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Otago 1874  Shipping News
New Zealand Bound

did not transcribe the inter-coastal shipping.

Reference online: Papers Past Images online.

Otago Witness 3 Jan 1874, Pg 14
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Dec 31 - Claud Hamilton, ss, Bowden, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co. Passengers:
Saloon: From Melbourne -

Cameron 	Mrs and Miss
Davidson 	Mr and Mrs
Bloomery 	Mr and Mrs
Ross 		Miss
Slomans 	Miss
Corrigan 	Miss
Cameron 	Rev Dr
Webster 	Mr
Coventry 	Mr
Mercer 		Mr
Thompson 	Mr
Steinam 	Mr
Skinner 	Mr
Yaldwyn 	Messrs (2)
Wilkinson 	Mr
Lawes 		Mr
Ross Master
20 steerage
From Bluff -
Hawkshaw 	Mr and Mrs
Birchill 	Miss
Tope 		Mr
Asher 		Mr
Burwell 	Mr
Mentiplay 	Mr
Fisher 		Mr
For Northern Ports -
Saloon 20
Steerage 4

Otago Witness 3 Jan 1874, Pg 15
Death
De Paravicini George - On the 30th December, at Invercargill, George De Paravicini, the beloved and only child of John and Emma Simon, aged three months.

Otago Witness 3 Jan 1874, Pg 16
Telegrams.
Wellington, December 29th, The ship Duke of Edinburgh, from London, which, was signalled some days ago only got into harbour yesterday. She was placed in quarantine, owing to there being two scarletina cases among the children on board. The pilot, however, was allowed to come ashore. She brings 211 immigrants, who are not expected to be detained long in quarantine.

Otago Witness 10 Jan 1874, Pg 14

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Jan 1 - Warrior Queen, ship, 988 tons, Wilson, from London. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Cabin:
Cook 		Messrs F and S
2nd Cabin:
Claxton 	Miss
Cook 		Mr
Halliwell 	Mr
Lane 		Mr
Matheson 	Mr and Mrs
Mayhew 		Messrs (2)
Scon 		Miss
Swan 		Mr and Mrs and 8 children
Taylor Mr

Jan 2 - Agnes Muir, ship, 851 tons, Anderson, from London, Oct 4th. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passengers:

Butt 		Mr and Mrs
Culonhouse 	Mr
Haville 	Mr
Maidman 	Mr
Moore 		Mr and Mrs
Noakes 		Mr and Mrs and family (3)
Redcliffe 	Mr
U'Ren 		Mrs and family (6)
Webb 		Mr
West 		Mr and Mrs and family (6)

Departures
Jan 2 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 662 tons, Bowden, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Lyttelton -
McKay 		Mr
For Wellington -
Brodle 		Miss
Wyatt 		Mr
For Melbourne -
5 steerage
and 36 Chinamen for Hokitika

Arrival of The Warrior Queen
The ship Warrior Queen, some time due from London, was signalled at the Heads on New Year's morning, and being promptly attended to by the steamer Geelong, soon made her appearance inside, and was towed to the Powder Ground by 1 o'clock and then anchored to discharge the two tons of powder and some acids which she had on board. Reckoning from the time she left the East India Docks, the Warrior Queen's passage would appear as 110 days; but as she did not leave the Downs until eight days afterwards, and clear the land until two days subsequent to that again, it cannot be said that the passage has been of extraordinary length. She brings a full cargo, and 20 first and second-class passengers. On December 11th Kerguelon lsland was sighted, and on the 30th the land of Now Zealand at the Snares. On the evening of the following day she sighted Otago Heads and was boarded by Pilot Kelly, arriving in the harbour as above stated.

Arrival of the Ship Agnes Muir.
The good ship Agnes Muir, with her popular commander, Captain Anderson, arrived at the powder ground, Port Chalmers, on the 2nd instant, after a fair passage of 90 days from Gravesend. Her report states that she left Gravesend on October 4th and ran through the Downs with a fresh NW breeze, was off Port und on the 6th, and on the 7th discharged the pilot, and took a list departure from Start Point.
On the 6th of December westerly weather set in, and drove her along with square yards, and on the 11th the Crozet Islands were sighted. Dense foggy weather prevailed from the 11th to the 21st December, with northerly winds, and then the wind, freed again, swept her before it - the breeze hanging to the west and SW. It was during this spell that she made her best running, one day, the 25th December, knocking off 205 miles, She ran down her casting in 45 deg south, and when abreast of the Leuwin edged away south passed south of Tasmainia and made the Solander on New Year's morning. She took the Foveaux Strait passage for it, was close in to the Bluff and made her number the same evening, and reached the Heads and towed in astern of the Geelong last night. She sighted several vessels during the passage, but signalled or spoke none. The greater number of them were seen when she was stuck up off the Cape by the easterly weather. Amongst them was the ship Pleiades from London, bound to Canterbury, and which was in company with the Agnes Muir in the English Channel. The Agnes Muir saw nothing of the ill-fated Surat as she came along the coast. We may observe that she is one of Messrs Patrick Henderson's and Co's vessels and is chartered by Shaw, Savil and Co. for the present voyage.

The Wreck of The Redcliffe

An eye witness supplies the North Otago Times with the following information regarding the above disaster - "The Redcliffe (Halford, master) arrived at Allday Bay about 9 am on Saturday from Kakanui Roads, where she had discharged part cargo from Dunedin, and anchored at about half-a-mile from the Landing Place. Including the master, her hands numbered three, all told. She had on board cargo for Otepopo and about 700 bushels of wheat (insured), the property of Messrs Anderson and Mowat, and proposed to take in further cargo for Dunedin at Allday. A heavy NE sea and breeze prevailed, and about 11am it was observed that she was dragging her anchor. She attempted to make sail, but her halyards carried away and the vessel drifted fast and struck on the reef. She then hoisted signals of distress, but owing to the heavy sea running no assistance could be rendered from the shore. Captain Crawford, acting beach master, signalled the ketch to launch her boat, which was done, but the boat filled and swamped and drifted ashore. It was attempted to put off in it from the beach to the vessel's assistance, but the boat was stove, and leaked so much that the attempt had to be abandoned. The ketch went rapidly to pieces, breaking up entirely between 1 and 2 p.m. One of the men was washed overboard, and clung to a piece of wreck; but after drifting about 50 yards, was washed off and struck out for the shore. One of the boatmen swam out some 200 yards to meet him, and succeeded in bringing him in in a very exhausted condition, the rescued man being for more than half-an-hour in an insensible state. The other sailor (named Williams), being unable to swim, Captain Halford remained with him, clinging to the wreck until he (Williams) was washed overboard and sank. Captain Halford then struck out for shore. He succeeded in reaching a rope thrown to him, and was brought ashore safely, but in a very exhausted state, owing to the buffeting of the heavy sea. The vessel has gone entirely to pieces. The body of Williams was washed up about 4 pm. We learn that the unfortunate sailor was a single man, but are not informed as to his nationality.

Otago Witness 10 Jan 1874, Pg 17

Immigration to Otago
The following table shows the number of immigrants introduced into Otago during the year 1873:

Otago Witness 10 Jan 1874, Pg 5
The Wreck of The Surat

Otago Witness 17 Jan 1874, Pg 14

Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Jan 9 - Mikado, ss, 1002 tons, Newell, commander, from Hong Kong, December 9th. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents. Passengers:

Saloon -
Bathgate 	John jun
2 in the second cabin
and 536 Chinese

Jan 10 - Gothenburg, ss, 591 tons, Pearce, from Melbourne, via Hokitika and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Saloon -
Bastings 	Miss
Bastings 	Mrs and 4 children
Crawford 	Mr
Hunter 		Mr
Kent 		Mrs
McOwen 		Mr and Mrs
Miers 		Mr
Moore 		Mrs
Munroe 		Mr
Ponsonby 	Mr
Prosser 	Mrs
Townes 		Mr and Mrs
Tregear 	Mr
and 10 in the steerage

Jan 13 - Glencoe, barque, 159 tons, Dillner, from Hobart Town. G F Reid, agents. Passengers:

Brown 		S C
Fan  		Mr J and Mrs and family (6)
Holroyd 	Messers (2)
King 		Messrs (2)
Lloyd 		Mrs and family (5)
Vaile 		Mr
Wilson 		Mr
and 20 steerage

Alhambra, ss, 497 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Arkell 		Mr
Babington 	Mr and Miss
Bernard 	Mr
Brotherton 	Mr
Brotherton 	Mr
Coates 		Mr
Coates 		Mr and Mrs
Coombe 		Mrs and 2 children
Cunningham 	Mr
Dohey 		Mr
Douglas 	Mr
Dunk 		Mr and Mrs
Dunn 		Mr
Gibbs 		Mr
Gillies 	Mrs and family (5)
Hayzen 		Mr
Henty 		Mr
Hodgson 	Mr
Lawrie 		Mr
McDonald 	Mr
Runting 	Mrs and Miss
McDougall 	Mr and Mrs
McKellar 	Mr
Murphy 		Mr
Petrie 		Mr
Professor 	Mr
Rood 		A
Rose 		Mr
Sale 		Mr
Simmonds 	Mr
Simmonds 	Mr
Steane 		Master
Steane 		Mr
Thomson  	Masters H & J
Webb 		A W
and 20 in the steerage

(note: there are two Mr Brotherton and Simmonds in the prior passenger list - not a double-up)

Departures
Jan 9 - Lady Jocelyn, ship, 2138 tons, Jenkins, for Melbourne. Matheson Bros, agents. Passengers:

Buzin 		Mrs
Murphy 		Mr and Mrs

Jan 12 - Gothenberg, ss, 501 tons, Pearce, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Barr 		Mr
Kelly 		Mr
Lyons 		Mr
Sanderson 	Mr
Woodward 	Mr
and seven in the steerage

Jan 14 - Alhambra, ss, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Lyttelton -
Fox 		Mr
Smart 		Mr
For Wellington -
Corrigan 	Miss
Jack 		Miss
For Melbourne -
Hislop 		Mr
and four in the steerage
and 212 Chinese

On Thursday, 15th instant, a full-rigged ship hove in sight to the southward, and soon afterwards made the number of the Dunfillan, the first own vessel of the New Zealand Shipping Company that has arrived here. She left London on October 29th, and consequently has made a rattling passage of 78 days, the quickest we have had to record for some time. She signalled for a tug, but the weather kept the Geelong inside until the evening, when, the gale having moderated, the Geelong ran down to the Heads, and in all probability towed the ship up to the Quarantine ground. She arrived, however, too late to be either cleared or regularly reported. She has 178 passengers and has signalled that all are well on board.

Otago Witness,  17 January 1874, Page 14
No passengers on the barque Elizabeth Graham

ARRIVAL OF THE BARQUE ELIZABETH GRAHAM.
The New Zealand Shipping Company's third arrival (counting the unfortunate Surat as one), direct from England, occurred on Sunday evening, when the barque Elizabeth Graham was towed in by the p.s. Geelong from the Heads, where she had been lying at anchor the greater part of the day. She comes in first-rate trim and condition, and has had a very fine although rather long passage from home. As she brought neither immigrants nor powder she was towed right up to the lower anchorage and moored between the barque Duke of Edinburgh and the steamer Mikado. She is a smart little barque, sailing under charter for the New Zealand Shipping Company, but owned by Shaw, Savill, and Co. Captain Mordue, her commander, who is on his first visit to Otago, reports having left Gravesend on the 22nd September,.....No vessels were sighted during the passage until she was off the coast, when the ship Lady Jocelyn and the barque India wore seen on Saturday morning a little south of the Nuggets. Amongst the good things brought out by the Elizabeth Graham are seven valuable Leicester sheep, out of twelve that were shipped at London, five of them having died on the way. When first put into the lockup, and until a few minutes before death, the man was rather noisy, singing and dancing. He appeared to be quite insane. Persons who might happen to be taken to the lock-up when suffering from delirium tremens received every attention.

Otago Witness, 7 February 1874, Page 4
CORONER'S INQUEST.
An inquest upon the body of James Walker, who died suddenly in the Port Chalmers lock-up on Wednesday, 28th ult., was held at the Police Court on the 29th, before the Coroner, Dr O'Donoghue. The jury having been empanelled elected Mr Henry Thompson as the foreman. Persons who might happen to be taken to the lock-up when suffering from delirium tremens received every attention, and if the case seemed a very bad one medical assistance would be called in. The captain of the Elizabeth Graham told witness that the man was entered on the ship's articles by the name of James Walker ; age, 33 years ; place of nationality, Dundee.

Otago Witness 17 Jan 1874, Pg 15 Marriages
Bidgood - Lackhurst: On the 8th January, by the Rev Thomas Roseby LLD, George Bidgood of Roxburgh, to Aunie Luckhurst of Dunedin.
Macdonald - Hislop: On the 13th inst at Tweedbank, Dunedin, by the Rev Dr Stuart, Hugh Macdonald MD, Lyttelton, to Mary Helen, elder daughter of John Hislop, Inspector of Schools.
McLeod - Hamilton: On the 9th January at the residence of the bride's father, Saddle Hill, by the Rev Mr Watt, Mr Malcolm McLeod of Brighton, to Jane Hamilton, third daughter of Mr George McIntosh, Saddle Hill.

Otago Witness 24 Jan 1874, Pg 16

Shipping Port Chalmers - Arrivals
Jan 16 - Dunfillan, ship, 853 tons, Kerr, from London. A C Begg, agent.

Passengers:
Saloon:
Kerr 		Mrs
Tempest 	Miss
Isitt 		Miss
2nd Cabin:
Dench 		Mr and Mrs
163 assisted immigrants, equal to 142 statute adults

Jan 20 - Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clarke, from Melbourne via the West Coast and intermediate ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Saloon - from Melbourne:
Chadwick 	Mr
Clark 		Mr
Farron 		Mr
From other ports:
Anderson 	Mr and Mrs
Austin 		Mr
Cotton 		Mr
Forsyth 	Mr
Hayman 		Mr
Hordship 	Mr and Mrs
McIllroy 	Mr and Mrs
Mackay 		Mr
Mein 		Mrs
Newton 		Mr and Mrs
Pepys 		Mr
Shaw 		Mr
Taylor 		Miss
Twentyman 	Mr
Willis 		Miss
Willis 		Mr
13 in the steerage
and 19 for Melbourne

Jan 20 - Gothenburg, ss, 510 tons, Pearce, returned disabled. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.
Jan 22 - Albion, ss, McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Ireland 		Mr, Mrs and Miss
Beely 			Mr
Belcher 		Mr
Donaldson 		Mr
Fraser			Mr
Gray 			Mr
Hart 			Mr
His Honour the Superintendent
James 			Mr
Kemp 			Mr
Leggatt 		Mr
Malcolm 		Mr
Park 			Mr and Mrs
Paterson 		Mr
Pillans 		Mr, Mrs and Misses (2)
Roberts 		Mr
Sievwright 		Mrs and child
Somner 			Mr
Theweneti 		Mrs
and 25 in the steerage

Departures
Jan 20 - Otago, ship, 992 tons, Stewart, for London. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passengers:

Saloon -
Cobb 		Mr and Mrs and family
Brown 		Mr and Mrs and child
Tolmie 		Mr and Mrs and child
Ritchie 	Mrs and two children
Waldie 		Miss
Cargill 	Masters (2)
McMaster 	Masters (2)
Hassell 	Master
and 14 in the steerage

Jan 21 - Tararua, ss, Clark, for Melbourne, via the Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Bluff - 
Brunton 	Mr
Carandini 	Madame
Carandini  	Miss Fannie
Carandini  	Miss Isabel
Cotterell 	Mr
Gordon 		Mr
Sherwin 	Mr
Smith 		Mr
For Melbourne -
Bealey 		Mr
Cameron 	Mr
Cargill 	J
Helsham 	Mr
Lloyd 		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
McMaster 	Mr
Maitland 	Mr
Read 		Mr
Webster 	Mr
West 		Mr
and 12 in the steerage
5 saloon and 17 steerage passengers, transhipped from the steamer Gothenburg and 19 original passengers.

Arrival of the Dunfillan
The New Zealand Company's ship Dunfillan, Captain Kerr arrived on January 16th, and her bill of health was of the cleanest, she suffered no detention, but was once moored off the Railway Pier. The Geelong went to her on the previous evening, but the hour being late, whilst the strong SW gale still blew in occasionally heavy squalls. It was deemed advisable to let the ship remain for the night where she was at anchor under Hayward's Point. The wisdom of this decision was manifested in the morning, which broke calmly and the ship being got underweigh on the young flood tide, she very soon completed one of the best passage made this season by any home ship which has arrived here. The Dunfillan has also done well in other respects, for she comes out a neat, comfortable and clean ship, and brings a number of assisted immigrants of very good stamp indeed. A healthier and happier looking lot of people, or more respectable in appearance, we have not had occasion to inspect for a very long time indeed. That they are healthy is evident by the doctor's report, which states that the hospital was not occupied during the passage; and that they arrive her in a thoroughly contented mind, both with themselves and those who had charge of them on the voyage was clearly demonstrated by the hearty, unhesitating replies of satisfaction which were given to the interrogation of the Immigration Commissioners. Although a staider bearing, the married people expressed no less satisfaction at the treatment they had received, whilst the single men were quite as emphatic in their replies. The passage out was a quick and pleasant one, no bad weather having been experienced, whilst the ship was admirably fitted up to accommodate her passengers. As in the case of the Zealandia, especial care was taken to ensure thorough ventilation below. In the married people's department the berths were arranged in blocks, with passages round them, instead of being fixed, as is the rule, on each side of the 'tween decks, with only one main passage between them. There were also such passages in the single women's compartment, the berths of which lay fore and aft, but wore built in athwart ship blocks. Each compartment was fitted with one main ventilator besides the hatchway and had also deck-lights. These were scrupulously clean; cleanliness was everywhere apparent and had evidently been practised on the voyage, together with the kindred habit of tidiness. We are delighted with the opportunity afforded us of according a full meed of praise to the ship Dunfillan - but we still adhere to our formerly expressed opinion of the necessity of an alteration in the manner in which the married people are berthed and also that all emigrant ships should be pierced for side-scuttles in the 'tween decks. We may observe that the Dunfillan is remarkable for ample galley accommodation. She has a magnificent cooking range, whilst adjoining it is one of Granley's distilling apparatus, capable of producing 400 gallons of fresh water in 24 hours. (more...)

Otago Witness 31 Jan 1874, Pg 16

Shipping Port Chalmers
Jan 24 - Chanticleer, brig, 187 tons, Philips, from Hobart Town, Jan 18th. Guthrie and Larnach, agents. Passengers:

Saloon -
Davey 		Mr and son
Gellibrand 	Mr
Jones 		Mr
Valentine 	Mr
and 9 in the steerage

Jan 28 - Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, from Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Melbourne -
Briene 		Mr and 2 sons
Chiaroni 	Mr
Clapperton 	Mr
Drew 		Mr
Golby 		Mr
Hamilton 	Rev Mr
Harman 		Mr
Kafferfield 	Mr and Mrs and child
Mybred 		Mr and Mrs
Styles 		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Terry 		Mr
and 25 steerage
For Wellington -
Coombes 	Mr
Hamilton 	Mr
Mitson 		Mrs
Rodgers 	Mr and Mrs
Thompson 	Mr
For Lyttelton -
Spencer 	Miss and Master
Taylor 		Mrs
For the North - 6

Departures
Jan 23 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Lyttelton -
Brown 		Mrs
Chapman 	Mrs
Lawrie 		Mr
Towsley 	Mr
Waldie 		Mr
For Wellington -
Cooles 		Mr
Palmer 		Mrs
Walter 		Mr and Mrs
For Melbourne -
Houghton  	Mr and Mrs Henry
McNeil 		Mr
15 in steerage
and 10 Chinese for the West Coast

Jan 24 - Columbus, barque, 744 tons, Atkins, for London. A C Begg, agent. Passengers:

Saloon -
Ballarty 	Mrs
Kay 		Mrs

Jan 29 - Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Anderson Mr
Bell  		Sir F D and son
Cotterill	Mr
Strode 		Mr
For Wellington -
Donaldson 	Mr
Keats 		Mr
For Greymouth -
Why 		Keo
and 17 Chinese steerage

Otago Witness 31 Jan 1874, Pg 17 Birth
Larnach - On the 27th January, at her residence, Tokomairiro, the wife of Albert Larnach, Esq, of a daughter.
Death: Reay John - On the 23rd January, at Catlin's River, John Reay, aged 15 months.

Otago Witness, 31 January 1874, Page 19
During the week ending January 24th, sixteen patients were admitted into the Hospital, and fifteen were discharged there from. Five deaths occurred— Charlotte Levy, died of consumption ; William Murray, disease of the brain ; Mary Macmahon, bronchitis ; Robert Hawkins, disease of the kidneys ; and John Wasser, disease of the heart. The number of patients at present in the Hospital is 133, of whom 21 are females. A seaman, named Ebenezer Henry Nelson, belonging to the ship May Queen, met with a fatal accident on board that vessel, at the Bluff, on the 25th inst. Owing to his own mismanagement in taking a bale of wool on board, it struck him on the back, knicking him with great force against the winch, the spindle of which struck him on the left breast. Death seems to have been instantaneous. At the inquest the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death."


Otago Witness, 7 February 1874, Issue 1157, Page 14

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Jan 30 - Beautiful Star, ss, 146 tons, Hart, from Lyttelton and Timaru. J Mills, agent.
Saloon Passengers:

Reach 		Mr
Jadhead 	Mr
Lawrie 		Mr
Levy 		Master
Stiller 	Master
and 4 in the steerage

Jan 30 - Comerang, ps, 152 tons, Hughes, from Lyttelton and intermediate ports. W & G Turnbull and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Wilson 		Mrs
Johnston 	Mr
Rolls 		Mr
and 1 in steerage

Jan 31 - Paterson, ps, 260 tons, Kennedy, from Lyttelton and the North. W & G Turnbull and Co, agents. Saloon Passengers:

Garner 		Mrs
Paishley 	Mr and Mrs
Whitmore 	Colonel
Raine 		Mr
Randle 		Mr
Dick 		Mr
Stranem 	Mr

Feb 1 - Wanganui, ss, 179 tons, Fraser, from the Bluff. H Houghton and Co, agents.
Saloon Passengers:

Harrop 	Mrs
Pollock 	Miss
Levi 		Miss
Barr 		Miss
Barr 		Mr
Brodrick 	Mr and Mr
Henty 		Mr
Beatie 		Mr
Wallace 	Mr
Young 		Mr
Menzies 	Mr
Drabble 	Mr
Brockhurst 	Mr
Wishard 	Mr
and 6 in the steerage

Feb 1 - Ladybird, ss, 221 tons, Andrew, from Lyttelton and the North. W F Wheeler, agent.
Saloon Passengers:

Burns 		Mr and Mrs and Children (3)
Dick 		Mr and Mrs
Rattray		and Children (6)
Servant
Robertson  	Mrs C
Powley 		Mrs
McNicoll 	Mrs
Lamish 		Mrs
Hughes 		Mrs and Children (3)
Roberts 	Miss
Hens 		Miss and Miss
Matheson 	Miss
Mannering 	Miss
Preston 	Mr
Gray? 		Mr
Coates 		Mr
Cornie 		Mr and Mr
Pannett 	Mr
Hay 		Mr
Coates 		Master
Variety 	Troupe (11)
and 16 in the steerage

Feb 1 - Samson, ps, 125 tons, Peterson, from Oamaru. J Mills, agents.
Saloon Passengers:

Miller 		Mr and Mrs
Gibbs 		Miss
Gibbs 		Master
Gray 		Mrs
Johnston 	Mrs
Black 		Mr and Mrs
Cook 		Mr and Mrs
and 7 in the steerage

Feb 4 - Maori, ss, 118 tons, Malcolm, from Lyttelton and intermediate ports. J Mills, agent.

