in 1865.

February of 1867, the newly ordained Father Charles Alphonsus Grandmougin was appointed as the first resident pastor of St. Augustine. On Jefferson Avenue, a commodious brick pastoral residence was built for $3,000. It still stands today, though in a sad state of repair due to fire damage. Father Grandmougin started a school and placed it in the charge of the Sisters of St. Joseph, who administer the parish programs to this day. While on a house call to an ill parishioner, Fr. Grandmougin contracted smallpox and died on November 21, 1871. He's laid to rest in St. Joseph Cemetery off of Woodland Avenue.

June 16, 1874, transportation improved as the Southside Railroad Company opened a tram line operating from Seneca between Superior and Franklin Place in Cleveland, running southeast to Scranton Road, then to Jennings Road and out to the city limits. The line was extended twice to Fairfield in 1879 and finally to Clark Ave. in 1889. (Orth, 1910)

Rev. W.J. Gibbons was the pastor intermittently until 1875. The duties were shared with Rev. Edward Meors, whose temporary posting became permanent in 1877. During this time a large and comfortable wood frame schoolhouse was erected in 1875-1876. The current wood frame structure became inadequate and was enlarged. A chapel was added and the interior was improved. On February 1, 1877, W.J. Gibbons was reappointed as the permanent pastor. As the chapel was dedicated on December 9, 1877, the current campus consisted of the church and four schools staffed by the Sisters of St. Joseph. The appointment of Rev. Michael Murphy on July 5, 1879 expanded the parish grounds with the purchase of two lots and a house adjoining east of the church property for $3,000. By August 19, 1988, the pastor Rev. John O'Connor deemed the structure to be inadequate. In 1895, after long and contentious negotiation, the current property at Jennings Ave. (W. 14th) and Howard Street was purchased for $20,000. The Pilgrim Church did not want to sell to Catholics. Every action which bigotry could dictate was used to prevent this acquisition. (Houck, 1903). According to Father Joseph McNulty, Father John O'Connor, the then resident pastor implied that the property across Howard Street on W. 14th St. will be used to build a Catholic Church, much to the horror of the other Christian houses of worship. (McNulty, 2003). After about a year's worth of remodeling the structure was finally dedicated on April 26, 1896. St. Augustine continued to use the old structure as a chapel until 1911, while maintaining the school and pastoral residence at the original site.

Depending on the source, the new rectory was built; according to Kaczynski in 1904, or in 1906. Father Raymond Mylott from 1907 to 1908 built a fireproof school and also a convent was built for the Sisters of St. Joseph. In 1911, a house was purchased east of the rectory and church on W. 14th St. where the convent is currently located. On the Jefferson St. property, all the structures except the rectory building were demolished.

By 1917, there was a schism in the unity of the Roman Catholic Church, as the Slovak population in the Southside wanted a new parish. St. Wendelin's Slovak Catholic Church was too distant. Rev. Farrelly suggested the Slovaks send their children to St. Augustine. In December 1918, lightning struck the steeple, causing a fire which resulted in its removal.

After World War II people started leaving Tremont in increasing numbers. During the 1960's, to serve the influx of the Puerto Rican population into the community, St. Augustine adopted a Spanish Liturgy. The Spanish Ministry eventually moved to St. Michaels.

The true decline of Tremont and St. Augustine began with the construction of I-71. This destroyed a large number of homes, about 25,000 to 26,000, and served to isolate the remaining neighborhood from the rest of Cleveland. The school building, built in 1908, was closed in 1964. St. Augustine school building did not remain closed for long. In June of 1965, work began to remodel this facility for mentally retarded students. On November 19, 1965 the facility for the St. Augustine Special School opened and continues to serve those mentally retarded students who were not accepted in regular schools. Sister Mary Fidella was one of three specially trained staff members of the Sisters of St. Joseph to practice in this teaching specialty.

Sources:
"The Church in Northern Ohio and in the Diocese of Cleveland From 1749 to 1890 by George F. Houck, 1890
"People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
"Introduction to Urban Studies", 2002 by Richard Klein PhD
"A History of Cleveland Ohio Volume 1, 1910, by Samuel P. Orth
Interviews with Rev. Joseph D. McNulty

HISTORY OF SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF ST. AUGUSTINE
St. Augustine was the 9th parish in the Diocese of Cleveland. It was founded in 1860 at the southeast corner of Tremont and Jefferson Streets. At this time, it was not an independent parish, but an appendage of the Cathedral Parish. From 1860-1867 a priest came to offer Mass. In 1867, Rev. Alphons Grandmougin was appointed as pastor. The school was immediately organized in 1867. Men taught from 1867-1874. The Sisters of St. Joseph taught from 1874-1946. The Sisters lived at the Motherhouse on Starkweather, which then became the parish hall of St. Theodosius. In 1906 Father O'Connor moved to the new rectory on W. 14th. The Sisters then moved to the former rectory. In 1911 the convent was transferred to the present location on W. 14th and this was the last connection with the original convent location on Starkweather.

ANOTHER HISTORY OF SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH
St. Augustine parish was founded in 1860 by Bishop Amadeus Rappe, but it did not begin to function as a separate parish until 1867. From 1860 to 1867, St. Augustine parish was an appendage of the Cathedral parish. In 1867, the new pastor, Rev. Alphons Grandmougin organized a parochial school. Whether sisters taught the parish school at this time cannot be ascertained from the records. It has been reported that men (possible brothers) first taught in the parish school.

Father J.P. Carroll was appointed in July, 1872 and early records stated that he was devoted to Catholic education. It is possible that in 1872 the Sisters of St. Joseph started to teach in the parish. The record does not indicate the exact date, nor does it give the sisters' names at that early date. The first sisters who taught in the parish lived at the Motherhouse on Starkweather Avenue, about 3 blocks away.

When the "new school" (present building) was opened in Sept. 1908 the teaching staff was composed of Sister Stanislaus (first grade), Sister Lucille (second and third grade), Sister Annetta (fourth grade). Sister Annetta also gave piano lessons after school and on Saturday. Sister Laurence (fifth and sixth grade), Sister Veronica (7th and 8th grade). Sister Michaella taught the 8th grade for some time, and also the two year Commercial Course. Sisters Michaella and Veronica had charge of the church and servers.

Mary Jane Ryan, born Oct. 27, 1868, now Mrs. Hurley, residing in Blessed Sacrament Parish said she was in the first grade 72 years ago when our sisters took charge of St. Augustine School. This would indicate that our sisters first taught there in 1874. Chancery records state 1877.

Mrs. Ryan states that the teachers in 1874 were Sisters Angela (entered 1876) Josephine (1877) Celestia Gitlin (1873) and Loretta (1883). These sisters could not have taught there in 1874 - several were not in the community at that time.

1867-1872 ­ St. Augustin ­ Wood and Jefferson Streets, Rev. F. Grammonschett
1872 ­ St. Augustine ­ Tremont and Jefferson ­ Rev. W.O. Higgins
1874 ­ St. Augustine ­ Tremont and Jefferson, Rev. J.P. Carroll
1874-1877 ­ St. Augustine ­ Tremont and Jefferson, Rev. E. Meors
1874 - 1879 ­ St. Augustine ­ Tremont and Jefferson, Rev. J.W. Gibbons
1879 - 1887 ­ St. Augustine ­ Tremont and Jefferson, Rev. Michael Murphy
1888 - 1906 ­ St. Augustine ­ Tremont and Jefferson, Rev. John O'Connor
1906 - St. Augustine - Tremont and Jefferson, Rev. John Scullen
1906 - 1921 ­ St. Augustine ­ W. 14th at Howard, Rev. Raymond Mylott
1924 ­ St. Augustine ­ W. 14th at Howard, Rev. John Nolan
1925 - 1928 ­ St. Augustine ­ W. 14th at Howard, Rev. Francis Collins
1936 - St. Augustine - W. 14th at Howard, Rev. William Walsh
1964 - St. Augustine - W. 14th at Howard, Rev. John Wilson
1970s - St. Augustine - W. 14th at Howard, Rev. John Krasen
1977 - St. Augustine - W. 14th at Howard, Rev. Joseph McNulty

ST. BARBARA (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In 1905, a small group of Polish Catholics living near Henninger Road in South Brooklyn formed St. Barbara Parish. They were joined by a number of families which crossed the Cuyahoga River Valley from their homes in the vicinity of East Denison Avenue. They originally celebrated mass at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church and later at the firehouse on West 23rd Street and Broadview Road. They soon purchased land at Valley Road and Elston Avenue and on Christmas Day, 1907, they celebrated the first mass in their new building. In 1916 a fire completely destroyed the church. While looking for another location, the congregation held services in the Woodsmen of the World Hall on Denison Avenue and West 25th Street. They then purchased land at the intersection of West 15th and Denison. The current church was completed by 1952. Today this church is located at 1505 Denison Avenue, Phone 216-741-2067

1907 - 1908 ­ St. Barbara - 4149 Valley Rd., Rev. Albert Migdalski
1911 - 1918 ­ St. Barbara - 4149 Valley Rd., Rev. Paul Szulerecki
1921 ­ St. Barbara ­ 1510 Denison, Rev. J.M. Zeglen
1924 ­ St. Barbara ­ 1510 Denison, Rev. John Solinski
1928 ­ St. Barbara ­ 1505 Denison, Rev. Leo Sztupek
1929 - 1970 ­ St. Barbara ­ 1505 Denison, Rev. Joseph Jarosz
1970 - ???? ­ St. Barbara ­ Rev. Chester C. Cudnik

1908 ­ St. Basil (SYRIAN) - 2231 E. 9th, Rev. Basil Marcha

ST. BONIFACE (GERMAN AND HUNGARIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In 1903, in the area known as the "Stockyards", German and Hungarian Catholics founded St. Boniface Parish. Today this church is located at 3545 West 54th Street, Phone 216-961-2713

1906 ­ St. Boniface ­ Poplar near Denison, Rev. Adolph Seeholzer
1908 - 1924 ­ St. Boniface ­ W. 54th near Denison, Rev. Adolph Seeholzer
1928 ­ St. Boniface, 3555 W. 54th, Rev. George Reber

ST. BRIDGET (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Before May, 1857, the Irish Catholics living in the vicinity of Woodland Avenue and Perry Street originally worshipped at the Cathedral. They built a small brick church on Perry Street and it was named St. Bridget parish. For seven years priests from St. John Cathedral and St. Mary Seminary held services for the parish until Father Denis Tighe was appointed the first resident pastor. Construction began on a new church in 1871 and it was completed in 1879. Parishioners finally moved out of the neighborhood, many moving to Glenville and attending St. Thomas Aquinas. It was decided to merge St. Bridget and St. Anthony of Padua. This took place in 1938. The parish known as St. Anthony-St. Bridget was sold to the State of Ohio for the Inner Belt Freeway in 1961.

1864 ­ 1866 ­ St. Bridget ­ Perry north of Kinsman, Rev. Denis Tighe
1865-1872 ­ St. Bridget ­ Perry north of Kinsman, Rev. J. Monohan
1872 - 1874 ­ St. Bridget ­ Perry near Woodland, Rev. B.B. Kelley
1874 - 1876 - St. Bridget - Perry near Woodland, Rev. P.J. McGuire
1877 - 1906 ­ St. Bridget ­ Perry near Woodland, Rev. William McMahon
1876 - 1908 ­ St. Bridget ­ E. 22nd opposite Creighton, Rev. Wm. McMahon
1913 - 1924 ­ St. Bridget ­ 2504 E. 22nd, Rev. Jas. Collins
1928 ­ St. Bridget ­ 2504 E. 22nd, Rev. Richard Brennan

ST. CASIMIR (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Soon after their arrival in the Unites States, Polish-Catholic immigrants set about the task of erecting a church. For the Polish Immigrants of Cleveland's Poznan district, this center was St. Casimir Church. Today this church is located at 8223 Sowinski Avenue, Phone 216-361-4322

1894 ­ St. Casimir ­ Sobieski near Ansel, Rev. Benedykt Rosinski
1894 - 1895 ­ St. Casimir ­ Sobieski near Ansel, Rev. Stanislaw Wozny
1895 - 1899 ­ St. Casimir ­ Kossuth at Pulaski, Rev. Francis N. Fremel
1899 - 1903 ­ St. Casimir ­ Kossuth at Pulaski, Rev. Constantin Lazinski
1903 - 1906 ­ St. Casimir ­ Kossuth at Pulaski, Rev. Ignatius Pitrowski
1906 - 1912 ­ St. Casimir ­ E. 82nd at Pulaski, Rev. Ignatius Piotrowski
1912 ­ 1912 ­ St. Casimir ­ Rev. Paul Kosczy
1912 ­ 1918 ­ St. Casimir - Rev. Carl Ruszkowski
1918 - 1921 ­ St. Casimir ­ 8223 Sowinski, Rev. J. Solinski
1921 - 1924 ­ St. Casimir ­ 8223 Sowinski, Rev. Louis Redmer
1924 - 1967 ­ St. Casimir ­ 8223 Sowinski, Rev. Andrew Radecki
1967 ­ St. Casimir ­ 8223 Sowinski, Rev. Stanley Cymanski

 

ST. CATHERINE
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Catherine was organized as a mission of Holy Name Parish by Father John T. Carroll.
Today this church is located at 9412 Heath Avenue, Phone 216-341-3353

1902 - 1906 ­ St. Catherine ­ Woodland Hills at Heath, Rev. James Quinn
1908 - 1918 ­ St. Catherine ­ E. 93rd at Heath, Rev. James Quinn
1921 ­ St. Catherine ­ E. 93rd at St. Catharine, Rev. J.J. Quinn
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Catherine ­ 3447 E. 93rd, Rev. J.J. Quinn

ST. CECILIA
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Cecilia Parish began with a November, 1913 meeting of the Catholic residents of Cleveland's Mount Pleasant neighborhood. Father John T. Farrell was the first pastor. The parish celebrated their first Mass in 1915 in the living room of the Daniel O'Reilly family home. It then constructed a church at E. 152nd and Kinsman Road. From the beginning, this parish attracted worshipers from the Czech, German, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, and Polish. Today this church is located at 3476 E. 152nd Street, Phone 216-921-3310

1918 - 1921 ­ St. Cecilia ­ 13719 Kinsman, Rev. John T. Farrell
1927 ­ St. Cecilia ­ 15001 Kinsman, Rev. John Farrell
1928 - 1941 ­ St. Cecilia ­ 15001 Kinsman, Rev. Edward Kirby
1942 - 1955 ­ Rev. John T. Ruffing
1955 ­ Rev. John Tivenan
1988 ­ Rev. Daniel Begin

1924 - 1928 ­ St. Charles ­ Ridge Rd. and Wilbur, Rev. N.F. Monaghan

ST. COLMAN (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Eugene O'Callaghan was appointed as the community's first pastor. They worshiped in an abandoned school house on Pear Street. The first mass was on July 25, 1880. The current church was consecrated on October 17, 1918. Today this church is located at 2027 W. 65th Street, Phone 216-651-0550

1880 - 1898 ­ St. Colman Church ­ Gordon and Lawn, Rev. E.M. O'Callaghan
1902 - 1906 ­ St. Colman Church ­ Gordon and Lawn, Rev. James O'Leary
1908 - 1913 ­ St. Colman Church ­ W. 65th at Madison, Rev. James O'Leary
1918 - 1921 ­ St. Colman Church ­ 2027 W. 65th, Rev. James O'Leary
1922 - 1962 ­ St. Colman Church ­ 2027 W. 65th, Rev. Charles Martin

ST. COLUMBKILLE
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Columbkille was founded in 1871 as a daughter parish of St. John the Evangelist Cathedral. The first pastor was James O'Reilly. A small wood-frame building was constructed at the northwest corner of E. 26th and Superior. Fifteen years later, Father T.P. Thorpe, the pastor of St. John Cathedral, moved the original church to the northeast corner of the intersection. This structure became the first St. Columbkille Church. In 1904, a larger church was erected at the corner of E. 26th and Superior. St. Columbkille School closed in 1953 and the parish closed in 1957. In 1958, the entire St. Columbkille Parish campus was demolished to make way for the Innerbelt Freeway.

