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William Watson - barque

New Zealander, 9 January 1850, Page 2
California Shipping.— The barque William Watson from Port Phillip had arrived at San Francisco, and would sail for Valparaiso in a few days.

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 16 February 1859, Page 2
The barque William Watson, from London, arrived at Auckland on the 8th instant, with a large number of passengers ; and several other passenger vessels were shortly expected.

Taranaki Herald, 19 February 1859, Page 2
The barque William Watson, Captain C. Macfarlane, arrived in harbour yesterday, after a very fair passage of something under 110 days from port to port, with 160 cabin, intermediate, and steerage passengers, and a full cargo of goods. - New Zealander.

Daily Southern Cross, 11 February 1859, Page 2
BAY OF ISLANDS.
The barque William Watson, Capt. Macfarlane, from Gravesend, arrived in harbour on Tuesday forenoon last, 110 days out, having sailed on the 21st October. Her time would in all probability have been considerably less but for a succession of light easterly winds between this and Van Diemen's Land. One death occurred on board, that of Mrs. Fitzgerald. Shortly after the vessel had east anchor two addresses were presented, one to the Captain and the other to the Medical Officer in charge— Dr. Hale, which will be found below. Great enthusiasm was shown by all the passengers in supporting the. prayer of the addresses, who seemed, one and all, M vie with each other, in speaking most highly of both gentlemen's exertions for their safety, health, and comfort during the voyage.

To Captain Campbell Macfarlane, barque, William Watson, from London.

Dear Sir, — We, the undersigned Passengers of the William Watson, at the conclusion of a most prosperous and pleasant voyage, being fully sensible of your invariable kindness and attention towards us during the passage, gladly avail ourselves of the present opportunity in saying farewell, to assure you of the sincere regard and esteem we hare for your character and conduct, not only as highly efficient and successful navigator, but also as a gentleman ; always at your post, and unwearied by the uncrating cares and anxieties inseparable from your position ; together with the affability and courtesy which must have been experienced by each and all with whom you have been in contact, and which hare insensibly won for you golden opinions. Although this present testimonial cannot be measured by the worldly standard of riches, and may not be commensurate with the zeal, ability, and untiring energy displayed in the discharge of your important trust, yet, Sir, it is rich in that which you must equally prize, namely, in kindly feelings and sincere wishes for your welfare in this life, and happiness in the life to come.

Thomas Ritchie
W. H, Davis
F. C. Holloway
John George Hutchinson
Charles H. Mills
J. B. Smithyman
John March and Lady
Joseph H. Boor
M. Hale and Lady
Edwin F. Norris
Thomas Wallis
Robert Boor
John Douglas & family
Thos. Adamson and family
Thomas J. Robinson
J. T. Santy and family
F. E. A. Campbell
Mary E. Prendergast
(Barecaldine)
Margaret Williamson
James Davis
Isabella Baker
James Etheridge Smith
Frances Thomas

To Robert J. Hale, M.D., F.R.C.P., &c. &c, &c
Dear Sir,— We, the undersigned Passengers of the William Watson, anxious to show our just appreciation of your services as Medical Officer during the voyage which has just now been satisfactorily terminated, and actuated by feelings of respect and esteem for your person and conduct as a gentleman, so strikingly and yet so unostentatiously shewn forth during your period of office amongst us, added to the lively interest you hare at all times evinced for our welfare and comfort, request that you will accept this present expression of our warmest thanks and kindest wishes ; for your praiseworthy and disinterested efforts in our behalf, merit, Sir, a hearty acknowledgment, which we now give with much satisfaction. May your visit to this southern clime, the land of jour adoption, prove the realization of your brightest anticipations, and lastly we wish that you, Mrs. Hale, and family, may find health and happiness in your New Zealand home.

Thos. Adamson & family
Herbert Ashton & family
Isabella S. Baker
(Barcaldine)
Joseph H. Boor
Robert Boor
F. E. A. Campbell
James Davis
W. H. Davis
John Douglas & family
Richard Dugleby & family
 Henry Hirst and family
W. H. Hobbs and family
Mrs. Hodges
Miss Hodges
F. C. Holloway
John Geo Hutchinson
Mrs. Litton
William Litton
John March 
Mrs. Marshall
Catherine Marshall
Mary Marshall
Charles H. Mills
Sophia Mullarkie
Edwin F. Norris
Anne Otway and family
Mary E. Prendergast
Thomas Ritchie
Thomas J. Robinson
J. T. Santy and family
James Etheridge Smith
Mary Smith
J. B. Smithyman
George Taylor
Frances Thomas
Sarah Wallace
Thomas Wallis
Margaret Williamson


Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 1 June 1859, Page 2
Arrived - barque William Watson, 480, Macfarlane, from Sydney via Lyttelton.
Imports, William Watson, from Sydney - 300 tons coal.

Otago Witness, 12 April 1862, Page 6
Wednesday, 9th April, 1862. Insubordination — William Rankin, seaman on board the barque William Watson, was charged on the information of Captain Pendleton, with disobeying lawful commands during the passage of the vessel from Melbourne, but, on evidence being, taken, the Bench considered there was not sufficient to substantiate the charge, and dismissed it accordingly.

Otago Witness, 14 June 1862, Page 5 Victoria
The barque William Watson arrived from Dunedin, and the captain , Mr Macfarlane, was charged with a breach of the shipping regulations in not making a correct return of the effects of a passenger who died. The return was that he died possessed of 25s., whereas another passenger, who had been educated as a surgeon, swore he had handed over £43 to the captain. It is very clear perjury has been committed on either side, and the case has been remanded to allow of further evidence being adduccd.