Passengers:
Norman 		Mr and Mrs
Evans 		Mrs
Wilson 		Mrs
McLean 		Miss
Horne 		Miss
Foster 		Miss
Cairns 		Miss
Ward 		Judge
Livingston 	Mr
Bidwell 	Mr
Balfour 	Mr
Saunders 	Mr
Burrows 	Mr
Corkcroft 	Mr and Mr
Simms 		Mr
Gage 		Mr
McKerrow 	Mr
Collins 	Mr
Logan 		Mr
Cairns 		Mr
Miller 		Mr
Howard 		Mr
Quinn 		Mr
Sherrer 	Mr
and 9 in the steerage

Feb 5 - Samson, ps, 125 tons, Peterson, from Oamaru. J Mills, agent.
Passengers:

St John 	Mr and Mrs
Moir 		Miss
Moore 		Mr
Mason 		Mr
Shaw 		Mr
Wylie 		Mr
Thomson 	Mr
Paterson	Mr
Lechmarch 	S
Quinn 		Mr
Young 		Mr
Findlay         Mr
and six in the steerage

Departures
Jan 31 - Wallabi, ss, 101 tons, Leys, from the Bluff. H Guthrie, agent.

Saloon Passengers:
From the Bluff -
Mcllroy 	Mrs
Kerr 		Mr
Burns 		Mr
Kelly 		Mr
Joss 		Mr
From Catlin's River -
Mills 		J
Hyman 		Mr
Guthrie 	H
Moss 		Mr
Jackson 	Mr
Watson 		Mr
and 7 in the steerage

Jan 31 - Jane, ss, 35 tons, Adams, from Invercargill. Thomson Brothers, agents.
Saloon: Passenger: Mrs Adams

Feb 3 - Wallabi, ss, 101 tons, Leys, for the Bluff. H Guthrie, agent.
15 passengers
Feb 3 - Lady Bird, ss, 221 tons, Andrew, for Lyttelton and the North. W F Wheeler, agent.
Passengers:

For Lyttelton -
Eskett 		Mr and Mrs and Child
Styles 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Forsyth 	Mr
For Taranaki -
Dandsea 	Mr
For Manukau -
Genever? 	Mr and Mrs
Bodell 		Dr and Mrs and Children (2)
Parker 		Mr
For Hokitika -
Murr 		Miss
Steerage 5
and 23 Chinese for the coast

Otago Witness, 14 February 1874, Issue 1159, Page 14

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Feb 7 - Beautiful Star, ss, 146 tons, Hart, from Lyttelton and Timaru. J Mills, agent.

Passengers:
Mossman 	Mr
Cramond 	Mr
Children (2)
Lawrence 	Mr
Odder 		Mr
and 6 in the steerage

Feb 7 - Wanganui, ss, 179 tons, Fraser, from the Bluff. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Smith 		Mr and Mrs
Anderson 	Miss
Watt 		Miss
Wilson 		Miss
Smith  		Miss G
Allan 		Colin
and 7 in the steerage

Feb 7 - Samson, ps, 125 tons, Edie, from Oamaru. J Mills, agent.

Passengers:
Prescott 	Miss
Stewart 	Miss
Berry 		Mrs
Wylie 		Mr
Steawalt 	Mr
Lees
and 9 in the steerage

Feb 8 - Wellington, ss, 262 tons, Carey, from Lyttelton and the North. J Mills, agent.
Passengers:

Fulton 		Mr and Mrs and Mr Jnr
Fereday 	Mr and Mrs
Beasley 	Mr and Mrs
Tulcher 	Mr and Mrs
Winston 	Mrs
Marling 	Mrs
Livingstone 	Mrs and Child
Reynolds 	Miss and Miss
Westbrooke 	Rev Mr
Bell  		Sir F D
Murdock		Mr
Hill 		Mr
Rees 		Mr
Marshall 	Mr
Froggatt 	Mr
Disher 		Mr
Marris 		Mr
Morrison 	Mr
Rowlands 	Mr and Mr
Strachan 	Mr
Kerr 		Mr
Wallace 	Mr
Smith 		Mr and Mr
Massey 		Mr
Reany 		Mr
Buntin 		Mr
Tolson 		Mr
Mill 		Mr
Lambert 	Mr
O'Brien 	Mr
and 14 in the steerage

Feb 9 - Wallabi, ss, Leys, from the Bluff. H Guthrie, agent.

Passengers:
Smith Mr and Mrs and Children (2)
Perry 		Miss
Perkins 	Miss
Hallow 		Miss
Aldridge 	Mr and Mr Jnr
Edwards 	Mr
Harnett 	Mr
Peterson 	Mr
Smith 		Mr
Godfrey 	Mr
Parry 		Mr
Long 		Mr
Ross 		Mr
Leons 		Mr
Drake 		Mr
Herbert 	John
Harrison 	Mr
and 7 steerage

Feb 11 - Comerang, pss, 152 tons, Hughes, from Lyttelton, via intermediate ports. W & G Turnbull and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Blair 		Mr
Waterfield 	Mr
White 		Mr
Leslie 		Mr
and 3 in steerage

Feb 11 - Samson, ps, 124 tons, Edie, from Oamaru. Jas Mills, agent.

Passengers:
McJanett 	Mr and Mrs
Easton 		Mrs
Graham 		Mr
Gordon 		Mr
Farlic 		Mr
Stark 		Mr
and 4 in the steerage

Departures

Feb 6 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 520 tons, Bawden, for Melbourne, via the Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
McIntyre 	Mr and Mrs
St John 	Mr and Mrs
Muir 		Mr and Miss
Booth 		Mrs
Rowland 	Mr and Mr
Mayer 		Mr
Engel 		Mr
Tighe 		Mr
Belcher 	Mr
For Bluff -
Paterson 	Miss
and 9 in the steerage

Feb 9 - Alhambra, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Lyttelton. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Yeend 		Mr
Allan 		Mr
For Wellington -
Crombie 	Mrs and Children (3)
Haworth 	Mr
And 2 steerage

Feb 10 - Wellington, ss, 262 tons, Carey, for Lyttelton. W F Wheeler, agent.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Matthews 	Miss and Miss
Mossong 	Mrs and Children (2)
Goldsmith 	Mr
For Wellington -
Dean 		B C
Moore 		Mr
For Manukau -
McNicholl 	Mrs
and three in the steerage

Feb 10 - A and AMSS Mikado, 1992 tons, Moore, for San Francisco, via Lyttelton, Wellington and Auckland. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For San Francisco -
Douglas 	Mr and Mrs
Thomson 	R H
Roberts 	F
and five third class
For Lyttelton -
Murray 		Rev W H 
Bunten 		Mr
For Auckland -
Terry 		Mr
Hudson 		Mr
For Napier -
Five in the steerage


Otago Witness, 21 February 1874, Page 16

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals

Feb 14 - Samson, ps, Edie, from Oamaru. J Mills, agent.
Saloon Passengers:
Hawden 		Mr and Mrs
Doughty 	Mrs and Children (3)
Currie 		Mr and Mrs
Corrigan 	Mrs
Campbell 	Mrs
Hartley 	Miss
Wales 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Hunter 		Mr
Cowall 		Mr
Joad 		Mr
Luke 		Mr
Barr 		Mr
Hutchinson 	Mr
and seven in the steerage

Feb 15 - Otago, ss, 1000 tons, John McLean, from Melbourne via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
From Melbourne -
McKenzie 	Mrs and Miss
Swanston 	Mrs and Misses (3) and Servants (2)
Wolf 		Mrs
Rekel 		Mr and Madame
Claus 		Madame Jenny
Robertson 	Miss and Miss
Jacobs 		Miss
Hudson 		Dr
Chechi 		Signor
Campbell 	Mr
Raphael 	Mr
Muller 		Mr
Quiggan 	Mr
Coombe 		Mr
Cogle 		Mr
Atkinson 	Mr
McLeod 		Mr
McGlashan 	Mr
Brotherton 	Mr
and 18 in the steerage
From the Bluff -
Kingsland 	Mr and Mrs and Miss
Swanston 	Mr
Cleland 	Mr
Locksby 	Mr
Pepys 		Mr
Gibbs 		Mr
and five in the steerage

Feb 15 - Wanganui, ss, 179 tons, from the Bluff. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Brown 	Mr and Mrs and Miss
McGill 		Mrs and Children (4)
Hamilton 	Mr
Cleve 		Mr
Tusson 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
Powell 		Mr
Clarke 		Rev J 
and 11 in the steerage

Feb 15 - Taranaki, ss, 299 tons, Wheeler, from Lyttelton and the North. W F Wheeler, agent.

Saloon Passengers:
Douglas 	Mr and Mrs
Inksar 		Miss
Isitt 		Rev Mr
Beck 		Rev Mr
Rigg 		Rev Mr
Coughtrey 	Dr
Borrows 	Dr
Cameron 	Mr
Morrow 		Mr
Hursey 		Mr
Pitt 		Mr
Pyke 		Mr
Sherriff 	Mr
Spriat 		Mr
Buchanan 	Mr
McMartin 	Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Mason 		Mr
Moray 		Mr
White 		Mr
and 29 in the steerage

Feb 15 - Beautiful Star, ss, 146 tons, Hart, from Lyttelton and intermediate ports. Jas Mills, agent.

Saloon Passengers:
Fleet 		Mr and Mrs
Forne 		Miss
Fan 		Miss
Ward 		Mr
Wright 		Mr
Opie 		Mr
Staunton 	Mr
Wilson 		Mr
Danber 		Mr
Coraten 	Mr
McNaught 	Mr
and 10 in the steerage

Feb 15 - Wallabi, ss, 101 tons, Leys, from the Bluff. H Guthrie, agent.
Passengers:

Hunter 		Mr
Weston 		Mr
Kingsland 	Mr
Reed 		Mr
Holt 		Mr
Butler 		Mr
Dukrist 	Mr
Grimley 	Mr
Jonasy 		Mr
Granger 	Mr
Perry 		Mr
Stockley 	Mr
Walker 		Mr
Burns 		Mr
and seven in the steerage

Feb 17 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Lyttelton and Wellington. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Burke 		Mr and Mrs and Children (5)
Palmer 		Mrs
Harker 		Mr
Jacobs 		Mr
Ancell 		Mr
and 1 in the steerage

Feb 18 - Samson, ps, 125 tons, Edie, from Oamaru. J Mills, agent.
Passengers:
McLean 		Hon John
McLean 		Mrs
McLean 		Miss
Renton 		Miss
Hay 		Mr
Luvingston 	Mr
And 8 in the steerage

Departures
Feb 14 - Gothenburg, ss, 510 tons, Pearse, for Melbourne. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

 Saloon Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Roberts 	Mr
McKellar 	Mr
and five in the steerage
For Bluff -
Rodgers 	Mr and Mrs
Witson 		Mrs
Tomes 		Mr
and two in the steerage

Feb 16 - Otago, ss, 1000 tons, J McLean, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and coast ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Weld 		His Excellency Governor
Thomson         Mr and Mrs
Ireland         Mr
And 1 steerage
For Lyttelton -
Sale 		Professor
Hayman 		Mr
For Wellington -
2 steerage
For Nelson -
1 steerage
For West Coast Ports -
1 steerage and 10 Chinese

Feb 17 - Taranaki, ss, 299 tons, Wheeler, for Lyttelton and the North. W F Wheeler, agent.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Hardy 		Dr
Webb 		Mr
For Wellington -
Calcutt 	Mr
Capper 		Mr
Grant 		Mr
For Manukau -
Stewart 	Mr
Bathgate 	Mr
And 5 steerage for all ports

Feb 19 - Wallabi, ss, 101 tons, Leys, for the Bluff. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Watson 		Mrs and Family (3)

Feb 19 - Wanganui, ss, 175 tons, Fraser, for Invercargill. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Morris     	Mrs and Child
Smith 		Mrs and Children (2)
Gray 		Mrs
Thompson     	Miss
Cotterell       Mr
Murray         	R G
Murray         	John
and the Queen's Variety Troupe

Feb 19 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via the Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
McIntyre Mr and Mrs
Humphries 	Mr and Mrs
McFarline 	Mrs
Pogson 		Miss
Wilson 		Miss
Thompson 	Mr
Spiller 	Mr
Taylor 		Mr
Fleming 	Mr
Price 		Mr
Pitt 		Mr
And 6 steerage
For Bluff: Saloon -
Murray 		Mr and Mrs

Otago Witness, 28 February 1874, Page 14

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Feb 20 - Lady of the Lake, ss, 60 tons, Urquhart from the Molyneux. G F Reid, agent.

Passengers:
Moore 		Mr
Larkson 	Mr

Feb 21 - Samson, ps, 124 tons, Edie, from Oamaru. J Mills, agent.

Passengers:
Holmes 		Hon M 
Jameson 	Mrs
Ritchmore 	Mrs
Jameson 	Miss
Ford 		Miss
Lambert 	Miss
Sidey 		Mr
Cross 		Mr
Solomon 	Mr
Jameson 	Mr
Thomson 	Mr
Wallace 	Mr
Burnside 	Mr
Clarke 		Capt
and 10 in the steerage

Feb 22 - Wanganui, ss, 175 tons, Fraser, from the Bluff. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Caldwell 	Mr and Mrs and Children (4)
Fish 		Mr and Mrs
Powell 		Mrs and Miss
Haycock 	Mrs
Roberts 	Mrs
Grant 		Miss
Craig 		Mr
Sherar 		Mr
Hamilton 	Mr
Pollard 	Mr
Roberts 	Mr
Cooper 		Mr
Raine 		Mr
Robson 		Mr
Tatchell 	Capt
Flamming 	Sergeant and prisoner
and 8 in the steerage

Feb 22 - Comerang, ps, 152 tons, Hughes, from Lyttelton and intermediate ports. W & G Turnbull and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Buck 		Mr an Mr Jnr
Barry 		Mr
Cook 		Mr
Fidler 		Mr
and 3 in the steerage

Feb 24 - Beautiful Star, ss, Hart, from Lyttelton and intermediate ports. J Mills, agent.

Passengers:
Leslie 		Miss
Roberts 	Miss
Wilson 		Mr
Parker 		Mr
Shipton 	Mr
Grey 		Mr
Rodgers 	Mr
Sweeny 		Mr
and 3 steerage

Feb 24 - Phoebe, ss, 416 tons, Worsp, from Lyttelton and the North. W F Wheeler, agent.

Passengers:
Benjamin 		Mr and Mrs
White 			Mrs
Haggar 			Miss
Hudson 			Mr
Redwood 		Mr
Blundell 		Mr
Brodrick 		Mr
Schwartz 		Mr
Jacobs 			Mr
Mendelshon 		Mr
Sargeant 		Mr
and 14 steerage

Feb 26 - Wallabi, 101 tons, Leys, from the Bluff. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Watson 		Mrs and Children (3)
Wilson 		Mr
Toms 		Mr
Richards 	Mr
Malcolm 	Mr
Williams 	Mr
McAndrew 	Mr
Wilson 		Mr
and 3 in the steerage

Feb 26 - Samson, ps, 124 tons, Edie, from Oamaru. J Mills, agent.

Saloon Passengers:
Ellison? Miss and Miss
Young 		Mr
Ross 		Mr
Macan 		Mr
and 3 in the steerage

Departures
Feb 21 - A and AM Co's ss Mongol, 2262 tons, Flamank, for Lyttelton and the North. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Jacobs 		Mr and Miss
Moore 		Mr
White 		Mr
Morey 		Mr
Ostler 		Mr
Roskruge 	Mr
Parke 		Mr
Murison 	Mr
For Wellington -
McMaster 	Mr
Haimes 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
and 3 in the steerage

Feb 24 - Lady Bird, ss, 286 tons, Andrews, for Lyttelton and the North. W F Wheeler, agent.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Saunders 	Miss
Grierson 	Mr
For Napier -
Fulton 		Mr
For Wellington -
Peterson 	Mr, Mrs and Children (3)
Anderson 	Miss
Peterson 	Mr Jnr
Thomson 	Mr
Newman 		Mr
For Nelson -
Simon 		Mr
Murison 	Mr
For Manukau -
Carandini 	Madame
Carandini  	Miss Fanny
Isabella 	Miss
Neale 		Miss
Lambert 	Miss
Barnard 	Mr
Gordon 		Mr
Cotterill 	Mr
Sherwin 	Mr
6 steerage
and 11 Chinese for Hokitika

Feb. 23 Otago, barque, 340 tons, Bicknell, for Lyttelton. Dalgety, Nichols, and Co., agents. Flying Squirrel, ketch, 19 tons, Maine, for All Day Bay.
Feb. 24 Christian McAusland, ship, 962 tons, Tilly, for London. Russell, Ritchie, and Co , agents.

Feb 25- Elizabeth Graham, barque, 500 tons, Mordue, for London. A. C. Begg, agent.
Zealandia, ship, 1110 tons Curry, for London. Russell Ritchie, and Co., agents.

Passengers : Saloon - 
Barker  	Messrs (2) 
Brownlie 	Miss
Calvert 	Miss
Coe 		Mrs  and 4 children  
Duncan 		Mr
Glassford 	Mr and Mrs , 9 children, and 2 servants 
Grant 		Miss
Hills 		Mr
McLean 		Mrs 
Scott 		Mr
Whybrow 	Mr and Mrs , 4 children, and nurse
Young 		Dr
and 10 in the second cabin. 

Feb. 20 Carl, brig, 215 tons, Otzen, for Auckland. W and G Turnbull and Co., agents.


Otago Witness 7 March 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Feb 27 - Albion, ss, Underwood, from Melbourne, Feb 14th, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Allan 		Mr
Cameron 	Mr
Chapman 	Mr and Mrs
Farra 		Mr
Flexman 	Miss
Gabetes 	Mr
Guiness 	Mrs
Heywood 	Miss
Higginson 	Mr and Mrs
McIntosh 	Mr
Rees 		Mr
Rooke 		Mr
White 		Mr
and 15 steerage

Chanticleer, brig, 186 tons, from Hobart Town. G F Reid, agent.

Passengers:
Davy 		Mrs and children (6)
Howis 		Mrs and child
and six steerage

Curnatic, ship, 871 tons, Moon, from London November 23rd: Plymouth, January 8th. A C Begg, agent. Passengers:
5 second cabin and 208 statute adult emigrants

March 5 - Selmittar [Scimitar], ship, 1220 tons, Fox, from London, via Plymouth, Dec 21. A C Begg, agent.

Passengers;
Fox 		Mrs
Gough 		Mr
Hoskins 	Mrs and children (2)
Lewes 		N
Lewes 		S
And 350 statute adult immigrants

Wild Deer, ship, 1066 tons, Cowan, from Glasgow. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Cowan 		J and D
Duncan 		Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Howden 		Mr
Inglis 		Mr
McDougall 	Mr, Mrs and child
McGregor 	Mr
McGregor 	Mr and Mrs
Robertson 	Mr
Wilson 		Mrs
And 258 in the steerage.

Departures
Feb 27 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Begg 		C
Faulkner 	Mr
Faulkner 	Mrs and children (3)
Jamieson 	Miss
Soutter 	Mr and Mrs
Wilkinson 	Mr
Wood 		Mrs and child
and 18 steerage
For Bluff -
Brodrick 	Mr

March 5 - Jessie Readman, ship, 926 tons, Mitchell, for London, Cargills and McLean, agents.

Passengers:
Muston         Mr
Fulton         Mr
and 2 in the second cabin

Otago Witness 7 March 1874, Page 16
Whales seem to be particularly abundant this season in New Zealand waters. Only the other day a large school of 'sperm critters' was seen off Timaru and news we hear from Captain Russell of the schooner Canterbury that several schools of the right whale species were seen by him between the Kaikouras and Timaru. As he remarked, "If I had had the 'fixings' on board the schooner I could have done well whaling this trip." The schooner fell in with many fine fish on the West Coast. What a pity that our local whaler the Superb is not about.

Arrival of the Carnatic
The ship Carnatic, which arrived at the Heads on Friday, the 27th ult, was towed in astern of the Geelong on Saturday afternoon, 'and came to an anchor in the Quarantine ground. The announcement at her not having a clean bill of health had preceded her, but the character of the disease which she had on board was not known. The worst was, however, apprehended from the fact that a direct admission of sickness amongst the emigrants was made by signal when the ship reached the Heads, such a circumstance never having before occurred in the case of any vessel arriving, the rule being to say as little as possible until inquisition on the part of the Health Officer was made. However, the admission, and a very proper one too, on the part of those in charge of the Carnatic, put the Board of Health on the qui vive, and one of its members, Professor McGregor, came down to the Port and proceeded to the ship in the steamer Result, along with Captain Thomson, Health Officer; Dr O'Donoghue, judicial adviser to the Board of Health; Mr Monson, of the Customs; and Mr Colin Allan, Immigration Agent. Representatives of the Press were also of the party. Dr Robert Gibbs, surgeon superintending the immigrants, and Captain Moon of the ship, were waiting on the gangway when the Result ranged alongside, and to the interrogatory of the Health Officer replied that measles and scarlet fever had broken out, that nearly all the children on board had had the fever, that four deaths had ensued from it, and that there were diseases still under treatment. The first case of sickness in the form of measles appeared on the 13th day after the ship left Plymouth, and on the 21st day scarlet fever appeared. It seemed to have run its course, no new case having occurred since the 14th ult. Every care had been taken and close attention paid to the sick, but owing to the lack of space on board, it was found to be impossible to practise isolation. Fumigating the ship had not been attempted, but chloride of lime and carbolic acid had been used freely. There were no measles on board then, the disease having entirely disappeared on the 14th ult. The fever was not confined to the children, six adults having taken it, but all recovered. When asked by Professor M'Gregor for an opinion as to the probable source of the disease, Dr Gibbs replied that he believed the contagion was brought on board by one family, the mother of which one day remarked that she had no fear for her children, all of them having had the fever, and, in fact, had recovered from it only a fortnight or so before the ship sailed. The six deaths which have occurred lay amongst children of ages from a few months to six years. One, an infant named Cox, died from exhaustion whilst Fanny Larkins, Morley Cox, Eliza Maher, and Elizabeth Lainchbury were carried off by fever. Of the six cases in hospital, five were progressing favourably and one was considered to be very critical, indeed. A violent death had also happened during the passage. - one of the seamen whose name we did not ascertain - having fallen overboard, was drowned. The ship has 251 living souls on board, besides her crew of 30 men and boys. Reckoned by standard, the immigrants number 208 statute adults, of which 60 are single women. The proportion of children is said to be immensely large. The investigation having been concluded, the health-officer ordered the yellow flag to be hoisted, and informed the captain that the Board of Health would meet early, and decide upon the steps to be pursued with the immigrants. Before the Result shoved off, we succeeded in gleaning a few particulars relating to the ship on her passage from home. The Carnatic is a fine, substantial wooden built ship, of 871 tons register, and commanded by Captain Moon. She belongs to Messrs James and John Waite, of North Shields, and is under charter for the present voyage out and home to the New Zealand Shipping Company. She left London on the 23rd of November, and "when just clear of the Channel, had to run back to Plymouth to procure repairs to the fresh water condenser, which had gone wrong. She reached Plymouth on the 7th December, left again next day. She arrived oft the Heads in good time on Friday. She brings about 1100 tons of cargo, of which 550 tons consist of railway and other iron. The immigrants thronged the side of the ship when the Result went alongside. They appeared to be a tolerably fair sample, not of the best, certainly, but possessing bone and sinew, and seemingly in hearty condition.

Otago Witness 7 March, Page 17
Birth : McBryde - On the 15th February, at Macrae's Plat, the wife of Mr John McBryde, teacher, of a son.

Otago Witness 7 March, Page 26

Our Own
If I had known in the morning
How wearily all the day
The words unkind would trouble my mind
That I said when you went away,
I had been more careful, darling
Nor given you needless pain:
But we vex our own with look and tone
We might never take back again.

For though in the quiet evening
You may give me the kiss of peace,
Yet it might be that never for me
The pain of the heart should cease!
How many go forth at morning
Who never come home at night!
And hearts have broken for harsh words spoken
That sorrow can never set right.

We have careful thought for the stranger,
And smiles for the sometime guest;
But oft for our own the bitter tone,
Though we love our own the best.
Ah! lips with the curve impatient,
Ah! brow with the shade of scorn,
"Twere a cruel fate were the night too late
To undo the work of morn!