1871 - 1874 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior and Alabama, Rev. James O'Reilly
1877 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior and Alabama, Rev. Francis McGovern
1879 - 1891 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior and Alabama, Rev. T.P. Thorpe
1900 - 1906 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior and Alabama, Rev. George J. Vahey
1908 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior at E. 26th, Rev. George Vahey
1913 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior at E. 26th, Rev. John Sidley
1918 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior at E. 26th, Rev. Martin J. O'Malley
1919 - 1932 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior at E. 26th, Rev. G.J. Moseley
1932 ­ St. Columbkille ­ Superior at E. 26th, Rev. Arthur Gallagher

ST. CYRIL AND ST. METHODIUS (SLOVAK)
A mission for Slovaks living and working in the "Birdtown" area of Lakewood was established in 1902. It was called SS. Cyril and Methodius Church. Services were initially conducted in a renovated house on the corner of Madision and Lakewood Avenues. The following year, 1903, St. Wendelin Church on W. 25th Street at Columbus Road was established for Slovaks in Ohio City and the area south of Lorain Road. Today this church is located at 12608 Madison Avenue, Phone 216-521-7288

1908 ­ St. Cyril and St. Methods ­ Madison at Lakewood, Rev. Thomas Ballon
1913 - 1918 ­ St. Cyril and St. Methods ­ Madison at Lakewood, Rev. A.J. Masat
1924 ­ Sts. Cyril and Methodeus ­ Madison near Alameda, Rev. Albert Masat
1928 ­ Sts. Cyril and Methodeus ­ Madison at Alameda, Rev. Frank Dubosh

ST. EDWARD (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
In 1863, Father Anthony Abel became the first priest to celebrate Mass with Catholics living in the area of Woodland and East 72nd Street. For the next 8 years, Masses were said with priests from St. John the Evangelist Cathedral, St. Mary Seminary, and the Franciscan Monastery of St. Joseph in the chapel of St. Joseph Orphan Asylum on Woodland. St. Edward Church was dedicated in 1873. By 1943, most of the Irish Catholic families had moved from the area and were replaced by African-American homes. St. Edward Parish became the second African-American parish in the Cleveland Diocese. In 1958, the parish's high school was closed. Falling membership caused the parish to merge with Holy Trinity Parish in 1975. St. Edward Church was demolished in 1976.

1871 ­ St. Edward ­ Woodland at Geneva, Rev. Jacob Kuhn
1873 - 1899 ­ St. Edward ­ Woodland at Geneva, Rev. M. Scanlon
1899 - 1906 ­ St. Edward ­ Woodland at Geneva, Rev. William Kress
1908 - 1920 ­ St. Edward ­ Woodland at E. 69th, Rev. William Kress
1921 - 1925 ­ St. Edward ­ Woodland at E. 69th, Rev. Joseph F. Nolan
1925 - 1928 ­ St. Edward ­ Woodland at E. 69th, Rev. John R. Kenny
1928 ­ 1932 ­ Rev. J.E. Casey
1933 ­ 1936 ­ Rev. J.E. Casey
1936 ­ 1937 ­ Rev. William Moseley
1937 ­ Rev. James E. Maher
1953 - 1968 ­ Rev. Werner Verhoff
1968 - 1971 ­ Rev. Charles McKoy
1971 - 1975 ­ Rev. Raymond Schultheis

 

1913 - 1921 ­ St. Elias (SYRIAN) ­ 1225 Webster, Rev. Basil Marsha
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Elias ­ 1227 Webster, Rev. Malatios Mufleh

ST. ELIZABETH (HUNGARIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
During the last two decades of the 19th century, Hungarian-Catholic immigrants settled in the Buckeye Road area. They celebrated Mass at St. Ladislas Parish. Father Charles Boehm arrived in Cleveland in 1892 and became the first pastor. The first Mass was celebrated in the chapel of St. Joseph Orphan Asylum on Woodland Avenue. They then purchased property on Buckeye Road and Bismarck Street (now E. 90th). The new church was dedicated on February 19, 1922. Today this church is located at 9016 Buckeye Road, Phone 216-231-0325

1892 - 1907 ­ St. Elizabeth­ S. Woodland at Bismarck, Rev. Charles Boehm
1908 - 1922 ­ St. Elizabeth ­ Buckeye at E. 90th, Rev. Julius Szepessy
1922 - 1927 ­ St. Elizabeth - Buckeye at E. 90th, Rev. Charles Boehm
1927 ­ 1973 ­ St. Elizabeth ­ Buckeye at E. 90th, Rev. Emory Arpad Tanos
1973 - 1977 ­ St. Elizabeth ­ Buckeye at E. 90th, Rev. Julius Zahorsky
1977 ­ 1987 ­ St. Elizabeth ­ Buckeye at E. 90th, Rev. John Nyeste
1987 ­ ???? ­ St. Elizabeth ­ Buckeye at E. 90th, Rev. Andras Antal

ST. EMERIC (HUNGARIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Emeric overlooks Cleveland's industrial Flats. In November, 1904 the first Mass was celebrated as a parish. On January 22, 1905, the church was dedicated. In 1916 the church was gutted by fire. Bishop Farrelly offered the parish the use of the soon-to-be-suppressed St. Mary of the Annunciation Church, which the parish soon purchased. In 1925, the Van Sweringen brothers purchased the parish site and moved the parish to its current location. Today this church is located at 1860 West 22nd Street, Phone 216-861-1937

1906 ­ St. Emeric ­ Hicks near Bridge, Rev. Stephen Soltesz
1908 ­ St. Emeric ­ W. 24th near Bridge, Rev. Stephen Soltesz
1913 - 1918 ­ St. Emeric ­ W. 24th at Bridge, Rev. J.N. Zabo
1921 - 1928 ­ St. Emeric ­ 1921 W. 22nd, Rev. Jos. Hartel
1965 ­ 1983 ­ St. Emeric ­ 1921 W. 22nd, Rev. Francis Karpi
1983 ­ 1988 ­ St. Emeric ­ 1921 W. 22nd, Rev. Richard Orley
1988 - ???? ­ St. Emeric ­ 1921 W. 22nd, Rev. Sandor Siklodi

ST. FRANCIS (GERMAN)
From: Jubilee Edition of Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902

The newest of the German Catholic congregations in Cleveland is St. Francis Church. Its area of activity lies outwards in the district where East Madison Avenue crossed Superior Street. The present minister is Father F. Metternich. The branching off of St. Francis from St. Peter's occurred because the distance of the faithful from the church had grown too great. This took place on March 3, 1887. As soon as the little congregation was organized by Father Francis Westerholt, a lot was obtained on Superior Street near Becker Avenue. The new church was consecrated on September 11, 1887 and the school was begun with two sisters of the Sisters of Our Beloved Lady. The first minister of the congregation was Nikolaus Kirch. He remained until January 29, 1893 and was replaced by Rev. Francis Metternich.

1887 ­ St. Francis - Superior near Becker, Rev. Francis Westerholt
1887-1893 ­ St. Francis ­ Superior near Becker, Rev. Nicholas Kirch
1893 - 1906 ­ St. Francis ­ 2135 Superior, Rev. Francis Metternich
1908 - 1918 ­ St. Francis ­ Superior at E. 71st, Rev. Francis Metternich
1921 - 1928 ­ St. Francis ­ Superior at E. 71st, Rev. Joseph Hopp

ST. GEORGE (LITHUANIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The Lithuanian settlers celebrated mass at St. Joseph Parish on Woodland Avenue originally. In 1895, Father Joseph Delininkaitis became the first pastor of St. George Parish. They then celebrated mass at St. Peter Parish on Superior Avenue. The parish purchased land at the corner of Oregon Street (now Rockwell Avenue) and East 21st Street, where it erected a small frame church/school. Father Halaburda purchased property at the corner of E. 67th Street and Superior. The present church was dedicated in 1921. Today this church is located at 6527 Superior Avenue, Phone 216-431-5794

1895 - 1898 ­ St. George ­ Dodge and Superior, Rev. Joseph Delinikaitis
1898 - 1905 ­ St. George ­ 38 N. Perry, Rev. Joseph Jankowski
1907 - 1919 ­ St. George ­ E. 21st at Oregon, Rev. Joseph Halaburda
1919 ­ St. George ­ E. 21st at Oregon, Rev. Vincent G. Vilkautalitis
1924 - 1959 ­ St. George ­ E. 65th at Superior, Rev. V.G. Vilkautalitis
1959 - 1961 ­ St. George ­ E. 65th at Superior, Rev. Bernard Bartis
1961 - 1980 ­ Rev. Balys Ivanauskas
1980 ­ present ­ Rev. Joseph Bacevice

1921 ­ St. Gregory (GREEK) 2037 Quail, Rev. Joseph Hanulya
1924 ­ St. Gregory 2037 Quail, Rev. Basil Volasin
1928 ­ St. Gregory 2037 Quail, Rev. George Hritz

1908 ­ St. Helena's (GREEK ROMANIAN) ­ W. 65th near Detroit, Rev. Epaninondas Lucaciu
1913 ­ St. Helena's ­ W. 65th near Detroit, Rev. Amelin Haetigen
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Helena's ­ 1367 W. 65th, Rev. John Spatariu

ST. HYACINTH (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Polish immigrants settled in the Francis Avenue ­ East 61st Street area. They had to travel to St. Stanislaus Parish on Forman Avenue to celebrate Mass. This led to many Jackowo neighborhood residents to ask to establish a new Polish nationality parish. St. Hyacinth was established on December 20, 1906 with Rev. Ludwik Redmer as the first pastor. The first mass was held at St. Edward Parish and then they moved to St. Lawrence parish. The first Mass in their own church was on Christmas Day, 1907. They built another later church, which was dedicated on May 22, 1952. Today this church is located at 6114 Francis Avenue, Phone 216-641-3944

1906 - 1920 ­ St. Hyacinth ­ Francis at E. 61st, Rev. Louis Redmer
1921 - 1957 ­ St. Hyacinth ­ Francis at E. 61st, Rev. Joseph Sztucki
1957 ­ 1973 ­ St. Hyacinth ­ Rev. Joseph Rutkowski
1973 ­ St. Hyacinth ­ Rev. John Deka

ST. IGNATIUS
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
On September, 1, 1902, Bishop Horstmann appointed Father Joseph Hoerstmann to form a parish at the "west end of Lorain Street". For the next year, while continuing as pastor of St. Mary, Rockport, and St. Patrick, West Park, Father Hoerstmann started visiting households. At a meeting on March 15, 1903 it was announced that the Lorain Street and Denison Land Company had donated land on Lorain just past Denison. This community celebrated Mass for the first time in this building on November 15, 1901. The cornerstone for the church was laid in 1925 and the first Mass in the main church was Father Hanrahan's funeral on April 14, 1930. The church was dedicated on November 9, 1930. The golden anniversary of the parish was celebrated in 1951. The high point of the celebration came with the consecration of the church on October 22, 1951. Today this church is located at 10205 Lorain Avenue, Phone 216-251-0300

1902 - 1906 ­ St. Ignatius ­ Lorain opposite Helen, Rev. Joseph Hoerstmann
1908 - 1917 ­ St. Ignatius ­ Lorain opposite W. 103rd, Rev. Joseph Hoerstmann
1918 - 1930 ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. Thomas Hanrahan
1930 ­ 1945 ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. Anthony Stuber
1945 ­ 1950 ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. John Kelly
1950 - ???? ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. Albert Murphy
1960's ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. James McIntyre
???? ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. John Krasen
1982 - St. Ignatius - West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. Robert Glepko
???? ­ St. Ignatius ­ West Blvd. at Lorain, Rev. James McGonegal

1898 ­ St. John the Baptist (UNITED GREEK) ­ 78 Rawlings, Rev. Simon Szabo
1902 ­ St. John the Baptist ­ 78 Rawlings, Rev. Ryan Matysezko
1906 ­ St. John the Baptist ­ 78 Rawlings, Rev. Julius Orosz
1908 ­ St. John the Baptist ­ 8019 Rawlings, Rev. Julius Orosz
1913 ­ St. John the Baptist ­ Buckeye near Woodhill, Rev. Victor Kizak
1921 - 1928 ­ St. John the Baptist ­ Buckeye at Ambler, Rev. Eugene Tabakovich

ST. JOHN CANTIUS
906 College Avenue at Professor
216-781-9095

This church was organized in 1898 by its first appointed pastor, the Rev. Hippolit Orlowski. The first church was a remodeled car barn at the corner of Professor and College Streets, and the first Mass was celebrated in the remodeled building on March 26, 1899. A part of a two-story building at the rear of the property was remodeled into a school, which opened its doors to the children on September 11, 1899, under the care of the Sisters of Saint Joseph. A combination church and school was built in 1913 by Rev. Francis Doppke. When the present church was constructed in 1925 under Rev. Joseph P. Kocinski, the church part of the school building was made into a spacious parish hall. The church features the ornate altar saved from St. Joseph Franciscan Catholic Church. The architects were Potter and Gable. The Rev. Francis B. Duda constructed the present high school building and recreation center which was dedicated on the 50th Anniversary of the parish in 1949.

