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Shipping News  to Otago - October 1883 
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Transcription Otago Witness Saturday October 6th 1883. Page 15

Thursday. Arrival.

Per Wakatipu from Sydney-
Burt 		Mr
Burt 		Mrs
Cole 		Mr
M'Whinnie 	Mr
M'Whinnie 	Mrs and family
Murdoch 	Mrs
Wilson 		Miss
And 18 in the steerage

Friday. Departure.

Per Wairarapa for Melbourne-
Cranstoun 	Mr
Feldman 	Mr
Goderyn 	Mr and Mrs
Gon  Allah	Mr 
Grace 		Mr
Hogan 		Mr
Jones 		Mr
Mendershausen 	Mr and Mrs
Moore 		Mr
Thompson 	Mr
Wilson 		Mrs, child and servant

Tuesday. Arrival.

Per Te Anau from Melbourne-
Fraser 		Mrs and child
Nancarrow 	Mrs
Piller 		Miss
Menlove 	Mr and Mrs
Tresedor 	Mr
B_ddycomb 	Mr
Davidson 	Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Heath 		Mr
Keogh 		Mr
U'Ren 		Mr
And 20 steerage

Tuesday. Departures.

Per Wakatipu for Wellington-
Niven 		Mr
Per Wakatipu for Sydney-
Alexander 	Mr
Arthur 		Mr
B_ack 		Mr
Connor 		Mrs
Hill 		Miss
M'Gill 		Mrs
Millar 		Mr
Murdoch 	Mr
Roberts 	Mr
Wilson 		Mr
And 7 Chinese

Per Wakatipu for Newcastle-
Stubbins 	Mrs and child

Wednesday. Arrivals.

Per Waihora from the North-
Ancell 		Mr
Bailey 		Mr
Boyd 		Mr
Brown 		Mr
Brown 		Mrs
Davies 		Mrs
Findlay 	Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Gowen 		Mr
Henderson 	Mr
Henderson 	Mrs
Robertson 	Mr
Salkeld 	Mr
Von der Heyde 	Miss
Wood 		Mr
And 10 steerage

Wednesday. Departures.
Per Te Anau for Lyttelton-
Berry 		Mr
Boyle 		Mr
Gordon 		Mr
Greaves 	Mrs
M'Gee 		Mr
Milne 		Mrs
Nob_e 		Mrs and family (3)
Shearer 	Mrs and 2 children
Stephenson 	Mr
Watkins 	Mr

Per Te Anau for Wellington-
H_ffernan 	Mr D

Per Te Anau for Napier-
Carter 		Miss

Per Te Anau for Gisborne-
Best 		Mrs and Miss

Per Te Anau for Auckland-
Barr 		Dr
Carter 		Mr
Crawford 	Mr (2)
Folgrove 	Mrs
Murray 		Mrs
Wendon 		Mr

Just a week marked the stay of the steamer Fenstanton in the port of Otago, and during that period she put out 2000 tons of inward cargo, coaled, and shipped a large quantity of cargo for the Home Country. She left Port Chalmers at 11.25 a.m. on Friday in charge of Mr Pilot Paton, drawing 19ft 5in aft and 18ft 8in forward, and proceeds to Lyttelton, where she completes her loading for London. The Fenstanton met with very rapid despatch, notwithstanding the inclement weather which marked her stay here. The following cargo was taken from Otago:-

7790 	sacks grain 		£7,700
60 	casks tallow and pelts 	   500
920 	bales wool and skins 	18,000
7 	pkgs sundries 		   140 
5968 	carcasses mutton 	 8,352 

Total value £34,692 

In addition to her general cargo she took two boxes of gold. The Fenstanton left the Port in excellent order, and after clearing the Heads shaped a course for Lyttelton.
 


Otago Witness Saturday October 13th 1883.

No shipping.


Otago Witness Saturday October 20th 1883. Pages 14 & 15.

Thursday. Arrivals.