Otago Witness 14 March 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
March 7 - Omeo, ss, Clader, from Melbourne, February 28th, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Allen  		Mr and Mrs G B
Benham 		Mr and Mrs
Christie 	Miss
Evans 		Mr
Gunning 	Mr
Hallam 		Mr and Mrs
Hobbs 		Mr
Johns  		Miss A
Johns 		Miss
Johnston 	Miss
Lambert 	Miss
Lyster 		Mr and Mrs
Mitchell 	Mr
Richardson 	Master
Richardson 	Mr
Richter 	Mr
Rainford 	Mr and Mrs
Stoneham 	Mr
Templeton 	Mr
Vernon 		Mr and Mrs
And 35 steerage
From Bluff -
Coleman 	Rev Mr
Dunlop 		Mrs
Holmes 		Miss
Rose 		Mr
Van Blarcom 	Miss

Claude Hamilton, ss, 529 tons, Bandon, from Melbourne Feb 21st, via West Coast and Wellington. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From 		Melbourne -
Barr 		Mr and Mrs
Coleman 	Mr
Kelly 		Miss
Reed 		Mr
Tyrel 		Mr
and 5 steerage
Coastwise -
Batlsni 	Mr
Bowsey 		Mr
Clive 		Mr
Conley 		Mr
Forsyth 	Mr and Mrs
Grilsay 	Mr
McFarlane 	Mr
Mabcus 		Mr
Neal 		Mr
Sale 		Professor
Saunders 	Miss

March 8 - Pakeha, brig, 173 tons, Paterson, from Hobart Town, March 28th. Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Passengers:
Gordon 		Miss
Jones 		Mrs and Miss
and 14 steerage

Jungfrau, barque, 585 tons, Scotland, from London December 17th. A C Begg, agent. No passengers
Kassau, barque, 324 tons, McConnachy, from Mauritius March 1st. W and J Scoular, agents. No passengers
Serene, barque, 549 tons, Sogerman, from New York Nov 26th. A Briscoe and Co, agents. No passengers

Departures
March 10 - A and A Co's MSS Mongol, 2262 tons, Flanank, for Kaudavu, with English mail via Lyttelton, Wellington and Auckland. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents. Saloon

Passengers:
For San Francisco -
Hall 		Mr
Scoullar 	Mr
Watson 		Mr
And one in the steerage
For Lyttelton -
Hugh 		Mr and Mrs and children (3)
For Wellington -
Buchanan 	Mr
McAndrew 	Mrs and Miss
For Auckland -
Anderson 	Mr and Mrs
Anderson 	Mr
Sutton 		Mr and Miss
Turton 		Mr and Mrs
and three in the steerage

Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, for Newcastle via Lyttelton and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Saloon

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Goss 		Mr
For Wellington -
Arkell 		Mr
Biscacciauti 	Miss
Cecchi 		Miss
Claus 		Miss Jenny
Gleeson 	Miss
Gore 		J B
Mons 		Miss
Rekel  		Miss Jeanne
Rekel 		Miss
Three in the steerage
and 36 Chinese for Hokitika

(Arrival of the Wallabi - Wreck of the Brig Silver Lining )

Otago Witness 21 March, Page 14
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
March 18 - Alhambra, ss, 530 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Ballantyne 	Mr
Batton 		Mr
Delamain 	Mr
Downey 		Mr
Howey 		Mr
Hutton 		Mr
Nicholson 	Mr and Mrs
Stont 		Mr
Yuille 		Mr
And 5 steerage

Woodville, barque, 360 tons, Huge, from Newcastle. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Launder 	Mrs
Veale 		Miss

March 19 - Otago, ss, 642 tons, McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Christopher 	Miss
De Lacy 	Mr
Dickie 		Rev Mr
Eastwood 	Mrs and child
Gibbs 		Mr
Gorr 		Mr
Hislop 		Mr
Hooper 		Mrs
Keely 		Mrs
Lyons 		Mr and Mrs
McLean 		Mrs
Martin 		Mr and son
Orr 		Mr
Pallant 	Mrs and children (3)
Snider 		Mr
Stale 		Mr
Taylor 		Mr
And 51 steerage
From the Bluff -
Dunn 		Mr
Pritchard 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Sheenan 	Mr
Swanson 	Mr
Todd 		Mr
Tulloch 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Webb 		Mr

Departures
March 18 - Alhambra, ss, 530 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Bathgate 	Mr
Eskdale 	Mr
Glass 		Mr
Grogan 		Mr
Jones 		Mr, Mrs and Miss
Leggett 	Mr
Munro 		Mr
Mills 		Mr
Smith 		Mrs
Stevens 	Mrs
and 31 steerage
For Bluff -
Brodrick 	Miss
Goodman 	Mr
Tennet 		Mr
Woodlark 	Miss
and 1 steerage

Otago Witness 21 March 1874, Page 15 Passing Notes
Everyone must have noticed that the mortality among the children in the recent " sick vessel " was considerably beyond that of the adults. But probably everyone has not noticed causes which may account for that fact. In the first place, considering the sort of accommodation that a generous Government is obliged to provide seemingly for steerage passengers, it is little short of wholesale butchery to ship a lot of young children under five years old at all. The whole circumstances of a child's life must be so entirely altered by going on board ship, that it would be but common wisdom not to tempt the chances too far. When we also consider the peculiar diet which young children of two or three require - a diet consisting of just those things which can only be procured on board ship with difficulty - it becomes still more obvious that shipping children is a most hazardous proceeding. One hundred and twenty babes, without a pound of sago between them, launched on a three months' voyage, is a condition of things likely to eventuate in murder. Has the Agent-General forgotten his own childish days or the babyhood of his family? I should suppose so; but it would do no harm to remind him that he was not sent home to out-Herod Herod, and that it would be more merciful to send even fewer immigrants, and not to kill all the poor chickens at one fell swoop.

Otago Witness 21 March 1874, Pages 15 & 16 Telegrams

March 18th
A telegram from the Agent-General, dated March 6th, states that the following ships, with emigrants, sailed during February:
The Veruna, for Canterbury, with 326 souls;
he Atrato, ss, for Otago and Canterbury, 770 souls;
the Schiehallion for Napier, with 150 souls;
the Hague, for Wellington, with 440 souls;
the Fleming and two other vessels, for Otago, with 720 souls;
the Roukaron, for Auckland, with 360 souls
and the Ballochmyle, for Canterbury, with 480 souls.
Twenty-four vessels were to be despatched during March and April.

Auckland March 13th
The schooner Kenilworth has arrived from Samoa, and brings the mate of the schooner Enigma, wrecked at Gilbert's Group on the 11th August. The crew; were brought to Samoa by a German brig, commanded by Captain Clarke. One of the crew was burnt to death by the explosion of a kerosene lamp, which set the vessel on fire about a month prior to the wreck.

March 16th
The RMSS Mongol sailed at five o'clock with 33 passengers. Captain Flamank, the master, was charged at the Police Court with wrongfully landing John Williams, a passenger, at Port Chalmers instead of Auckland. £15 compensation is claimed, but the hearing of the charge has been adjourned to the 30th inst.

Bluff, March 18th
The ss Otago, under the command of Captain McLean, arrived at 9 o'clock this morning from Melbourne, which port she left on the 12th inst. She brings 38 cabin and 76 steerage passengers, together with 506 tons cargo for all ports. The Otago sails for Dunedin at 6 pm.

Passenger List : 
Eastwood 	Mrs
Kelly 		Mrs
Goodwin 	Miss
Christopher 	Miss
Pallant 	Mrs and children (3)
Dickie 		Rev Mr
Gerrand 	Mr 
Snider 		Mr
Gibbs 		Mr
Orr 		Mr
Hislop 		Mr
Taylor 		Mr
Lyons 		Mr
Lyons 		S
Delacy 		Mr
Staile 		Mr
and 42 in the steerage. 
She has 284 tons cargo for Dunedin.

Otago Witness 21 March, Page 22 Select Poetry

STAR-GAZING
Closing is the autumn gloaming,
Lined the sky with red and gold;
On the clover-breadth the shepherd
Pens his white flock in the fold.

Show the distant hills in outline,
Pale and blue, and sharp and clear;
In the willow-tree the throstle
Pipes the requiem of the year.

On the purpled brow of evening
Sits one trembling silver star;
I and Nellie, 'neath the hazels,
Stand and watch its light afar.

May it be, that sphere is peopled,
Even as ours, with busy brains,
Loving hearts, and honest toilers,
Subject to our 'oys and pains?

Who shall say? The book is scaled.
Many worlds perchance there be
In the universe of Heaven,
Many isles upon that sea.

Nell's dark eyes are turn'd upon me,
Neither longer looks above;
Gone are all our dreaming fancies,
'Tis enough to live and love.
Astley H Baldwin

Otago Witness 28 March, Page 14
Shipping Port Chalmers Departures
March 20 - Otago, ss, 642 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Saloon

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Portage 	Mr and Mrs
Lyttle 		Miss
Walters 	Mr
Kahu 		Mr
Apes 		Captain
For Wellington -
Gore 		Mrs and child
Chillingworth 	Mr
Batkin 		Mr
For Nelson -
Robinson 	Mr
For Grey -
Rae 		Mrs
For Melbourne -
Glass 		Mrs
Taylor 		Captain
Pope 		Mr
14 Chinese for Hokitika
and 22 steerage passengers for all ports


March 25 - Dunfillan, ship 353 tons, Kerr, for London. A C Begg, agent.

Passengers:
Blair 		Mr
Hewlett 	Messrs (2)

Otago Witness 28 March 1874, Page 15 Birth
Small: On the 10th March at Cardrona, the wife of G W Small, of a daughter.
Death : Scott Jane Elizabeth: On the 6th February, suddenly, at East Strafthdownie, Casterton, Victoria, Jane Elizabeth, eldest daughter of the late Rev John Scott, HEICS, Hourah, Calcutta, and sister of Mr D McP Scott, Schoolmaster, Macetown.
Marriage : Drummond - Harrison: On the 20th March at Otepopo, by the Rev Mr Ryley, Mr Peter Drummond, late of Stirling, Scotland, to Helen Harrison, sixth daughter of Mr Thomas Harrison, Westwater, East Taieri.


Otago Witness 4 April, Page 5
We have elicited a few additional facts from Captain Loftus of the Trevelyan, in reference to the singular mutiny on board the barque Satsuma, a report of which appears In another column. As soon as the Satsuma was within distance of the Trevelyan she signalled what had occurred and upon that Captain Loftus presuming that she stood in need of assistance, lowered his boat and went on board. He then saw enough to convince him that a serious mutiny had occurred. There were the wounds of the captain and marks in the smashed companion hutch and other damages, of the Satsuma which had taken place. Captain Leslie of the Satauma, stated that during the passage he had had a great deal of trouble with the men, and that three of the six men who went away in the boat were old Californian rangers. The Mutiny and the subsequent action taken by the mutineers are certainly most astonishing, and, we may add, unparelleled in as much that it is the rule for mutineers to stick by the ship and send their unfortunate victims adrift, instead of vice versa. But in this case the men deliberately launched themselves in an open boat in the middle of the wide ocean, with but a very inadequate stock of provisions for a voyage of 900 miles- that is, if they meditated fetching Rio Janeiro, the nearest part of the South American coast -whilst the inhospitable island of Trinidad lay 300 miles nearer to them. These were their nearest land points. However, their chances of reaching either place were exceedingly remote, because firstly they set out upon their mad cruise in the belt of doldrums, south of the SE Trade belt and might therefore be tossed about for days by unfavourable weather; and secondly, it is more than probable that, having an abundant stock of spirits with them, they would engage in a heavy debauch and meet their fate either at each other's hands, or be overwhelmed by the elements. It is of course possible that they may have been picked up by a passing vessel, as they were right in the track of outward-bounders to the Colonies and East India. But if rescued that way, it would be but to answer to the laws they have so audaciously outraged, for of a surety they would be brought within reach of the hand of justice. This latest story from the sea is truly singular, and almost incredible, were it not for the authenticity of its details. The Trevelyan was not the first vessel which the Satsuma fell in with after the mutiny. She was fortunate enough to meet with a German ship, from which she obtained three seamen, who, with the remnant of her original crew, were enough to take her to the Cape of Good Hope, from which she was only some 700 miles distance when the Trevelyan spoke her. Hence she did not require assistance from the latter vessel.

The Rose M, a handy barque of Yankee build and sightly appearance, arrived at Port on Tuesday from Calcutta. Her coming is an event in its way, because the Rose M is the first vessel direct from East India to this port, and has thus opened a trade that we trust will increase and prosper year by year. The barque has done very well since she left Calcutta on the 22nd of January last, during the height of the NE monsoon season. She cleared the Hoogley on the 27th, and crossed the Equator on the 9th of February, having experienced a very poor monsoon in the Bay of Bengal. She, however, carried it to the Line. On the 14th of March she met with a first slant from the westward, she then being in 134 cast longitude. The breeze took her to Port Phillip Heads by the 18th; the same day she ran in and anchored under Queenscliffe. Landed passengers and watered, and left again on the 20th, had variable winds across, and made the West Cape on Sunday last. Passed the Solander shortly after midnight, and Dog Island at 9 am on Monday; and after a slashing run along the coast, arrived at the Heads at 10 pm. Stood off and on during the night and anchored yesterday morning, was towed in by the Geelong in the afternoon, when the gale abated. Captain Dennis, of the Rose M, reports remarkably fine weather during the passage from Calcutta, topgallantsails being carried right to the Heads. The barque brings a mixed cargo, rice predominating. We may observe that she went from Melbourne to Calcutta. She did not fall in with a single vessel between Calcutta and Queenscliffe and only sighted one coming across a barque in Foveaux Strait.

Arrival of the Ship Trevelyan
The anxiously looked for ship Trevelyan arrived in port on Sunday evening, after an exceptionally long passage of 117 days from the Downs, and 120 days from London. She, however, comes in good order and condition - the length of her passage being accountable to light weather, the exceedingly foul bottom of the ship, and also to the fact that, although a remarkably fine vessel and good seaboat, the "go" is not in her. She is anything but a clipper. However, she has made a very comfortable passage; and after getting over her first mishap, when she carried away some of her head gear, and had to run back to the Downs, she made a final start on December 2nd, and cleared the land on the 8th, taking a last departure from Start Point. Kerguelen Land was passed on the 3rd of March, the ship did good running, and also to the south end of Tasmania, which was passed on the 21st of March. Then she was headed by easterly weather three days, and the westerly start that followed took her to within sight of Stewart's Island on the afternoon of the 26th, thick cloudy weather prevailing. Light variable weather was experienced on the coast. Otago Heads were sighted at 2 pm yesterday, and the ship towed in astern of the Geelong and anchored at the powder ground at 7 pm. She stays there to discharge 10 tons of powder she has on board, and then will remove to a berth higher up the harbour. The Trevelyan brings 20 passengers and a large cargo, particulars of which are published in another place. She is a fine ship of over 1000 tons register, and belongs to Messrs Shaw, Savill and Co, and comes here consigned to Messrs Russell, Ritchie, and Co. She is of iron build, and her dimensions are, length, overall, 245 feet; beam, 33 feet; depth of hold, 21 feet. She is on her first visit to this port, as also is her commander Captain Loftus, to whom we are indebted for the report of her passage, and its incidents, which are more than usually interesting. Only one death occurred during the passage, that of Alfred Jeune, the cook of the ship, from an attack of bronchitis, from which he had been suffering off and on for five weeks. He died on the 15th of February, in lat 28 south, long 21 cast. February 9th, spoke and boarded the barque Satsuma of Sunderland, bound to the Cape of Good Hope; lat 36 south, long 5 west - which reported of a mutiny aboard: (Story above)

Otago Witness 4 April 1874, Page 14
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
March 29 - Southern Cross, barque, 324 tons, Boon, from Hobart Town / Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Passengers:
Besier 		Mr and Mrs
Brooks	 	Mr
Currie 		Mr
Haskel 		Mrs and son
James 		Mr
Levien 		Mrs and 2 children
And 18 steerage

Trevelyan, ship, 1041 tons, Lofus, from London, December 2nd. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Austin 		Mr
Davis 		Rev Mr and Mrs, Miss, Master and servant
Downes 		Mr
Gardiner 	Mr
Harkness 	Mr and Mrs
Navin 		Mr
Pycroft 	Mr
Southerland 	Rev Mr and Master
Vowell 		Mr
2nd Cabin:
Jackson 	Mr
Lodge 		Mr
Nicolls 	Miss
Richards 	Mr and Mrs

Rose M, barque, 366 tons, Dennis, from Calcutta. Lange and Thoneman, agents. Saloon Passenger: Captain Pendleton
Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne via Oamaru and other ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Bergren 	Dr
Ellison 	Mr
Haworth 	Mr
Huie 		Mr
Kenney 		Mr
Lees 		Mr
McKenzie 	Mr
Manson 		Mr
Matthews 	Misses (2)
Mitchell 	Mrs
Ostler 		Mr
Palmer 		Miss
Smith 		Mr and Mrs and 3 children
Taiaroa 	Mr
And 25 steerage
And 26 for Melbourne

April 2 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 570 tons, Bawden, from Melbourne March 26th, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Bawden 		Master and nurse
Chapman 	Mr
Cottier 	Miss
Davis 		Mrs, Misses (2) and Master
Foster 		Mr
Harris 		Miss
Ireland 	Mr
Jarman 		Mrs
Levison 	Mr
McCarthy 	Mr
McNeill 	Mr
Rankin 		Mr
Roberts 	Mr
Scott 		Mr
Seeley 		Mr, Mrs and Miss
Wilkinson 	Mr and Mrs
And 45 in the steerage

Departures
April 1 - City of Dunedin, ship, 1085 tons, for London, Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Passengers: Cabin -
Hockon 		Mrs
Kerrow 		Mr
Kroning 	Mr
Shaw 		Mr
2nd Cabin -
Faulkner 	Mr
Forrest 	Mr and Mrs and 5 children
Gregg 		Mr
Guthrie 	Mr
L?arty 		Mr
McEwan 		Mr and Mrs
Malcolm 	Mr
Moss 		Mrs and Miss
Richardson 	Mr
Scott 		Mr
Steinmetz 	Mrs and 4 children
Stoddart 	Mr and Mrs and 4 children
Sweeney 	Mr and Mrs

Otago Witness 4 April 1874, Page 15 Marriages
Marshall - Drysdale: On the 27th March at the residence of the bride, Ida Burn, by the Rev J McCosh Smith, Presbyterian Church, Naseby, William Marshall, to Georgina Isabella Douglas Drysdale, both of Ida Burn.
McLean - Stevenson: On the 27th March, at Roslyn, by the Rev John Gow, Charles McLean, to Eliza Jane Stevenson.

Otago Witness 4 April 1874, Page 22 Select Poetry
The Plough and the Press. (From the Wimping " Nor' Water")
We envy not the princely man,
In city or in town.
Who wonders whether pumpkin vines
Run up the hill or down.
We care not for his marble balls,
Nor yet his heaps of gold;
We would not own his sordid heart
For all his wealth thrice told.

We are the favoured ones of earth.
We breathe pure air each morn,
We sow, we reap the golden grain,
We gather in the corn.
We toil, we live on what we earn;
And more than this we do;
We hear of starving millions round,
And gladly feed them too.

The lawyer lives on princely fees,
Yet drags a weary life;
He never knows a peaceful hour,
His atmosphere is strife.
The merchant thumbs his yard stick o'er -
Grows haggard at his toll -
He's not the man God meant him for,
Why don't he till the soil?

The doctor plods through storm and cold,
Plods at his patients' will;
When dead and gone he plods again
To get his lengthy bill.
The Printer - bless his noble soul!
He grasps the mighty earth,
And stamps it on our daily sheet
To cheer the farmer's hearth.

We sing the honour of the Plough
And honour to the Press,
Two noble instruments of toil,
Each with a power to bless;
The bone, the nerve of this fast age -
True wealth of human kind -
One tills the ever-glorious Earth,
The other tills the Mind.

Disaster to the Somersetshire on her voyage from Australia
The Argus has been favoured with the following account of the disaster to the Somersetshire by a gentleman who was a passenger on board:
Valparaiso, December 1st,1873.
The Somersetshire left Melbourne on the 28th October and proceeded on her voyage to England by way of Cape Horn. Nothing of note occurred until the morning of the 14th November when the ship, while running before a moderate gale took over a sea which smashed into the saloon doors and flooded all the cabins. From that time until Monday the 17th we had very light winds. On that day, when in about latitude 53 S longitude 113 W, the barometer. Fell to 28'25, and there were other indications of a blow. About 7 pm the wind had' increased to a strong gale, and occasional seas began to come over the poop. This continued still increasing until about 10 pm, when the wind blew with the violence of a hurricane. The ship, still running under the same canvas, a very heavy sea came over on the main deck and again broke in the saloon doors, which had been patched up since the gale of the 14th, flooding the saloon and cabins and rushing down the stairway, which is immediately inside the poop doors. While this was going on below, the gale had carried away all the sails on the foremast and the seas had smashed in and carried away nearly all the starboard bulwarks, along with the spare spars which had been secured on deck alongside it. With the bulwarks, of course, all the braces which were made fast to it went, leaving the yards to swing about at every roll of the ship. The only sail now left on the ship was the lower main-topsail and that, as will be seen, only lasted for a few minutes more. Our most serious danger, however, arose from the after hatch - which is, immediately under the break of the poop - being stove in. One of the skids on which three of the boats were placed bottoms up had been broken by some means, and when this gave way one of the boats fell upon the hatches, which not being very strong, were broken in. This allowed the seas to rush down and flood the 'tween decks in some places to the depth of over 2ft. While some of the officers and men were trying to cover it with sails, one of the harness casks, in which the mess pork is kept, having broken loose, was carried by the sea down the hatchway, and falling upon the hatches of the lower hold, broke through these also, and thus allowed the seas to pour into the hold of the ship. All those who were cognisant of this state of matters thought that our fate would be that of the London, as the water was still rolling on to the main deck in immense volumes, both over the rail and in through the breach where the bulwarks had gone on the other side. The men who were endeavouring to secure the hatch were in constant danger of being washed overboard; some of them, indeed, were carried down the hatchway into the 'tween decks along with the hatches which they were striving to fit on. They ultimately, however, partially succeeded in stopping the gaping hole which threatened our destruction. About halfpast 10 our last sail went to ribbons. To give some idea of the strength of the wind, it may be stated that this was a new sail procured in Melbourne, made from the best No. 1 Gourock canvas. When this sail went the helm was immediately starboarded and the ship brought up to the wind on the port tack, thus bringing to the lee the side which had lost its bulwarks. This prompt action, in conjunction with the stopping up of the hatchway, we believe, saved the ship, as without a rag of sail she would have lost way and then was as likely to come up on the one tack as the other, and if she had come up with her exposed side to the sea, nothing could have saved us. The ship fortunately came to the wind without taking over any seas, and the mainyards having been braced round and some tarpaulins put on the weather mizzen rigging, she kept her bow to the sea and rode pretty easily. We now felt that we, had some chance of being saved, but during the hour from 10 to 11 pm, no hope was entertained by anyone. After the saloon doors had been barricaded, the passengers had nothing to do, and prayers were read by one of their number. Everyone was perfectly calm, the ladies behaved with great composure. As soon as the ship was brought to the wind, the passengers and others commenced to bale out the 'tween decks. This occupied them six hours, and steam was got up on the donkey engine to pump out the water which had, made its, way to the hold. When daylight broke, about half-past 2 o'clock next morning, the ship presented a most woeful appearance. The gale still blowing with great violence, the upper main topsail, which had been stowed as above described, blew clean out of the gaskets and at once went to ribbons, so that the whole ship from stem to stern was garnished with tatters and the foreyards swinging round at every roll of the ship, threatened to bring the mast over, which it ultimately did about 7 or 8 am breaking close off by the cap and all the yards going overboard with it had to be cut away. The decks were lumbered up with broken boats and, tangled ropes, and the ends of the starboard quarter-boat, which had been smashed by a sea, were, dangling by the davits and bumping against the side at every roll of the ship. The seas washed constantly on the main deck by the breach in the bulwarks, but otherwise the ship rose easily to the high sea which was still running, and took very little water over the weather side. The sad part, of the disaster: now comes to be told. When the skids gave way, and the men fell on the deck, three were severely crushed; one, the boatswain, only lived for about half an hour, the others happily, are recovering. Next morning it was also, found that two of the firemen were missing. For a time it was hoped that they might be found in some part of the ship, but as the day wore on the conclusion was forced upon us that they had been washed overboard when engaged in putting a cover over the grating which is over the stoke-hole. One them leaves a widow and five children; the other was not married, and the boatswain was a widower without children. Taking into consideration the destitute condition in which the widow and children of the fireman McCarthy are left, the passengers and ship's company got up a subscription on their behalf, and although there were but few passengers, the fund at this time has reached £146. During the whole of the trying time, the captain and his officers conducted themselves with the utmost coolness and bravery. Captain Atwood, who had hardly left the deck the whole day previous, was disabled about 11 pm by a sea, which washed him halfway along the poop and landed him among the relieving tackle of the helm. This sprained his knee and he was obliged to keep his bed all next day. The wind having gradually abated on the 18th, steam was got up. After consultation with his officers, Captain Attwood decided that his best course was to proceed to Valparaiso, distance 1800 miles, to refit. The storm which we have passed through had shown us several weak points in ships like the Somersetshire. Poop ships seem to us to be very unfit to withstand the heavy seas which are met with in both the Southern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the main decks of' such vessels, when at all deeply laden, being mere traps for the seas, which, when once on board, do not readily find their way to the scuppers, but wash about everything that is not very firmly secured, endangering the hatches, and frequently breaking in the front of the saloons, as was done both in our own case and also in that of the Dallam Tower.