Cleveland News 5/19/1909:
FINE NEW CHURCH FOR THE POLES OF THE SOUTH SIDE
Sunday will be a red letter day for the Polish Catholics of Cleveland. The occasion will be the laying of the cornerstone of the new combination church and school of the congregation of St. John Cantius of which Rev. Francis F. Doppke is the pastor. The exercises will begin with a parade of all the societies connected with the parish. The procession will form at the church, proceed by way of Professor Ave. to Jefferson Ave, thence to Starkweather, West 14th, to Buhrer, to Scranton, to the residence of Bishop Koudelka, and return by Scranton Road, to Clark Ave., West 14th to Kenilworth, College and Professor to the pastoral residence. The dimensions are 78 x 118 feet. It will be fireproof, with steel roof trusses, iron stairways and slate roof. The exterior will be of pressed brick, with stone trimmings. The interior will be in hardwood finish. The school will be on the first floor, where there will be six classrooms, stairways and halls in ceramic mosaic. The chapel and sacristy will be on the second floor. The chapel will seat 1,200. The building will cost $57,000.

This congregation was organized May 1, 1898. In 1890 a few Polish families settled in the southwest portion of the city. They first attended Stanislaus church. Later a Polish priest was occasionally called to St. Joseph's church to administer to their spiritual needs. When they grew stronger in number they obtained permission from Bishop Horstmann to establish a parish of their own at Professor and College Avenue. Father Orlowski was sent as their pastor. He was educated in the Seminary of Plock, Poland. At first Father Orlowski held services in St. John's cathedral school chapel. In May, 1898, property at Professor and College streets, with the old street car barns, was purchased for $4,000. The number of parishioners grew and soon a larger church and school was needed.

Plans were prepared by William C. Jansen, architect, and the contract was let. Before the building was started additional property for the sum of $12,000 was bought and paid for. The property now has 297 feet frontage on Professor Ave. and 396 feet on College Ave.

From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Bishop Ignatius F. Horstmann established St. John Cantius Parish on April 14, 1898, appointing Father Hippolit Orlowski its first pastor. On March 26, 1899, the community gathered in a converted car barn in Cleveland's Tremont neighborhood to celebrate its first mass. Soon after, Father Orlowski wrote Bishop Horstmann of the enthusiasm of the Kantowo community, assuring him that "the honorable and hard-working Poles would support this church and fulfill the expectations inherent with the new undertaking." In September, the community opened its school, welcoming teachers from the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis. By the time Father Orlowski left the parish in September 1908, the community had grown to approximately 400 families and a school enrollment of 300 students. Father Orlowski's successor, Father Francis Doppke, supervised the construction of a new church and school. The burden of ministering to a growing parish taxed Father Doppke's strength, led him to petition the Diocese for an assistant - a request difficult to fill with the dearth of Polish-speaking Priests in the United States. After eight years of dedicated service, Father Doppke died on March 18, 1917. Bishop Farrelly appointed Father Joseph P. Kocinski the next pastor of St. John Cantius Parish. By the mid 1920's, continued growth led the community to erect a new church. The dedication took place in November 1926. In May 1932, the Diocese reassigned Father Kocinski, replacing him with Monsignor Marion Orzechowski. With Monsignor Orzechowski's death in May 1939, Archbishop Schrembs appointed Father Francis Duda on July 2, 1939. In May 1945, the parish received word that Bishop Edward F. Hoban had approved plans for the establishment of St. John Cantius High School. Father Duda was elevated to the rank of domestic prelate on May 25, 1947. Monsignor Duda served the parish for a number of years before ill health forced him to turn over the community to an administrator, Father Edward F. Gackowski. Father Gackowski served the parish until January 1956, when it welcomed its new pastor, Father Francis A. Szudarek. In 1969, the parish high school merged with St. Stanislaus, St. Michael and Our Lady of Lourdes High Schools, creating the multi-campus Cleveland Central Catholic High School. That September, the parish welcomed its new associate pastor, Father Ralph A. Bodziony, who in January 1973, succeeded Father Szudarek as pastor. Over the next 10 years the Spanish-speaking population of the area grew, leading Father Bodziony to propose the establishment of a parish Hispanic ministry in 1984. Two years later, the parish campus was damaged when an explosion ripped through the church and rectory. Recent renovations include the conversion of the former convent into a half-way house for recovering alcoholics and the creation of a parish hunger center.

HISTORICAL SKETCH OF ST. JOHN CANTIUS CHURCH FROM THEIR GOLDEN JUBILEE BOOK IN 1949:

Over 50 years ago, a small number of Catholic Polish laborers settled on the South side of Cleveland. The early settlers although few in number, eagerly desired the ministration of their Holy Faith.

As the spiritual needs of these families became known, the ordinary of the diocese, The Most Rev. Bishop Ignatius Horstmann, appointed the Reverend Hippolit Orlowski as the first pastor of St. John Cantius Church to serve the Polish Catholic families of the South Side. The Holy Sacrifice of Mass was offered up for the first time in a remodeled car barn at the corner of Professor and College Avenues. A part of the two-story building at the rear end of the property was remodeled into apartments serving as a pastoral residence, school, and Sister's home, so that within three months from the date of its establishment, the parish was functioning normally. The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis were appointed to teach, and they remain in charge of the school to this day.

The Parish of St. John Cantius grew rapidly to the extent that Father Hippolit Orlowski could not carry the burdens of his work due to ill health. He asked to be relieved of his duties and in August, 1908 the Most Reverend Bishop appointed the Reverend Francis Doppke as his successor. Under his administration a combination school and church were built in 1913. He also arranged for the building of a Parish house, and a Sister's home. His plans for a new church did not materialize because he too did not enjoy good health, and died at a comparatively young age on March 18, 1917.

Father Joseph P. Kocinski succeeded Father Francis Doppke on April 24, 1917. He soon realized that the school was too small so he arranged for the building of six additional classrooms. He also enlarged the Sister's home which was too small for all the Sisters needed to serve the parish.

Having completed the school program, Father Kocinski with his committee were now planning a new church. So naturally the people of the parish were enthusiastic, to start building a new House of God. In 1923, Father Kocinski solicited the services of Potter & Gable Co., Cleveland architects, well experienced in church structure. This was the first step taken, having for its goal the present church. On Sunday afternoon, July 6, 1924, the cornerstone of the new church was laid. The church is of a beautiful Romanesque style, determined in every detail to be a fitting house of worship, a structure worthy of being dedicated as a Catholic church and also a fitting monument to the South Side of Cleveland, as well as the parishioners of St. John Cantius.

On Sunday, the twenty-fourth of November 1926, St. John Cantius parish witnessed the dedication of its new church. The Pontifical Mass was celebrated by His Excellency, the Most Reverend Bishop Joseph Schrembs. Many visiting clergy were present, and the Church was filled with parishioners. At the conclusion, Bishop Schrembs addressed the Congregation and was followed by Father Kocinski, the pastor of St. John Cantius, who conveyed to the parish his sentiments of joy and appreciation on this great occasion.

Father Kocinski has given his best efforts to St. John Cantius. He worked strenuously and conscientiously until May 17, 1932 when he was succeeded by the Rt. Rev. Msgr. Marion J. Orzechowski, who for seven years worked zealously for the welfare of the parish, both socially and spiritually. He was loved, by all the people, both young and old. His untimely death on May 1, 1939 put an end to a great benefactor. The present pastor, the Rt. Rev. Msgr. Francis B. Duda succeeded Msgr. Orzechowski.

During the 10 years of his Pastorate at St. John Cantius, Monsignor Duda has been instrumental in furthering the progress of the parish. In the first place, he achieved the remarkable feat of clearing the parish of its heavy indebtedness.

Perceiving the appalling need of a Catholic high school on the south side, Monsignor Duda formulated plans for remodeling the auditorium into suitable classrooms for the high school department. Assured that this was a step in the right direction he conceived the idea of erecting a new unit comprising a high school and recreation center. In 1947 Monsignor Duda requested the service of Mr. Ellsworth Potter, a Cleveland architect, who skillfully drew the plans for a high school and recreation center. The plans were submitted to His Excellency, the Most Reverend Edward F. Hoban, who approved them.

On Sunday afternoon, July 10, 1949, the cornerstone of the new high school was laid. The general contractors were Woods and Chleva.

With the completion of the new building, the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades were transferred to the former high school quarters while the wooden frame building in which these lower grades were housed was removed from the premises.

Undaunted by the difficulties besetting his path, Monsignor Duda succeeded in this great enterprise for the need of providing a wholesome and religious environment for the training of youth both intellectually and socially is apparent to all who are aware of the modern atheistic tendencies.

On Sunday, the 16th day of April the Most Reverend Bishop Edward F. Hoban dedicated the new high school and recreation center in the presence of a large number of clergy and parishioners. This indeed was a memorable day for it marked also the Golden Jubilee of the parish.

Monsignor Duda and his loyal parishioners deserve great credit and commendation for their zeal in the cause of Catholic education. Indeed, this was a noble work for the greater glory of God and the welfare of the youth.

St. John Cantius Parish stands now as a complete unit - a memorial to the Priests, Sisters, and all the Parishioners who worked loyally for its accomplishment.

ST. JOHN CANTIUS 90TH ANNIVERSARY 1898-1988
HUMBLE BEGINNINGS
The "Heights" area of Cleveland was a quiet rolling rural community ninety years ago, its quiet country lanes provided perfect sites for the school complexes that were planned. The city would remain by the Cuyahoga River, the people believed. The steel mill executives began building estates on the hillsides.

Many of Cleveland's steelworkers and other laborers were Polish immigrants who had settled on the South side of the city. They brought a burning faith with them from the old country and felt a need for a priest who could serve them in their own tongue.

His Excellency, the Most Reverend Bishop Ignatius Horstmann readily agreed that, although their numbers were comparatively small, their dedication would surely support a parish of their own. And so he appointed Reverend Hippolit Orlowski to serve the Polish nationality parish of St. John Cantius.

Masses were originally held in a two-story barn at the corner of Professor and College Avenues. One of the first Sacraments bestowed was the baptism on May 7, 1898 of Stanislaus Sroka - the parish's first baptism. The first marriage in our parish united Adelbert Bilski and Catherine Misiak on May 30.

The hard-working parishioners immediately began remodeling - creating a pastoral residence, a school, and a Sisters' home in separate apartments behind the sanctuary portion of the building. These poor immigrants knew the importance of a good education. They wanted Catholic schools for their children and were willing to sacrifice to attain the best.

Accordingly, when the church was established, so was the school The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Francis were appointed to teach. Their many years of service to St. John Cantius School is gratefully acknowledged by today's parishioners.

A BUILDING PARISH
The parish's growth was rapid. Father Orlowski's health was poor and the burden was growing greater and greater. Eventually he asked to be relieved of his duties. In August of 1908, Father Orlowski was replaced by Reverend Francis Doppke, another dedicated priest who gave his all for St. John Cantius. He directed the building of a new church and school combination in 1913. He then arranged for the construction of a parish hall and a convent. Father Doppke's death came prematurely in March, 1917 - before he was able to begin the new church.

When Reverend Joseph P. Kocinski assumed the pastorate on April 24, 1917, the United States had just entered the World War. Industry was expanding in Cleveland. The population was growing. More and more Polish-speaking Catholics were joining St. John Cantius School. Almost immediately, Father Kocinski contracted for six classrooms to be added to the overcrowded school. The Sisters' residence was expanded also.

Then, the parish turned its thoughts to a new church building. This time it was to be a huge beautiful edifice - a monument to their faith and a sanctuary that would serve an ever-expanding parish for many decades. Architects Potter and Gable of Cleveland were chosen in 1923 to design the massive Romanesque church. Its cornerstone was laid on Sunday afternoon, July 6, 1924.

When the structure was completed two years later, it had cost $245,000 excluding heat and electricity. The church is 184 feet long and 67 feet wide. At the point where it widens for side entrances it is 97 feet wide. The bell tower is 135 feet high and its bells were added at a cost of $6,000. These were fantastic expenditures for working people, many of whom were recent immigrants from a war-torn foreign country. But if they didn't have their faith to sustain them, they would not have had the inspiration to push on.

A PARISH PRIORITY - EDUCATION
In May, 1932, a new pastor, the Right Reverend Monsignor Marion J. Orzechowski, was appointed. He came to a parish that was suffering from the final phases of the Great Depression. Unemployment was widespread; bank failures were still occurring. Monsignor Orzechowski was a zealous worker who inspired his people. Parish activities knit the congregation ever closer as well as slowly but steadily decreasing the mortgage loan. Monsignor Orzechowski's sudden death on May 1, 1939, was a heart-rending loss to his faithful flock.

St. John's fifth pastor, Right Reverend Monsignor Francis D. Duda, proved to be as dynamic a leader as were his predecessors. One of his first tasks was to clear the parish of indebtedness. He then turned his attention to a parochial high school. The area had begun to grow. The Second World War was expanding industrial production; steel mills were creeping into the residential areas. The influx of workers caused overcrowding in the community's schools. One of the country's first housing projects was built in this area at the time and sis still in the eighties serving needy people.

Monsignor Duda planned the remodeling of the parish auditorium into high school classrooms which opened in 1945. When his assessment of the demand proved true, he decided that a complete high school and recreation center would be a vital addition. Monsignor added English Masses to the Polish in the post World War II period.
In 1947, Monsignor Duda employed architect Ellsworth Potter of Cleveland to draw the plans which were later approved. Contractors Woods and Chleva were hired and the work began.

Cornerstone laying ceremonies were held on Sunday, July 10, 1949, and when the building was completed, the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grades were transferred into what had been the high school quarters. The old wooden frame building was moved from the parish property.

CHANGES AND MORE CHANGES
After a long and vital pastorate, Monsignor Duda died on November 27, 1955. He was succeeded in 1956 by Reverend Francis A. Szudarek, who had served St. John Cantius as an associate pastor from 1936 to 1948. In the parish and in the community, changes were still the way of life during Father Szudarek's pastorate. The city kept pushing out its boundaries. Highways were being cut through here, there, and everywhere. Homes had to be moved or torn down to allow the wheels of progress to keep turning. Many parishioners had moved out into the suburbs, and although most parishioners now spoke Polish as a second language, they commuted to St. John's rather than change to another church.

The high school required additional laboratory facilities, a new cafeteria and gym locker rooms. Then, in 1969, after 24 years of service, St. John Cantius High School was consolidated with three other schools to form Cleveland Central Catholic High School. Its initial enrollment exceeded 2,000.

In preparation for the 75th Anniversary celebration, the main body of the church was re-decorated.

The grammar school was merged, in the Fall of 1972, with that of the neighboring parish - Our Lady of Mercy.

The people of St. John Cantius held a Recognition Night Banquet on December 30, 1972, for a beloved priest who had faithfully served them for a total of 28 years - seventeen as pastor. Father Szudarek was retiring to the position of Pastor Emeritus. Rev. Ralph A. Bodziony's appointment as pastor would become effective as of January 2, 1973. Then it was Father Bodziony's turn to be feted by his parish. Over 500 celebrants joined him at a banquet in his honor on the day of his official installation - January 28.

A parish that is still comprised of in some instances by parishioners of four generation of Polish-Americans, St. John Cantius is as active and vital as ever.