Per British Queen from London-

Saloon:
Briscoe 	Mr G
Duckworth 	Miss

Second cabin:
Brown 		Miss
Carter 		Miss
Higgins 	Miss
Higgins 	Mr and Mrs

Third class:
[R?B?]ovan 	Mr
Allsop 		Mr
Corkam 		Mr
Davidson 	Mr
Griffiths 	Mr and Mrs and child
Jowett 		Mr and Mrs and family (2)
Landies 	Mr
Leonard 	Mr
M_rrow 		Mr
Martin 		Mr
Nelson 		Mr and Mrs and child
Nicholson 	Mr and Mrs and family (4)
Pearson 	Mr
Ross 		Mr
Sharp 		Mr and Mrs and family (4)
Smith 		Mr
Watt 		Mr
Webb 		Mr and Mrs
Woodgate 	Mr and Mrs and family (3)
And 86 immigrants, equal to 74 adults.
Per Manapouri from Sydney-
Bird 		Miss
Cohen 		Mr
Dodd 		Mrs
Duke 		Mr
Duke 		Mrs
Fairweather 	Miss
Fitzherbert 	Mrs
Graham 		Mr
Hardy 		Mr
Herbert 	Mr
Herbert 	Mrs
Hill 		Miss
Hunston 	Mr
Irwine 		Mr (2)
Joyce 		Miss (2)
Lowe 		Mr
Maberley 	Miss
Monckton 	Dr
Pointon 	Mr
Pointon 	Mrs
Powell 		Mr
Reid 		Mrs
Strange 	Mr
Symons 		Mr
Wright 		Mr
Wright 		Mrs
And 10 steerage

Friday. Arrival.
Per Takapuna from Glasgow (April 17)-

_odder 		Mrs
Anderson 	Mr
Darling 	Mr J
Dobbie 		Mr and Mrs
Ferguson 	Mr W
Fergusson 	Mrs
Lewis 		Mr
M'Adam 		Mrs and 2 children
M'Andrew 	Mr
M'Gorrey 	Mr
M'Lean 		Hon. Geo.
M'Loughlin 	Mr E P
Mathieson 	Mr, Mrs and Master
Neilson 	Mrs and 2 children

Otago Witness 20 October 1883, Page 10
Among the passengers by the Union Company's new steamer Takapuna, which arrived at Port Chalmers on Friday evening, were the Hon. G. M'Lean and Mr John Darling. Both these gentlemen have returned from their trip to the Old Country in renewed health, and were heartily welcomed by a great number of their friends on the Takapuna's arrival.

Otago Witness 20 October 1883, Page 15
ARRIVAL OF THE TAKAPUNA.
The latest addition to the steam fleet of the Union Company, and the twenty seventh vessel bearing their flag, reached Port Chalmers at 7.3o p.m. on Friday, and was berthed alongside the Bowen Pier. Here she was perfectly rushed by persons anxious to view this, which is supposed to be the Company's crack boat. After she had been cleared in by the Customs authorities, the Press representatives carded her, and although the time was a little late, they could but acknowledge the beauty of the vessel's lines, as she is built of mild steel, and rigged as a schooner, her masts being also steel; her upper decks are of the same metal, but are sheathed with teak and kauri-pine timbers, the latter wood having been sent Home by the Company expressly for the construction of their boats. She is fitted with hurricane decks, which afford beneath them a number of excellent cabins devoted to the üse of first-class passengers. She is lit throughout by Edison's incandescent system of electric light, and this is also applied to her mast-heads, side-lights, and holds. There are on her top-gallant forecastle two miniature turrets, from which the regulation lights are exhibited ; while there is every modern improvement supplied her which can in any way tend to the rapid intake or output of her cargo. As we stated some months since, the Takapuna is not to be considered as an ordinary passenger carrying and cargo boat. She is intended to be a despatch vessel, and will run the mails between the Manakau and Lyttelton, and for this purpose she is eminently fitted. She has beautiful lines, is built of mild steel, while her scathings are far above the requirements insisted upon under Lloyd's register, in which class is 100 Al. Her dimensions are as follow :- Length between the perpendiculars, 220 ft; breadth moulded, 3 ft ; and depth of hold, 18ft 6in. She is constructed on the cellular water ballast system, which enables her to adjust her ballast trim up to 172 tons, and which can, of course, be lightened at any time deemed advisable, by means of the very powerful steam-pumps she carries. Her engine-room and boilers are placed amidships, and are without doubt the most beautiful we have yet seen. The boilers ate constructed of mild steel and are double ended, being fed by 12 furnaces. The flues are constructed with Fox's corrugated patents, and are also supplied with the latest modern improvements. She is fitted with compound intermediate surface-condensing engines, the cylinders being respective y 39in and 68in in diameter, with a length of stroke of 39in. They are capable of working up to a maximum of 2500-horse power, which force is necessary to be developed in order to drive the vessel at the rate of 15 knots per per hour, a speed which was successfully attained on the measured mile at her trial trip. In the engine room which is under the charge of our old friend Mr J.B. Hutton, is a testing house parent engine which drives the dynamo machine, supplied by Messrs Alley, M'Lellan, and Co. of Glasgow, and which produces the electric light used throughout the vessel; while in case there should be any failure in this system of lighting, provision is made to have recourse to either oil or kerosene. The Takupuna is steered by steam, and there is every modern improvement is placed on board in order to save labour and ensure the rapid despatch of the vessel Upon an average consumption of 18 tons of coal per, diem _ during the passage out she has succeeded in maintaining a speed averaging from 11 to 12 knots an hour. The engines have worked remarkably well, the revolutions at full speed being registered at 105, and the average at 80. ...

Friday. Departures.