Otago Witness 11 April 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
April 7 - Tasso, barque, 264 tons, Moulden, from Newcastle. Master, agent. Passengers:  Mrs Moulden and child
Departures
April 3 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, Sampson, for Newcastle. Findlay & Co, agents.

Passengers:
Cain 		Mr
Galloway 	Mr
Hooghan 	Mr
Langley 	Mr
Larkin 		Mr
McLean 		D
Moss 		Mr
Nugent 		Mr
Rae 		Mr
Ritchings 	Mr
Toomey 		Mr

Albion, 591 tons. Underwood, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents.

Passengers:
Atkinson 	Mr
Brough 		Mr and Mrs
Burke 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Evans 		Mrs
Fleming 	Rev R
Hagger 		Miss
McLean 		Mr
Notman 		Mr
Roberts 	Mrs and 2 children
Smith 		Mr
White 		Mrs
And 36 steerage
For Bluff -
Atkin 		Mr and Mrs
Bagley 		Mr
Belcher 	Mrs
Boyes 		Mr
Malaghan 	Mr
Moran 		Mr and Mrs
And 1 steerage

April 5 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 570 tons, Bawden, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Dunk 		Mrs
Irvine 		Mr
Tainui 		Mr
For Nelson -
Aldridge 	Mr
For Greymouth -
McGowan 	Mr
Steerage 6
And 11 Chinese for the Coast

April 7 - A & A Co's MSS Mongol, 2262 tons, Flamank, for Kandavu, via Lyttelton and other ports. Driver, Stewart & Co, agents.

Passengers: 
For Liverpool -
Moore 		C G
For Ireland -
Coleman 	Rev Father
For San Francisco -
Donald 		Mr
Duncan 		Mr, Mrs, Misses (4) and Masters (5)
Forster 	Mr
Guthrie 	Mr and Mrs, John, Miss and Master
Hancock 	Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Jeffrey 	Mr
Moody 		Mr
And 1 in the steerage
For Lyttelton -
Foster 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
For Wellington -
Cullen 		Mr
Dowse 		Mr
Stuart 		Rev Dr
For Auckland -
Crowhurst 	Mr
For Kandavu -
1 in the steerage

(Page 13 - Cable Telegram London, March 25th The body of Dr Livingstone has arrived at Aden, en route for England)

Otago Witness 11 April 1874, Page 26 Select Poetry
Growing Up
Oh to keep them still around us, baby darlings, fresh and pure,
"Mothers" smile their pleasures crowning, "mother's" kiss their sorrows cure;
Oh to keep the waxen touches, sunny curls, and radiant eyes,
Pattering feet, and eager prattle - all young life's lost Paradise!

One bright head above the other, tiny hands that clung and clasped,
Little forms, that close enfolding, all of Love's best gifts were grasped;
Sporting in the summer sunshine, glancing round the winter hearth;
Bidding all the bright world echo with their fearless, careless mirth.

Oh to keep them; how they gladdened all the path from day today,
With gay dreams we fashioned of them, as in rosy sleep they lay;
How each broken word was welcomed, how each struggling thought was hailed,
As each bark went floating seaward, love-bedecked and fancy-sailed!

Gliding from our jealous watching, gliding from our clinging hold,
Lo! the brave leaves bloom and burgeon; lo! the shy sweet buds unfold;
Fast to lip, and cheek, and tresses steals the maiden's bashful joy;
Fast' the frank bold man's assertion tones the accents of the boy.

Neither love nor longing keeps them; soon in other shape than ours
Those young hands will seize their weapons, build their castles, plant their flowers;
Soon a fresher hope will brighten their dear eyes we trained to see;
Soon a closer love than ours in those wakening hearts will be.

So It is, and well it is so; fast the river nears the main,
Backward yearnings are but idle; dawning never glows again;
Blow and sure the distance deepens, slow and sure the links are rent;
Let us pluck our autumn roses, with their sober bloom content.

Otago Witness
18 April 1874, Page 16
April 12 - Himalaya, ship 1008 tons, Friston, from London, December 18. H J Gibbs & Co, agents.

Passengers:
King 		Mrs and Miss
Kinty 		Mr
Lawson 		Mr
May 		Mr
Murphy 		Mr and Miss
Osborne 	Mr
Parker 		Mr
Peach 		Mr
And 10 steerage

April 12 - Otago, ss, 642 tons, McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Bannerman 	Mrs
Begg 		C
Burfield 	Mrs and Miss
Decarle 	Mr and Mrs, Misses (2) and Master
Fairclough 	Mr
Ibbotson 	Mr
McNaughton 	Mr
Mong 		Long
Morris 		Mr
Munro 		Mr
Proudfoot 	Mr
Robertson 	Rev Mr
Smith 		Miss
Soutter 	Mr
And 21 in the steerage

Hopeful, barque, 332 tons, Luly, from Mauritius. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents. Passengers: 350 Chinese
Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents.

Passengers:
Allan 		Mrs and family
Ancell 		Mr
Broadbent 	Mr
Horner 		Mrs
Orr 		Mr
Pierce 		Mr
Reid 		Mr and Mrs
Smith 		Mr
Stamper 	Mr
Webb 		Miss
And 11 in the steerage

Durham, ship, 998 tons, Sexton, from London, Jan 13th. Bright Bros, agents. Saloon

Passengers:
Sexton 		Mrs
2nd Cabin -
Cowling 	Mr
Davis 		Mr
Wagstaff 	Mr

Departures
April 11 - Otago, ss, 646 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, Lyttelton and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Beale 		Mr
Gillies 	Mr
For Wellington -
Gloag 		Captain
For Melbourne -
Jackson 	Mr
Stevenson 	Mr and Mrs and child
5 steerage for all ports
and 120 Chinese for Hokitika

Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols & Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Bluff -
Arthur 		Mr
Cameron 	Mr
De Beer 	Mr
Modison 	Mr
Pollock 	Mr
Robertson 	Mr
And 8 steerage
For Melbourne -
Caffin 		Mr
Cooper 		Mr
Dow 		Mr and Mrs
Hawden 		Mrs and daughter
Jacobs 		Mrs and 2 Children
Lewis 		Miss
Moore 		Rev Mr and Mrs
Ode 		Mr
Orr 		Mr
Palmer 		Mr and son
And 17 steerage

Arrival of the ship Himalaya
The signal "A ship to the southward" was made at the Heads early on Sunday morning and soon afterwards the steamer Geelong proceeded outside, and half-an-hour before noon returned with the long-expected Himalaya in tow. The latter having powder on board anchored at the Powder Ground, where she was boarded by the Customs and Harbour authorities, and members of the Press. She looked travel stained in the extreme, and bore marks of fierce encounter with the elements - her foretopgallant mast being down, whilst the head of her foretopmast and the heel of the maintopmast were both fished. This is the Himalaya's first visit to this port. She is a fine-looking 1000 ton ship, and flies the house flag of Shaw, Savill, and Co, who, however, have not long owned her, having purchased her for this trade only a few mouths ago from her former owners G T Tiser and Co of London.

Arrival of the Durham
The signal of a ship to the northward, and then others for a pilot and a tug to proceed to the Heads, were made on Tuesday afternoon and responded to and in due time the Geelong returned with the ship Durham in tow. Having 18 tons of powder on board, the Durham was anchored at the lower end of the powder ground and was there boarded by all those who had immediate business with her. She is a fine looking iron ship of 993 tons register, and although not a stranger to New Zealand waters, having traded to Auckland, is on her first visit to this port. She belongs to Messrs Temperly, Carter, and Duke, the firm which owns the Warwick, and comes here consigned to Messrs Bright Brothers. The dimensions of the Durham are -Length 198 feet; beam 33 feet; depth of hold 21 feet. She has superior saloon accommodation, and, taking her throughout, is a sightly well-appointed vessel. Her commander is Captain Sexton. The Durham has had what may be termed a fair weather passage of 91 days duration. She brings a full general cargo, and only four passengers.

Otago Witness 18 April 1874, Page 26 Select Poetry
For those at Sea
Two little mischievous, curly patea,
From d 'wny pillows starting,
Out of the darkness leap upright.
Into the moonbean's treak of white,
The cradle curtains parting;
And "Mother! mother!" the children cry,
"Come and sing us a lullaby."

"What shall I sing to you, babies mine?
The waves have drowned my singing -
Ever they ring so loud and strong,
Ever repeat the same sad song,
A weary burthen bringing -
A burthen of brave men cast away,
And storm-tost wrecks on the ocean spray.

"Listen, oh! listen, my small, sweet son.
My Robin fearless-hearted:
Summer and winter both are sped,
And mother's hopes are nigh to dead
For one so lone: departed.
Oh ! pray, my darling, pray to-night
That God will guide that wanderer right,

"Dear little wandering, wide blue eyes!
"What is my Robin saying?" -
"Mother, father will soon come back;
Cherubs aloft take care of Jack,
And keep him from de'aying;
He said so when he last was here," -
"Oh, baby! but our hearts to cheer,

"And but to make our spirits light,
And stay our tears from flowing.
The cherubs that our sailors guard,
The cherubs that keep watch and ward,
Are prayers to Heaven going -
Prayers wrung from hearts pierced thro' with pain;
God send they be not poured in vain!

"Fold your hands, little Robin, in mine,
And softly say with mother,
"God keep my father safe at sea,
And bring him home again to me,
And to my baby-brother.
Fierce is the wild wind and fierce the wave,
Please God take care of my father brave."

"What, baby too must repeat it now!
I thought my lamb was sleeping.
But hark! yon boom from harbour bar,
The deep-toned warning wafted far!
Our God his word is keeping.
And safe in port, his home in sight.
Your father keeps his watch to-night!"

Otago Witness 25 April 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
April 17 - Freetrader, barque, 206 tons, Miles, from Hobart Town, April 9th. G F Reid, agent.

Passengers:
Barker 		Miss
Barton 		Miss
Clark 		Mrs
Digney 		Mr
Dyer 		Mr and Mrs
Fowler 		Mr
King 		Mr and Mrs
Miles 		Mrs
Salaver 	Mrs
Winter 		Mrs and child
And 46 in the steerage

Trial trip of the South Cross
On January 21 the fine new screw-steamier Southern Cross, built by Mr J Eltringham, South Shields, for the New Zealand and Australia trade, went to sea for her trial trip previous to sailing for Newcastle, New South Wales. The Southern Cross measures 140 feet in length, and is propelled by a pair of surface-condensing engines, 50-horse-power nominal and 200 horse-power effective. The vessel was taken for a run to the eastward for the purpose of adjusting compasses, after which a run was taken from the buoy at the Tyne to the buoy opposite to Sutherland Harbour, and a mean speed of nine knots was obtained, which, considering that the steamer was heavily-laden, was considered highly satisfactory to all on board.

The Argus of the 7th inst. reports as follows: "Captain Graham, of the Cingalese, which arrived in port yesterday from Liverpool, gives the following account of five men having been found at sea in an open boat, and picked up by the Kate Carnie: 'The Cingalese on the 1st February, in 33 deg. 51min W, sighted the barque Kate Carnie bound to Hong Kong, and on coming within hailing distance Captain Wilson, of the Kate Carnie, asked Captain Graham if he would relieve him of three out of five men that he had shortly before picked up, as he had not sufficient water on board to last him the voyage if obliged to keep the whole of the men in his vessel. This was acceded to. Captain Wilson of the Kate Carnie then sent his chief officer on board the Cingalese, with the following men: William Weston of Manchester, aged 30; John Johnston of Dungarvan, aged 21; Richard Newton of Preston, aged 19. They were engaged as seamen on board the ship Laura, under the Costa Rica flag, bound from Valparaiso to Monte Video. When out 55 days the crew had to abandon the Laura, as she was in a sinking state, and they took to the boats to save their lives. Those rescued by the Kate Carnie were in their boat seven or eight days before they were picked up. The other boats, two in number, were not seen by those saved by the Kate Carnie beyond the second night after the men left the Laura. An investigation will be held into the matter, when fuller particulars will probably be elicited. We shrewdly suspect that the above relates to the men who were said to have mutinied on board the barque Satsuma, particulars of which occurrence were brought here by the ship Trevelyan. There is prima faeie evidence to support such a conclusion. The mutiny of the Satsuma happened on the 29th January, in lat 31 south, long. 24 west, and three days afterwards the boat was picked up by the Kate Carnie, close to lat. 33.51 south, long. 21.51 W. But the report of the Satsuma states that six men left her, whilst only five were picked up. "What became of the 6th man was, he eaten by the others? The yarn about the voyage from Valparaiso to Monte Video is very like a whale. The boat was found too far to the eastward for that, quite 30 degrees east of Monte Video. Is is not at all probable that vessel would have been blown so far out of her course, whilst in open boat could not make a great deal of headway in 8 days, unless favoured by exceptional weather and winds.


Otago Witness 2 May 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
April 25 - William Davie, ship, Rankin, from London, January 14th, via Bluff, April 23rd. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passengers:
4 steerage
April 27 - Asia, ship, 1445 tons, McMillan, from London via Cork. A C Begg, agent. Saloon Passengers: Mr Hare and 389½ statute adult immigrants, nominated, free.
April 28 - Tararua, ss, Clark, from Melbourne, via the West Coast and Wellington. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Apes 		Mr
Bennett 	Mr
Captain 	Mr
Cullen 		Mr
Haines 		Mrs
Hamilton 	Mr
Hughes 		Mrs
Jackson 	Mr
Johnston 	Rev Mr
Kaka 		Mr
Macnamara 	Miss
Marks 		Mrs
Orbin 		Mr
Polki 		Mr and Mrs
Polki 		Miss
Rankin 		Mr
And 13 in the steerage

Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Anderson 	Mr
Blythe 		Mr
Dalgety 	Mr
Donaldson 	Mr
Eskdale 	Mr
Fane 		Mr
Paterson 	Mr
Price  		Miss G
Richards 	Mr
Rowe 		Mrs and family
Roxby 		Mr
And 15 in the steerage

Departures
April 24 - Tokatea, barque, 805 tons, McKinnon, for Sydney. Neill and Co, agents. Passengers: 9 second class and 20 original Chinese
April 26 - Warwick, ship, 1005 tons, Skinner, for London. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Hogg 		Mrs and 3 children
Lawrie 		Mr
Miller 		Mrs
Ross 		Mrs, 3 children and servant
Skinner 	Mrs and 3 children
Tilford 	Mr
And 16 second cabin

April 29 - Tararua, ss, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Beaver 		Mr
De Beer 	Mr
Gellibrand 	Mr
Gordon 		Mr
Logan 		Mr
Lowe 		Mr
McNaughton 	Dr
May 		Miss
Stonehan 	Miss
And 26 steerage
For Bluff -
Ambridge 	Miss
Beatie 		Mr and Mrs
Deek 		Mrs, 2 children and servant
Howden 		Mr
Mays 		Mrs
Moffatt 	Mr and Mrs and child
Price 		Mr
Sykes 		Mr
Tenage 		Mr
And 4 steerage

Otago Witness 9 May 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers No Arrivals
Departures
May 2 - Carnatic, ship, 871 tons, Moon, for London. A C Begg, agent. Passengers:

Cassells 	Mr and Mrs
Gibb 		Dr
Johnston 	Mr
Stephenson  	Mrs G
And 3 steerage

Otago Witness 9 May 1874, Page 26 Select Poetry
Advice
He has told you the same old story,
Told ever anew by wooers -
The story of pure devotion,
Unchanging while life endures -
This passionate, palpitating,
Persistent lover to yours....

Otago Witness 16 May 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
May 8 - Cyphrenes, R M ss, 1279 tons, Wood, from Kandavu via Auckland and coast ports. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Arkell 		Mr
Carruthers 	Mr
Gloag 		Mr
Hackworth 	Mr
Higginson 	Mr
Jackson 	Mr
McKenzie 	Mr
Nelson 		Mr
Spencer 	C
Williams 	Mr
And five steerage

May 10 Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Atkinson 	Mr
Burke 		Mr
Haldie 		Rev Mr
Harper 		Mr
Hart 		Mr
Hill 		Mr
Keay 		Mrs
Wood 		Mrs and child
And 20 in the steerage

Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne, via the West Coast and Lyttelton. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Coleman 	Captain and Mrs
Geddes 		Mr
Hutton 		Mr
Lewis 		Mr
Muir 		Mrs and Miss
Smyth 		Mr
Todd 		Mr
And 15 in the steerage

Departures
May 8 - Cyphrenes, RM s, 1279 tons, Wood, for Kandavu via coast ports.

Saloon Passengers:
For Wellington -
Belmont 	Mr
Edwards 	Rev Archdeacon
Nevill 		Right Rev Bishop and Mrs
Williamson 	Mr
For Auckland -
Clarkson 	Mr and Mrs
Fergusson 	Mrs and 3 Children
Taylor 		Miss
Willoughby 	Mrs and 2 children 
For San Francisco -
Clayton 	Mr S 
Second cabin:
Rianson 	Mr
Ritchie 	J 
Ross 		Mr
For Liverpool -
Stewart 	Mr
For Napier -
Four steerage

May 11 - Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Bluff -
Beetham 	Mr
Gloar 		Mr
Jackson 	Mr
McKeord 	Mr
Turton 		Mr
For Melbourne -
Campbell 	Mrs and 4 children
Townsend 	Mr
And 13 steerage

Albion ss, 501 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Dank 		Mr
Foster 		Mr
Hart 		Mr
Nicolls 	Mr
And 1 steerage
For Wellington -
Calcutt 	Mr
Gillies 	Mr
And 1 steerage
For Melbourne -
Webb 		Mr
And 1 steerage

Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Albertie 	Mrs
Anderson 	Mr
Bell 		Mr
Blair 		Mr
Coombe 		Mr
Lillon 		Mr and Mrs
Nelson 		Mr
O'Brien 	Mr
Webb 		Mrs
Welsh 		Mr
Wilson 		Mrs and 2 children
Ziele 		Mrs
And 4 steerage
For Bluff -
Brunton 	Mrs
Cook 		Miss
Petrie 		Mr
And 1 steerage


Otago Witness 16 May 1874, Page 25 Select Poetry
Old Letters
Untie the knot that binds, and set them free -
Old line-worn records of the past we'll see;
Scatter them wide, and we will read them o'er,
They will recall the friends we loved of yore.

Here is an answer to some words we spoke,
And here we smile at some remembered joke;
And here some memory of childhood's home -
Ah! how we trusted in the joys to come.

This speaks of sickness and of anxious fear,
Soiled here and there with the fast-falling tear.
Then the black border, and the anguished tone,
Telling of happiness for ever gone.

The border narrows, and the grief seems past -
Perhaps 'tis well such sorrow should not last;
And yet almost with scorn aside we fling
These tokens of the change that time can bring.

Is it the dead alone we thus forget?
See, here a packet all unopened yet,
Breathing of love, repeating each fond vow -
Alas! how carelessly we read them now!

Perhaps we see, as o'er the page we glance,
Some name that then was merely one of chance;
Yet that name since we've blotted out with tears -
It came between us and the hopes of years.

Here the thin paper speaks of foreign clime,
The faint ink telling of the lapse of time;
Longings therein for sight of English shore;
Here the announcement that they come no more.

And now a letter hard to understand,
All blurred and blotted by a childish hand;
Yet how we prized it in the years gone by! -
And now refold it with a gentle sigh.

So pure that memory, so free from pain,
The simple baby-words come back again;
We treasure grains of love thus early sown,
For little of the harvest is our own.

And now we come to lines of grateful love,
Written in sickness, striving still to prove,
Though weak the hand, the heart with hope was fed;
Now hand and heart are numbered with the dead.

Worthless old letters may be, foolish, vain -
Yet we will keep them. Tie the knot again.
Lay them aside. O visions of past years,
My heart beats high, mine eyes are moist with tears.


Otago Witness 23 May 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers No Arrivals
Departures
May 19 - Margaret Galbraith, ship, 841 tons, Peebles, for London. Cargills and McLean, agents.

2nd Cabin Passengers:
Callender 	Mr
Jenkins 	Mr
Lyon 		Mr
McIndoe 	Mr
McLeod 		Mr
McMorron 	Mr
Robertson 	Mrs and child
Wallace 	Mr and two sons

Otago Witness 23 May 1874, Page 18
Telegram Wellington, May 14th
A telegram from the Agent-General, dated May 4th, announces that during April the following emigrant ships sailed for the Colony :- The Miltiades, for Auckland, with 780 souls (but this number seems to be too large for one vessel) ; the Winchester, for Napier, with 400 ; Euterpe and Conflict, for Wellington, with 840 ; Hereford and Monarch, for Lyttelton, with. 990; Caroline, Sussex, and Peter Denny for Port Chalmers, with 1200 ; Garlick, for the Bluff, with 300 ; Adamant, for Nelson, with 330.

Otago Witness 23 May 1874, Page 25
Select Poetry
Love's Exchange
"O give me your heart, dearest Nelly," said I,
As we strolled by the smooth-flowing river -
"O give me your heart, or I'm sure I shall die,
And remorse will possess you for ever!...