Because the Sisters of St. Joseph (Marymount) did not continue to staff the High School and did not reside at the Sisters' residence, the convent became inefficient to operate. The residence of the sisters was changed to a newly renovated convent opposite the High School. The former convent became the Matt Talbot Inn, a half-way house for recovering alcohol and substance abuse residents.

The merger of the Grade School with Our Lady of Mercy School lasted only a few years. In 1977, the Grade School was moved to the High School building. The former grade school building for a brief period of time housed a Spanish Day Center.

Changes which began in the neighborhood a couple of decades ago are now being addressed by a variety of neighborhood organizations. The Tremont West Development Corp. is renovating homes in the area to preserve the residential area, and has implemented plans for new housing by building its first new home in the area. Various area landmarks have been renovated into loft-type apartments. In 1987 discussions began for the sale of the former Grade School building to a Tremont area developer for renovation into loft-type apartments.

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE ARE NOW
From the handful of Catholics who once met in a car barn to the thriving parish celebrating Mass on weekdays and Saturdays, and three times on Sundays, in a beautiful spacious sanctuary of their own creation, it has been a long upward climb covering a period of 90 years. As the City changes and a building boom is revitalizing downtown Cleveland, also changes are beginning to take place in the neighborhood. Art related enterprises have begun to move into the area along with other businesses. The area has also become more attractive to some by its designation as a Historic Area due to its unique Architecture and Civil War connections.

Hopefully, the neglect and deterioration of former years is being replaced by a new spring for the former Lincoln Heights area. The outside world has changed beyond our founders' recognition; we must express appreciation and gratitude to them for their deep faith and foresight to the future from these humble beginnings. With an overwhelming debt of gratitude, we reflect on the accomplishments of our forefathers; with thankful pride, we point to the dedicated parishioners of today, with a renewed sense of commitment, we face a glorious future for the Parish of St. John Cantius.

1898 - 1908 ­ St. John Cantius ­ Professor at College, Rev. Hippolit Orlowski
1908 - 1917 ­ St. John Cantius ­ Professor at College, Rev. Francis Doppke
1917 - 1932 ­ St. John Cantius ­ Professor at College, Rev. Joseph P. Kocinski
1932 - 1939 - St. John Cantius - Rev. Marion Orzechowski
1939 - St. John Cantius - Rev. Francis Duda
???? - 1956 - St. John Cantius - Rev. Edward Gackowski
1956 - 1969 - St. John Cantius - Rev. Francis Szudarek
1969 - 1984 - St. John Cantius - Rev. Ralph Bodziony

ST. JOHN NEPOMUCENE (CZECH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
At the turn of the century, the Slavic Village area attracted Bohemian immigrants. They formed the St. Joseph Society and purchased property at the corner of Fleet and Raus Avenues. Father Francis Hroch was the first pastor. Ground was broken for a church on October 16, 1902 and the first mass was celebrated on February 7, 1903. The current church was dedicated in 1920. Today this church is located at 3785 Independence Road, Phone 216-641-8824

1902 - 1906 ­ St. John Nepomucene ­ Raus at Fleet, Rev. Francis J. Hroch
1908 - 1937 ­ St. John Nepomucene ­ E. 50th at Fleet, Rev. Francis J. Hroch
1937 ­ 1941 ­ St. John Nepomucene ­ E. 50th at Fleet, Rev. Albert Masat
1941 ­ 1962 ­ St. John Nepomucene ­ E. 50th at Fleet, Rev. Clarence Dik
1962 ­ 1964 ­ St. John Nepomucene ­ E. 50th at Fleet, Rev. Clarence Liederbach
1964 ­ 1975 ­ St. John Nepomucene ­ E. 50th at Fleet, Rev. Paul Plafcan
1975 - St. John Nepomucene ­ E. 50th at Fleet, Rev. William F. Tezie

1921 ­ St. John's (SLOVAK) ­ W. 11th near Kenilworth, Rev. J.Z. Jasinski

1924 - 1928 ­ St. John's (GREEK) ­ E. 22nd at Scovill, Rev. Stephen Gulyassy

ST. JOSAPHAT (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Father Albert Migdalski was appointed to serve the growing number of Polish-Catholics in the St. Clair ­ Superior area. This parish was originally called St. Hedwig, but because of another parish of the same name in Lakewood, the name was changed to St. Josaphat. The congregation purchased three lots in 1911 for a pastoral residence and school. Construction was begun in 1915 on St. Josaphat Church. The project was stalled due to arguments over funding and the Influenza Epidemic of 1918. Today this church is located at 1411 E. 33rd Street, Phone 216-579-0173

1908 ­ St. Josephat ­ Rev. Albert Migdalski
1913 - 1918 ­ St. Josephat ­ 1411 E. 33rd, Rev. Jos. Kocinski
1918 - 1924 ­ St. Josephat ­ 1411 E. 33rd, Rev. J. Spanowski
1928 - 1931 ­ St. Josaphat - 1431 E. 33rd, Rev. Joseph Spanowski
1931 - 1937 ­ Rev. Stanislaus Rybacki
1937 ­ 1948 ­ Rev. Joseph Kocinski
1948 - ???? ­ Rev. Joseph Napierkowski
???? ­ Rev. Stanislaus Ciolek
???? ­ Rev. Thaddeus Michalski
1987 - 1995 ­ Rev. James Gettig
1995 ­ Rev. David Novak

 

ST. JOSEPH'S
From: Jubilee Edition of Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902
The first beginnings of St. Joseph's, located on Woodland Avenue and Chapel Street, dates back to 1855. In that year, some distance from the church, a Catholic school was opened called St. Bernard's School on the east side of Irving Street. In 1857 the school was moved to Orange and Irving Street. Here Pastor Luhr bought a lot. A frame building was located there for school purposes, then it was later used as a church. This church was called St. Bernard's Church and was a mission of St. Peter's. In summer, 1862, St. Bernard's Mission was elevated from an autonomous congregation, and the Most Reverend Ant. Krasney took office in August 1862 as the first parish priest. An effort was made to obtain another property and it was found at Kinsman (now Woodland Avenue) and Chapel Street. It was purchased in September, 1862. Construction was begun. The cornerstone was laid in 1862 and St. Joseph was taken as patron of the new church, so the church is known as St. Joseph's. Pastor Krasney had become pastor of the Bohemian St. Stanislas and in the meantime, Reverend H.D. Best took over. The church became too small, and eight lots were purchased on Chapel Street between Hazen and Creighton Streets. These were purchased for the monastery or for the church. At the same time as construction was begun on the new church, the minister Pater Capistran was recalled, and on August 31, 871 Father Kilian Schlosser was named pastor of St. Joseph's. The church was consecrated on October 5, 1873. On Father Kilian's initiative, St. Alexis Hospital was established in 1884. On July 15, 1885 Father Kilian was transferred to Chicago. Father Alardus Andrescheck, was not pastor. He was succeeded on July 25, 1888 by Father Theodorus Arentz. Father Arentz remained until summer, 1897 and was replaced by Father Benignus Schuetz. He was pastor for three years. Since September, 1900, Father Bernard Wewer has been pastor.

From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
By the early 1980's, the diocese was providing an annual financial subsidy to St. Joseph. Major repairs were needed to the church as well. With declining numbers, the Franciscans could no longer provide a full-time pastor. The Parish Council, Franciscan community and the Diocese agreed on closing the parish. A final Mass was said on September 17, 1986. Church furnishings, statuary, and stained glass windows were removed. On February 15, 1993, the church was gutted by fire.

1862 - 1868 ­ St. Joseph ­ Kinsman and Chapel, Rev. H.D. Best
1868 - 1871 ­ St. Joseph, corner Chapel and Hazen, Rev. Capistran Zwinge
1871 ­ 1885 ­ St. Joseph, Chapel and Hazen, Rev. Killian Schlosser
1885 - 1888 ­ St. Joseph, Woodland and Chapel, Rev. Alardus Andrescheck
1888 - 1897 ­ St. Joseph ­ Woodland at Chapel, Rev. Theodore Arentz
1897 ­ 1900 ­ St. Joseph ­ Woodland at Chapel, Rev. Benignus Schutz
1900 - 1906 ­ St. Joseph - Woodland at Chapel, Rev. Bernard Wewer
1908 ­ St. Joseph ­ Woodland at E. 23rd, Rev. Francis Haase
1913 - 1924 ­ St. Joseph ­ Woodland at E. 23rd, Rev. Polycarp Rhode
1928 ­ St. Joseph ­ Woodland at E. 23rd, Rev. Flavius Kraus

1908 ­ St. Joseph's ­ Manchester at Collins, Rev. John W. Bell
1913 - 1921 ­ St. Joseph's ­ Saranac at Aspinwall, Rev. John W. Bell
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Joseph's ­ E. 144th at St. Clair, Rev. John Bell

1924 ­ St. Joseph (GREEK) ­ 9400 Orleans, Rev. Victor Mirossay
1928 ­ St. Joseph ­ 9417 Orleans, Rev. Thomas Sabow

 

ST. LADISLAS (SLOVAK)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The first Slovak Church in Cleveland was a Catholic one ­ St. Ladislas Church. It was founded in 1885 at Corwin (now E. 92nd Street) and Holton Avenues in the Buckeye area. It remained until 1971. There had been talk of closing it when a fire destroyed the church in 1970. The remaining buildings were sold to another denomination, and a new St. Ladislas was built in Westlake. Today this church is located at 2345 Bassett Road, Phone 440-835-2300

1890 ­ St. Ladislas ­ Corwin at Holton, Rev. John Martvon
1894 ­ St. Ladislas ­ Corwin at Holton, Rev. W.A. Panuska
1898 - 1902 ­ St. Ladislas ­ Corwin at Holton, Rev. Peter Cerveny
1904 - 1907 ­ St. Ladislas ­ Corwin at Holton, Rev. John Svozil
1908 ­ St. Ladislas ­ E. 92nd near Holton, Rev. John Svozil
1907 - 1942 ­ St. Ladislas ­ E. 92nd near Holton, Rev. Ladislav Necid

ST. LAWRENCE (SLOVENIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Slovenian immigrants arrived in Cleveland during the 1880's. They settled in the Newburgh neighborhood bounded by E. 80th, 81st, 82nd, Marble and Burke Streets. They first attended Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes and then later at St. Vitus. They founded St. Lawrence Catholic Church in 1901 and Father Francis Kerze was the founding pastor.
The first mass was held on December 11, 1901. The cornerstone for the church was laid on May 11, 1902. Work was begun on a permanent church in 1923. Finances only allowed them to built the basement and this served as the church until 1940 when the present church was constructed. Today this church is located at 3547 E. 80th Street, Phone 216-341-0496

1901 - 1906 ­ St. Lawrence, Rural near Union, Rev. Francis Kerze
1907 - 1908 ­ St. Lawrence, E. 81st near Union, Rev. Francis Kerze
1909 - 1915 ­ St. Lawrence, E. 81st near Union, Rev. Joseph Lavric
1915 - 1962 ­ St. Lawrence, 3510 E. 81st, Rev. John Oman
1962 ­ 1968 ­ St. Lawrence, 3510 E. 81st, Rev. Francis Baraga
1968 ­ 1979 ­ St. Lawrence, 3510 E. 81st, Rev. Joseph Varga
1979 ­ 1997 ­ St. Lawrence, 3510 E. 81st, Rev. Anthony Rebol

ST. MALACHI (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Malachi is located at 2459 Washington Avenue just north of W. 25th Street at the west end of the old Superior Viaduct and was established in 1865. Because of its location near Lake Erie, it was considered to be the "port" church, and the cross on its steeple was illuminated to guide ships into the harbor. It was founded to serve the Irish immigrants of the "Old Angle". The first Mass was celebrated on November 13, 1865 at St. Mary's of the Flats. The cornerstone for the church was laid in 1867 and the first Mass there was on Christmas, 1868. On December 22, 1943, the newly-renovated church burned down. The people of Saint Malachi were determined to rebuild. The new cornerstone was dedicated on June 29, 1947. Today this church is located at 2459 Washington Avenue, Phone 216-861-5343

1865-1902 ­ St. Malachi ­ Washington and Pearl, Rev. James P. Maloney
1906 ­ St. Malachi ­ Washington and Pearl, Rev. John McHale
1908 - 1913 ­ St. Malachi ­ Washington near W. 25th, Rev. John McHale
1918 - 1928 ­ St. Malachi ­ Washington near W. 25th, Rev. J. McInerney

1924 ­ St. Margaret (HUNGARIAN) ­ 2919 E. 116th, Rev. Ernest Rickert
1928 ­ St. Margaret ­ 2919 E. 116th, Rev. Andrew Koller

ST. MARIAN (ITALIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Until 1905, all the Italian speaking people who lived east of E. 55th Street looked to Holy Rosary Church on Mayfield Road as their Church. In 1905 a group living in the neighborhood of Cedar Avenue and Fairmount Road acquired property at 2200 Woodhill Road to build a church dedicated to SS. Marian and James. By 1953 the parish had only one hundred families. Father Francis Valentini was assigned as administrator in 1967. He found an empty convent, an empty school and little parochial life remaining. The decision was made to close the parish in the Spring of 1975 and the final mass was on September 20, 1975.

1908 - 1920 ­ St. Marian ­ Woodhill at Fairmount, Rev. Angelieus Idone
1921 ­ St. Mariano ­ Woodhill at Fairmount, Rev. James Matturo
1922 - 1928 ­ St. Marian ­ 2200 Woodhill, Rev. Joseph Trivisonno
1943 ­ Rev. Francis Cacciacarro

 

1924 ­ St. Maron's (SYRIAN) ­ 2210 E. 21st, Rev. Louis Zouain
1928 ­ St. Maron's ­ 2210 E. 21st, Rev. Joseph Komald

ST. MARTIN (SLOVAK)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The second parish for the Slovak Catholics ­ St. Martin, was established in 1893 on E. 25th Street near Woodland. Services were initially held in a church building purchased from an Evangelical Lutheran congregation, but then it was sold and a bigger, grander St. Martin's was constructed nearby. Unfortunately, however, what was once considered the most beautiful Slovak church in the United States was demolished circa late 1960. The State of Ohio bought the entire St. Martin property when it was erecting the freeway.