Per Wanaka for Lyttelton-
Abercromby 	Mr
Bates 		Mr
Beaven 		Mr
Bowden 		Mr
Critchi_ 	Mr and Mrs
Devon 		Mr
Doats 		Mr
Drybrough 	Mr
Duncan 		Mr
Evans 		Mr (2)
Feald 		Mr
Gould 		Miss
Greaves 	Miss
Herbert 	Mr
Hodges 		Miss
Howie 		Rev Mr and Mrs
Lloyd 		Mr
Lonsdale 	Mr
Lord 		Mr
M'Donald 	Mr and Mrs and family
Mellor 		Mr
Mellor 		Mr and Mrs
Pattiman 	Mr
Pearson 	Miss
Phillips 	Mr
Rogerson 	Mr (2)
Sampson 	Mr
Saunders 	Mr and family
Stalker 	Mr
Stavely 	Mr
Thirlwell 	Mr and Mrs and family

Per Wanaka for Wellington-
Carter 		Miss
Paske 		Mr
Seymour 	Miss

Per Wanaka for Hokitika-
Brett 		Mr

Per Wanaka for Nelson-
Stevenson 	Mr and family

Per Wanaka for Auckland-
Croft 		Mr

Saturday.

The following was the Fenstanton's cargo Home:-
From Port Chalmers, 2 boxes gold (27_9oz)
Original for London 1 case, 324 bales rabbitskins, 576 bales wool, 67 bales basils, 4 bales crop offal, 58 bales leather, 5_5_ carcasses frozen mutton, 8 pkgs sundries, 44 casks tallow, 3 bales skins, 1650 sacks flour, 275 sacks oatmeal, 10 sacks pease, 18 casks pelts, 5697 sacks wheat. From Lyttelton- 12 bales leather, 11 bales basils, 4142 sacks wheat, 137 bales wool, 1 bale hair, 102 sacks bones, 54 sacks hoof, 5 cases horns, 12 bales flax, 1381 frozen sheep, 32 casks tallow, 71 bales skins, 10 casks pelts, 20 sacks horns and bones.

Monday. Departures.

Per Hawea for Lyttelton-
Adams 		Mr
Aldridge 	Mr
Beddingfield 	Mr
Broadbent 	Mr
Canott 		Mr
Crozier 	Mr and Mrs
Duckworth 	Miss
Fleming 	Mr
Gorgde 		Mr and Mrs
Green 		Miss
Green 		Mrs
Grisby 		Mr
Hall 		Miss
Herman 		Mr (2)
Landles 	Mr
Law 		Miss
M'Bride 	Mr
M'Caughan 	Mr
M'Donald 	Mr (4)
M'Nally 	Mr and family (9?)
M'Phure 	Mr and Mrs
Portbury 	Mr and Mrs
Swanson 	Mr
Todd 		Mr
Wagstaff 	Mr (2)
Wright 		Mr

Per Hawea for Wellington-
Belles 		Mr
Breden 		Mr
Bushey 		Mr
Cleming 	Mr
Conley 		Mrs
Glass 		Mr
Graham 		Miss
Graham 		Mrs
Haggon 		Mr
Hodson 		Mr and Mrs
Holli_ay 	Miss
Holloway 	Mrs
Jones 		Mr
M_tham 		Mr
M'Donald 	Mr and family
Main 		Mr
Mathews 	Mr and family
Middleton 	Mr and Mrs
Robertson 	Mr
Row 		Mr
Waid 		Mr

Per Hawea for Auckland-
Macildowney 	Mr and Mrs
Wheeler 	Mr R T
Monday. Arrival.
Per Jessie Readman from London-

Saloon:
Brown Mr and Mrs and child
Saxelby Mr
Wayte Mr
Williamson Miss
And 29 steerage
Tuesday. Arrival.

Per Wairarapa from Melbourne-
Blackadder 	Mr
Blackadder 	Mrs
Crocker 	Mrs
Duke 		Mrs
Falconer 	Captain
Hancock 	Mr
Hazlett 	Mr
M'Donald 	Master
M'Donald 	Mr
M'Pherson 	Mr
M'Pherson 	Mrs
Masterton 	Mr
Munro 		Mr
Pearson 	Mrs
Singer 		Mrs
Wealo 		Mr
And 16 steerage

Out of her 4000 tons of cargo the steamer British Queen has only about 3_0 tons dead weight remaining on board yesterday. She is another proof of the despatch which marks the discharge of cargo in this port, little over 70 hours having elapsed since she first commenced to put out her inward freight.
As illustrating the strength of a sou'-wester in the harbour on Saturday morning, it is stated that the boat belonging to the steam tug Lyttelton was hanging in the davits of the steamer on Saturday morning, when the tug went down to the Heads to the Annie, and the wind more than once completely threw the boat over in ailings. The boat is a heavy one, and the force necessary to make it revolve in the davits must have been a considerable one.- Press.
The barquentine Clara E. M'Gillivray was towed up to Dunedin, yesterday evening.