Otago Witness 30 May 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
May 22 - Otago, ss, 642 tons, McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Barton 		Mr
Brown 		Mr
Doun 		Mr
Foggerty 	Mrs
Jinck 		Mr
Jones 		Mr
Leggett 	Mr
Lowe 		Mr
McEwen 		Miss
McKenzie 	Mr
Oare 		Mrs
Solaman 	Miss
Trewern 	Mrs
Wilton 		Mr
And 48 in the steerage

Claud Hamilton, ss, 570 tons, Bawden, from Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Brough 		Mr and Mrs
Coastwise -
Ballantine 	Mr and Mrs
Harris 		Dr
Harris 		Mr and Mrs
Morrison 	Mr
Morrow 		Miss
Nichols 	Mr
Rentle 		Mr
Wood 		Mr
And 12 in the steerage

May 24 - James Nicol Fleming, ship, 992 tons, Peacock, from London, February 18th. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Fulton 		G
Fulton 		W
Nicoll 		Rev Mr
Waites 		Mr
And 302 statute adults, immigrants

Halli Bayley, schooner, 113 tons, Harrison, from Hobart Town. W and G Turnbull, agents. Passengers: 3 steerage
May 27 - Southern Cross, barque, 324 tons, from Hobart Town, May 9th. Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Barwin 		Mr and Mrs and two children
Button 		Mr
Hatch 		Mr
Johnston 	Mr
Jowler 		Mrs and two children
Murphy 		Miss
Watkins 	Mrs
And 6 in steerage

Departures
May 23 - Claud Hamilton, ss, Bawdon, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Du Cane 	Governor and suite
McFee 		Mr and Mrs
Byrne 		Mr
And 22 steerage

May 24 - Otago, ss, 640 tons, John McLean, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Fielding     	Mr
Ostler 		Mr
Robertson 	Mr
For Wellington -
Holmes 		Hon Mr
Murray 		Mr
Tolmie 		Mr
For Melbourne -
Farr 		Mrs
Forlong 	Mrs
Handyside 	Mr
Swanston 	Mr
And 4 steerage

Arrival of The James Nicol Fleming
Our old acquaintance, the ship James Nicol Fleming put in a welcome appearance on Sunday forenoon, after a passage of 95 days from the East India Docks. She reached the Heads before noon yesterday and was there delivered over to the tug Geelong which had gone out to meet her, and soon towed her to the anchorage off Port Chalmers. This proceeding was of course consequent upon the gratifying condition of the large number of free and nominated emigrants she brings out. Not one case of serious sickness occurred during the passage, which happy exemption from the most dreaded of the contingencies that beset the path of emigrants is in a great measure to be attributed to the care exercised in keeping the ship clean, and in preserving good order amongst her passengers. The Fleming was towed right through the shipping, and moored off the end of the Railway Pier, but before she had reached so far, she was boarded by Mr Monson, the General Government Emigration Officer, and by Capt, Thomson, on behalf of the Board of Health. The immigrants have arrived in good health, and appeared to be rather above the average. They were well spoken of by the captain, doctor, and matron.
    Grave charges were brought against the Surgeon. Superintendent, Dr Freeman, by the passengers. A petition signed by nearly 60 of the married men was presented to the Captain on March 23rd, its purport being a request that the Captain would take the control of the immigrants, the Doctor being neglectful, and also given to drunkenness. The single men also made a written complaint to the Captain about the condition of one of their number named Huntly Burke, who had been lying ill some time, and yet the Doctor had refused to put him in hospital. We readily give publication to these matters, deeming it to be of the utmost importance to the cause of immigration that only the most capable and thoroughly respectable medical men should be appointed to take charge of emigrants.
The J. N. Fleming was fitted up in the usual manner. There were hospitals and the dispensary, a commodious galley, and a Chapman's condenser that was reported to have worked well, and was capable of producing 500 gallons of fresh water per day.
The ship left the East India Docks on Feb. 18th, and took a last departure from the Start on the 25th. The Equator was crossed on the 19th, in long. 25.47; The meridian of Greenwich was passed on the 10th of April, in lat. 37.18 S and the meridian of the Cape on the 13th of April. Next day the breeze failed, and hauled to the SE and on the 10th blew a strong gale, that was attended by a very low glass - the mercury having fallen to 28.70. The gale continued until the 18th, and during its height Mrs Tinson, one of the emigrants, gave birth to a stillborn child. After the gale the wind veered to the westward, and held there until the 25th, when it went into SE again and blew up another gale, during which the ship head reached under the three lower topsails. Another birth also happened - Mrs Bragg being confined of a daughter; and both did well. This gale was succeeded by the steady westerlies, and the ship commenced to knock off her easting in good style, and ran it down in about the 45th parallel. On the 4th March a second sea-born youngster made her appearance - the wife of Mr Hailiday being safely delivered of a fine little girl. On the 8th May the ship crossed the meridian of the Leuwin, and experienced a change of wind of short duration to SE. The breeze then backed to west, and freshed to a severe gale, before which the Fleming ran under lower fore and main topsails. A heavy sea got up, and the glass fell to 28.20. It was during this gale that the only mishap to the ship occurred. She was, bowling along at eleven-knot speed and rolled heavily at times; and shortly after midnight of the 8th - which makes the date the 9th of May - she gave a tremendous lurch to starboard and at the same time struck something with a force that produced a startling concussion fore and aft. It was at first supposed she had run hit a piece of floe ice, but Captain Peacock afterwards concluded that it was a piece of wreck. But, whatever it was, the ship suffered considerably. She received the blow on the tore part of the starboard fore rigging. Two of the plates and one part of the main bulwarks were stove in; 20 feet of the mainsail was split; and 15 feet of the topgallant bulwark carried away. A couple of sheets of her copper were were also torn off, and one of the diagonal plates supporting the deck-house was bent. The ship passed on without striking a second time, and hence it is inferred that it was wreckage which she encountered. The gale broke at daylight, and thence until the Snares were sighted on the 19th May. The Fleming arrives in splendid trim, she is flying light. Of the statute adults she has on board 36 are single women.

Otago Witness 30 May 1874, Page 25 Select Poetry
In Liquor
A mouse one day on frolic bent,
About a brewery roaming,
Into a beer-butt sudden went,
And called, with sighs and groaning,

Unto a cat which passed that way,
'Though to its sight most hateful,
"Sweet puss, come lift me out, I pray,
And I'll prove ever grateful!"

"How would it help you in the least,"
Replied Grimalkin, grinning,
"When I at once should on you feast -
And where would be the sinning?"

"And better so than here to drown,
Dear puss - so help me speedy,
And I'll to you my life lay down,
And will not call you greedy."

Quick, quick, or you will be too late!
I perish, I am freezing!"
Puss helped him out; but, luckless fate,
The beer fumes set her sneezing.

The mouse she dropped, which sped away,
And in its hole safe nestled;
Puss, disappointed of her prey,
With craft and anger wrestled.

"Come from that hole," she cried, "and roam
With me in regions upper."
"Excuse me, puss, I'll keep at home -
So seek elsewhere your supper."

"You cheating rascal, think, oh, think,
You promised I should cat you
If I would help you; now you shrink -
Come out, let me entreat you."

"I know I promised," mousie said,
"Yet wonder not nor bicker,
For when the promise it was made
You know I was ' in liquor.' "


Otago Witness, 6 June 1874, Page 18
Bluff, May 29th. The s.s. Alhambra left Melbourne at 2 p.m. on the 23rd. and arrived at the Bluff at 8.33 a.m. to-day. She brings 14 saloon and 22 steerage passengers, and 350 tons of cargo for all ports. She sails for Dunedin at 4 p.m.

Saloon passengers — 
Mears 		Miss
Daverie 	Mrs
Anderson 	Mrs 
Hall 		Mr J. 
Anderson, J. 	Mr
Clark 		Mr
Esther 		Mr
Beaver 		Mr
Salomon 	Mr
Watkin 		Mr
Hall 		Masters Alfred and Oliver
eleven in the steerage, and 230 tons of cargo.

Otago Witness 6 June 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
May 29 - Buckinghamshire, ship, 1406 tons, Harland, from London, March 8th, Matheson Bros, agents. Passengers: Mrs Bristowe
And 505 free and nominated immigrants

Janet Court, ship 908 tons, Crawford, from Glasgow, February 25th. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passengers:
275 free and nominated immigrants

Saloon Passengers:
Russell  	Mr D and Mrs 
Wade  		Mr F and Mrs
Hale 		Mrs J and Master (2)
Anderson 	Mrs
Mears 		Miss
Tulloch 	Mr and child
Bendall 	Mr
Grant 		Mr
Soloman 	Mr
Clarke 		Mr
Watkins 	Mr
Esther 		Mr
Stevens 	Sergeant-major
And 17 steerage

May 31 - RMSS City of Adelaide, 824 tons, Brown, from Kandavu via coast ports. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
From San Francisco -
Barr 		Mr and Mrs
From Auckland -
Sprott 		Mrs
From Wellington -
Bell 		Mr
Gillis 		Mr
Calcutt 	Mr
Hunter 		Mr
From Lyttelton -
McNeil 		Mr
Woods 		Mr
Turnbull 	Mr
Dunk 		Mr
Tolmie 		Mr
Holmes 		Mr
And 4 steerage

Departures
May 30 - Helen Burns, ship, Malcolm, for London. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agent

Saloon Passengers:
Burns 		Mr and Mrs and 9 children
And 2 in the steerage

June 2 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Parr 		Mr
Joiner 		Mr
For Hokitika -
Hart 		Mr
And 4 in the steerage for sundry ports

RMSS City of Adelaide, 824 tons, Brown, for Kandavu via Coast Ports. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
For Liverpool -
Sutton  	Mr G
For Kandavu -
Nixon  		Mr A
And 6 in the steerage
For Lyttelton -
Amos 		Mr and Miss
Grey 		Miss
Burns 		Mr
De Bourbel 	Mr
And 1 in the steerage
For Wellington -
Reynolds 	Hon Mr
Campbell 	Hon R
Dawson 		Mr
Crawford 	Mr
For Napier -
Rich 		Mrs
Gardiner 	Mr
Small 		Mr
For Auckland -
Atkinson 	Major
For San Francisco -
2 in the steerage

Arrival of The Buckinghamshire
As soon as tide served on Friday, 20th ult, the ship Buckinghamshire was towed in from the Heads and anchored off Carey's Bay, There was no stopping by the way, the ship having a thorough clean bill of health, and the tenor to that effect of her way bill received the most conclusive endorsement by the appearance of the very large number of immigrants whom she has brought here. The Buckinghamshire is a fine ship of 1466 tons register, commanded by Captain Robert Harland, a veteran seaman, who is not a total stranger to these waters, having paid Dunedin a visit on the second year after the foundation of the Province. The ship he now commands is owned by Messrs O. Marshall and Sons, of London, and was chartered for the present voyage by Messrs Shaw, Savill and Co, and comes here consigned to Messrs Matheson Bros. She is a handsome iron vessel, suitable in every respect for the conveyance of immigrants, having lofty, well-lighted and well-ventilated 'tween decks, and a roomy main deck. She is pierced for side scuttles in the 'tween decks and is capitally appointed throughout. Her dimensions are length over all 238 ft; beam 37ft; depth of hold 23ft. She brings a large cargo, much of it being dead weight, which accounts for her trim. She lies rather deep in the water, her draught being 22ft aft.
She has 505 immigrants on board, classified as follows:
Adults - Males 234; females 114
Children, aged from 1 to 12 years - Males 69; females 66.
Infants - Males 12; females 10.
The number of statute adults is 415½.
Dr Ingram Welsh is the surgeon superintendent in charge of the immigrants, and Mrs Poster is the matron. We may observe that the latter was appointed to the post after the ship sailed. Thirty females were under her special control - not all spinstors, three of them being widows with families. The single men numbered 178, and appeared hale and hearty and inclined to put their shoulders to the wheel in the new country they have come to. Work, work, give us work, was the cry, and a shout of exultation arose when they were informed that no hands ready to work need be idle bore. All the immigrants were favourably spoken of by the captain, doctor, and matron.
There were only 4 deaths; one of them was almost a still-born child. Of the others, Mrs Dowling died of heart disease on the 30th April; Mrs Leddington's little girl died of diarrhoea on the 6th inst, and Mrs Scott's little boy aged 2 years died of hydrocephalus on a later date.
The former reports that the ship left the Downs on March 11th and passed Start Point on the 12th, that being her departure. … On 27th May land was sighted at the Snares and on the afternoon of the 28th the ship arrived at Otago Heads and anchored.

Otago Witness 13 June 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
June 7 - Tararua, ss, 529 tons, Clark, from Melbourne, via the West Coast and Lyttelton. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Nevill 		The Bishop of Dunedin and Mrs
Steele 		Mr and Mrs and 3 children
Dunk 		Mrs
Richmond 	Miss
Edward 		Rev Mr
Caddiford 	Mr
McLellan 	Mr
Gwynneth 	Mr
Gallagher 	Mr
Mackay 		Mr
Bouttoron 	Mr
McCaughlan 	Mr
Wood 		Mr
And 4 in the steerage

June 8 - Albion, ss, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Gibbs 		Mr and Mrs and servant
Evans 		Mr and Mrs
Mirams 		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Mirams 		Miss
Joyce 		Miss 
Hine 		Miss
O'Dea 		Miss
Wilson 		Rev Mr
Logan 		Captain
Matthewman 	Mr
DeBeer 		Mr
Bell 		Mr
Ross 		Mr
Quinlan 	Mr
Pell 		Mr
And 25 steerage

Harriet Armitage, barque, 233 tons, Mailler, from Newcastle, May 21st. H Houghton and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Thomas 		Mrs
Thomas 		Misses (3)
Thomas 		Mr and Master
Lomberg 	Mrs
And 4 steerage

June 8 - Atrato, ss, 2051 tons, Husband, from Plymouth, April 5th. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.
Passengers: 159 free and nominated immigrants (Saloon Passenger listed) Arrival of the Atrato

Departures
June 5 - Undine, ship, 796 tons, Vowell, for Hong Kong, Calvert and Campbell, agents. Cabin Passengers: Six Chinese
Steerage: 27 Chinese
June 6 - Dallam Tower, ship, 1409 tons, Davies, for London. Begg, agent. Passengers: 13 second class
June 8 - Tararua, ss, 530 tons, Clarke, for Melbourne via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Russell 	Theweueli and Master
Robson 		Mr
Roxby 		Mr
Ziele 		Mr
Muller 		Mr
Dripps 		Mr
Stalte 		Mr
And 3 steerage
For Bluff -
Bergren 	Dr
Goodow 		Mr and Mrs

June 8 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne via the coast. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Ayers 		Mr
Murdoch 	Mr
For Wellington -
Winter 		Mr and Mrs, child and servant
For 		Melbourne -
Lundon 		Mr
And 4 steerage for all ports

Otago Witness, 6 June 1874, Page 18
Wellington, May 28th.
During the rough weather yesterday the Tahitian barque Cheviot put in here with loss of mast topmast in a gale, five days out from Newcastle. She is bound for Otago coal laden, and has been forty days out. On arrival she had not a single boat left, and could not communicate with the shore until the Customs boat went off. She will refit here. Her passengers are — Mrs Jenkenson, Misses Jenkenson (4), Messrs Jenkenson (3), and Andrew Watson.

Otago Witness 20 June 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
June 16 - William Gifford, barque, 250 tons, Gibbs, from New York. A Briscoe and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Wilson 		Mrs and Miss
Wilson 		A 
Wilson 		A B
Wilson 		J B

Lady of the Lake, ss, 61 tons, from Port Molyneux. G F Reid, agent.

Passengers:
Russell 	Captain
Moffett 	Mr

June 18 - Frances, barque, 704 tons, Loring, from Boston, via Melbourne June 2. Bates, Sise and Co, agents. Passenger:
Mr Chipman

No Departures

Otago Witness 20 June 1874, Page 17 Marriage
Engel - Sass: On the 10th June, at St Luke's Church, Oamaru, Otago, New Zealand, by the Rev A Gifford, Karl Wilhelm N Engel, of Germany, also of Bendigo, to Mary Ann Sass, relict of Frederick Sass, of Canterbury, New Zealand, and eldest daughter of Anthony Young, of Dalston, London. Australian and other papers please copy.
Death: Howell: On the 25th May, at Sydney, NSW, John Howell of Fairlight Station, Kingston, Lake Wakatipu, aged 64 years.

Otago Witness 20 June 1874, Page 21 Prospectus
Wm Fraser, of Strode and Fraser, runholders
J Logan, runholder
Walter Miller, runholder
J A Connell, of Connell and Moodie
W D Stewart, barrister
M Price, Dunedin
J S Webb, Webb and Fulton
J Brown, senr
C R Chapman, barrister
The Hon James Paterson
W Gellibrand, runholder
D F Main, Barrister-at-Law
W J Burton, Burton Bros
J R Jones, Harbour Steam Company
Charles Zeile, Rattray street
James Hazlett, merchant, Clyde
John Reid, Elderslie, Oamaru
Robert Gillies, Gillies and Street
Donald Reid, MHR
C R Howden, distiller, Cumberland street
Charles Reid, Princes street
R. Glendining, Ross and Glendining
Dr Edward Hulme
John Douglas, runholder,Mount Royal
J T Wright, Wright, Stephenson and Co.
G F Reid, Stafford street
R Paterson, Paterson and M'Leod
R M Robertson, distiller, Rattray street
James Shand, MPC
Wm Barron, Barron, Grant and Co
Wm Park, Park and Curie
George Elliot Barton, Barrister-at-Law
W D Murison, Editor Daily Times
Charles De V Teschemaker, runholder, Taipo, Oamaru
David Proudfoot, railway contractor
Horace Bastings, MPO
W North, North and Scoullar
Hugh M'Neil, Briscoe and Co
John Bathgate, RM.
E B Cargill, Cargills and McLean
H J Walter, Manse street
R K Murray, Rattray stret
James Black, Black and Thomson
Marcus Hume, Dunedin
James Allan, MPC, East Taieri
William Snow, Outram, West Taieri
A J Smyth, contractor
Thomas Birch, merchant
Ed Herbert, Lawrence
Robert Pritchatd, Arrow
Walter Inder, Naseby
M J Malaghan, Queenstown
Job Wain, Manse street
James Fulton, R M
John Scanlan, Scanlan Bros, Princes street
William Kennedy, Rattray street
The Hon John McLean, Redcastle, Oamaru
Edmund Smith, Dunedin Savings Bank
George Proudfoot, railway contractor
C. W. Flexman, wool merchant
John M'Gregor, CE
W H Cutten, late Commissioner of Crown Lands
John Reid, of Corner Bush, Merton
Gilbert Matheson, of Matheson Bros, Dunedin
Henry Orbell, runholder, The River, Waikouaiti
Francis McDiarmid
With power to add to their number

Otago Witness 27 June 1874, Page 7 Prospectus.
James Allan, MPC, East Taieri
William Snow, Outram, West Taieri
A J Smyth, contractor
Thomas Birch, merchant
Ed Herbert, Lawrence
Robert Pritchard, Arrow
Walter Inder, Naseby
M J Malaghan, Queenstown
Job Wain, Manse street
James Fulton, BM
John Scanlan, Scanlan Bros, Princes street
William Kennedy, Rattray street
The Hon John McLean, Redcastle, Oamaru
Edmund Smith, Dunedin Savings Bank
George Proudfoot, railway contractor
C W Flexman, wool merchant
John McGregor, CE
W H Cutten, late Commissioner of Crown Lands
John Reid, of Corner Bush, Merton
Gilbert Matheson, of Matheson Bros, Dunedin
Henry Orbell, runholder, The River, Waikouaiti
Francis McDiarmid, West Taieri
With power to add to their number

Otago Witness 27 June 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
June 21 - Otago, ss, 640 tons, McLean, from Melbourne via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Dow 		Mr and Mrs
Monkhouse 	Mrs and child
Jordan 		Mrs and 2 children
Moore 		Rev Mr
McMullen 	Mr sen
Cope 		Mr
White 		Mr
Dick 		Mr
Day 		Mr
Blair 		Mr
Palmer 		Mr
Cooper 		Mr
Patton 		Mr
Paterson 	Mr
Whittingham 	Mr
Beal 		Mr
And 32 steerage
From Bluff -
Kennasen 	Mrs
Habbitt 	Mrs
Palmer 		Mr
Holmes 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
McMullen 	Mr jun
Young 		Mr
Bergren 	Mr
Lodge 		Mr
Nicholine 	Mr
And 9 steerage

Departures
June 23 - Otago, ss, 640 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Coast ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co., agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Hains 		Mr and Mrs
Flint 		Dr
For Wellington -
Beetham 	Mr
Bergren 	Mr
Buist 		Mr
For Nelson -
De Beer 	Mr
For Greymouth -
Monkhouse 	Mr
And 2 steerage
For Melbourne -
Wright 		Mr and Mrs, four children and servant
Belough 	Mr
McLean 		Mr
Yeats 		Mr
And 3 steerage

Otago Witness 27 June 1874, Page 17 Deaths
Langlands: On the 7th March, at sea, three days' sail from Port Said, of heart disease, Rodger Langlands, third son of the late Rodger Langlands, Lieutenant RN. Canterbury papers please copy.
Cuthbert: On the 15th June, at the residence of her son-in-law, Exe street, Oamaru, Mrs Elizabeth Cuthbert, late of Perth, Scotland, aged 74 years.


Otago Witness 4 July 1874
No shipping

Otago Witness 4 July 1874, Page 13
Prospectus
M. Price, Dunedin
J S Webb, Webb and Fulton
J Brown, senr
C R Chapman, barrister
The Hon James Paterson
W Gellibraud, runholder
D P Main, Barrister-at-Law
W J Burton, Burton Bros
J R Jones, Harbour Steam Company
Charles Zeile, Rattray street
James Hazlettt merchant, Clyde
John Reid, Elderslie, Oamaru
Robert Gillies, Gillies and Street
Donald Reid, MHR
C R Howden, distiller, Cumberland street
Charles Reid, Princes street
E Glendining. Ross and Glendining
Dr Edward Hulme
John Douglas, runholder, Mount Royal
J T Wright, Wright, Stephenson and Co
G F Reid, Stafford street
R. Paterson, Paterson and McLeod
R. M. Robertson, distiller, Rattray street
James Shand, MPC
Wm. Barron, Barron, Grant and Co
Wm Park, Park and Curle
George Elliot Barton, Barrister-at-Law
W D Murison, Editor Daily Times
Charles De V Teschemaker, runholder, Taipo, Oamaru
David Proudfoot, railway contractor
Horace Bastings, MPC
W North, North and Scoullar
Hugh McNeil, Briscoe and Co
John Bathgate, RM
E B Cargill, Cargills and McLean
H J Walter, Manse street
R K Murray, Rattray street
James Black, Black and Thomson
Marcus Hume, Dunedin
James Allan, MPC, East Taieri
William Snow, Outram, West Taieri
A J Smyth, contractor
Thomas Birch, merchant
Ed Herbert, Lawrence
Robert Pritchard, Arrow
Walter Inder, Naseby
M J Malaghan, Queenstown
Job Wain, Manse street
James Pulton, RM
John Scanlan, Scanlan Bros, Princes street
William Kennedy, Rattray street
The Hon John McLean, Redcastle, Oamaru
Edmund Smith, Dunedin Savings Bank
C Flexman, wool merchant
John McGregor, CE
W H Cutten, late Commissioner of Crown Lands
John Reid, of Corner Bush, Merton
Henry Orbell, runholder, The River, Waikouaiti
T A Clowes, of Ashcroft, Spence and Co, Oamaru
Francis McDiarmid, Woodside, West Taieri
Donald Borrie, West Taieri
Joseph Clarke, Victoria and Moa Flat
With power to add to their number.

Otago Witness 11 July 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
July 3 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Ziele 		Mr and Mrs
Alberti 	Mrs
Fulton 		Mrs
Moore 		Miss
Walstub 	Miss
Handyside 	Mr
Cuthbertson 	Mr
Rose 		Mr
17 in steerage
and 30 for other ports

City of Adelaide, RMSS, 824 tons, Brown, from Kandavu. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Kandavu -
Brown 		Mr, mail agent
Crauford 	Dr
Cargill 	Mr
Maitland 	Mr
And 1 in the steerage
From Auckland -
Clarkson 	Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Atkinson 	Major
Smart 		Mr
And 5 in steerage
From Napier -
Collidge 	Mr
From Wellington -
Kirle 		Mr and Mrs
From Lyttelton -
Maitland 	Mrs
Turton 		Mrs
Gonisor 	Mr
Hobday 		Mr

July 4 - Lady of the Lake, ss, 60 tons, Urquhart, from the Molyneux. G F Reid, agent.

Passengers:
Miller 		Mrs and child
Melville 	Mrs and child

July 5 - Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clarke, from Melbourne, via West Coast and other ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Collier 	Mr
Litchfield 	Mr
Clapcott 	Mr
Budge 		Mr
Quick 		Mr
Brown 		Mr
And 14 in the steerage

July 8 - Hally Bayley, schooner, 113 tons, Harrison, from Hobart Town. W and G Turnbull and Co, agents. Passengers: 3 steerage
Memento, barque, 464 tons, Ruwald, from Newcastle. Drummond and Watson, agents.

Passengers:
Begg 		Mr and Mrs and 6 children
O'Connell 	Mr

July 9 - Roslin Castle, barque, 644 tons, Miller, from London, March 9th. NZ Shipping Co, agents. No passengers.
Departures
July 2 - City of Adelaide, RMSS, 824 tons, Brown, for Kandavu, via Auckland and intermediate ports. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Bates 		Mr
For Wellington -
Bradshaw 	MHR, Mr and Mrs, 2 children and servant
Thomson 	Mr and Mrs
Montgomery 	Mrs, Miss and Master
Moore 		Mrs and child
Copeland	3 children and 2 servants
Campbell 	Honourable R MLC and 2 servants
McNeil 		Mr and son
Downey 		Mr
Cohen 		Mr
Bell 		Mr
Murray 		Mr
For Napier -
Miller 		Mrs
Webb 		Mrs
Thomson 	Miss
Fordyce 	Mr
Livingstone 	Mr
Blackburn 	Mr
For Auckland -
Cowan 		Mr
Hille 		Mr
Gunn 		A
For San Francisco -
Calman 		Mr
4 steerage for coast ports

July 6 - Tararua, ss, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Wade 		Mr and Mrs
Thorpe 		Mr and Miss
Main 		Mrs
Turnoch 	Miss
Evans 		Mr
Davis 		Mr
Flemings 	Mr
Clarke 		Mr
Watchorn 	Mr
Colledge 	Mr
Dalgety 	Mr
Young 		Mr
Williamson 	Mr
And 12 steerage
For Bluff -
Richardson 	Mr and Mrs
Moody 		Mr
Weir 		Mr
McLean 		Mr
McArdell 	Mr
Houghton 	Mr
Kerle 		Mr
And 2 steerage

Otago Witness 18 July 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
July 9 - Roslin Castle, barque, 644 tons, Miller, from London, March 9th. NZ Shipping Co, agents. No passengers.
July 11 - India, barque, Samson, from Launceston. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers: Seymour (2) and two in the steerage
Caroline, ship 984 tons, Clyma, from London, via Queenstown. New Zealand Shipping Company, agents. Passengers:
300½ statute adults, free and nominated immigrants.
Easby, ss, 969 tons, Shands, from Newcastle. F C Fulton, agent.