1893 - 1896 ­ St. Martin ­ 35 Henry, Rev. Wenceslas Panuska
1896 - 1899 ­ St. Martin ­ 35 Henry, Rev. Aloysius Kollar
1899 - 1906 ­ St. Martin ­ Chapel near Scovill, Rev. Wenceslaus Horak
1907 - 1946 ­ St. Martin ­ E. 23rd near Scovill, Rev. Wenceslas Horak
1947 ­ 1956 ­ St. Martin ­ E. 23rd near Scovill, Rev. Michael Hnat

1869-1870 ­ St. Mary (BOHEMIAN) ­ Columbus and Girard, Rev. Gontyn
1871 ­ St. Mary Church (FRENCH) ­ Columbus and Girard, Rev. A. Sauvadet
1874 ­ St. Mary (BOHEMIAN) ­ Columbus and Girard, Rev. Anthony Hynek
1877 ­ St. Mary Church (POLISH) ­ Columbus and Girard, Rev. Victor Zirechney
1879 ­ St. Mary Church (POLISH) ­ Columbus and Girard, Rev. F. Marshall

 

ST. MARY'S ON THE FLATS
It was 1825, at the time when the construction of the Ohio Canal was begun, and the city numbered about 500, when the first Catholics, a number of Irish workers seeking employment with the canal, arrived here. The next year the first priest arrived in Cleveland, Thomas Martin. The foundation for the first Catholic Church in our city was laid by Father John Dillon who was sent here in 1835. He felt victim to a bilious fever which killed him on October 16, 1836 at the age of only 29. In September 1837, the priest Patrick O'Dwyer was sent to Cleveland. A few days after Father O'Dwyer's arrival, on October 24, 1837, messrs. James S. Clarke, Richard Hilliard and Edmund Clark transferred through a land contract the building lots 218 and 219 in "Cleveland Centre" to the bishop of Cincinnati as trustee for the "Roman Catholic Society of Our Beloved Lady of the Lake" of Cleveland, with the condition that the society build an adequate frame structure for public divine services and afterwards regularly holds services there. It was further stipulated that this property would remain the property of the said society as long as it was used for this purpose, or as long as this society owned property within "Cleveland Centre" and operated a church and held regular services in it.
Father O'Dwyer went to work right away to increase the building fund established by his predecessor and to undertake the construction of the church. A few months later the rough construction was complete but the building could not be completed due to lack of funds. In the meantime disputes had arisen within the congregation which were partly due to nationalism. Father O'Dwyer was removed for that reason. The church stood unfinished for months until Bishop Purcell came to Cleveland in September, 1839. He managed to get the church to the point where a mass could be read there for the first time in October of 1839. The consecration took place on June 7, 1840. This church was named "The Church of Our Beloved Lady of the Lake".

This church served all Catholics of the city of Cleveland until 1852. In October, 1840, the priest Peter McLaughlin was named minister at St. Mary's. Since he understood German to some extent, he could meet the needs of his "mixed congregation", which consisted largely of German immigrants. With the intention of moving the church to the higher and better parts of the city, Father McLaughlin bought four lots from Thom. May at the corner of Superior and Erie Street, where the cathedral now stands. Critics accused Father McLaughlin of buying land "out in the country". Erie Street was then the eastern limit of settled city. Tired of harassment, Father McLaughlin asked his bishop to relieve him of his position in St. Mary's. His request was honored and he took his leave in February, 1846. His successor was Father Mauritius Howard. In January, 1848, the priest Louis deGoesbriand was named Father Howard's successor. From October 1847, to November 6, 1852, St. Mary's in the Flats, the sole Catholic church in Cleveland, was the first cathedral of the diocese. On the latter date the present cathedral at the corner of Superior and Erie was dedicated. St. Mary's was left to the German Catholics, who were served by Father N. Roupp until the arrival of Johann H. Luhr in February, 1853. Father Luhr was the first residential parish priest of the Germans in Cleveland. After the formation of St. Peter's and Assumption of Mary churches, Monsignor Boff celebrated high mass on Three Kings, 1886, at the direction of the bishop in the decaying church, which had been used since 1879. This was done to prevent repossession of the church by the descendents of the donors as a result of the contractual conditions which they had already raised. Collections were taken to set the church in good order, but they did not amount to much. The heirs of the donors turned to the courts. There was a compromise in which the lot was to be sold and the proceeds split between the diocese and the heirs. This church was torn down in September of 1888.

Spawning from St. Mary's Church in the Flats were St. Peters and Assumption of Mary.

1835 - 1836 - St. Mary's on the Flats - Rev. John Dillon
1837 - 1840 - St. Mary's on the Flats - Rev. Patrick O'Dwyer
1840 - 1846 - St. Mary's on the Flats - Rev. Peter McLaughlin
1846 - 1848 - St. Mary's on the Flats - Rev. Maurice Howard
1847 - 1852 - St. Mary's on the Flats - Rev. Louis deGoesbriand

ST. MARY'S ON THE FLATS RENAMED ST. MARY'S OF THE ASSUMPTION
From: Jubilee Edition of Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902
Germans living west of the river became a congregation of their own in November, 1854, with the name of "Assumption of Mary" using the church in the Flats until the completion of their own church at the corner of Carroll and Jersey Streets in 1865. This is the oldest German Catholic church on the West Side. It was organized in 1854. The first minister was Rev. J.J. Kraemer. In 1857 Rev. F.X. Obermueller became Kraemer's successor and served the congregation until 1861. Under Rev. Stephan Falk, who was pastor from 1862 to 1880, the congregation built a church of their own. At the corner of Jersey and Carroll Street they obtained a lot and in September, 1863, construction began. It was consecrated on September 13, 1865. Father Michael Zollner was the next parish priest. Father Ignatius Korling was chaplain and in 1881 a second assistant was given in the person of Heinrich Wochner. In 1884 Father Wilhelm Pakisch was another assistant. After Father Zollner left, Father Neusich was made his successor. He held office until 1894. The present minister is Victor Scheppach who entered office on June 15, 1894.

From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
German immigration had peaked by the turn of the century. Immigrants from other nations had moved into the Near West Side, leading to St. Wendelin Parish in 1903 and St. Emeric Parish in 1904. By 1929, St. Mary was losing population. In 1944, St. Ignatius High School took over unused rooms in St. Mary's School. In 1945 St. Mary students were transferred to St. Patrick School. Bishop Hoban conceived a process of assimilating St. Mary's into St. Patrick. On October 18, 1945, Father Francis Callan was appointed pastor of both St. Patrick and St. Mary. The last public services at St. Mary Church were on February 11, 1959. In May 1959, the deed to St. Mary's was transferred to St. Ignatius High School. The church was demolished in 1968 to erect a science center.

1853 - 1856 - St. Mary's Assumption - Rev. Henry Luhr
1854 - 1857 - St. Mary's Assumption - Rev. Louis Kramer
1857 - 1861 - St. Mary's Assumption - Rev. Francis Obermueller
1861 - 1862 - St. Mary's Assumption - Rev. Hammer
1862 - 1870 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ Carroll and Jersey Sts., Rev. Stephen Falk
1871 - 1880 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ Jersey and Carroll, Rev. Stephen Falk
1880 - 1887 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ Jersey and Carroll, Rev. Michael Zoeller
1891 - 1894 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ Jersey and Carroll, Rev. John Neustich
1894 - 1902 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ Jersey and Carroll, Rev. Victor Scheppach
1906 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ Jersey and Carroll, Rev. Anthony Hartmann
1908 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ W. 30th at Carroll, Rev. Anthony Hartmann
1909 - 1910 - St. Mary's Assumption - W. 30th at Carroll, Rev. Andrew Smrekar
1913 - 1921 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ W. 30th at Carroll, Rev. Rudolph Meschenmoser
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Mary's Assumption ­ W. 30th at Carroll, Rev. Augustine Hackert

1908 ­ St. Mary's of the Assumption (SLOVENIAN) ­ Crosby near Case, Rev. Mark Paklz
1913 ­ St. Mary's of the Assumption ­ 15519 Holmes Ave., Rev. Andrew Sturekar
1918 ­ St. Mary's of the Assumption ­ 15519 Holmes, Rev. Paul Hribar
1921 ­ St. Mary's of the Assumption ­ 15519 Holmes, Rev. Joseph Skur
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Mary's of the Assumption ­ 15519 Holmes, Rev. Vitus Hribar

1877 - 1883 ­ St. Mary's of the Holy Rosary ­ Gaylord and Miles Park, Rev. Joseph Gallagher

1906 ­ St. Mary's of the Nativity (SLOVAK) ­ 670 Aetna, Rev. Ladislav Necid
1908 ­ St. Mary's of the Nativity ­ 9126 Aetna, Rev. Ladislas Necid
1913 - 1918 ­ Nativity ­ 9614 Aetna, Rev. Chaloupka
1928 ­ Nativity ­ 9600 Aetna, Rev. Vaclav Chaloupka

ST. MICHAEL'S (GERMAN) (1889)
3114 Scranton Rd.
216-861-6297

From The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History:
Large German immigrations in 1881 made necessary the establishment of a school as the first unit of a new parish at the corner of Scranton Road and Clark Ave. In July, 1881, a lot at the northwest corner of Scranton and Clark Avenues was bought, and 3/4's of the purchase price was paid by St. Mary's Church. In the autumn of that year a two-room frame school house was erected. Mass was celebrated at a temporary altar in one of the rooms. The Rev. Joseph M. Koudelka was the first pastor and placed the parish under the patronage of St. Michael the Archangel. In January, 1882, the school was opened with 155 children in charge of two Notre Dame Sisters. In 1883 a small frame house was built for the pastor. In March 1884 a larger property on the southwest corner of Scranton and Clark was secured for $5,600 and on June 19, 1888 ground was broken for the present church. The exterior was completed in 1888 and it was decided to do no further building until the current indebtedness had been reduced. The church was completed in 1890. A fire in 1891 almost entirely destroyed the frame church and school built 8 years before. A temporary altar and pews were placed in the still uncompleted new church and the first Mass was said 5 years ahead of the time planned. The present church was dedicated on November 20, 1892. The convent was built in 1905 and the large school was finished the next year. The present pastor is the Rev. John F. Gruss who has served since 1964.

A German congregation built the magnificent St. Michael's Church in 1888. This nationally-recognized High Style Gothic Revival structure features an imposing exterior and an impressive sanctuary. The original buff-colored rubble stone has darkened with age. This exquisite church is furnished with over 50 polychrome statues imported from Germany. The altar is modeled after the altar of the Church of St. Francis in Borgo, Italy. The main bell tower soars to 232 feet making St. Michaels one of the most distinctive churches in Cleveland. Architect: Adolph Druiding. It caters to the multicultural population, conducting services in English and Spanish.

From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Prior to the 1880's the south side of Cleveland (now the Tremont and Clark-Fulton area) had very few Catholic German immigrants residing there. An influx of German Catholics from West Prussia, Kreisen, Marienburg and Danzig changed that. They worshipped at St. Mary Church on Carroll Avenue or St. Joseph Franciscan Church on Woodland Avenue. Some were dismayed at the distance their children would travel to reach the parish schools so they approached the pastor of St. Mary's, Father Michael Zoeller, S.J. for advice on starting a German Catholic school for the children of the south side. Armed with petitions and pledges of financial support, the committee and Father Zoeller met with Bishop Gilmour, The Bishop approved the plan and a frame school building was constructed on the corner of Clark Avenue and Scranton Road. Father Zoeller secured the services of the Notre Dame Sisters for the school. Two sisters, Sister Mary Florentine, and Sister Mary Eusoebia welcomed 155 students on January 12, 1882, the first day of school. Realizing that the very old and very young had difficulty traveling to the German churches, Father Zoeller began saying Mass in the school building. Even though the German Catholics of the south side now had regular church services, a school, and property, they were still a mission of St. Mary Parish. On July 15, 1883, Bishop Gilmour granted them parochial status when he named Father Joseph Mary Koudelka, the first pastor of the new congregation. The parish was placed under the patronage of Saint Michael the Archangel. Father Koudelka was Bohemian by birth and quite young (only 31 years), but he was enthusiastically welcomed by his congregation. The combination church school building was decorated for church services and blessed by Bishop Gilmour on October 21, 1883. Father Koudelka believed in an active Catholic laity. He saw organizations as a means of deepening the spiritual and communal life of the parish. He organized the St. Ann Christian Mothers' Organization and the St. Michael Sickness and Death Benefit Society and sodalities for the young. The rapid growth of the parish necessitated a new building. Property was purchased on Clark Ave. across from the school building. Work was begun and the cornerstone laid on July 7, 1889. The plans called for an imposing Victorian Gothic structure with three life size statues of angels over the front entrance. Disaster struck when a fire burned the combination church-school building on June 29, 1891 and forced the congregation to use the partially finished church. Father Koudelka personally supervised the work. Besides being a writer and linguist, he was an artist and he designed the interior of the church. The elaborate wood carving, the imposing altars, the imported German stained glass and stations of the cross gave the church a distinguished place among Cleveland's congregations. Bishop Ignatius Horstmann alluded to this when he dedicated the church on November 20, 1892. The parish needed a new school. Emil Uhlrich designed the building and work was begun in 1906. This massive building would house both a grade school and high school (established in 1909). One of the proudest moments in the history of the parish occurred on February 25, 1908 when Rev. Koudelka was consecrated the first Auxiliary Bishop of Cleveland. His successor, Father Joseph B. Paulus served for only two years when Father John A. Schaffeld was given charge of the parish. The parish still retained a strong German identity, but its younger parishioners saw themselves as American. In 1925 English hymns were introduced in the church liturgy. In 1943 the Notre Dame Sisters established a four year high school program. In May of that year Father Schaffeld died and Father Roman Bacher became the pastor. In 1944 he convened a group of male parishioners and the parish Holy Name Society was established. By the 1940's slightly over one quarter of the parishioners were German. Bishop Edward Hoban agreed that it was time to make St. Michael a territorial parish rather than a nationality parish. Father Bacher also had building projects: a new rectory was built in 1949 and a convent constructed in 1955. Father Bacher died on January 15, 1964 and was succeeded by Father John Gruss. Father Gruss recognized that many Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics were moving into the neighborhood and established a ministry to them at St. Michael. In 1969 the parish high school, which had been under the direction of the Notre Dame Sisters, merged with three other Cleveland Catholic high schools to become Cleveland Central Catholic. The building was renovated, but the parish lost its hall area. The parishioners met and raised the funds to buy property and construct Gruss Hall which was completed in 1970. In 1975 Father Gruss retired and was succeeded by Father Richard Ziegler whose pastorate was cut short by illness. In 1980 Father Dennis O'Grady became pastor. In the mid-1980's the Notre Dame Sisters proposed the merger of the parish schools of St. Boniface, St. Michael, and St. Stephen. The parishes accepted the plan and Metro Catholic School was opened in September of 1988. The educational programs were centralized at St. Stephen and St. Boniface schools, so Cleveland Central Catholic was able to take over the entire St. Michael building.

From Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902:
Through 1880 the southwestern part of Cleveland was only lightly populated, and most of this belonged to St. Mary's on Jersey Street. The heavy immigration from Germany which followed brought so many to that part of the city that the desire was expressed for a German parish school. The project was supported by Father Zoeller, then minister of St. Mary's, and on April 16, 1881 permission was given by the bishop to establish not only a school but also a congregation. In summer, 1881 a lot was purchased at the corner of Scranton and Clark Avenue. In the autumn, a frame building was built on the site consisting of two schoolrooms. Father Zoeller had a small alter placed in the school room. The building became too small and another two-story building of respectable dimensions was planned. The upper story was to be dedicated to divine services. The young congregation received a minister of its own on July 15, 1883 in the person of Rev. Joseph Maria Koudelka. The two-story church and school house were first consecrated on October 21, 1883. In the years immediately following it was decided that a larger church would have to be built in a few years. In March, 1884 a lot was purchased across from its previous property, at the corner of Clark and Scranton for the building of a future great church. In the meantime, a temporary schoolhouse was put up. In 1897 another schoolroom was built so that now there were seven large classrooms in which 234 boys and 227 girls received instruction.

The steadily growing congregation now decided to approach the church project. On June 19, 1988 the excavation of the foundation was begun. In this year the foundation alone was completed. Early the next year the other contracts were given out. On April 7, 1889 the cornerstone was laid. In 1890 the towers were built and the roof covered with tiles. A colossal figure of the Archangel Michael, patron of the congregation, was placed on the forward gable. Two other life-sized statues decorate the front façade ­ the archangels Gabriel and Raphael. During the winter months the interior work was done. It was the intention of the congregation only to do each year what their money permitted. It was hoped that they could complete the church by 1893, but on June 29, 1891, early in the morning, the old church and school burned down with all its contents. The new church was at once equipped for divine service though it was still unfinished. At the start of March, 1892, the work was advanced to allow the scaffolding to be taken out of the church. Finally on November 20, 1892, the church was consecrated.

1883 - 1911 ­ St. Michael ­ Scranton at Clark, Rev. Joseph Koudelka
1886 - St. Michael - Scranton at Clark, Rev. George Schoenman
1895 - St. Michael - Scranton at Clark, Rev. Ludwig Herberth
1902 - 1911 - St. Michael - Scranton at Clark, Rev. August Brieg
1911 - 1913 ­ St. Michael ­ Scranton at Clark, Rev. J.M. Paulus
1913 - 1943 ­ St. Michael ­ Scranton at Clark, Rev. J.A. Schaffeld
1943 - 1964 - St. Michael - Scranton at Clark, Rev. Roman Bacher
1964 - 1975 - St. Michael - Scranton at Clark, Rev. John Gruss
1975 - St. Michael - Scranton at Clark, Rev. Richard Ziegler

1906 ­ St. Nicholas (CROATIAN) ­ St. Clair near Lyman, Rev. Maxim Relic
1921 ­ St. Nicholas ­ Superior at E. 36th
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Nicholas ­ Superior at E. 36th, Rev. Milan Hranilovich

ST. PATRICK'S (IRISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Patrick is currently located at 3602 Bridge Avenue. It was founded July 2, 1853 and the parishioners built a church on Whitman Avenue. As the church became too small, property was purchased on Bridge Avenue. Ground was broken in 1870, the cornerstone was set in 1871, and the church was occupied for worship on May 1, 1873. The church was finally completed and consecrated on March 17, 1931.

1854 - 1877 ­ St. Patrick ­ Whitman St. near Kentucky, Rev. James Conlan
1877 - 1879 ­ St. Patrick ­ Whitman near Kentucky, Rev. E.M. O'Callaghan
1883 - 1887 ­ St. Patrick ­ Bridge near Fulton, Rev. T.M. Mahoney
1891 - 1894 ­ St. Patrick ­ Bridge near Fulton, Rev. Patrick O'Brien
1898 ­ St. Patrick ­ Bridge near Fulton, Rev. James O'Leary
1902 - 1924 ­ St. Patrick ­ Bridge near Fulton, Rev. Francis T. Moran
1928 ­ St. Patrick ­ Bridge near Fulton, Rev. John Kenny

1924 - 1928 ­ St. Patrick (IRISH) ­ 4427 Rocky River Dr., Rev. Edward Calvey

ST. PAUL (CROATIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Paul is the only church serving Latin Rite Croatians in Cleveland. The Croatians first worshipped at St. Vitus Church. In 1901, land was purchased on E. 40th Street near St. Clair. In 1902, Rev. Milan Sutlic became the first pastor. The cornerstone for a new church was laid in 1903 and on Easter Sunday, 1904 the first Mass was celebrated.

1904 ­ 1906 ­ St. Paul ­ Case near St. Clair, Rev. Milan Sutlic
1906 - 1907 - St. Paul ­ Case near St. Clair, Rev. Nicholas Griskovic
1908 - 1917 ­ St. Paul ­ E. 40th near St. Clair, Rev. Nicholas Griskovic
1917 - 1937 ­ St. Paul ­ E. 40th near St. Clair, Rev. M.C. Domladovic
1937 ­ 1965 ­ St. Paul ­ E. 40th near St. Clair, Rev. Joseph Misich
1965 ­ 1986 ­ St. Paul ­ E. 40th near St. Clair, Rev. Stephen Mrakuzic
1986 ­ 1987 ­ St. Paul ­ E. 40th near St. Clair, Rev. John Mueller
1987 - ???? ­ St. Paul ­ E. 40th near St. Clair, Rev. Mirko Hladni

ST. PETER (GERMAN)
From: Jubilee Edition of Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902
Since St. Mary's was inconvenient for many German catholics, who were scattered over the city, Father Luhr proposed that those living east of the river should have their own church. A lot was purchased at Superior Street and Dodge Street. In this way, St. Peter's Church came into being. The congregation is the oldest German Catholic church in the metropolis of the state of Ohio. It was established on February 17, 1853. On March 10, 1854, St. Peter's obtained a large lot on Superior and Dodge Streets, on which they built a school and small church. On August 17, 1857 the cornerstone to the present St. Peter's Chruch was laid. Pastor Luhr resigned in 1868. He was succeeded by Pastor Francis Allen Westerholt. He died on November 20, 1896 and Nicolaus Pfeil was his successor. He came to Cleveland on June 6, 1897 from Avon, where he had led the Trinity Parish. Properties were purchased on January 16, 1900 on Superior and Huntington Street for future expansion. Pastor Pfeil is a child of Cleveland. He is the son of our treasured fellow citizen, Lorenz Pfeil, who is now 82 years old. He came from the Tauber Valley in Baden in 1847. Pastor Pfeil was born in 1859, attending St. Mary's school, then the St. Stephan's parish school before studying in Canisius College of the Jesuits in Buffalo, which he graduated in 1878. On July 1, 1883 he was consecrated a priest. Today this church is located at 1533 E. 17th Street, Phone 216-861-1798

1847 - 1869 - St. Peter (GERMAN) - Superior and Dodge Streets, Rev. Anthony Krasny
1853 - 1868 - St. Peter - Superior and Dodge, Rev. John Luhr
1868 - 1896 ­ St. Peter ­ Superior and Dodge Streets, Rev. Francis Allen Westerholt
1877 - 1879 ­ St. Peter ­ Superior and Dodge, Rev. T. Litterst
1883 - 1894 ­ St. Peter ­ Dodge and Superior, Rev. F. Westerholt
1896 - 1907 ­ St. Peter ­ Dodge and Superior, Rev. Nicholas Pfeil
1908 - 1935 ­ St. Peter ­ Superior at E. 17th, Rev. Nicholas Pfeil
1936 - 1940 - St. Peter - Superior at E. 17th, Rev. George Koob
1940 - 1945 - St. Peter - Superior at E. 17th, Rev. George Dennerie
1945 - 1975 - St. Peter - Superior at E. 17th, Rev. Jerome Schneider
1975 - St. Peter - Superior at E. 17th, Rev. Richard Byrne

SS. PETER AND PAUL (UKRAINIAN)
2280 West 7th Street at corner of College
216-861-2176

From the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History:
The congregation of SS. Peter and Paul Church was formed when Ukrainian Byzantine Rite Catholics from Galicia withdrew from St. John The Baptist Byzantine Rite Cathedral over nationality differences. The parish was founded in 1902 and a church built in 1910 at W. 7th and College streets in Tremont near a large Ukrainian settlement. Rev. Wolodymyr Dowhowycz was the first pastor. The church, on a sloping site, was built in the Byzantine style of yellow brick and featured a single central tower topped by an onion dome. The architect was Stephen Paliwoda. The Eastern cross is used and the interior of the church is laid out in traditional Eastern Orthodox form. Look for statues of St. Vladimir and St. Olga. The ceiling is decorated with an icon of the Holy Mother surrounded by Ukrainians in traditional dress. The most obvious Orthodox influence is the icon screen or iconostas in the sanctuary of the church. Stained glass windows commemorating the Millennium of Ukrainian Christianity were added in 1978.

The church took an active role in the community, sponsoring drama productions, organizing literacy drives for adults, and conducting Ukrainian language classes. In 1943 the church was renovated and redecorated, including the addition of a set of murals depicting scenes in the life of Christ. Rapid growth took place after World War II, under the pastorate of Rev. Dmytro Gresko. In 1947 an all-day parish school was started on State Rd. in Parma, the first parish school for Ukrainian Catholics in the Diocese. A new convent was built in 1953. In 195657 major renovations to the interior and exterior of the church took place. On the exterior, the onion dome was converted to a bell tower and the steps were reworked. SS. Peter and Paul is considered the mother church of 3 parishes: St. Mary's in Solon (originally on Kinsman), St. Josaphat's in Parma, and St. Andrews in Parma. The church retained its Ukrainian identity in the 1990s, and in 1995 had a membership of 150 families.
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RUSSIANS. Cleveland's Great Russian community has never been very large. Even in the 1980s, it was difficult to accurately estimate the number of Great Russians in the area, because many ethnic groups, such as the Belarusians and Carpatho-Russians, have derived from regions under the control of Tsarist Russia or the Soviet Union and have thus been enumerated as Russians or are popularly considered Russians by the general populace. Even the city's preeminent "Russian" symbol, St. Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral, was built not by Great Russians but by Carpatho-Russians. Indeed, in the 1980s all of the Russian Orthodox churches in the region had mixed congregations that probably included Great Russians. Great Russians began arriving in the city in small numbers during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Those who came before World War I were largely political refugees, often of a radical bent, who were at odds with the tsarist government. Following the Russian Revolution of 1917, the nature of Russian immigration to Cleveland reversed entirely as former supporters of the tsar came to constitute the major portion of the local Great Russian immigration. Even with the impetus of the revolution, the city's Russian community is estimated to have consisted of only 5,000 persons at most by 1932.

No real Great Russian neighborhood evolved in Cleveland, although a small community could be found near E. 30th and Woodland Ave. by 1912. Its focal point was the radical Russian Workingman's Club. The tendency of the Russians to scatter throughout the community was strengthened by the nature of the post revolutionary immigrants, who tended to be skilled and highly literate and therefore able to assume employment and residence in various sections of the city. Organizations within the new group of immigrants were few. Some did gather at Hiram House social settlement. A Russian Circle was begun at the Intl. Institute of the YWCA in the 1930s; the 64 Russians enrolled at the YWCA lived in areas as diverse as Lakewood, Parma, and Cleveland Heights. In the 1930s, the city did have a branch of the liberal national organization the Russians Consolidated Union of Mutual Aid. Several local organizations started by the Soviet Union in Cleveland during the 1930s, including the Friends of the Soviet Union at E. 55th and Euclid and the Russian American Institute in the Erie Bldg., may have appeared Russian to the general onlooker, but they failed to garner any membership from the local Russian community. Instead, they, like the radical Ukrainian Labor Temple in the Tremont area, tended to attract American radicals or those from ethnic groups such as the Hungarians and Ukrainians. Given the difficulty of emigration from the Soviet Union, Cleveland's Great Russian population received little replenishment until the 1970s, when, by virtue of international pressure and agreements between the USSR and U.S., a number of Russian Jews migrated to the U.S. and to Cleveland. Many of them took up residence in the Jewish community of Cleveland Hts. and, because of their numbers and language, formed what could be considered a Russian-speaking community, with much of its activity centered in the Coventry Village Business District. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, a renewed immigration began from all areas of the former communist state. This led to an increased flow of Russians of all faiths, Jewish, Orthodox, and Protestant, to cities such as Cleveland. As of this writing, the nature of the Russian population of Cleveland continues to evolve and that population is now larger than at any time in the city's past. Over 1,300 people of Russian birth lived in Cleveland and Cleveland Heights in 1990 while over 30,000 local residents claimed Russian as their primary ancestry in the census of that year.

Catholic Universe 9/6/1912:
SS. Peter and Paul's Ruthenian Church on the West Side
Leader among the congregations which are affiliated with Rome, but which use the separate and authorized Ruthenian form of service - have fine property with good parochial residence and church which was dedicated this summer - Father Dobrotwor a leader who is carrying his people forward splendidly.

In all probability the most widely known of the churches in the city of Cleveland which celebrate the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass in other than the Latin rite, is that under the patronage of SS Peter and Paul, located at West 7th St. and College Ave. It was dedicated a few weeks ago. The occasion was a memorable one, the Rt. Rev. Stephen Soter Ortynsky, D.D. Bishop of the Catholic Ruthenians in the U.S., was here as the officiating prelate. The pastor, Rev. Demetrius Dobrotwor has been in Cleveland for a little more than a year. The Ruthenian Catholics are an entirely separate division of the Church from the Greek Uniats, although their service is more closely knit in form to the Greek Uniat than the Latin rite. SS Peter and Paul is a young parish, having scarcely half a decade to its chronological credit. Father Dobrotwor succeeded a former pastor, Rev. Vladimir Dovhovych, now of Buffalo, just one year ago yesterday, the 5th of September, 1911. The site of the property of the parish is a most commanding one, it occupying a corner with a long depth which commands a view of that whole section of the city. The church fronts on College Avenue. It is of yellow brick, containing the basement, which is used for school purposes and for meetings. The second story is the church and is nicely outfitted with a good alter, splendid furnishings for the Divine Service, good pews, a good organ and all the other detail of a church interior.

This church was built in 1910 and is a Catholic church of the Byzantine Rite, united with the Holy See in Rome. The Old Slavonic language is used in the Mass.