Wednesday. Arrival.

Per Te Anau from the North-
Butterworth 	Mr
Carter 		Mr S and family
Chambers 	Miss
Cock 		Mr
Cohen 		Mr (2)
Edmond 		Mr
Findlay 	Mrs
Galli_ 		Mrs and child
Galli[e?o?] 	Mrs
Harris 		Mr
Henderson 	Miss
Levy 		Mr G
M'Glashan 	Miss
M'Kellar 	Mr
Pearce 		Mr
Reid 		Mr
Rich 		Mrs and child
Rowe 		Mr P?
Scott 		Mr R
Teasdale 	Miss
Tri_master 	Mr
Trythall 	Mr
Watt 		Mrs and child
Wilkins 	Dr
Young 		Miss
Young 		Mr A
Young 		Mrs
And 18 steerage

Wednesday. Departures.

Per Wairarapa for Lyttelton-
Adams 		Mrs and family
Clark 		Captain
Mellor 		Mr
Swanston 	Mr
Williamson 	Miss
Yates 		Mr
And 3 seamen

Per Wairarapa for Wellington-
Cox 		Miss
Jones 		Miss
L_chman 	Mr

Per Wairarapa for Napier-
Irvine 		Miss
Irvine 		Mr

Per Wairarapa for Gisborne-
M'Neill 		Mr

Per Wairarapa for Auckland-
Court 		Mr L
Graham 		Mrs and family (6)
M'Lennan 	Mr M
Meunier 	Mr
Weston 		Mr
Wilson 		Mr
Wilson 		Mr R

The steamer British Queen has already taken in over 1300 carcasses of mutton.
The Jessie Readman came over the bar, drawing 18ft 8in, on the first quarter flood on Monday night.
Before the days of dredging she would have had to wait for high tide.
The steamer British Queen has taken in 3316 carcasses of mutton. She is expected to leave for Lyttelton on Saturday.
The New Zealand Shipping Company's ship Hurunui, which arrived off the heads on the forenoon of the 16th inst., was tendered yesterday morning by the tug Plucky, and came up to the Export Pier at 7.30 a.m. She has some 1800 tons of cargo, of which 1100 tons are general, and the remaining 700 tons dead weight.

The new steamer Koranui, built to the order of Captain Williams, of Wellington, for the West Coast coal trade, came into port at 5 a.m. yesterday, and passed up the harbour to Dunedin in charge of senior Pilot Kelly. The Koranui was built expressly to Captain Williams' order by Messrs M'Intyre, of Glasgow, and appears in all respects suitable for the trade in which she is to be chiefly employed. She is 170 ft long, with a beam of 25 ft and depth of hold 14 ft. Her gross measurement is 600 tons, net 301 tons. Her engines are compound, of 75 horse-power nominal, and indicating 520 horse-power if required. She has steel boilers, pressed to 90lb. Her consumption of coal is extraordinarily small, as proved by the fact that she was under steam for 65 days' averaging nine knots, and only consumed six tons of coal per day. She can carry 550 tons on a draft of 12ft 9in, so that she is specially adapted for trading in shallow harbours. She is fitted fore and aft with tanks for water ballast, and has powerful pumping and donkey engines of improved types. Her rig is that of a topsail schooner. The saloon is amidships, and is very comfortably fitted up, while there is a pleasant smoking-room on deck.

ARRIVAL OF THE BRITISH QUEEN.

The New Zealand Shipping Company's chartered steamer British Queen, the fifth of the direct line of steamers from Great Britain to this Colony, arrived at Port Chalmers at 10 a.m. on the 11th, and was berthed at the George street pier, drawing 21ft of water aft and 16ft forward. She crossed the bar at three-quarters tide under the charge of Senior-pilot Kelly, and came up to the wharf in splendid style, having 509 passengers for New Zealand, of whom were 86 assisted immigrants for Otago, and 150 for the district of Canterbury. The British Queen was built in 1880 by Messrs Harland and Woolff, of Belfast, for the British Shipowners' Company, of Liverpool, and is classed 100 A1 at Lloyd's. She is engined by Messrs J. Jack and Co., of Liverpool, and has a pair of compound surface condensing engines, the diameter of the high pressure being 28in, that of the low pressure 60in; the nominal horse-power is set down at 400. She is specially fitted for the conveyance of frozen meat, and has chambers fitted up in the most perfect style, the refrigerating engineer being Mr R. E. Hamilton. She brings about 400 tons of cargo, of which 2000 tons are for Dunedin, and the remainder transhipments for other ports of the Colony. Her passengers for all the ports of New Zealand number 509 persons. Of these 144 are for the district of Otago, 150 for the district of Canterbury, and the remaining 310 for Northern parts of the Colony.
The whole distance run by the steamer British Queen from London to Otago has been 18,235 miles, the time occupied by her in doing so being 46 days 9 hours, which the navigating officer (Mr Saw) sets down as follows:-

				Days. 	Hrs. 	Min. 	Miles
London to Plymouth 	 	 1 	 1 	 5 	   298
Plymouth to St. Vincent  	 7 	18 	50 	 2,249
St. Vincent to Capetown 	14 	18 	31 	 3,938
Capetown to Port Chalmers 	22 	18 	34 	 6,750
Total 				46 	 9 	00 	13,235

ARRIVAL OF THE TAKAPUNA.