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 30 May 1865, Page 2
Otago Shipping. Arrived 19 May, barque William Watson, from Newcastle

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 17 June 1865, Page 2
Sailed. — June 8th, barque William Watson, for Newcastle

Daily Southern Cross, 13 March 1866, Page 4
Arrival- Wm. Watson, barque, 383 tons, M. Moran, from Newcastle, N.S.W., with coal.

Daily Southern Cross, 20 March 1866, Page 4
Cleared Outwards. March 19— William Watson, barque, 383 tons, Moran, for Guam, with original cargo of coals from Newcastle, N.S.W. — Owen and Graham, agents.

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 9 June 1866, Page 2
Entered inwards - barque William Watson, 384, Moran, from Newcastle, via Wellington.

Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, 19 June 1866,
Criminal Cases. ABSENCE FROM SHIP.
John Burn, a seaman belonging to the barque William Watson, was sentenced to fourteen days' imprisonment for having been absent from his snip without leave.
DISTURBING THE PEACE. Six seamen belonging to the barque William Watson, were charged with having, on the night of the 16th, assaulted Joseph Trimble, the proprietor of the Masonic Hotel, Hardy-street. The prisoners were undefended. Joseph Trimble, being sworn, said : At half-past nine, on Saturday night, the prisoners were at my house. 1 identify them all. They had some drinks there. The youngest, James Power, was very disorderly, but he was not to drunk as be pretended to be.

Evening Post, Volume II, 21 July 1866, Page 2
The barque William Watson, Captain Moran, which lately left this harbor, in making for the port of Newcastle, N. S. W., on the morning of the 13th inst., got ashore; the captain and the steward were both drowned, but fortunately all the rest of the crew, together with the steward's wife, were saved by means of life lines. The William Watson was expected shortly to return to this port as a regular trader, and her loss and that of her captain, who was well known and respected by a large circle of friends in this city will be much regretted.  The barque 'William Watson,' from Nelson bound for Newcastle, went on shore on the North Beach on the 13th inst., and has become a total wreck. The 'William Watson was owned by Mr. W. H. White, of Newcastle, and we believe is insured.

Otago Witness, 27 July 1866, Page 14
FEARFUL, GALE ON THE AUSTRALIAN COAST
(From the Empire, July) 
Friday, 8.40 a.m. There has been a dreadful night. Nothing like it for the past fourteen years. Fearful sea on, making fearful gaps in the breakwater. Lighthouse lately erected on breakwater washed away. The barque William Watson, just arrived, got in a similar position to the Cawarra. The captain made all sail, and beached her on the North Beach. Hopes are entertained that all bands will be saved. [It was since reported that all but two had been saved.] The William Watson is a total wreck ; two men lost.  Midnight. The storm raged furiously all night. Early in the morning, the barque William Watson, on entering the port, was driven on to a beach near the Oyster Bank, where she now lies a complete wreck. All the hands were saved except the carpenter and cook. The schooner Lismore, soon afterwards, on rounding Nobby's, nearly met a similar fate, but was finally beached near the William Watson. All the hands were saved by Manby's apparatus.

Daily Southern Cross, 27 January 1866, Page 5
ARRIVAL OF THE SCHOONER 'ST. KILDA.'
NAKRATIVE OF THE SMUGGLER
The schooner St. Kilda, captured at the Navigator Islands on the 29th October last, on a charge of smuggling spirits on this cost, was brought into port yesterday morning from Sydney, in charge of Captain Macfarlane, to whom she was entrusted on behalf of her Majesty's Customs at this port by the New South Wales Government. As we stated during the week, Captain Macfarlane (formerly master of the American schooner 'Trader' and London barque 'William Watson,' which visited this port) left Auckland in the 'Alice Cameron' for Sydney, where he arrived on the 6th instant. On the 9th he took charge of the schooner by authority of the Collector of Customs at Sydney, and on the 11th left for Auckland, consigned to the Collector of Customs at this port. She was immediately boarded by Messrs. Tabuteau and Williams, of H.M. Customs, to whom he was handed over by Captain Macfarlane, on behalf of the collector at this port. The St. Kilda has on board one of her old seamen, a native of Rorotonga, named Tiny, who has twice visited Auckland in her, under Captain Smith. From him we learn a complete narrative of the movements of the vessel since visiting these waters, and landing a large and valuable cargo of smuggled goods close to Auckland. he St. Kilda, which was some time a constant trader to this port, and partly owned and commanded by an American, cleared out at Sydney early in July last for the South Sea Islands, deeply laden with spirits and tobacco, having upwards of 80 tons on board. The cabin and every available space were occupied with cases of gin, hogshead of rum, and tierces of tobacco, so that she could not have less than from £3,000 to £4,000 worth of cargo on board.  The mate of the St. Kilda,'known here as " Jimmy," left her at Rorotonga, and the second mate supplied his place. " Jimmy " came on to Sydney. It is probable that Smith, Cobden, and the mate have escaped from Tongataboo in some whaling vessel, and will never be heard of again. The St Kilda looks the worse for wear, and Captain Macfarlane reports her as leaky in her top sides. She is a British-built vessel, and was formerly a yacht owned by Lord Yarborough. She now lies moored off the west end of Queen-street Wharf.