1902 - St. Peters and St. Pauls (RUTHENIAN) - College at W. 7th, Rev. Wolodymyr Dowhowycz
1913 - 1918 ­ St. Peters and St. Pauls - College at W. 7th, Rev. Demetrus Dobrotwar
1921 ­ St. Peters and St. Pauls (UKRANIAN) ­ College at W. 7th, Rev. Philemon Tarnovsky
1924 ­ Sts Peter and Paul's ­ College at W. 7th, Rev. Eustachyj Sydoriak
1928 ­ Sts Peter and Paul's ­ College at W. 7th, Rev. Leo Lewicky
1947 - Sts Peter and Paul's - College at W. 7th, Rev. Dymtro Kresko

1928 ­ Sts Peter and Paul ­ 4750 Turney, Rev. John W. Solenski

ST. PHILIP NERI
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Large numbers of Catholic immigrants settling near Immaculate Conception, St. Aloysius and St. Thomas Aquinas Parishes. Bishop Farrelly established St. Philip Neri on June 23, 1914. They purchased land at St. Clair and E. 82nd and the first Mass was celebrated on July 4, 1914, by Father John P. Brennan. A church was built there. A second church was dedicated on June 24, 1950. Today this church is located at 8215 St. Clair Avenue, Phone 216-431-2583

1914 - 1932 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. John P. Brennan
1932 ­ 1943 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. Kiernan Banks
1943 ­ 1960 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. James Brennan
1960 ­ 1693 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. Mcihael Ondik
1963 ­ 1969 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. Leo Carlin
1969 ­ 1975 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. William Eylar
1975 ­ 1990 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. Thomas Gallagher
1990 ­ 1995 ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. Frederick Krause
1995 - ???? ­ St. Philip Neri ­ East Blvd. at St. Clair, Rev. Gary Stakem

ST. PROKOP (BOHEMIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
Large numbers of Bohemians arrived in Cleveland between 1854 and 1870. St. Wenceslaus was established on the east side to serve them. As the community grew on the west side, St. Prokop was established in 1872 to serve them. The first church was dedicated in 1874 and Rev. Joseph Koudelka was the first pastor. Construction on the current church was begun in 1899. Today this church is located at 3181 W. 41st Street, Phone 216-631-0365

1872 - 1882 ­ St. Prokop ­ Burton near Newark, Rev. Joseph M. Koudelka
1885 ­ 1893 ­ St. Prokop ­ Burton near Clark, Rev. Anthony Vlcek
1893 - 1896 ­ St. Prokop ­ Burton near Clark, Rev. Vaclav Koerner
1896 - 1901 ­ St. Prokop ­ Burton at Trent, Rev. Wenceslas Panuska
1901 - 1906 ­ St. Prokop ­ Burton at Trent, Rev. Peter M. Cerveny
1907 - 1942 ­ St. Prokop ­ W. 41st at Trent, Rev. Peter Cerveny
1943 ­ 1949 ­ St. Prokop ­ W. 41st at Trent, Rev. John Becka
1949 ­ 1973 ­ St. Prokop ­ W. 41st at Trent, Rev. Wenceslaus Uhlir
1973 ­ 1987 ­ St. Prokop ­ W. 41st at Trent, Rev. James Vesely
1987 - ???? ­ St. Prokop ­ W. 41st at Trent, Rev. Mark Peyton

ST. ROCCO (ITALIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Rocco was the first Italian-Catholic parish on the west side. In 1915, immigrants from Bari, Italy, met and erected a humble independent church on Trent Avenue in the Clark-Fulton neighborhood. In 1922, the diocese realized that this church existed and the Bishop invited the priest, Father Sante Gattuso to assume leadership of St. Rocco Parish in 1924. Land was purchased on Fulton Avenue and a new church was built. It was dedicated in 1952. Today this church is located at 3205 Fulton Road, Phone 216-961-8331

1924 - 1956 ­ St. Rocco ­ 2538 Trent, Rev. Sante Gattuso
1956 - 1972 ­ Rev. Andrew Costanzo
1972 ­ ???? - Rev. Michael Contardi

ST. ROSE OF LIMA
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The first mass for St. Rose of Lima was held on December 25, 1899 in an improvised chapel in the Marshall family home. Father Ignatius J. Wonderly was the first pastor. A church was soon built at the corner of Detroit Avenue and West 116th Street. A cornerstone was laid for the second church on June 26, 1927. The upper church was dedicated on February 20, 1957. Today this church is located at 11411 Detroit Avenue, Phone 216-521-0133

1899 - 1906 ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at Fruitland, Rev. Ignatius Wonderly
1906 - 1909 ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at W. 116th, Rev. Ignatius Wonderly
1909 - 1924 ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at W. 116th, Rev. Jas. Stewart
1924 - 1950 ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at W. 116th, Rev. Patrick O'Connell
1950 ­ 1967 ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at W. 116th, Rev. Edmund Kirby
1968 ­ 1974 ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at W. 116th, Rev. Thomas Murphy
1975 - ???? ­ St. Rose of Lima ­ Detroit at W. 116th, Rev. James Viall

ST. STANISLAUS (POLISH)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
As early as the late 1840's, Polish immigrants began arriving in Cleveland, settling in the Czech community near Croton Street. As new immigrants arrived, they moved to the area around the intersection of Tod Street (now E. 65th) and Fleet Avenue. The first pastor of St. Stanislaus was Rev. Victor Zareczny. In 1881, the church was erected at the corner of Baxter and Tod Streets. Ground was broken for another church in 1886. It was dedicated the new St. Stanislaus Church in 1891. Today this church is located at 3649 E. 65th Street, Phone 216-341-9091

1873 ­ 1877 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near Tod, Rev. Victor Zareczny
1877 ­ 1879 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near Tod, Rev. F.A. Marshall
1879 - 1883 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near Tod, Rev. Wolfgangus Janietz
1883 - 1892 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Baxter near Tod, Rev. Anton F. Kolaszewski
1894 - 1906 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near Tod, Rev. Benedict Rosinski
1906 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near E. 65th, Rev. Theobald Kalamaja
1913 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near E. 65th, Rev. Damian Kozeolik
1918 - 1921 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near E. 65th, Rev. Wenceslaus Krzycki
1924 - 1928 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near E. 65th, Rev. Theobald Kalamaja
1945 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near E. 65th, Rev. Thaddeus Woloszyk
1993 ­ St. Stanislaus ­ Forman near E. 65th, Rev. William Gulas

ST. STEPHAN'S (GERMAN)
From: Jubilee Edition of Waechter und Anzeiger Newspaper 1902
St. Stephan's Church is the strongest in numbers of the German Catholic congregations in Cleveland. It is a daughter of the Assumption of Mary Church on Jersey Street, separated in 1869. It received the district to the west of Harbor Street. After the founding of St. Stephan's, Pastor Stephan Falk had a two-story brick building erected in the middle of the land on which the present church stands, on Courtland across from Duke Street. In its first floor there were schoolrooms, while in the upper story there was a church. In April, 1870, Pastor Casimir Reichlin was consecrated priest. A new church was soon necessary and the cornerstone was laid on September 7, 1873. Work on the church wad delayed, but the congregation finally entered the church on July 2, 1876. On November 20, 1881, the church was consecrated. In 1889, the Sisters of Our Beloved Lady, who had served the school since 1874, received a lovely convent of brick. In 1897 a new schoolhouse was built on Scott Street. Today this church is located at 1930 West 54th Street, Phone 216-631-5633

1869 - 1906 ­ St. Stephen ­ Courtland near Fulton, Rev. C. Reichlin
1908 - 1913 ­ St. Stephen ­ W. 54th near Lorain, Rev. C. Riechlin
1918 - 1928 ­ St. Stephen ­ W. 54th near Lorain, Rev. Joseph Gerz

 

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS (IRISH AND GERMAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Thomas Aquinas Parish was founded on June 26, 1898. Rev. Thomas F. Mahon was the first pastor. The cornerstone for this church was laid on July 26, 1903 and the church was blessed on July 2, 1905. It was finally completed on May 30, 1923. The Glenville area that held Saint Thomas Aquinas gradually changed to include many African-Americans. When the riots of the 1960's occurred, the St. Thomas Aquinas African-American community were victims, not rioters. The shrinking of the parish population affected the parish. The aging building developed problems and the church was condemned as structurally unsound. The last Mass IN St. Thomas Aquinas Church was on October 12, 1975. The parish continued to meet though in a multi-purpose building constructed by the Diocese. Later, however, it was decided to close the parish and the last services were held on October 31, 1993. Parishes founded from St. Thomas Aquinas are: St. Philomena (1902), Pt. Philip Neri (1914), St. Aloysius (1902), St. Agatha (1945).
Today, St. Thomas Aquinas is located at 1230 Ansel, Phone 216-721-9002

1902 - 1939 ­ St. Thomas Aquinas ­ Superior near Ansel, Rev. Thomas F. Mahon

1924 - 1928 ­ St. Timothy's (IRISH) ­ 13205 Miles, Rev. Thomas Mulligan

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Vincent de Paul parish began in 1922. A group of people living on the outskirts of Cleveland (beyond West 98th Street) petitioned to have a church established. The church was established on April 17, 1922 and Father Michael Flanigan was the founding pastor. A new church was built and ready for use on Christmas Eve, 1922. Today this church is located at 13400 Lorain Avenue, Phone 216-252-2626

1924 - 1963 ­ St. Vincent de Paul ­ 13442 Lorain, Rev. M.J. Flanigan

ST. VITUS (SLOVENIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
The area running from E. 24th to E. 87th would become the largest Slovenian settlement in the United States. The founding pastor of St. Vitus was Rev. Vitus Hribar. Property was purchased on Glass Avenue and Norwood Road. The first services were held in St. Peter Church. The first church was dedicated on November 4, 1894. Today this church is located at 6019 Lausche, Phone 216-361-1444

1893 - 1907 ­ St. Vitus ­ Norwood at Glass, Rev. Vitus Hribar
1908 - 1921 ­ St. Vitus ­ Norwood at Glass, Rev. Bartholomew Ponikvar
1921 - 1952 ­ St. Vitus ­ 1110 Norwood, Rev. B.J. Ponikvar
1952 ­ 1969 ­ St. Vitus ­ 1110 Norwood, Rev. Louis Baznik
1969 ­ 1975 ­ St. Vitus ­ 1110 Norwood, Rev. Rudolph Praznik
1975 - 1982 ­ St. Vitus ­ 1110 Norwood, Rev. Edward Pevec
1982 - ???? ­ St. Vitus ­ 1110 Norwood, Rev. Joseph Boznar

ST. WENCESLAUS (BOHEMIAN)
From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Wenceslaus was the first parish established to serve Bohemian Catholics in Cleveland. Prior to 1867 services were held at St. Joseph's, St. Peter's, and St. Mary's on the Flats. In February 1867, a church site was purchased at the corner of Arch Street and Burwell (E. 35th Place), near Woodland Avenue. Father Anthony Krasny was the first pastor. The first Mass in the new church building was on December 22, 1867. Later, it was clear that the parish needed a larger site, and land was purchased on E. 37th and Broadway in 1886. Construction began in 1891 and the church was completed in 1899. By the early 1920's, many parishioners had moved away. In the years after 1926 the parish continued to serve its parishioners, but the size dwindled. Plans for building Interstate 77 encompassed the church and sealed its fate. The last mass was celebrated on June 9, 1963. The buildings were torn down in July, 1963.

1867 - 1869 - St. Wenceslaus - Arch and Burwell Streets, Rev. Anthony Krasny
1869 - St. Wenceslaus - Arch and Burwell Streets, Rev. George Beranek
1869-1873 ­ St. Wenceslaus ­ Arch and Burwell Streets, Rev. Wenceslaus Revis
1873 ­ 1906 ­ St. Wenceslaus ­ Arch and Burwell, Rev. Anthony Hynek
1908 ­ 1917 ­ St. Wenceslaus ­ E. 35th and Burwell, Rev. Anthony Hynek
1921 - 1924 ­ St. Wenceslaus ­ E. 35th at Burwell, Rev. Joseph Koudelka
1928 ­ St. Wenceslaus ­ Broadway at E. 37th, Rev. C.W. Dik

ST. WENDELIN (SLOVAK)
2281 Columbus Avenue
216-861-1141

For several years prior to 1903 Slovak immigrants on the west and south sides attended nearby Catholic churches. Recognizing language difficulties, Rev. Ignatius Horstmann, in May, 1903, established the parish of St. Wendelin. It was not until the Rev. Joseph Koudelka, pastor of St. Michael's, became interested that plans for a church got under way. A site at W. 25th St. and Columbus Road was purchased, the erection of the new frame church was begun, and December 6 of the same year it was opened for the first mass. Two rooms in the parish house were converted into two class rooms and, In October, 1904, the school was opened with the Sisters of Notre Dame in charge. In 1904 Rev. J.P. Kunes was appointed pastor. Due to language difficulties, Father Kunes was replaced the following month by Rev. Thomas Wilk who was of Polish birth. In November, 1904, another appointment brought Rev. Oldrich Zlamal. A four room school was built in 1905 to care for the increasing enrollment. Father Zlamal purchased a large property on which four frame houses stood. This purchase increased the parish debt somewhat. Four year later, when Father Zlamal was appointed pastor of the SS Cyril and Methodius Church in Youngstown, the Rev. Augustin Tomasek took charge of the parish. New parishioners from St. Martin's on Scovill were moving to the West side, so by 1909, it was necessary to open two more school rooms. At that time an addition was built to the sisters' residence. The church received its first assistant, the Rev. F.J. Dubosh, on September 9, 1916. The church purchased a large property at the corner of Freeman Ave. and Columbus Road, which included two modern homes. The plans for this property were never realized however, as the Cleveland Terminal Company wanted to use the tract as an approach to the new Union Station. In May, 1924, the property was sold with the privilege of moving the two buildings to the original parish property. A tract adjoining the site was then purchased and the two houses moved there were remodeled as a residence for the sisters and a parish home. Ground was broken for the present combination church and school on November 23, 1924. The modern two-story brick building, with stone trim, has a property frontage of 319 feet. The school, with 12 classrooms and the club rooms in the basement, occupies the north portion of the building, while the church, with its main entrance in the west elevation, is in the southern section. A modern parish hall and gymnasium are now housed in a two-story building which was erected in 1936.

From: "People of Faith" by Charles R. Kaczynski
St. Wendelin
After settling in Ohio City during the last decades of the nineteenth century, Slovak-Catholics celebrated Mass with a variety of area parishes. Recognizing their language difficulties and their ethnic traditions, Bishop Ignatius F. Horstmann established St. Wendelin Parish on May 3, 1903. Under the direction of Father Joseph M. Koudelka, pastor of St. Michael parish, the Slovak community purchased property at the corner of W. 25th St. and Columbus Road, on which it erected a wood-frame church. On December 6, Father Koudelka joined the community in celebrating its first Mass. The following March, the community welcomed its first pastor, Father J.P. Kunes, who served for only a month before turning over the parish's administration to Father Thomas Wilk. By October, the community had converted two rooms in the parish house into classrooms, in which Sisters of Notre Dame began instructing the parish's children. Seven months after his arrival, Father Wilk left St. Wendelin, being succeeded by Father Oldrich Zlamal. Four years later, upon his assumption of pastoral duties at Ss. Cyril & Methodius in Youngstown, Father Zlamal left the St. Wendelin community in the competent hands of Father Augustin Tomasek. For the next five decades, Father Tomasek led the parish through successive periods of prosperity and crisis. By the 1920s, growing membership led the community to erect a new church-school. During the next two decades, as they struggled with unemployment during the Depression, the parishioners of St. Wendelin Parish generously contributed to their church. In 1943, the community celebrated the retirement of its debts. Father Tomasek continued to administer to the parish until an illness and stroke forced him to retire in 1957. For the next 6 years, Father Edward Stanko served as pastor. His successor, Father John Kraynik, administered to the parish for the next ten years. The 1970's were difficult years for the parishioners. With its enrollment declining, Father Richard Ondreyka and teachers from the Ursuline Sisters supervised the merger of St. Wendelin School into the Urban Community School. This mission of adjusting to changing conditions was assumed in 1977 by St. Wendelin Parish's current pastor, Father Jerome Lajack. St. Wendelin Parish prepares for its ninety-fifth anniversary in 1998.