The latest edition to the steam fleet of the Union Company, and the twenty seventh vessel bearing their flag, reached Port Chalmers at 7.30 p.m. on Friday, and was berthed alongside Bowen Pier. Here she was perfectly rushed by persons anxious to view this, which is supposed to be the Company's crack boat. After she had been cleared in by the Customs authorities, the Press representatives carded her, and although the time was a little late, they could but acknowledge the beauty of the vessel's line, as she is built of mild steel, and rigged as a schooner, her masts being also steel; her upper decks are of the same metal, but are sheathed with teak and kauri pine timbers, the latter wood having been sent Home by the Company expressly for the construction of their boats. She is fitted with hurricane decks, which afford beneath them a number of excellent cabins devoted to the use of first-class passengers. She is lit throughout by Edison's incandescent system of electric light, and this is also applied to her mast-heads, side-lights, and holds. There are on her top-gallant forecastle two miniature turrets, from which the regulation lights are exhibited; while there is every modern improvement supplied her which can in any way tend to the rapid intake or output of her cargo. As we stated some months since, the Takapuna is not to be considered as an ordinary passenger carrying and cargo boat. She is intended to be a despatch vessel, and will run the mails between the Manukau and Lyttelton, and for this purpose she is eminently fitted. She has beautiful lines, is built of mild steel, while her scantlings are far above the requirements insisted upon under Lloyd's register, in which her class is 100 A1. Her dimensions are as follows:- Length between the perpendiculars, 220ft; breadth moulded, 3_ft; and depth of hold, 18ft 6in. She is constructed on the cellular water ballast system, which enables her to adjust her ballast trim up to 172 tons, and which can, of course, be lightened at any time deemed advisable, by means of the very powerful steam-pumps she carries. Her engine-room and boilers are placed amidships, and are without doubt the most beautiful we have yet seen. The boilers are constructed of mild steel and are double ended, being fed by 12 furnaces. The flues are constructed with Fox's corrugated patents, and are also supplied with the latest modern improvements. She is fitted with compound intermediate surface condensed engines, the cylinders being respectively 39in and 68in in diameter, with a length of stroke of 39in. They are capable of working up to a maximum of 2500 horse power, which force is necessary to be developed in order to drive the vessel at the rate of 15 knots per hour, a speed which was successfully attained on the measured mile at her trial trip. In the engine-room, which is under the charge of our old friend Mr J. B. Hutton, is a testing hou_e patent engine, which drives the dynamo machine, supplied by Messrs Alley, M'Lellan and Co., of Glasgow, and which produces the electric light used throughout the vessel; while in case there should be any failure in this system of lighting, provision is made to have recourse to either oil or kerosene. The Takapuna is steered by steam, and there is every modern improvement placed on board in order to save labour and ensure the rapid despatch of the vessel. Upon an average consumption of 18 tons of coal per diem during the passage out she has succeeded in maintaining a speed averaging from 11½ to 12 knots an hour. The engines have worked remarkably well, the revolutions at full speed being registered at 105, and the average at 85. We must certainly congratulate Mr Hutton on the successful manner in which he has brought the vessel out, considering that he had no opportunity displaying her at full speed, owing to the fact that her bunker space would not permit him to exceed a limited speed. The Takapuna is undoubtedly a passenger vessel, and although she will carry a fair amount of cargo, she may be fairly considered to be a despatch boat, set apart by her enterprising owners to perform the task of rapid communication from the two extreme points of the Colony.

THE DIRECT STEAM LINE.

The New Zealand Shipping Company has received cable advice of the arrival (all well) at Plymouth of the s.s. British King on the 13th inst., the actual steaming time being under 41 days. Refrigerator has worked satisfactorily, and meat in prime condition.
The s.s. Catalonia arrived (all well) at Plymouth on the 14th inst.

ARRIVAL OF THE JESSIE READMAN.

The ship Jessie Readman, from London, arrived at Port Chalmers and anchored in the Powder _round at 11 p.m. on Monday. She brings 1800 tons of cargo, of which 1000 tons are dead weight and the rest general, together with about 14 tons of powder, stowed in a properly constructed magazine. She has also 35 passengers, who are all in good health.