Passengers:
Fulton 		Miss
Nisderhauser 	Mademolselle
Fulton 		Mr
Brown 		Mr

July 13 - Hindostan, ship, 1262 tons, White, from London, March 26; Downs, April 7th. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:
344 immigrants, equal to 279 statute adults.
Sword Fish, brigantine, 155 tons, McIntyre, from Hobart Town. G F Reid, agent. Passengers: Mr Bagette. And 4 steerage
July 14 - Cartsburn, ship, 1257 tons, Young, from Glasgow, April 8th. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Duncan 		Mr and family
Cobham 		Mr
And 404 free and nominated immigrants

Devana, ship, 795 tons, Thompson, from London, April 12th. Bright Bros, agents. Passengers: 23 second cabin and steerage
Clematis, brig, 249 tons, Johnson, from Geograph Bay, Western Australia. D and G Proudfoot, agents. Passengers: 6 steerage
Departures
July 11 - James Nicol Fleming, ship, 993 tons, Peacock, for Melbourne. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents. 16 passengers.

Otago Witness 18 July 1874, Page 13
Arrival of Home Ships
THE CAROLINE
The first signal made on Sunday morning was that of the Hindostan, when the Geelong appeared at the Heads with a full-rigged ship in tow. The Steamer Peninsula, -with the Health and Customs Officers on board, together with Mr C Allan, Immigration Agent, proceeded down the Harbour to meet her; mid when the vessels met - and not before - the stranger was ascertained to be the ship Caroline, from London a long rakish craft, with exceedingly fine ends, good sheer, and rather high topgallant forecastle and poop. She had three hundred and forty-eight souls (immigrants) on board, of whom 126 were single women, 78 were single men, and the balance married people and their families. Reckoned according to the statute adult standard the immigrants numbered 300½. They were reported by Dr Fitzgerald to have been quite healthy on the passage. Our reporter, who was amongst the first to board the ship, heard but a very indifferent account of the behaviour of a considerable majority of the passengers during the passage. They were all shipped at Queenstown, and the single women were selected by that estimable person, Mrs Howard. Out of the 126, 40 came out of the Cork Workhouse and were reported by the captain to be amongst the best-behaved of the lot. Where the others came from was not known, but that they were very troublesome was vouched for by the captain and matron and doctor. The single women's compartment was remarkably clean, and well lit and ventilated. Indeed each of the compartments were very clean - few ships have arrived here in more commendable state in this respect than the Caroline. At the same time, the usual huddling was practised with the married people, and their compartment was darker than the others. On being asked what they were, the single men said, "Mostly labourers and pensioners." There were a few mechanics and artizans amongst them, and one burly looking individual observed with some pride that he was a ploughman. Of the married people, twelve of the heads of families were admitted to be pensioners, ie, old soldiers. Taking the Caroline's immigrants all through, we do not think that the Province is to be congratulated upon this latent accession to its population. It is high time that Mrs Howard's useful career was cut short. As we before remarked, the Caroline is a handsome Ship. She was once one of the African mail steamers, and on being withdrawn from that service was almost rceonstructed and converted into a first-class merchant ship, classed for 20 years A1 at Liverpool Lloyd's, and A1 90 at London Lloyd's. She is owned by Mr H Ellis, of London, and is about 13 years old. The New Zealand Shipping Company chartered her for the present trip, and made liberal provision for the comfort and safety of the immigrants. Concerning the passage out, Captain Clyman reports leaving London on March 25th and met the full force of the Equinoctial gales in the Channel. Twice she was driven back from the Start to the Isle of Wight by furious westerly gales, And finally arrived at Queenstown (Cork) on the 10th April. There she embarked the emigrants, and sailed on the 14th. Had light and battling winds to the NE Trade, which was met with on the 4th May, in Int 23½ . Some of the water tanks having leaked, whilst the condenser broke down badly, the ship was run into S. Vincent, one of the Cape de Verde Islands, and came to an anchor there on the 7th May. Filled 5000 gallons of water, repaired the condenser, and obtained more material to repair it in the event of other break-downs occurring. Some more coal for working the condenser was also obtained. The Caroline lay at St Vincent for 24 hours, then resumed her voyage.
She ran the coast down with light westerly winds, and reached the Heads and the Port yesterday, after a fair passage of 89 days.

Otago Witness 18 July 1874, Page 21
Prospectus
H S Fish, junr, Princes street
W M Hodgkins, of Howorth and Hodgkins
R H Leary, High street
J H Harris, solicitor
Wm Fraser, of Strode and Fraser, runholders
J. Logan, runholder
Walter Miller, runholder
J A Connell, of Connell and Moodie
W D Stowart, Barrister
M Price, Dunedin
J S Webb, Webb and Fulton
J Brown, senr
C . Chapman, barrister
The Hon James Paterson
W Gellibraml, runholder
D F Main, Barrister-at-Law
W J Burton, Burton Bros
J R Jones, Harbour Steam Company
Charles Zeile, Rattray street
James Hazlett, merchant, Clyde
John Reid, Elderslie, Oamaru
Robert Gillies, Gillies and Street
Donald Reid, MHR
C R. Howden, distiller, Cumberland street
Charles Reid, Princes street
R. Glendining, Rods and Glendining
Dr Edward Hulme
John Douglas, runholder, Mount Royal
J T Wiight, Wright, Stephenson and Co
G F Reid, Stafford street
R Paterson, Paterson and M'Leod
R M Robertson, distiller, Rattray street
James Shand, MPC
Wm Barron, Barron, Grant and Co
Wm Park, Park and Curie
George Elliot Barton, Barrister-at-Law
W D Murison, Editor Daily Times
Charles De V. Teschemaker, runholder, Taipo, Oamaru
David Proudfoot, railway contractor
Horace Bastings, MPC
W North, North aud Scoullar
Hugh McNeil, Briscoe and Co
John Bathgate, R.M. E
B Cargill, Cargills and McLean
H J Walter, Manse street
R K Murray, Rattray street
James Black, Black and Thomson
Marcus Hume, Dunudin
James Allan, MPC, East Taieri
William Snow, Outram, West Taieri
A J Smyth, contractor
Thomas Birch, merchant
Ed Herbert, Lawrence
Robert Pritchard, Arrow
Walter Inder, Naseby
M J Malaghan, Queenstown
Job Wain, Manse street
James Fulton, RM
John Scanlan, Scanlan Bros, Princes street
William Kennedy, Rattnay street.
The Hon John McLean, Redcastle, Oamaru
Edmund Smith, Dunedin Savings Bank
George Proudfoot, railway contractor
C W Flexrnan, wool merchant
John McGregor, CE
W H Cutten, late Commissioner of Crown Lands
John Reid, of Corner Bush, Merton
Henry Orbell, runholder, The River, Waikouaiti
T A Clowes, of Ashcroft, Spence, and Co, Oamaru
Francis McDiavmid, Woodside, West Taieri
Donald Borrie, West Taieri
Joseph Clarke, Victoria and Moa Flat
With power to add to their number.

Otago Witness 25 July 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
July 17 - Sussex, ship, 1305 tons, H Strap, from London, April 18th. New Zealand Shipping Company, agents. Passengers:
487 nominated and free immigrants
July 23 - Otago, ss, McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Fitzsimmons Mr and Mrs and servant
Reeves 		J J and Mrs and 2 children
Isaacs 		Mr and Mrs
Brown 		Dr and Mrs and child
Techen 		Mrs and 4 children
Smith 		Mrs and child
Martin 		Mrs
Souttar 	Mrs
Arthur 		Mrs and 2 children
Jacobs 		Mrs and 2 children
Smith 		Miss
Parish 		Miss
Monteith 	Miss
Kelly 		Miss
Donald 		Hon
McLean 		Mr
Ropata 		Major
Townsend 	Mr
McKeown 	Mr
Swanston 	Mr
Ehrman 		Mr
Grogan 		Mr
And 27 steerage

Sam Mendel, ship, 1033 tons, Hill, from London, May 9. Guthrie and Larnach, agents. Passengers: 37 second and third class

Departures
July 22 - Easby, ss, 969 tons, Shand, for Newcastle. Webb and Fulton, agents.

Passengers:
Williams 	Mrs and daughter
Fulton 		Mr, 2 daughters and servant
Joel 		M

Arrival of the Sussex
Favoured by a light leading breeze during Thursday night, the Sussex fetched the Heads on Sunday morning and meeting with prompt attention from the steamer Geelong, was towed into Port and moored right abreast of the town by noon.
Touching on nationalities, the immigrants are a mixed lot; there are Scotch and Irish and English and 69 foreigners - Germans, Hungarians and Swiss. The total number of souls who left Britain in the Sussex was 495 equal to 402 statute adults, but eight deaths had occurred on the passage, irrespective of the deaths of two infants born on board. Thus the ship arrives with 487 souls, equal to 398 statute adults. This number comprises 56 single women, 100 single men and 78 married couples with their children; the number of the latter being estimated at about 100. We give these numbers as they were supplied us on board; but there is a discrepancy between their total and the total number of souls - possibly a score or two of children were overlooked. The single women were described as good workers - several of them being farm girls who could milk and make butter. They all looked healthy, strong and respectable. The physique of the men was also tolerably good but, whilst some were robust in the extreme, others wore that wan appearance common to life in crowded thoroughfares. But, for all that, we are of opinion that the Colony is the gainer by the arrival of the Sussex, and that her immigrants are likely to prove a help to, instead of a burden upon the land.
We may observe that the immigrants were healthy all the passage, the only deaths being in the case of children, as follows:
Wall James - May 6, aged 19 months, died of congestion of the brain
Ross Philip - May 13, two months, congestion of lungs
Wiblin George - May 13, five months, debility
Boume George - May 21, three years and two months, chronic diarrhoea
Collier Maria - May 23, 13 months, dentition
King Charles - May 28, one year and three months, diarrhoea
Stratton Wm - July 15, three years, croup
Milcham Fred - July 15, four years, croup
The Sussex is a fine ship, of stately appearance, and is owned by Messrs G Marshall and Co, of London. She is about six years old and until this voyage has been engaged in the Calcutta trade. Captain Strap, her master, is not quite a stranger in these waters, having paid the port a visit ten years ago, when in command of the ship Mystery. The Sussex is 1305 tons register and her dimensions are - Length 232 feet; beam 37 feet; depth of hold 23 feet.


Otago Witness 1 Aug 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
July 25 - Mairi Bhan, ship, 1315 tons, Massen, from Glasgow, May 5th. Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Bartrine 	Mr and Mrs
Russell 	Rev Mr and Mrs
Russell 	Misses (2)
Russell 	Masters (2)
Thomson 	Mr and Mrs
Young 		Miss
Keith 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
And 463 free and nominated immigrants

July 26 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 529 tons, Bawden, from Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
From Coast ports -
Davidson 	Mrs
Laland 		Miss
Logan 		Captain
Pierson 	Mr
Sander 		Mr
Weycos 		Mr
Mudday 		Mr
Hendry 		Mr
Coothers 	Mr
Jones 		Mr
Rich 		Mr
Badfoy 		Mr
Clark 		Mr
Hastwell 	Mr
Wylie 		Mr
And 5 in the steerage
With 24 others for the South and Melbourne

Peter Denny, ship, 997 tons, Pycraft, from London, May 2. Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Stevenson 	Mr and Mrs, family (4) and servant
Grainger 	Rev Mr
Brent 		Mr
And 365 free and nominated immigrants

July 28 - Cyphrenes, RMSS, 1279 tons, Wood, from San Francisco, via Kandavu, Auckland and Coast ports. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Passengers: 
Rich 		Mr and Mrs
Shrimpton 	Mrs
Seal 		Miss
Grubb 		Mr
Calcutt 	Mr
Smith 		Mr
Murdoch 	Mr
Thompson 	Mr
Comrie 		Mr
Henderson 	W

July 28 - Cezarewitch, barque, 428 tons, Moir, from Port Esperance, Tasmania, July 18th. D and G Proudfoot, agents.

Passengers:
Scott 		Mrs and 2 children
Robertson 	Mr

Albion, RMSS, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Campbell 	Mrs and 4 children
Spence 		Mr and Mrs and servant
Webb 		Mrs
Tye 		Miss
Easton 		Mr
Simmonds 	Mr
Baxter 		Mr
Ferguson 	Mr
Clark 		Mr
Morrison	Mr
Wright 		Mr
Wheeler 	Mr
O'Brien 	Mr
15 in the steerage
and 30 for other ports

Departures
July 24 - Otago, ss, McLean, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Rendall 	Mr
Fitzgerald 	Mr
And two in the steerage
For Wellington -
Robson  	Mrs J
Robertson 	Mr
Larnach 	W J M
For Hokitika -
Allen 		Miss
For Melbourne -
Spicer 		Mrs
Sedgewick 	Mr
Jago 		Mr
Schofield 	Mr
And two in the steerage
And 35 original passengers for New Zealand ports

July 27 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 529 tons, Bawden, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Evans 		Mrs W D 
Burn 		Mrs
Culling 	Mrs and two daughters
Scoullar 	Mrs and daughter
Alexander 	Dr
Sheenan 	Mr
Esther 		Mr
McDonald 	Mr
Blair 		Mr
McAuley 	Mr
Blues 		Mr
And seven steerage
For the Bluff -
Anderson 	Mr and Mrs
Simpson 	Miss
Broderick  	Miss K
Atkinson 	Major
Street 		C H
Hume 		Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Gillies 	Mr
Johnson 	Mr
Lachman 	Mr
And 15 steerage

July 29 - Cyphrenes, RMSS, 1279 tons, Wood, for Kandavu, via coast ports. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For San Francisco -
Cargill	 	Mr and Mrs
Turnbull 	Mr
Merewether 	Mr
Herbert 	Mr
Davie 		Mr
Cain 		Mr
Downes 		Mr (mail agent)
For Lyttelton -
Soutar 		Miss
For Wellington -
Paritt 		Mrs and 3 children
Holdsworth 	Mr and Mrs
Howorth 	Mrs
Holmes 		Hon Mr
For Napier -
Burke 		Mr
Drummond 	Mr
For Auckland -
Salmond 	Mrs
Davis 		Mr

July 30 - Albion, RMSS, 591 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Coleman 	Mr and Mrs
And 1 in the steerage
For Wellington -
1 in the steerage
For Melbourne -
Parry 		Mr
Harrison 	Mr

Otago Witness 1 Aug 1874, Page 17
Telegrams
Bluff, July 28th. The ss Albion, with the Suez mail on board, arrived at the Bluff at 10.30 this morning. She left Melbourne at 8 p.m. on the 23rd, and has thus made a quick passage of 4 days 12 hours. She brings 31 saloon and 26 steerage passengers. She sails for Dunedin to-night.

Saloon Passenger List:
Wright 		Mr
Wheeler 	Mr
Ferguson 	Mr
Spence 		E J
Easton 		Mr
Morrison 	Mr
Baxter 		Mr
Webb 		J S
Anderson 	Mr
Kerr 		Mr
Campbell 	Mrs and four children
Spence 		Mrs and two children
15 steerage

Otago Witness 8 Aug 1874, Page 16
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
August 2 - Tararua, 523 tons, Clark, from Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Benjamin 	Mr and Mrs
Hill 		Mr
Martin 		Mr
Young 		Mr
Fleming 	Mr
Coombes 	Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Kennedy 	Mr and family (7)
And 10 in the steerage

Departures
July 30 - Albion, RMSS, 591 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Coleman 	Mr and Mrs
And 1 in the steerage
For Wellington -
1 in the steerage
For Melbourne -
Parry 		Mr

August 2 - Tararua, 523 tons, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Saloon Passengers:

For Melbourne -
Howard 		Mrs
Lees 		Mrs
Jones 		Miss
Cargill 	Miss
Prosser 	Miss
Hutchinson 	Mr and Mrs
And four in steerage
For Bluff -
Thompson 	Mrs and Miss
Logan 		Mr
Day 		Mr
Gillow 		Mr
Lumsden 	Mr
Murray 		Mr

No copy Otago Witness 15 Aug 1874

Otago Witness 22 Aug 1874, Page 12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Aug 14 - Alhambra, ss, Sinclair, from Melbourne, 1st inst, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Sampson 	Mr, Mrs and 2 children
Gates 		Miss
Larnach 	Mr
Sampson 	Mr
Howden 		senior
Grant 		Mr
Parry 		Mr
Roy 		Mr
Allan 		Mr
And 20 passengers for other ports

Aug 10 - Otago, ss, McLean, from Melbourne Aug 12, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Roberts 	Mrs and 3 children
Hawthorne 	Mr and Miss
Hoggitt 	Miss
Little 		Miss
McLean 		Mr
Plumber 	Mr
Mureland 	Mr
Andrews 	Mr
Benson 		Mr
Fenwick 	Mr
Granger 	Rev Mr and son
Fraser 		Rev Mr
And 12 steerage

Departures
Aug 14 - Omeo, ss, Calder, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait and Newcastle, Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Pritchard Mr and son
For Newcastle -
Wilson Miss
Daniel Mr

Aug 16 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne via Bluff.

Saloon Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Gillespie Miss
Williams Miss
Pillans Miss
Bradley Mrs
Maitland Mr and Miss
Hamilton Dr
O'Brien Mr
Brown Mr
Cairns Mr
And 13 in the steerage
For Bluff -
Barton Mr
Patterson Mr

Aug 20 - Otago, ss, 640 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Hislop 		Mrs
Stamper 	Miss
Henderson 	Mr
and 1 steerage
For Melbourne -
Dunnett 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Bastings 	Mr
Hassell 	Mr
Sanders 	Mr
And 5 steerage

Otago Witness 22 Aug 1874, Page 13
Telegrams: Wellington, August 14th
The Omeo arrived at midnight. The Luna, which had been in search of her, missed her. The Omeo left Lyttelton at 10.40 p.m. on the 15th inst. The delay was caused by her boilers being out of order, and having strong westerly gales to contend against for thirty hours. On her return to Melbourne she will be thoroughly overhauled. Mr Nancarrow made an official survey of the Omeo's boilers this afternoon, but the result is not yet known.

Births: Cameron: On the 15th August, at Banvie, Mataura, Mrs Alexander Cameron, of a son.

Otago Witness 29 Aug 1874, Page 12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Aug 24 - Hally Bayley, Harrison, from Hobart Town, August 15th. Turnbull and Co, agents. Cabin Passengers:
Russell Mrs
And five in the steerage
Aug 27 - Albion, RMSS, Underwood, from Melbourne, 21st inst, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Cogle 		Mr and Mrs
Robson 		Mr and Mrs
Howard 		Mrs
Draper 		Mrs
Wilson 		Mrs
Taylor 		Mrs
Risk 		Mr
Waugh 		Mr
Chambers 	Mr
Splatt 		Mr
Gilles 		Mr
Esther 		Mr
Gunn 		Mr
Gogle 		Mr
Martin 		Mr
Sans 		Mrs
Shannon 	Mr
Boyle 		Mr
Auston 		Mr
And 20 in the steerage
And 28 for other ports

No Departures

Otago Witness 29 Aug 1874, Page 14
Telegrams
Bluff, August 26th
The Albion with the English mail, arrived at 11.30 this morning. She left Hobson's Bay at 4 p.m. on the 21st, and experienced a heavy NE gale on the passage. She brings 29 saloon and 35 steerage passengers. She leaves for Dunedin tonight.

Passenger List - 
Sans 		Mr
Cogle 		Mr
Cogle 		J 
Waugh 		Mr
Robson 		Mr
Risk 		Mr
Waugh 		G
Esther 		Mr
Chambers 	Mr
Splatt 		Mr
Gillies 	Mr
Gunn 		Mr
Waugh 		Mrs and child
Welson 		Mrs and 3 children
Robson 		Mrs
and 25 in the steerage

Otago Witness 29 Aug 1874, Page 21
Select Poetry

The Sigh of the Sea Shell.
I sat by the marge of the ocean,
Whose silvery waves to the strand
Were borne with a musical motion,
So peaceful, and solemn and grand,
Reviewing the past and regretting,
While summer its glories unroll'd -
The sun in his sapphire home setting
'Mid splendour of purple and gold.

I said, What is life ?- the old story,
Earth, ocean, and sky are the same -
The same, and yet changing in glory,
As colours that flush in the flame;
And man as of old seeketh pleasure,
Which but for a moment can bloom,
Forgetting that love is a treasure,
Which kindles a star in the gloom.

"Sing, sing, the soft tremulous trebles,
Oh, truehearted bird on the tree,
Diving for pearls I've found pebbles,
And what is existence to me?
The toss-bull of Fortune, I labour,
And polish my pebbles each hour,
The goddess's minion, my neighbour,
Grows rich in a Danae shower.

"Rocky the ground I've been ploughing,
No living blade gladdens my sight,
And after most diligent sowing
Thought's harvest has suffered a blight.
I sought for fair flowers in the meadows,
And found only brambles and weeds;
And life is fast flying 'mid shadows,
Which darken the best ot my deeds."

Oh, then, as the songster kept singing,
I thanked for its music the bird;
A voice in my spirit was singing--'
"Sing on, though thy song be unheard!
Many a sweet flow'ret is sighing,
To which never cometh the bee;
And, oh, whether living or dying,
God's work should be sacred to thee"

Then I marked on the sand, a wight tracing
Strange letters, while crowds looked on;
The waves up the beach soon came racing,
And quickly the figures were gone.
But away from the seaside comers,
His name a youth carved in the rock,
To be seen for a hundred summers
High over the billows' wild shock.

Methought, there's a lesson worth knowing,
Write deeply thy name on man's heart;
Up there, in God's sight, 'twill be glowing,
While ages like dead leaves depart.
Work on in the spirit of duty,
Despair not, but climb to the goal.
Oh, worship thy heart's dream of beauty,
And sing from thy innermost soul.
S C


Otago Witness 5 Sept 1874, Page 12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Aug 20 - Lady of the Lake, ss, 60 tons, Urquhart, from the Molyneux. G F Reid, agent.