HISTORY OF ST. WENDELIN'S PARISH 1903-1943
Officially St. Wendelin's parish dates back to May 3, 1903, for it was on this day that Most Rev. Bishop Ignatius Horstman of Cleveland gave permission to organize this new Slovak parish. Slovaks, coming directly from Europe, or those moving from other parts of the city to West Side, settled especially on Columbus, Franklin, River Streets, and the present W. 17, W. 18, and W. 19 St., and Lorain Avenue. Another group settled on the South side. These joined the parish later. There were meetings in private homes, and in a hall situated at W. 25th St. A financial campaign was started, and contributions were generously given. It was through the intercession of Rev. Jos. Koudelka, then pastor of St. Michael's, that Bishop Horstman gave his approval to organize the new Slovak parish which was given the name, St. Wendelin.

Some parishioners received information that Mr. Meckes had a property for sale on Columbus Rd., near W. 25th St. This was two lots, 120' by 330' and on which was a brick building was purchased for $5,650. The front part of this brick building was remodeled into a parish house and the back part into a school for two rooms. The parish property was surrounded on one side by Phoenix Brewery and on the other side by a saloon. A new wooden church and Sister's Home were built. The church with inside furnishings was contracted for over $14,000. Sisters' Home and the remodeling of the brick school building cost over $2,000. The first Mass in the new wooden church was offered Dec. 6, 1903. The income for the first year amounted to $7,560. Pearl Street Bank loaned the parish $11,000. Debt on the parish at the end of the year was $14,765.

School history starts October 1904 with two Sisters teaching in two classrooms. During this time the parish was directed by Rev. Jos. M. Koudelka who also had a Mass at St. Wendelin's every Sunday, until March 1904 when Rev. Thomas Wilk was installed as the first resident pastor. In November of 1904 Rev. O. Zlamal became the new pastor. He was transferred in August 1908 to Youngstown.

In 1905 a new brick school had to be built. The new school cost $7,570 and is used for club rooms and meetings. That same year, Father Zlamal bought a neighboring lot 50' by 300' on which were 4 homes. He paid $5,000. In 1904 there were 4 sisters teaching in 4 classrooms.

In August 1908 Rev. Aug. Tomasek became the pastor. At this time Slovaks from St. Martin's parish began to move to the West Side, so that by 1909 an addition had to be made to the Sisters Home, and to the School. By this time there were 5 sisters teaching. The greatest problem was the increase of school enrollment. Even the church was crowded on special occasions. This situation was relieved by having an extra Mass. From 1915-1917 four masses were said on Sundays. From 1917 - 1926 5 masses were said.

In 1911 six sisters were teaching. In 1912 9 sisters were teaching. In 1916 ten sisters and two lay teachers were employed. In 1928 the enrollment exceeded a thousand pupils. Extra classrooms were needed. Every building on the premises which had been purchased by Rev. Zlamal was put into use. The building adjoining the new hall on the grounds was the only edifice that had been constructed chiefly for school purposes. In 1912 two more classrooms were annexed to the brick house. In rapid succession, two rooms in the parish house and two in the vacated Sisters' home (after they had transferred their residence to Freeman Ave.), were also remodeled to provide classrooms.

In 1916 no young Slovak priests were available in the Diocese of Cleveland. In 1912, the Franciscan Fathers from their monastery on Woodland Ave. gave their assistance on Sundays and Feast days. Later Rev. J. Svozil supplanted them until the years 1917 - 1926 when Rev. S.A. Blackmore supplied the needed aid.

With Rev. Francis J. Dubosh acting as first assistant, from 1916 - 1917, others followed in quick succession; namely
Rev. John Frena, Rev. J. Krispinsky, Rev. Begalla, Rev. P. Rysanek, Rev. John Fecko, Rev. Jos. Bresnyak, Rev. Andrew Hudak, Rev. S. Marjenin, and the present assistants, Rev. Geo. Lawrence and Rev. Stephen J. Blasko. Some of the forenamed assistants remained at the parish for only a short duration.

It soon seemed evident that the land property purchased by Rev. J.M. Koudelka in 1903 and Rev. Zlamal in 1906, totaling 170 x 330 feet, was insufficient for future parish buildings. This necessitated the purchase of additional grounds. Two factions arose: one side favoring the purchase of neighboring property on the corner of Wiley and Columbus Rd, the other side desiring the purchase of grounds at a new location on the corner of Freeman and Columbus Rd. The desires of the latter were realized when the new piece of land 181 x 169' with four homes was purchased. Two of the larger homes became the present pastors' and Sister's residences. The other homes were rented to tenants.

On this newly selected site the new church and school were to be erected. The years that followed were unsettled years, work was slack, material expensive, and lastly rumors were being spread that the newly acquired site would become the purchased property of Cleveland Union Terminal Company for the erecting of the new Union Depot.
The rumor became a reality in 1924, when a special meeting held at the Cleveland Hotel attended by the Van Sweringen Bros., Mr. Barnett, president of the Nickel Plate R.R., Rev. Bishop Jos. Schrembs, Msgr. Jos. J. Smith and Rev. Augustine Tomasek. The parish property on Freeman was sold for $75,000.

At the beginning of the year 1924, the parish had on deposit $56,956 of the $75,000 received for the Freeman property. The remainder was used to purchase the land on which the new church and schoolhouse now stand. This property measured 149 ' x 189' on one side and 330' on the other. The parishioners were eager to begin the construction of the new combination building. In the meantime, the pastor's and Sisters' homes were moved to the present site. The new school and church, planned by architect William Jansen, was begun in 1924. The cornerstone was blessed on March 26, 1925. The construction of these new edifices and the services of the architect amounted to over $240,000. In 1925 when the building was completed, the parish debt was $110,000. It was decreased rapidly, so that by 1936 the debt was only $15,000. That year the parish bought from Greif Bros., for $1,000 a lot which is near the Sisters' Home. In 1937 the parish bought a lot and a home on Willey Ave. for $1,500.

By 1936 there was a need for a new hall. The old church, which was converted into a hall, began to disintegrate. After much deliberation, it was decided to build a new, modern parish hall. In the fall of 1936 the building of the present Parish Hall was begun and was blessed Sept. 26, 1937. There are two halls. The lower is a gymnasium, and the upper an Auditorium. The total cost was $73,000. All debt was paid completely by July 3, 1943, which means that St. Wendelin's parish since that date has no debts.

The enrollment in our school in 1942 is 464 children, divided into 12 classrooms, taught by 12 Sisters of Notre Dame. Our parish has given to the Church 11 priests, one Franciscan brother, 35 nuns. Thus far 674 young people of our parish are serving in the United States Armed Forces.

HISTORY FOR THE 75th ANNIVERSARY, 1978 (continuing the story from the 40th Anniversary above)
On Dec. 4, 1953, the celebration of the 50th anniversary of St. Wendelin Parish took place. The pastor was Msgr. Tomasek. On Feb. 12, 1953, Monsignor Tomasek suffered a stroke and four years later in Sept. 1957 he retired. He was replaced by Father Edward Stanko. He died suddenly on Sept. 22, 1963. Monsignor Tomasek met his eternal reward on Nov. 23, 1964.

After the death of Father Stanko, Father John Kraynik came to St. Wendelin's. He arrived November 10, 1963. Among the various events that occurred during his Pastorate one of the most historical was the formation of St. Wendelin School of Continuous Progress at which the Sisters of Notre Dame continued to serve until they were taken from our school in August 1973. This ended an era of 70 years in the history of St. Wendelin School.

In Sept. 1973 four Jesuit Fathers moved into the Convent and called it "Faber House". They conducted training for their young men interested in the Jesuit Order.

The 60th Anniversary was held on May 17, 1964. The parish was changing. Bishop Clarence Issermann realized that Father Kraynik needed help. Father Francis X. Budovic came to help. He came on January 10, 1972 and is still serving today. Father Kraynik's ill health forced him to retire on November 15, 1973. Father Richard Ondreyka succeeded Father Kraynik. It was during his pastorate that the school closed on May 28, 1976 as St. Wendelin School and reopened in September 1976 as part of Urban Community School. Our building provides classrooms for Jr. High and Primary grades while St. Malachi and St. Patrick took care of the intermediate grades.

Father Ondreyka stayed at St. Wendelin until April 15, 1977 when he was transferred to Lakewood. After two months of waiting for a new Pastor, Father Jerome M. Lajack, who at 37 became the youngest Pastor in the Diocese. He arrived June 15, 1977. Father Lajak is making preparations for a grand celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the parish.

A CONTINUING HISTORY - 90th ANNIVERSARY
Father Lajack was the driving force behind the celebrations which marked our 80th, 85th, and now our 90th Anniversary. He oversaw the organization of our Parish Council in 1985 and continues guiding the activities of Parish Council today. It is through Father Lajack's special social events, like the Summer Social, the Holiday Boutique, the Polka Mass and Dinner Dance, and the Holy Saturday Reception, that we all come together. Father Lajack too steps to channel the generous financial support of our parishioners to area social agencies, like the West Side Catholic Center, the West Side Ecumenical Ministry, Templum House, and Providence House.

A CONTINUING HISTORY - 100TH ANNIVERSARY
In 1996, St. Wendelin was a stop on the diocesan tour of churches in Cleveland. In 1999, a major, three-year long building repair effort began. All of the parish buildings were checked for defects and tuck-pointing was instituted. The project took several years to complete. As the new century dawned, the parish saw wonderful change and growth as programs blossomed. A Children's Choir and Liturgy of the Word program began. A summer Bible school was started. A sacramental program helped children prepare for the reception of the sacraments. A celebration was held to mark the 25th anniversary of Father Lajack's pastorate.

In the autumn of 2002, parish leaders declared a Year of Jubilee to mark the parish's centennial celebration. Street banners were produced. An anniversary calendar provided a thematic guide for every month of the celebration. A large, 100 year-old statue of St. Wendelin, which had been left in storage for many years, was taken out. The statue was repaired, and a new niche for the statue was carved inside the church where a confessional once stood. The bell, which had been removed from the belfry, was reconditioned and a new yoke was located. A frame was built which allowed the bell to be portable.

1903 - 1904 - St. Wendelin (SLOVAK) - Columbus near Pearl, Rev. Joseph Koudelka
1904 - St. Wendelin - Columbus near Pearl, Rev. J.P. Kunes
1904 - 1905 - St. Wendelin - Columbus near Pearl, Rev. Thomas Wilk
1905 ­ St. Wendelin (SLOVAK) ­ Columbus near Pearl, Rev. Udalrich Zlamal
1908 - 1909 ­ St. Wendelin ­ 2275 Columbus Rd., Rev. Udalrich Zlamal
1909 - 1957 ­ St. Wendelin ­ 2281 Columbus Rd., Rev. Augustin Tomasek
1918 ­ St. Wendelin ­ 2281 Columbus, Rev. F.J. Dubosh
1957 - 1963 - St. Wendelin - 2281 Columbus, Rev. Edward Stanko
1963 - 1973 - St. Wendelin - 2281 Columbus, Rev. John Kraynik
1974 - St. Wendelin - 2281 Columbus, Rev. Richard Ondreyka
1977 - 2006 - St. Wendelin - 2281 Columbus, Rev. Jerome Lajack

 

POLISH NATIONAL CATHOLIC CHURCH

SACRED HEART OF JESUS - POLISH NATIONAL CATHOLIC CHURCH
2310 West 14th
The first meeting to organize this church was held November 25, 1914, in a hall at the corner of Fairfield and West 11th. Three buildings were acquired on the east side of W. 14th and on January 24, 1915, the first mass was celebrated. The Rev. Father Ludwig Wrzesinski was the first pastor. On May 30, 1915, the Prime Bishop was present to bless the original church here in Cleveland. The financial obligations were too great for the parish and it was necessary to relinquish the title and seek a new site. In November 1916 two lots and a building used for the rectory were purchased on the west side of 14th Street and the present church building was erected. In 1957 the old rectory was razed and a rectory, formerly owned by the Lutheran Church, was purchased from the City. It was moved to the present site and blessed in 1958. The present pastor is the Rev. Father Charles Kawalkowski.

From The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History:
The Polish National Catholic Church supported 5 parishes in Cleveland, founded between 1910-60. The denomination began in Scranton, PA, in Mar. 1897, when Fr. Francis Hodur (1866-1953) led his new church out of the Roman Catholic Church in a dispute over control of local church property. The Polish National Catholic church was established formally in Sept. 1904 at its first synod; by then it had 20,000 members in 5 states. In the Polish National Catholic church, local congregations owned church property and the mass was said in Polish rather than Latin. In 1921 it abolished the rules of celibacy for priests.

The first Polish National Catholic parish in Cleveland was the Sacred Heart of Jesus, 2310 W. 14th St., established in 1913. The second, Our Lady of Czestochowa, established in 1915, later became St. Mary's. It had 660 members in 1955, when it moved from 3510 Broadview Rd. to a new $300,000 church at Wexford and Broadview Rd. in PARMA. The Church of the Good Shepherd, 7301 St. Clair Ave., was established in 1931, and Holy Trinity, 7460 Broadway, in 1940. All Saints Polish National Catholic Church, 3736 E. 59th St., was established ca. 1954. In 1962 Bp. John Misiaszek announced that the main masses in Polish National Catholic parishes in northeastern Ohio would be said in English rather than Polish. By 1970 these parishes had a total membership of 4,000. In 1995 only St. Mary's and Trinity remained active. (Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)

TODAY IN TREMONT THIS CHURCH IS:
St. Andrew Kim Korean
2310 West 14th Street

1921 - 1924 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ 2255 W. 11th, Rev. Louis Wrzesinski
1928 ­ Sacred Heart of Jesus ­ 2314 W. 14th, Rev. John Czyzak

 

Our Lady of Czestochowa, was established in 1915 by dissenting members of St. Barbara's. It was originally located at 3510 Broadview Road (on "short" Broadview, west of Pearl Road, where Vine Bible Fellowship Church is now); later it became simply St. Mary's.
1921 - 1924 ­ St. Mary's ­ 3500 Broadview ­ Rev. Louis Wrzesinski
1928 ­ St. Mary's ­ 3500 Broadview, Rev. John Czyzak
In 1955 St. Mary's Polish National Catholic Church moved to a new church at 5375 Broadview Road (at the corner of Wexford), just a few streets south of Brookpark Road.

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