Transcription Otago Witness Saturday October 27th 1883. Page 14.

Friday. Arrivals.
Per Nelson from Glasgow (August 2)-

Saloon:
Ferguson     Mr (2?)
Forsyth 	Miss
And 305 steerage and nominated immigrants

The Albion and Shaw Savill Shipping Company's clipper Nelson arrived off the Heads on Friday forenoon, reporting all well. She was tendered by the s.s. Plucky and towed across the bar at 2 p.m., anchoring off Mansford Bay at 3.10 p.m. The Nelson on this occasion has fully maintained her prestige as a clipper, having made the passage from anchor to anchor in 77 days, and from land to land in 73 days. This is decidedly the smartest passage of the year, and the good ship comes into port in the most perfect order. Two births have to be recorded- viz, the wife of Frank M'Leod of a daughter, and the wife of John Todd of a daughter. Boat and fire drill was constantly practised throughout the voyage. Divine service was celebrated whenever the weather permitted, and the naval amusements were carried out with great spirit. We must not omit to mention that a school was held on board under the supervision of Mr Campbell, a competent master, and it was well attended both by children and adults. Strict watch was kept over all the compartments, and everything passed off in the most satisfactory manner. The nationalities of the passengers are as follows:-
English, 71; Scotch, 194; Irish, 94; and 4 foreigners. The single females were, as usual, berthed in a compartment underneath the poop-deck. It was beautifully clean, and its neatness speaks well for the occupants, of whom there are 141. They are, we believe, principally domestic servants, and have a very high character from Dr M__ey. The compartment occupied by the married people and their children was amidships, and was without doubt scrupulously clean. It was occupied by 69 married couples and 97 children. The usual hospital and dispensing was in this compartment. In the forward compartment of the 'tween deck the single male passengers, numbering 65, were located. This is a part of an immigrant ship that is usually found in a state of confusion, but on the present occasion the Nelson is an exception, as the single men's quarters are quite as clean and tidy as any other part of the passenger compartments.

Per Wanaka from Northern ports-
Duckwell 	Miss
Evans 		Mr
Graham 		Mrs
No_ris 		Miss
Nowell 		Captain
Pickett 	Mr
Ryan 		Mr

Saturday. Departure.

Per Manapouri for Melbourne-
Barker 		Mr
Barker 		Mrs
Black 		Mr
Davis 		Mrs
Drumm 		Mr
Dundon 		Mr
Foley 		Mr
Francis 	Miss
Gibb 		Mr
Gray 		Mr
Lingham 	Miss
M'Auliff 	Mr
M'Fedian 	Mr
Matheson 	Mrs
Notting 	Mr
O'Neill 	Mr
Pegg 		Miss
Pizey 		Miss
Queen 		Mr
Sharp 		Mr
Simpson 	Mr
Smith 		Mrs
Spencer 	Mr
Strachan 	Mr
Wilson 		Mr

Monday. Departures.

Per Wanaka for Akaroa-
Fraser 		Miss

Per Wanaka for Wellington-
Bushel 		Mr J
Francis 	Mr D

Per Wanaka for Nelson-
Carrington 	Miss

Tuesday. Arrival.

Per Waihora from Melbourne-
Belborough 	Mr
Bolton 		Mr
Bolton 		Mrs
Cra_ford 	Miss
Crompton 	Mr
Davy 		Miss
Edwards 	Mr
Edwards 	Mr
Farquhar 	Mr
Fergus 		Mr
Fischer 	Mr
Fischer 	Mrs
Hamilton 	Mr
Howard 		Mr
Jones 		Mrs
Rental 		Mr
Ro[w?]an 	Mr
Robinson 	Mr
S___n 		Mrs
Sime 		Mr
Weston 		Mr
Wredo 		Miss
And 17 steerage

Wednesday. Arrivals.

Per Waitaki from Timaru-
Acland 		Miss
Acland 		Mrs
Br_oks 		Mrs
Bre_ze 		Mr 
Butcher 	Mr
Gillespie 	Mr (2)
M'Gui_ness 	Mr
Quelch 		Mr
And 2 steerage

Per Ringarooma From Sydney-
Christopher 	Miss
Neilson 	Mr

Per Ringarooma from the Coast-
Bagley 		Mrs
Baird 		Mr
Blacklock 	Mr
Byrno 		Mr
Carew 		Mr and Mrs
Clephane 	Mr
Dunford 	Miss
Kennedy 	Mrs
Lewis 		Miss
Miller 		Mr and Mrs
Sandstein 	Mr and Mrs
And 8 steerage