Saloon Passengers:
Cunningham Mrs
Moffatt Mr

Otago, ship, 1000 tons, Leslie, from London (June 6th). Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents. Passengers: 363 free and nominated immigrants
Columbus, barque, 744 tons, Atkings, from London (June 2nd). Saloon

Passengers:
Millington 	Mr
Nicolls 	Mr
Houghton 	C
Black 		Mr
And six in the steerage

Aug 30 - Splendid, barque, 369 tons, Miller, from New Bedford (Jan 11) via St Thomas (April 18). Dalgety, Nicolls and Co, agents. Cabin Passenger:
Parsons Mr
Aug 31 - Tararua, ss, Clark, from Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Thomson 	Mr and Mrs
Bradshaw 	Mr and Mrs, 2 children and servant
Ward 		Mr and Mrs
Smith 		Mrs, child and servant
Howorth 	Mrs
Carr 		Miss
Allen 		Mr
Dripps 		Mr
Creighton 	Mr
Holmes 		Mr
Miller 		Mr
Sheppard 	Mr
Stewart 	Mr
Barr 		Mr
Firra 		Mr
McGlashan 	Mr
Reid 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Malcolm 	Mr
Coombes 	Mrs
And 8 in the steerage

Departures
Aug 31 - Tararua, ss, Clark, for Melbourne, via the Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Jack 		Mr and Mrs, 3 children and servant
Neill 		Mr and Mrs
Beal 		Mrs
Coughtrey 	Professor
Farrer 		Mr
Moody 		Mr
Heyhurst 	Mr
Guthrie 	Mr
Branson 	Mr
Kennedy 	family
And 15 in the steerage
For Bluff -
Gillies 	Mr and Mrs, child and servant
McIntosh 	Mr
Grinn 		Mr
Lunford 	Mr
Beda 		Mr
And 2 in the steerage

Arrival of the Corona
The Corona, a stately ship of wooden build and nearly 1200 tons register, arrived on the 28th inst with another crowd of immigrants shipped at London. No infections disease of any kind had appeared during the passage and the immigrants on the whole were a decent lot of people. There are 496 souls, equal to 390½ statute adults, on board the Corona and include 93 married couples, 52 single women, 78 single men and 180 children. The latter comprise 71 boys, 78 girls and 31 infants. Eleven deaths and 10 births had occurred on the passage, the deaths being all in the case of children excepting one. The first was that of Whitehead George, aged 6 months, who died of bronchitis on June 4th
West Steven on June 12th, aged 16 months, died of atropy
Sullivan Michael on June 29th, aged 8 months, died of convulsions
Willis Ellen on July 23, 5 months, died of atropy
Walsh Edward on August 23, 10 months, died of convulsions
Milton John on August 24, aged 26 years, died of consumption
Sullivan Owen on August 27, 3 years, died of inflammation of the brain and as the death happened so near land the body was brought in to be buried on shore. The above were all the deaths amongst those who joined the ship at London, the remaining deaths are connected with the births which took place on board. These are as follows:
June 4, Mrs White of a son; June 21, Mrs Le Fauden of a daughter; July 21, Mrs Brooks of a son, who died on July 21. On that date Mrs Jopson was confined of a boy; July 16, Mrs Hannon of a girl; July 31, Mrs Barron of a girl, who died subsequently; August 11, Mrs Walker of a girl, died August 13; and at later dates, Mrs Grewett was confined of a girl and Mrs Blackwood of a boy, still-born.
Taking the immigrants throughout, we were not unfavourably impressed by their appearance. They appeared to be strong and healthy and one and all expressed their utmost desire for, and willingness to work.
Her report states that she left London on the 22nd May, Gravesend on the 24th and passed through the Downs on the 25th. Light variable weather and fogs were experienced in the Channel, so that it was not until the 1st June that she cleared the land. The Lizard being the last departure. On the 19th she crossed the meridian of Greenwich. On the 25th of June, she crossed the meridian of the Cape and sighted the Snares on the 24th August.

Otago Witness 12 Sept 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Sep 4 - Parsee, ship, 1281 tons, Nelson, from Glasgow, Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
McNaughton 	Mr and Mrs
Carthy 		Mr and Mrs
Carthy 		Miss and Master
Nelson 		Mrs
Duggan 		Miss
Stirling 	Mr
Brock 		Mr
Carrick 	Mr
Finlayson 	Messrs (4)
Bryson 		Mr
Tunn 		Mr
And 417 free and nominated immigrants

Tweed, ship, 1745 tons, Stuart, from London, June 16th. New Zealand Shipping Co, agents. Passengers: 639 free and nominated immigrants
Sept 9 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne, August 29th, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Logan 		Mr
Lathrope 	Mr
And 9 steerage
From Coast ports -
Robson 		Mrs
Gleenson 	Miss
Hayes 		Misses (2)
Todd 		Mr
Young 		Mr
Jennings 	Mr
Murray 		Mr
And 15 for the South and Melbourne
No overseas Departures

Arrival of the Parsee
The signal of another home ship - the Parsee - was made on the 4th instant, and the ship herself soon after hove in sight between the Heads. The Geelong found time only during the fore part of the day to bring in the Parsee. There was no infectious disease then on board, but according to the report of the Surgeon Superintendent measles had run through the ship, children and adults having been alike affected. Over 200 cases had occurred. The disease appeared about a fortnight after the ship left the Clyde and a fortnight after that was at its height. It then declined and disappeared altogether directly after the ship cleared the southern tropic, some six weeks ago. There were nine deaths from other causes, chiefly diarrhoea. The list of deaths is as follows:
Walker Elizabeth, June 26, 5 years, diarrhoea;
Richards Mary Ann, July 1 11 weeks, consumption;
Patterson Charles, July 2, 25 years, measles and diarrhoea;
Connell Jenny, July 3, 17 months, diarrhoea;
Richardson Robert, July 9, 18 months, bronchitis;
Jarvey Janet, July 10, 12 months, diarrhoea;
Fiddles Elizabeth, July 18, 20 months, bronchitis and measles;
Muir Mary, July 23, apoplexy - a post mortem examination of her body was held to ascertain the cause of death;
Robertson John, July 21, 13 months, measles and diarrhoea;
McIver John, August 16, one year, measles;
Shaw Lewis, August 27, 27 years, diarrhoea;
Shaw James, September 3, eight months, diarrhoea.
Six births occurred - two of them being premature and one an abortion. The other three were:
On June 29th, Mrs Allison, of a son; August 8th, Mrs Scott, of a son; September 1st, one of the single woman, of a son.
The Parsee left Glasgow with 16 cabin passengers and 428 free and nominated immigrants - equal to 362 ½ adults. Of the latter there were 88 males and 81 females above the age of 12 years; 63 married couples, 47 male and 58 female children; and 10 male and eight female infants. Allowing for births and deaths, the whole number brought here is 417 souls, exclusive of cabin passengers.

Arrival of the Tweed
The fine ship, which arrived at the Heads on the 3rd inst, was towed in on the evening's tide and as daylight was fast closing in, Pilot Kelly, who was in charge, brought her up for the night at the Quarantine Ground below the shipping. The Tweed brings 630 souls, a considerable proportion of them being nominated immigrants. They are classified as under: 91 married couples, 166 single men, 92 single women, 75 males and 84 females under 12 years of age and 19 male and 19 female infants. Arranged according to their nationalities there are: English 205 male and 175 females; Scotch, 4 males and 23 females; Irish 96 males and 89 females; Foreigners, 3 males and 2 females; Total 350 males, 280 females. It was scarcely to be expected that so many human beings cooped up together should escape a visitation from King Death. That potentate levied tribute by the way, and carried of 13, the causes of death being diarrhoea, mesenteric diseases, convulsions and consumption. Not one case of serious disease had occurred amongst and of the immigrants above the age of two years. One of the seamen died of congestion of the lungs and one of the passengers named Jeremiah Burnand, aged 45 years, fell overboard. This happened on the 23rd July, the ship at the time going nine knots. The unfortunate man had been repeatedly warned not to venture into the main rigging, but persisted in doing so, affirming that he was an old soldier, used to travelling, and knew what he was about. He, however, ventured once too often, lost his hold and fell. A life buoy was thrown over to him and the ship was immediately rounded to and a boat lowered and despatched in search, but to no effect - he was never seen again.
The Tweed is a handsome stately ship, built at Bombay of teak. She was built for a steamer, to run in the East India Company's service, and during the first two years of her career afloat she was known as the Punjaub. Then she was sold and converted into a sailing vessel, and is now owned by Messrs John Willis and Sons, of London. Her dimensions are - Length, over all, 287 feet; beam, 40 feet; depth of hold, 24 feet. She was chartered by the Agent-General, and comes here consigned to the New Zealand Shipping Co. She left Gravesend on June 16th passed the Downs next day, and cleared the Channel on the 18th, a last departure being taken from the Eddystone. The Equator was crossed on the July 9th. On the 22nd August she passed the meridian of the Leeuwin during a heavy southerly gale and thence to Stewart's Island, which was sighted on the 2nd inst, variable winds and weather prevailed. She had a fair run along the coast, and reached the Heads on the 3rd.

Otago Witness 12 Sept 1874, Page 21
Select Poetry - The Squall

Select Poetry.
THE SQUALL.
The nighest shave of death I've had?
Well, wait till my pipe's alight,
Throw a log of the drift-wood on the blaze,
And I'll spin you a yarn to-night.

Danger! you'll meet it upon the deep,
Nor shun it upon the land;
I take it, the sea and the shore alike
Are held in God's mighty hand.

Many's the tug and the tussle
The sea and I have had,
Since I sailed away to the whalery,
When I was a hit of a lad.

But not on tho Greenland waters,
Among the floes and the pack,
And not on the great Atlantic,
With the gales upon our track;

And not where the breakers whiten the reefs
By the cliffs of Elainore,
Have I been through such a perilous time
As last week, a mile from share.

There was me and Bill, and Mather,
All good sea-farmg men;
I can handle a rope as well as most,
Though I'm past three-score and ten.

The wind was whispering like a bairn,
In the merry April weather,
The great blue sea and the great blue sky
Seemed met like friends together.

We'd got a fair lot of fish aboard,
I turned to say to Mat
We might steer to shore: when he gripped my arm,
And swore, "Look thou at that,"

Over the calm sea, black and keon,
Blotting the glow of it all,
Fast and fierce, and cruel, and strong,
It came, it came, the squall.

The crested waves to its summons sprang,
Like tigers around the boat;
Down swept thoe drift, wild yelled thoe blast,
Were we still alivo and afloat?

Gone, the spot that marked the rock-buoy;
Gone, the far faint line of home;
There was nothing but hissing water and wind,
The very air was foam,

Mather baled and baled, I strove with the sheet,
She laboured - fit to fill,
None on us spoke, save just to shout
To the helmsman, "Mind her, Bill."

I'm none soft-hearted, but I thought
How the bairns, at play on the sand,
Were watching to see the boat come in,
And help with the fish to land.

I thought of the hearths clean swept for us,
And the poor old wifoe, and all,
While the waves poured over the gunwale,
And we tossed and drove in the squall.

And I thought a prayer to Him who trod
On the waters, and said, "Be still!"
Mebby a Hand we could not see
Held the rudder, along with Bill.

We weathered it, we rounded the Nab,
And cleared our eyes from the sea,
And just shook hands, and hauled down sail,
And took to the oars, we three.

They say the ways of a woman
Can puzzle the wisest yet;
I wot, she can never be harder to guide
Than the old North Sea in a fret.

I think I shall drown when my day is done;
And I'd liefer rest in the deep
Than moulder up in the churchgarth there,
Where the earthworms burrow and creep.

I've served the sea those sixty year,
When it calls, as it will, I know,
I'll be none so loath to hear its voice,
And say good-by, and go.

I shall better sleep where the billows
Sing to the seaman's soul,
Than where restless footsteps tramp and pass,
And weary church-bells toll.

But, till I hear and answer
The great sea's solemn call,
I shall never so near touch hands with death
As on that spring day in the squall.

Otago Witness 19 Sept 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Sept 11 - Woodville, barque, 372 tons, Lusher, from Newcastle, Aug 26th. Harbour Steam Company, agents.

Passengers:
Lusher 		Mrs and child
Gillois 	Mr

Glencoe, barque, 159 tons, Jasper, from Hobart Town, 27th Aug. Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Passengers:
Maddew 		Mrs, Miss and Master
Cole 		Miss
Bromley 	Mr
Cahill 		Mr
And 2 steerage

Sept 13 - Agnes Jessie, schooner, 187 tons, Phillips, from Hobart Town. Master, agent.

Cabin Passengers:
Maloney 	Mrs
Maloney 	Messrs (3)
Cutts 		Mr
Hood 		Mr
And three steerage

Sept 17 - Haddon Hall, ship, 1516 tons, Faithfull, from London, June 13th. Calvert and Campbell, agents.

Passengers:
Hooper 		Mr and Mrs and 3 children
Gossett 	Mr
Mellick 	Mr
Delamaine 	Mr
And 36 in the steerage

Departures
Sept 11 - Alhambra, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Satson 		Mrs and child
Brown 		Miss
Phillips 	Miss
Hendoring 	Mr
Fagan 		P and child
Mallard 	Mr
And 12 steerage

Sept 12 - Dunedin, ship, 1250 tons, Whitson, for London. Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Button 		Dr
McCall 		Dr
Second Cabin -
Vincent 	Mrs
Nairn 		Mrs and child
Richardson 	Miss
And 10 steerage

Sept 17 - Caroline, ship, Clyma, for Hong Kong. New Zealand Shipping Co, agents. Passengers: 170 Chinese

Otago Witness 19 Sept 1874, Page14 Telegrams:
Bluff, September 16th.
The ss Otago left Melbourne on the 10th, and arrived at the Bluff at daylight this morning. She brings 83 cabin and steerage passengers for all ports. She sails for Dunedin at 4 pm.

Passenger List: 
For Dunedin -
Berghoff 	Mr
Louisson 	Mr
Blair 		Mr
Coombe 		Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Orr 		Mr
Savage 		Mr
Clevedon 	Mr
Fraser 		Mrs
Savage 		Mrs 
She also brings 30 steerage passengers

Otago Witness 26 Sept 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Sept 18 - Otago, ss, McLean, from Melbourne September 10th, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Savage 		Mr and Mrs
Fraser 		Mr and Mrs
Coombe 		Mr
McArthur 	Mr
Leuisson 	Mr
Bergoff 	Mr
Blair 		Mr
Cleverden 	Mr
And 33 in the steerage
From the Bluff -
McDonnell 	Mr and Mrs
Topai 		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Dick 		Mrs and Miss
Wilson 		Mr
McKellar 	Mr
Calder 		Mr
Rodgers 	Mr
Pittie 		Mr
Bews 		Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Gibbs 		Mr
Horsey 		Mr
Warren 		Mr
3 steerage
and 45 for other ports

Easby, ss, 969 tons, Shand, from Sydney September 9th. Webb and Fulton, agents.

Passengers:
Alleyne 	Miss
O'Meagher 	Miss
Watkin 		Mr
Perriman 	Mr
And 3 in the steerage

Departures
Sept 10 - Otago, ss, 642 tons, McLean, from Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. 
Saloon Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Martin 		Mrs
Little 		Miss
Pinsent 	Mr
Webber 		Mr
Ryan 		Mr
For Wellington -
Bartleman 	Mr
Boyle 		Mr
For Hokitika -
Glasgow 	Mrs
Kean 		Mrs
Todd 		Mr
For Melbourne - 
Dearden 	Mr and Mrs
Selby 		Mr
Naples 		Mr
Grant 		Mr
And 21 in the steerage for all ports

Otago Witness 3 Oct 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Sept 27 – Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Brunton 	Mr and Mrs
Holmes 		Mr and Mrs
Launder 	Mr and Mrs
Hamilton 	Mrs
Ching 		Mrs
Gillies 	Mrs
Cook 		Mrs
Tanner 		Miss
Hamilton 	Rev R
Robinson 	Mr
Neil 		Mr
Barnfield 	Mr
Wilson 		Mr
Beal 		Mr
Maitland 	Mr
Moorah 		Mr
Shennan 	Mr
Moody 		Mr
Scoular 	Mr
Ching 		Mr
Brown 		Mr
Waters 		Mr
Arthur 		Mr
Tyre 		Mr
Young 		Mr
Preston 	Mr
Grubb 		Mr
Horne 		Mr
Proudfoot 	Mr
Schofield 	Mr
And 22 in the steerage

Oneca, barque, 725 tons, Henrique, from New York, June 5th. A Briscoe and Co, agents. Passenger: Mrs Henrique
Sept 29 – Tararua, ss, Clark, from Melbourne Sept 17th, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
De Beer 	Mrs
Hislop 		Mrs
Phillips 	Mrs
Lawrence 	Mrs and 2 children
McKay 		Miss
Driver 		Mr
Johnston 	Mr
Roberts 	Mr
Ross 		Mr
Lawrence 	Mr
Herman 		Mr
Curry 		Mr
Bartleman 	Mr
Wylie 		Mr
Coates 		Mr
Scott 		Mr
And 8 steerage

Departures
Sept 25 – Colusa, barque, 1189 tons, Howes, for San Francisco. H Houghton and Co, agents. Passengers: Mrs Howes  and 2 children
Sept – 29 – Albion, ss, Underwood, for Melbourne via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton –
Fotheringham 	Mrs
Thompson 	Mr
Shalders 	Mr
For Wellington –
Harris 		G H
1 steerage for Nelson
and 4 steerage for Melbourne

Sept 30 – Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
For Melbourne –
Riley 		Rev Mr and Mrs
McArthur 	Mrs
Fraser 		Hon Capt
Bick 		Mr
Lyders 		Mr
Hunt 		Mr
Marsh 		Mr
Turrock 	Mr
Woodley 	Mr
Chambers 	Mr
Splatt 		Mr
Ingham 		Mr
And 19 in the steerage
For Bluff –
McDonald 	Mr and Mrs
Scolfield 	Mr and Mrs
Gilles 		Mrs and four children
Trotter 	Mr
Jones 		Mr
Calcutt 	Mr
And 1 in the steerage

Easby, ss, 960 tons, Kennedy, for Newcastle. Webb and Fulton, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Spooner 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Spooner 	Mr
Williams 	Mr

The Oneca
The American barque Oneca, Captain J B Henrique, arrived at the port in tow of the steamer Samsea on 26th September. She is from New York and brings a full cargo of miscellaneous goods. Captain Henrique reports that John Green, an able seaman, fell overboard on the 17th day of September and was drowned.
When we boarded the barque Oneca, we were startled by sinister rumours respecting foul play in the case of one of the sailors named John Green, who was lost overboard on the 17th of Sept. One of his shipmates had, it appears, stated that the unfortunate fellow was knocked down with a belaying-pin by the second mate of the barque, and then thrown overboard. Before leaving the vessel, we interrogated Captain Henrique on the subject and he informed us that he feared all was not right, but declared that he knew no more about the occurrence than we did, as he was below by the side of his wife at the time it happened. He had, however, found it necessary to arrest the second mate and place him in close confinement and proposed consulting with the American Consul at Dunedin today as to the proper steps to be taken with the case.
(Court proceedings ‘The Occurrence onboard the Oneca’, Otago Witness 17 Oct 1874)

Otago Witness 10 Oct 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Oct 7 – Gothenburg, ss, Pearce, from Melbourne, Sept 30th, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne –
Hyland 		Mr
Brothers 	Mr
Wyndham 	Mr
Mellis 		Mr
Newton 		Mr
Pounds 		Mr
From Bluff –
Tippins 	Mr and Mrs and son
Sparrow 	Mrs
Powell 		Mrs
Gilroy 		Mrs and three children
Calcutt 	Mr
Hedry 		M
Thompson 	Mr
Crosby 		Mr
Massey 		Mr

Oct 8 – Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne –
Douglas 	Mr
And 8 steerage
From coast ports –
Lemon 		Mr and Mrs
Failey 		Mrs H 
McKenzie 	Miss
Stuart 		Mr
McWilliams 	Mr
Stone 		Mr
Crump 		Mr
Thornton 	Mr
And 3 steerage

Acacia, barque, 233 tons, Harvey, from Hobart Town, October 1st. Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Passengers:
Harvey 		Mrs
Chalmers 	Mr
Fraser 		Mr
No overseas Departures 

Otago Witness 17 Oct 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Oct 15 – Otago, ss, 642 tons, J McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Stevenson 	Mr, Mrs Jas and child
Thompson 	Mrs and Miss
Neale 		Mrs
Huttley 	Mrs and child
Wright 		Mrs, (4) children and servant
Murphy 		Miss
Hennings 	Miss
Trestrail 	Mr
Stronach 	Mr
O’Driscoll 	Mr
Rattray 	Mr
Black 		Mr
Somerville 	Mr
And 36 in steerage
From Bluff –
Stock 		Mr and Miss
Wilson 		Miss
Cameron 	Miss
Webster 	Captain
Stewart 	Mr
Webster 	Mr
Stobo 		Mr
Pearson 	Mr
Inglis 		Mr
Bunny 		Mr
For other ports, 39

Invercargill, ship, 1246 tons, Tilly, from Glasgow (July 16th). Cargill, Gibbs and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Morrison 	Alexander, Mrs and infant
Morrison 	John and Mrs
Campbell 	Mr and Mrs
Tilly 		Mrs
Lumsden 	Mrs
Black 		Mr
Drysdale 	Mr
Dunlop 		Mr
And 448 nominated and free immigrants

Departures
Oct 9 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne –
Morley 		Mr and Mrs
Tolmie 		Mr, Mrs and (2) Misses
Blackadder 	Dr and Mrs
Eva 		Mrs and child
Bransen 	Mrs
Gordon 		Dr
Hanan 		Dr
Houghton 	Mr
And 40 in the steerage
For Bluff –
Morrison 	Mr and Mrs
Taylor 		Mr and Mrs
Turner 		Mrs and child
Fish 		Mrs and Miss
Binney 		Mr
Pell 		Mr
And 15 in the steerage

Gothenburg, ss, 501 tons, Pearce, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passenger: Mr Calcutt
Oct 15 – Parsee, ship, 1281 tons, Nelson, for San Francisco. Russell, Ritchie and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Nuttle 		Mr and Mrs and two children
Redmayne 	Mr, five children and servant
And one in the steerage

Otago Witness 17 Oct 1874, Page13
Telegrams Bluff October 13th
The steamer Otago, Captain McLean, arrived at the Bluff at 6pm. She left Melbourne on the 8th. She sails for Dunedin at 3pm tomorrow.

Saloon Passengers:
Stronach 	Mr
Stevenson 	Mr
Black 		Mr
Trestrail 	Mr
Somerville 	Mr
Driscoll 	Mr
Schofield 	Mr
Wright 		Mrs, (5) children and servant
Stevenson 	Mrs
Stevenson 	Miss
Neill 		Mrs
Huttly 		Mrs
Thomson 	Mrs
Thomson 	Miss
And 31 in the steerage

Otago Witness 24 Oct 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Oct 17 – Southern Cross, barque, 324 tons, Boon, from Hobart Town. G F Reid, agent.

Passengers:
Plummer 	Mrs
Green 		Mrs
Dyson 		Miss
Green 		Mr
Rowlands 	Mr
Riddle 		Captain
Rheulen 	Mr
Parkins 	Mr
Keasely 	Mr
And 16 steerage

Oct 22 – Albion, RMSS, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour, Dalgety, Nichols and Co, Agents.

