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Arrival of the Slains Castle

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(from the "Otago Witness", November 13, 1852)

The "Slains Castle" left Gravesend on the 22nd July and arrived at Otago on the 9th November, after a good passage of 108 days. The voyage is described as having been an agreeable one, with the exception of extreme cold experienced in the high latitudes; 53 deg. South was reached. Several icebergs were seen. She brings 120 passengers, 58 of whom are for Otago. Amongst the passengers for Wellington by this vessel is Thompson Rauparaha, Chief of the Ngatitoa and Ngatiraukana tribes, son of Te Rauoaraha, who died about two years ago. On the 30th June he was presented by Sir John Pakington to the Queen.

Arrived. 9th, barque Slains Castle, 504 tons, Andrew, master, from London. Passengers:
Cabin- 

Booth		Mr Henry and Mrs Booth
Burnside	_______ 
Cheyne		William
English		_______
Fulton		Thomas
Galloway	W.
Hammond		E.
Hogg		Rev. Mr. and Mrs
Hood		Mr. Mrs. and Miss
Jones		Thomas
Maitland	James
Maitland	George
Maitland	William
May		James
May		Mrs
Oldham		John	
Pierce		Joseph
Price		A.
Richardson	Capt. and Mrs Richardson
Robertson	Dr. James and Mrs Robertson
Robertson	Miss Teresa
Sluck		John
Sutherland	Miss
Thompson	Joseph
Wheeler		George and Mrs Wheeler
Winks		Alexander
Winks		Alexander Master
Winks		Liss Eliza
Winks		Mrs Jane
Winks		John 

Steerage-
Boatson		Thomas
Birch		Mr and Mrs
Brebner		Mr and Mrs
Caldwell	S.
Cameron		George, wife and 2 children
Cameron		Miss
Cole		John
Dall		Mr and Mrs and 5 children
Davidson	William
Davis		Susan
Goodwin		William
Dawson		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Gillies		Mr and Mrs and 7 children
Hartley		Robert
Hartley		Miss
Horneman	Mr and Mrs and 5 children
Howarth		James
Johnston	Miss
McCulloch	Miss
McKenzie	Madeline
McNiel		James
Mowatt		Miss
Pattie		Mr and Mrs and daughter
Philips		James
Ried		Thomas
Shirley		Mr and Mrs and 5 children
Smaile		Robert
Smith		Robert
Spearing	William
Stevenson	Mary
Stewart		J.
Tailor		C.
Tucker		John and Mrs
Wrigley		James

For Wellington 

(from the "Otago Witness", December 4, 1852)

Sailed. December 1, barque Slains Castle, 504 tons, Andrews, master for Wellington
Passengers: Cabin

Booth		 Mr and Mrs Booth
Braithwaite	 Mr and Mrs Braithwaite and family
English		 William
Galloway	 Mr Wm.
Jones		 Mr Vaughan
May		 Mr. and Mrs
Oldham		 Messrs. John and William
Pierson		 Mr and Mrs
Price		 Mr A.
Richardson	 Capt. and Son
Robertson	 Dr. James and Mrs Robertson
Stack		 Mr John
Thompson	 Mr Joseph
Winks 		 Alexander and Mrs. Master John, Miss Eliza and Master Alexander 

Intermediate and Steerage.
Bowtson		Thomas
Caldwell	S.
Carter		John
Cole		J.
Coombs		J.
Cooper		S.
Davidson	W.
Davies		Susan
Downes		S.
Goodwin		Charles, Mrs., and Miss Pattie, William
Hogg		Rev. David and Mrs Hogg
Hogg		Master D., Andrew, Mary, and Isabella Hogg
Hogg		Mrs snr.
Horneman	Mr Frederick and Mrs
Horneman	Emma Julia, Frederick, Frederica, Marten and Laura
Houghton	Mr and Mrs
King		E
Phillips 	J.
Tucker		John and Mrs
Shirley		James, and Mrs
Shirley		Thomas, Joseph, Benjamin, Sarah and Emily
Smith		Robert
Spearing 	W. and wife
Sutherland	Iasbella
Walker		D.
Wheeler		George and Mrs
Winks		James
Wood		T.
Wrigley		J.

Timaru Herald Monday 29 July 1889 Obituary of the late Mr Justice Gillies.
Thomas Bannatyne Gillies, born at Rothesay, Scotland, on the 17th January 1828, was the eldest son of the late Mr John Gillies, and brother of the late Mr Robert Gillies, and of the Rev. W. Gillies, Timaru, and of Mr John L. Gillies, secretary to the Otago Harbour Board. The education he received was limited to the parish school but passed to a lawyer's desk. His father decided to emigrate. Just before leaving he married his first wife, Miss Douglas. He sailed from London in 1852 in the Slains Castle, and arrived in Otago...He wrote a series of articles entitled 'Pencillings by the Way' which he contributed to the Otago Witness. Having passed an examination by the Supreme court he started his legal career joining the late Mr J. Hyde Harris. The business prospered and in 1860 Mr Gillies commenced to take an active part in provincial and colonial politics. He was elected to the General Assembly as representative for Dunedin, and became Attorney General in 1862, Postmaster-General and Secretary for Lands in 1863-64 and in 1872 become treasure of the short lived Stafford Ministry. In the meantime his partnership with Mr Harris dissolved and he joined Mr C.W. (now Justice) Richmond. In 1865 he decided to move to Auckland, and he may almost said to have ridden overland. Cook Strait, of course, had to be negotiated by water, but the rest of the journey was performed on horseback. By his first wife he had several children. His eldest son, John, is in Sydney; his second Thomas, is at Glen Innes, NSW; his third, Douglas, is an engineer, lately in the Government service; and his eldest daughter was lately married to mar John Thompson, of Sydney. By his second wife he had two sons. He perpetulated the memory of his second wife by foundering the Sinclair-Gillies Scholarships in connection with the Auckland University College.

Sailing Poems