Wednesday. Departures.
Per Waihora for Lyttelton-

Ald_ich 	Miss
Cunningham 	Mrs
Gordon 		Mr
Jamieson 	Mr

Per Waihora for Wellington-

Caw 		Mr
Murdoch 	Mr
Sinclair 	Miss
Tayl_r 		Mrs

Per Waihora for Gisborne-
Morgan 		Miss
Morgan 		Mr

Per Waihora for Auckland-

Ba_ton 		Mr (2)
Crosson 	Mr
Exley 		Mrs
Findlay 	Mrs and child
Horne 		Mrs and child
Jack 		Mr
Smith 		Miss

Per Waihora for Sydney-
Horton 		Master (2)
Horton 		Mr
M?arry 		Captain W J

The New Zealand trade will shortly be able to boast of the finest electrically equipped vessels afloat. The spirited owners of the New Zealand Shipping Company's fleet have just entered into a contract with the Edison Company's branch in Scotland for the lighting of their three new streamers with the incandescent light, each to be fitted with a duplicate set of Edison's marine dynamos and engines, one set being for reserve in case of emergency.- Home paper.
The steamer British Queen left the George street Pier, Port Chalmers, at 6.15 p.m. on Monday for London, via Lyttelton, her draught of water on leaving being 20ft 2in aft, and 19ft 2in forward. Her outward cargo from this port is as follows:-

 264 	bales wool 		£5,280 0 0
  69 	bales sheepskins 	 1,389 0 0
 243 	bales rabbitskins 	 5,589 0 0
  83 	bales leather 		   660 0 0
  24 	bales basils 		   240 0 0
   5 	bales rags 		    25 0 0
7528 	bags wheat 		 7,528 0 0
 398 	bags oatmeal 		   398 0 0
1320 	bags flour 		 2,620 0 0
  88 	casks tallow 		   440 0 0
  20 	casks sheepskins 	   100 0 0
   6 	casks oil 		   489 0 0
 142 	kegs butter 		   284 0 0
   4 	boxes butter 		    50 0 0
  14 	casks skins 		    42 0 0
  20 	pkgs sundries 		   400 0 0
   8 	tanks oatmeal 		   120 0 0
7018 	carcasses mutton 	 8,773 0 0

Total value £34,589 0 0 
ENGLISH SHIPPING.

Per P. and O.'s Ballarat, ___ sail on September 1[3?8?], for Auckland-
Pit_ Dean 	Mr and Mrs

Per Ballarat for Port Chalmers-
Bennet[s?t?] 	Mr and Mrs

Per Ballarat for Lyttelton-
Heythorne 	Mr

Per P. and O.'s steamer, to leave London on October 11 for Port Chalmers-
Fenwick 	Miss and maid
Fenwick 	Mr F
Kirros 		Mr S
Paulen 		Mr and Mrs

For Lyttelton-
Symons 		Mr

For Wellington-
Brice 		Mr T A

Per Ionic, to sail on September 20 for Wellington and Lyttelton-

Saloon:
A[i?l?]dis 	Professor and Mrs W B? and family
Abraham 	Mr L
Atkinson 	Mr R D
Brooke 		Mr and Mrs R
Browning 	Miss Annie
Browning 	Miss Helen
Carr  		Mr Frederick
Culliford 	Mrs [C?O?]
Edmett 		Mr William
Fricke 		Mr and Mrs F
Gardner 	Mr and Mrs H and family
Hector 		Miss
Hubert 		Miss Harriet H
Hyams 		Mr Frank
Insull 		Mr James N
Lane 		Mr [P?B?R?]__ll N
Leary 		Mr R H
Leitch 		Mr John
M'Donald 	Miss B
M'Leod 		Mr and Mrs and family
Nu[t?]tal 	Mr and Mrs W and family
Ponsford 	Mr Ernest
Rushton 	Miss E?D? J
Rushton 	Mrs
Sealy 		Mr and Mrs H [B?R?] and son
Silk 		Mr Robert
Smith 		Mr Ernest B 
Tetley 		Mr and Mrs R B and child
Von Lenderfeld 	Miss E
Von Willer 	Miss N
Warboys 	Mr and Mrs [C?O?] and daughter
Wikinson 	Mr and Mrs J? M and Son?

Second saloon:
Ager 		Mr G
Baker 		Mr E S
Barlow 		Mr? J
Bind 		Mr and Mrs R
Birkett 	Mr G
Cambridge 	Miss T
Campbell 	Miss M A
Cooke 		Mr M
Dawson 		Miss A
Giles 		Mrs
Gough 		Mr and Mrs
Graham 		Mr J
Gray 		Mr W C S
Groves 		Mr C J
Harrison 	Mr G
Harrison 	Mr J
Hatchwell 	Mr and Mrs R
Hird 		Mr and Mrs A
Hudson 		Mr and Mrs F
Jeffrey 	Mr and Mrs F E
Ken_ 		Mr and Mrs B and family
Kent 		Mr H E
Leary 		Mr H
Leech 		Mrs and child
M'Lennan 	Mr R
M'Neil 		Miss C?
M'Neil 		Mr A
M'Neil 		Mr D
M'Neish 	Mr and Mrs and daughter
Mullin 		Mr and Mrs and family
Paul 		Miss M and infant
Pillar 		Mr E
Powell 		Mr and Mrs and family
Quinn 		Mr and Mrs T and family
Richardson 	Mr W J
Robinson 	Mr W F
Robinson 	Mr William
Shadwell 	Mr J L
Shak[e?s?]pear 	Mr E
Stables 	Mr Thomas J
Stickney 	Mr L
Sutherland 	Mr J C C
Thorpe 		Mr John
Triggs 		Mr and Mrs and family
Turner 		Mr John
Watson 		Miss R

DIRECT STEAMER FOR OAMARU.

Mr John Reid, in his letter to the Oamaru Harbour Board, says that he has arranged
For the s.s. Delhi to make six voyages "from Oamaru or Port Chalmers to London," and for the credit of Oamaru he is anxious that "Oamaru should be the port of arrival and departure for the whole of these trips." He goes on to say:- "The Delhi has been refitted with new boilers and engines, and will have refrigerating machinery put up sufficient to take 20 000 to 24 000 sheep each voyage. She is 315(?)ft long, 38ft beam, 1293 tons register, and 2009 tons gross register, and when entering the harbour with coal, &c on board will draw about 18ft. When loaded with meat cargo she will draw about 20ft. The commencement of loading for the first voyage is fixed for February 14, 1884, and my object in now addressing you is to urge upon you the importance of having a berth ready to receive her at that date. I need not point out to you the great and important effect the safe loading of such a ship in our harbour would have on the minds of those underwriters and shipowners with whom I have lately been in communication concerning the nature of the port and its right to the most favourable consideration in the matter of insurance. My own willingness to risk the loading of a valuable cargo in this vessel in the port of Oamaru is the best evidence of my sincere belief in its safe character. I trust, therefore, that the Board will see it to be their duty, if necessary, to make a special effort to prevent the necessity of my sending this ship to Port Chalmers to receive her cargo. I do not think that it would be needful to have the new wharf finished. All that would be required would be the necessary depth dredged for her to lie in at low water, and a sufficient part of the wharf to enable railway trucks to come alongside a part of the vessel."


The Maitland Mercury & Hunter Thursday 11 August 1881 page 2 Perilous Voyage.
(Newcastle Herald of yesterday.)
The small screw steamer Lilie Denham, 21 tons register, Captain George Greenwood, and owned by Messrs. Leask and Bradley, of Timaru, N.Z., returned to port yesterday morning, after one of the most exciting trip chronicled for a long time past. The Lilie Denham was recently engaged as a passenger ferry steamer between Bulmain and Sydney, but was purchased by her present owners to do duty as a steam tug at Timaru. Accordingly she was brought on to Newcastle, and after taking in a cargo of coal, including about five tons of deck cargo (consisting of coal in bags) left for her intended destination about four p.m. on Monday last. She was, as stated, under the command of Captain Greenwood, the chief officer being Mr. J. Ness Keith, and the chief engineer, Mr. Leask (part owner), Mr. Bradley (another part owner) being also on board, and a couple of firemen-making a list of six in all. After making about five hours excellent running under steam and sail, the captain reports having met with very heavy weather and stiff S.E. seas, during which, from constant plunging and heavy working (it is supposed) the vessel unexpectedly started to leak. So quickly did the water make that it was found necessary to lighten her by jettison of the deck load-by good fortune carried in bags. Before this could completed, however, leaking increased so rapidly that she was best part of gunwale under, and in momentary risk of filling and going down with all hands, all hope of saving her having been temporarily abandoned. The engine fires were flooded out, and the vessel became almost unmanageable. The hand-pump was started, and bailing carried on incessantly until about 3 a.m., when the engines were got somewhat under command, but no steam of any pressure could for a long time be got up owing to the coal in the bunkers being thoroughly drenched with salt water, whence little headway was made until about a.m. yesterday. Wore ship, and stood the land under soil as the only chance safety, about 11 a.m., but failed to the wind being off the land. While attending to the sails, the chief mate Mr. J. Ness Keith, had the muscles of his right hand badly stretched. When in the act of 'bouting ship the main sheet carried away, and in his endeavours to hold on to the broken end, flapping sail jerked the limb so severely as to necessitate it being put into splints at Dr Knaggs' surgery. Mr. Keith, it may be mentioned, stuck well to his post, remaining on duty at the wheel for eighteen and a half hours without relief, save for when taking refreshment in the shape of a cup of coffee. About eight a.m. a little headway was made, and the unlucky craft eventually sighted Redhead, Newcastle harbour about eleven  o'clock. She will resume her voyage under sail.