Passengers:
Burn 		Mrs
Smythe 		Mrs
Worthington 	Miss
Cargill 	Miss
Jones 		Miss
Petherbridge 	Captain
Aynsley 	H J
Aynsley 	J
Evans 		Mr
Jamieson 	Mr
McMullen 	J
Mullen 		G
Brown 		Mr
Oxford 		Mr
Mitchell 	Mr
Thomson 	Mr
Thompson 	G A
Dawson 		Mr
And 8 steerage

Departures
Oct 10 – Otago, ss, McLean, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton –
Latter 		Mrs
Royse 		Mr
Horse 		Mr
Chalmers 	Mr
Rainton 	Mr
Menzies 	Mr
Dodd 		Mr
Ashcroft	Mr
Mid 		Mr
And 1 in the steerage
For Wellington –
Stewart 	Mr and Mrs
McKay 		Mr and Miss
Henry 		Mr, Mrs and son
Pringle 	Mr
For Hokitika –
Forsyth 	Miss
For Melbourne –
Wheeler 	Mr
Riggen 		Mr
And 5 in the steerage

Bunker Hill, ship, 998 tons, Davis, for Manilla. Bates, Sise and Co, agents. Passengers: Smith’s Combination Troupe (14)
Oct 21 – Albion, ss, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton –
Miller	 	Mr
Ross 		Mr
For Melbourne –
Driscoll 	Mr
And 25 steerage
For Wellington –
1 steerage

Arrival of the Invercargill
Thick rainy weather, with a rising southerly wind ushered in last week and converted the Port into a picture of discomfort and unattractiveness. The entranced to the harbour was obscured by mist, which also shut in the signal station and so communicating by flags with the Port was rendered an impossibility. The Geelong proceeded down the harbour to bring in the stranger, whatever she might be. Opinions inclined to the overdue Celestial Queen and Calypso, with a strong probability of the new-comer proving to be the fully due Invercargill. “Powder or disease on board” was the remark when this proceeding was noticed, and then, as the stranger was evidently a large vessel, the General Government Immigration Officers and Health Officer started for her in the steamer Peninsula. As it happened the ship had neither powder nor disease of any consequence on board; but, as a course of measles and bronchitis had run through her during the passage, whilst one case of typhoid fever was in hospital convalescent, it was deemed advisable to anchor her in quarantine until the opinion of the Health Office had been taken. Besides the fever case, there were only three cases of consumption, one of chronic bronchitis and one or two minor cases of phthisis in hospital, or rather out of it, the patients being convalescent. Forty cases of measles and twenty cases of bronchitis had appeared during the passage. Measles were brought on board by a family of Shetlanders, although it was not apparent upon them when they joined the ship, The eruption, however, appeared a week after the ship left port and the disease took its course, but in a mild form, only one death being directly traceable to it. The total deaths were six, two of them being in the case of adults.
Porteous Annie on August 9th, aged eight months, died of measles and convulsions;
Walker James on August 10th, aged 20 months, died of tubercular disease of the lungs;
Smart John on August 17th, aged 1 month, died of convulsions;
Caskey John, aged 18 months, died of tubercular disease;
Catherine Stewart on September 5th, aged 28 years, died of hysterical mania, the effect of a premature confinement;
Charles McAtear on October 1st, aged 42 years, died of a pulmonary relapse of bronchitis. The deaths were very nearly balanced by births, of which there were four.
McLean Mrs, gave birth to a boy on the 2nd August;
Henesey Mrs on September 1st was confined of a daughter;
Shand Mrs on October 3rd, of a daughter.
The Invercargill arrives here a full ship, 900 tons of cargo and thirteen saloon passengers, and 448 immigrants, equal to 336 statute adults. The proportion of children is very large, the little people numbering 125. We were unable to ascertain the exact number of bona fide single women that were on board, but the single women’s compartment contained 83 souls, several of them being married. The husbands of the latter were quartered with the single men, both men and women preferring to be separated rather than submit to the disgusting close and yet open quartering that characterises the berthing of married people in Glasgow immigrant ships. The number of men in the single men’s compartment was 124. The number of married couples was 57. Regarded from a national point of view the immigrants stand thus:
English - adults, 19 males, 10 females; children, 7 males, 4 females; infants, 1.
Scotch –adults, 168 males, 123 females; children, 51 males, 46 females; infants, 3 males, 6 females;
Irish – adults, 9 males, 1 female; children, 6 females; infants, 1 male.
The Invercargill is the second of the Albion Shipping Co’s new ships that has come direct here from home. She is on her maiden voyage and is commanded by our old friend Captain F Tilly, late master of the ship Christian McAusland. Another familiar face was that of the Chief Officer, Mr Fyeyek, who occupied the same position on board the ship Otago, when she was commanded by Captain Stewart. It is ninety-one days since the ship broke ground at the Tail of the Bank, off Greenock.

Otago Witness 31 Oct 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Oct 24 – Coq du Village, 312 tons, Smith, from Newcastle. H Houghton and Co, agents. Passenger: Mr Stymen
Oct 26 – Agnes Jessie, ship, 920 tons, Mitchell, from London, July 28. Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents. Cabin Passengers: Mr Brown
And 329 free and nominated immigrants
Calypso, ship, 1014 tons, Leslie, from London, Aug 3.

Cabin Passengers:
Mackay 		Mrs
Leslie 		Mrs
Russell 	Mrs
Gibbs 		Mrs
Huie 		Miss
Cargill 	Miss
McFarlane 	Miss
Nun 		Mr
Simpson 	Mr
Bennett 	Mr
McKenzie 	Mr
Walsh 		Rev Mr
O’Leary 	Rev Mr
17 second cabin and 13 intermediate

Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clark, from Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

 

Saloon Passengers:
Web 		Mrs and child
Morey 		Miss
McLaren 	Miss
Newman 		Mr
Jack 		Mr
Mossom 		Mr
Seed		Mr
Reid 		Mr
Miller 		Mr
Williams 	Mr
Keogh 		Mr
Taine 		Mr
Morrison 	Mr
And 11 in the steerage

Departures
The Tweed, ship, 1745 tons, Stewart, for Sydney. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:
15 steerage
Oct 28 – Tararua, ss, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne –
Rattray 	J
Strode 		E C
Thonemau 	Mr
Comrie 		Mr
Brown 		Mr
Scoullar 	Mr
And 28 in the steerage
For Bluff –
Nicklen 	Mrs and 2 children

Arrival of the Jessie Readman
The Jessie Readman was towed in by the Geelong on October 28th. We were pleased to welcome this fine ship and her popular commander, Captain Mitchell, and equally gratified to note the admirable condition she was in. She arrived a clean, tidy ship, well appointed in every respect as a carrier of immigrants. Coming from London, her accommodation for married and single was of the highest class, according to the current scale, whilst the state of the compartments reflected great credit upon the immigrants. Of the latter, she brought 32 souls, equal to 274 ½ statute adults. They looked respectable and healthy, with, but a very small proportion of elderly folk. Not the faintest symptom of infectious disease had appeared during the passage and hence the surgeon’s duties were comparatively light. He had 25 cases of illness to combat with, the sufferers being children of tender years and the complaints diarrhoea and bronchitis chiefly; 8 deaths and 3 births occurred. The deaths were as follows:
Jordan William on September 7, 7 months, hydrocephalus
Learmonth Isabella on August 28, 11 months, diarrhoea
Johnston William on August 26, 17 months, diarrhoea
Rediand Alex on September 6, 2 years, diarrhoea
Heard Arthur on October 3, 15 months, bronchitis
Heyden William on October 15, 3 years 3 months, dropsy
Moore William on September 12, 5 months, spinal disease
Reid Louisa on September 21, 4 months, bronchitis
The births were:
Stanton Mrs on September 3, of a girl
Badson Mrs on September 21, of twins, boy and girl
Of the immigrants, there were 58 married couples, 74 single men, 29 single women, 88 children, and 11 infants. Considered from a national point of view, there were:
English, 105 males and 88 females
Scotch, 44 males and 20 females
Irish, 35 males and 28 females
Foreigners, 2 males and 3 females
We have much pleasure in acknowledging the courteous attention of Captain Mitchell. He reports a somewhat long passage of 82 days from land to land, 90 days from the Downs to port.


Otago Witness 7 Nov 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Oct 31 - Basby, ss, 969 tons, Kennedy, From Sydney, October 24. Webb and Fulton, agents.

Passengers:
Fenwick 		Mr, Mrs and Miss
Horton 			Mrs
Maine 			Mrs
Foran 			Rev Mr
Roberts 		Mr
Belcher 		Mr
And 4 in steerage


Nov 1 - Celestial Queen, ship, 843 tons, Watt, from London, July 9. Bright Bros and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Sheepshanks 		Mr
Sneider 		Mr
And 5 intermediate


Nov 2 - Lennox Castle, ship, 696 tons, William Stewart, from London, July 20th. New Zealand Shipping Company, agents.

Passengers:
Boyd 			Mr
Moore 			Mr
And 14 in steerage 

Evening Post, 3 November 1874, Page 2 PORT CHALMERS. 3rd November.
The ship Lennox Castle, 105 days from London, arrived yesterday. She lost a boy overboard from the mainyard-arm. She brings three bulls and three heifers of the shorthorn breed for the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Company.

Press, 10 November 1874, Page 2 Imported Stock
There were also landed from the same vessel six head of cattle for Mr Larkworthy, under the charge of W. B. Clarke, they arrived from London to Otago in the ship Lennox Castle and are very low in condition, but in perfect health. Their 105 days' passage out no doubt materially affected them. They are all from the celebrated Kent herd of Messrs Lenny and Son, at whose sale in England last year an average was reached of 250 guineas per beast, and will, no doubt, be of great service to the province if allowed to remain here. The first is a roan, bull named " Charming Prince," and we hear that his reserved price is 600 guineas; the second is a heifer calf, nine months old, named Magic the 12th." The third is a red bull named "Royal Prince," he is a red and white, calved in October. 1873. "Berrington Rose" is a roan and white heifer, two years old. First Lord is a roan and white bull, calved July, 1873, and is one of the grandest animals ever imported to these islands. "Verity the 5th," is a roan heifer, about two years old. It would be unfair to criticise any of the animals in their present low condition, but no doubt a month's New Zealand feed will work wonders. Eight heifers and three bull calves, bought at Mr Bell's sale, are also on board. They are consigned to Mr Adams, of Hawkes Bay.

Otago Daily Times 7 December 1874, Page 2
Saturday, 5th December. (Before T. A. Mansford, Esq., R.M.) Desertion — Herman Weir, cook of Lennox Castle, was charged by Captain Stewart, master, with having deserted from his vessel. It was shown that the defendant did on Friday obtain an order from the captain far certain articles of apparel, and purchased them. He then in the evening left the ship taking his tilings with, him, and deposited them in Mr Dodson's store. He was subsequently arrested. Defendant had nothing to say for himself, and was sentenced to 12 weeks' imprisonment with hard labour, it being optional with the captain to take him on board again whenever the ship was ready to go to sea.


Nov 4 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Marshall 	Mr and Masters
36 steerage
From the Coast -
Symons 		Mr, Mrs and 2 children
Cockburn  	Mrs A
Webb 		Miss
McGregor 	Mr
Post 		C A
Common 		Mr
Pearce 		Mr
Gray 		Mr
And 10 steerage

No Departures for Overseas
Otago Witness 7 Nov 1874, Page13 BIRTH
Schaw: On the 28th October, at Lauriston, Green Island, the wife of F Schaw, Esq, of a daughter.
DEATH Simpson: On the 27th October, at his residence, Eden street, Dunedin, after a short illness, Mr Andrew Simpson, butcher, in the 46th year of his age.

Otago Witness 14 Nov 1874, Page12 Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Nov 12 - Otago, ss, 640 tons, John McLean, from Melbourne via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Saloon Passengers:
Orr 		Mr, Mrs, and 3 Misses
Blackadder 	Mr and Mrs
Sargood 	Mr, Mrs, Miss, Masters (2) and servant
White 		Mrs and Miss
Towers 		Mrs and Miss
De Beer 	Mrs
McArthur 	Mrs
Fergusson 	Miss
Fagan 		Mr and Jnr
McLean 		J S
Beck 		Mr
From Bluff -
Pittman 	Miss
Le Range 	Mr
Ireland 	Mr
Proudfoot 	Mr
63 in steerage
and 73 passengers for Northern ports

No Overseas Departures

Otago Witness 21 Nov 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Nov 13 - May Queen, ship, 732 tons, R. Tatchell, from London, August 19th.

Passengers:
Tapper 		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Haley 		Mrs, Misses (2) and Master
Taine 		Miss and Master
Jones 		Miss
Higgins 	Rev Mr
Glessurs 	Rev Mr
Alexander 	Mr
Sherries 	Mr (2)
Babott 		Mr
16 second-class and 37 steerage

Nov 16 - Mataura, ship, Kerr, from London, August 18th. New Zealand Shipping Co, agents.

Passengers:
Hack 		Mr, Mrs and children (3)
Shaw 		Mr, Mrs and children (4)
Shaw 		Mrs
Sommer 		Captain
Walton 		Mr (2)
Gordon 		Mr
And 25 steerage

Departures
Nov 13 - Otago, ss, 640 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait, Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Holt 		Miss
Post 		Mr
McGregor 	Mr
Cook 		Mr
And 13th in the steerage.
For Wellington -
Chapman 	Mrs
York 		Miss
Smith 		J
Cook 		G
Cook 		J
Evans 		Mr
Margetts 	Mr
Stout 		R
Macassey 	Mr
Hackworth 	Mr
And 2 in the steerage
For Greymouth -
Edwards 	Miss
For Hokitika -
2 in the steerage
For Melbourne -
Barfield 	Mr and Mrs
Oliver 		Mr and Mrs
Hanson 		Mrs
Bruce 		Mr
Wielding 	Mr
Lawson 		Mr
And 2 in the steerage

Nov 15 - Easby, ss, 969 tons, Kennedy, for Newcastle. Webb and Fulton, agents.

Passengers:
Steinan 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Elliott 	Mrs and children (4)
Poullon 	Mr, Mrs and children (2)
Edwards 	Mrs
Wilson 		Mr
Golding 	Mr
Smith 		Miss
Kinkham 	Miss
Wilson  	Miss A B
McNeil 		Miss
Patterson 	Miss
And 25 in the steerage

ARRIVAL OF THE MAY QUEEN
This handsome little clipper ship put in her fifth appearence in these water yesterday morning, after a fair passage of 84 days from London and 82 days from land to land. This good time was made under adverse circumstances, so far as winds were concerned, exceedingly light weather being experienced from the Downs to the Line, whilst a spell of easterly weather was met with to the eastward of the Cape, and materially helped to retard the ship's progress. In other respects the passage was favourably ordered, no bad weather worth mentioning having been met with. The May Queen is still commanded by Capt Tatchell, and as she brought seventy-two passengers, a medical man, in the person of Dr Wilkins, was appointed to guard them in a sanitary sense. They arrived in good health. She left Gravesend at 4 pm on the 19th August, passed the Downs next morning and ran down Channel with light easterly winds, clearing the island on the 22nd.

Otago Witness 28 Nov 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Nov 21 - Auckland, ship, 1250 tons, Stevens, from Glasgow August 27th. Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Tait 		Mr and Mrs
Young 		Mr, Mrs and children (7)
Wright 		Mr, Mrs and children (3)
Clifford 	Miss
Donaldson 	Miss
Patterson  	Rev J G
Anderson 	Mr
Barclay 	Mr

Steerage - 392 nominated and free immigrants
Nov 22 - Albion, RMSS, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne Nov 16, via Bluff Nov 21. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Mackie 		Rev Mr, Mrs and children (2)
Westropp 	Colonel and Mrs
Faul 		Mrs
Ryley 		Mrs
McLaren 	Miss
Lindsay 	Miss
Hutchison 	Capt
Ryley 		Rev Mr
Wheeler 	R T
Ross 		Mr
Bell 		Mr
Russell 	Mr
Conway 		Mr
Mitchell 	Mr
Bastings 	Mr
Houghton 	Mr
Gaisford 	Mr
Lakeman 	Mr
Musgrave 	Mr
Ward 		Mr
Peel 		Mr
And 25 steerage


Nov 24 - Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clark, from Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Bright  	Mr A and Mrs
Carr 		Dr, Mrs and child
Glasgow 	Mrs
Reid 		Mrs
McDonald 	Miss
Richardson 	Mr
Roskruge 	Mr
Whilley 	Mr
Prince 		Mr
Snider 		Mr
And 9 steerage

Nov 25 - Glencoe, barque, 159 tons, Jasper, from Hobart Town, Nov 11th. Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Passengers:
Smart 		Mrs
Winston 	Mr
Cook 		Mr
Hornsby 	Mr
And 1 steerage

Nov 26 - Free Trader, barque, 206 tons, Miles, from Hobart Town November 19th, Guthrie and Larnach, agents.

Passengers:
Haskill 	Mr and Mrs
Haskill 	Misses (4)
Haskill 	Masters (3)
Moore 		Mr
And 2 steerage

Departures
Nov 24 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agent.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Mills 		J
Hope 		Mr
Common 		Mr
For Wellington -
Gaisford 	Mr
For Melbourne -
Lyndsey 	Mr
Tyree 		Mr

Nov 25 - Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Belfield 	Mr
Whitely 	Mr
Chatterton	Mr
Cullen 		Mr
And 4 steerage
For Bluff -
Lawson 		Mr and Mrs
Taylor 		Rev Mr
Dawson 		Mr
Proudfoot 	Mr

ARRIVAL OF THE AUCKLAND
This fine ship, the third of the new vessels launched by the Albion Shipping Company for the New Zealand trade, arrived in Port on the 21st November in tow of the steamer Geelong. She is a splendid vessel, the exact counterpart in every respect of the handsome Invercargill, now lying at the Railway Pier. Lines, tonnage, dimensions, rig, appointment and last - but not least- exquisite finish, are similar in both ships. Vessels better finished than the Auckland and Invercargill could not be desired, whilst both possess excellent saloon accommodation and commodious 'tween decks. The Auckland comes here commanded by Captain Stevens, formerly of the EP Bouveric, a courteous gentleman and smart seaman; and we were pleased to notice another familiar face in the chief officer, Mr Fritzer, late of the ship City of Dunedin. The ship brings the month's consignment of immigrants from Scotland to the Province; and to the credit of her commander and officers arrived in admirably clean condition. .She is certainly the cleanest ship that has come from Glasgow this year, and that is saying a great deal in favour of her passengers. The condition of the latter was also everything that could be reasonably desired. They presented a hale, healthy, respectable appearance and we should imagine, were more carefully selected than is usual with the indiscriminate operations of the sub-agents in Britain. That they have good constitutions was evidenced by the almost immunity from sickness they enjoyed during the passage, whilst only four deaths, all in the cases of infants, occurred; this being the lightest death rate that we can recollect in the case of any immigrant ship coming here, and may be regarded as another feather in the caps of those to whom the management of the Auckland's immigrants was entrusted.
Against the deaths- one of which was in the case of a child born on board- were five births so that the ship arrives with two more souls on board than when she left. One of the deaths occurred after they anchor was down on Saturday. There were a few sad sights in the married people's place, the most notable a family group father, mother, grandfather, mourning over a child that was dying in the mother's arms. It died before we left the ship. These people complained of want of proper attention during the passage, and their complaints were endowed by several others, who also had ailing little ones. One of the married who had been ailing in bed several day's, also complained of inattention. On the other hand the Doctor was well spoken of by many, and on his own behalf stated that he found not a few of the married people most impracticable to deal with. The fact of the ship having been so free from disease of any kind also speaks most loudly in his favour, although at the same time the credit accruing upon that is to be equally shared by the captain and officers for general good management.
Three hundred and ninety three souls, including twenty saloon passengers, arrived in the Auckland and are subdivided as under:
Fifty married couples, 110 single men, 85 single women, 47 male and 42 female children, between the ages of one and twelve years, and eight infants. Their nationality lay entirely between Scotland and Ireland. Of Scotch, there were 108 males and 171 females; of Irish, 26 males and 19 females; total statute adults, 356½ .
The deaths that occurred were -
Stevens J, October 6th, 16 months, of bronchitis
Murray George, November 2nd, 5 months, of piritonitis
The births were -
McCormick Mrs, September, of a boy, who died on September 25th;
Thomson Mrs, of a boy - the same date
Walker Mrs, October 22nd, of a girl
Mrs Macallum, November 10th, of a boy
Young J Mrs Nov. 20th, a saloon passenger, of a son.
The Auckland has performed well on this her maiden trip, having accomplished the run from Greenock in 86 days, and from land to land in 71 days, and from the Equator to the Solander sea made a dashing passage of 47 days, a passage that has been rarely equalled. The ship has thus established a clipping reputation. Captain Stevens informs us that she broke ground and sailed from the Tail of the Bank on the 27tb of August, discharged the pilot off Dublin next day, and then had a thrashing match down channel against a SW breeze, and so did not clear the land until September 6th, Scilly being the point of departure.

Otago Witness 28 Nov 1874, Page13
DEATHS
Scott: On the 10th November at The Glen, Mornington, Dunedin, Jane, only daughter of Thomas and Rachael Scott; aged nine months.
Percival: On the 2lst November, at his residence, Clyde street, Charles Alfred, the beloved son of William James Percival, of the Otago Survey Department.


Otago Witness 5 Dec 1874, Page12 Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Dec 2 - Alhambra, ss, 487 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Handyside 	Mr and Mrs
Scoullar 	Mrs and Miss
Pillans 	Miss
Macfarlane 	Mr
Pollard 	Mr
Maitland 	Mr
McDonald 	Mr
Telford 	Mr
And 15 steerage
From the Coast -
Ingles 		Mr, Mrs and children (2)
Waining 	Mr and Mrs
McKay 		Miss
Kershaw 	Mr
Poulson 	Mr
Buneek 		Mr
Hope 		Mr
Gramman 	Mr
Six steerage
And 10 for other ports
No overseas Departures

Otago Witness 12 Dec 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Dec 10 - Bobyelto, barque, 432 tons, Hodge, from Newcastle. Harbour Steam Co, agents.

Passengers:
Chandler 	Mrs and child
Culligan 	Mrs

Departures
Dec 4 - Alhambra, ss, 497 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Bluff -
Salter 		Mr
For Melbourne -
Anderson 	Mr, Mrs and family (4)
Murphy 		Miss
Mullard 	Mrs
Fothergill Captain
Tooth 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
Ainsley 	Mr
48 steerage

Otago Witness 12 Dec 1874, Page13 Deaths
Douglas Archibald: On the 1st December, 1874 at his residence, Hampden, Moeraki, Archibald Douglas, farmer, aged 74. Perth papers please copy.
Darling John: On the 3rd December, at his residence, Kemra Bank, Inch Clutha, after a short illness, John Darling, in the 62nd year of his age.

Otago Witness 12 Dec 1874, Page21 Select Poetry
IN HIS CHAMBER.
You say that I have naught to fear
Ah I sit in silence thinking here;
That the steamers thousand of times have crossed
And not a soul was ever lost;
That he is as safe on the ocean there
As I am here in his easy-chair;
That I am foolish to sit and brood,-
It does me harm, and him no good
Perhaps it is so. You may be right:
But, in the stillness of the night
I lie awake, when the wind is high,
And clouds are sweeping athwart the sky,
And only think of what may be -
Of the howling tempest, the surging sea;
The savage waves that rise and dash
On the shuddering ship with an awful crash,
Till the sturdy bulwalks are swept away
By a weight no work of man could stay;
The cracking masts that splintering fall;
And the cries of terror above it all.
The horrible din of death I hear;
And among the faces all blanched with fear
I see one so often raised to me
In tender, loving sympathy,
Whose eyes, so gentle and so bright,
Are wild with horror and affright.
The form I have rocked upon my breast,
And hushed in its baby years to rest,
And guarded and cherished so long and well,
All helpless, alone, in that surging hell,
I hear my name in the hurried prayer
That comes at the moment of dread despair;
When, far on its billows swept away,
The ocean roars with its struggling prey,
But this is foolish, you say, and weak;
And to argue my thoughts away, you seek.
It is very kindly done:
But I am his father; and here at home,
I picture the dangers that may have come
To him, far, far away from me,
Away on the treacherous, pitiless sea,
My dear, my only son.
Unknown


Otago Witness 19 Dec 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Dec 12 - Claud Hamilton, ss, Bawden, from Melbourne, Dec 5th, via Bluff Dec 11th. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Chamberlain 	Mr and Mrs
Von Blarcom 	Mr, Mrs and Jnr
Charles 	Mr and Mrs
Tolmie 		Mrs
Baxter 		Mrs
Cooper 		Mrs
Game 		Mrs
Johnston 	Miss
Baxter 		Miss
King 		Miss
Tolmie 		Miss (2)
Gellibrand 	Mr (2)
Cooke 		Mr
Hunt 		Mr
Shepherd 	Mr
And 25 steerage
From Bluff -
Holmes 		Mr and Mrs
Webster 	Mr and Mrs
Turnbull 	Mr
Fenwick 	Mr
Gibbs 		Mr
Dennison 	Mr
Two steerage
And 47 for other ports

Departures
Dec 12 - Easby, ss, Kennedy, for Newcastle via Wellington. Webb and Fulton, agents.

Passengers:
For Wellington -
Aitken 		Mr, Mrs and child
Cupper 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
Fulton 		Mr
And one steerage
For Newcastle -
Reynolds 	Mr
Currier 	Mr
Gordon 		Mr
Holt 		Mr
Latham 		Mr
Bonthron 	Mr
Nagle 		Mr
And five steerage

Dec 14 - Christian McAusland, ship, 962 tons, Duncan, for London. Cargills, Gibbs and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Barratt 	Mrs and Miss
McDonald 	Mrs
Sweet 		Miss
Brodie 		Mr
Williamson 	Mr
Kerry 		Mr
2nd Cabin -
Burton 		Mr and Mrs
Brown 		Mr and Mrs
O'Brien 	Mr
Railton 	Mr
Lodge 		Mr
Eherage 	Mr

Claud Hamilton, ss, 540 tons, Bawden, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Wellington -
Gillies 	Mrs
And one steerage
For Melbourne -
McGregor 	Mr
And 21 steerage
And four steerage for other ports

Otago Witness 26 Dec 1874, Page12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Dec 20 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Cunningham 	Mrs
Doughty 	Mrs
Phillips	Mrs
Musgrove 	Mrs
Caffin 		Mr, Mrs and children (4)
Lowe 		Miss
Hart 		Miss (2)
Clapperton 	Miss
Bell 		Miss
Harris 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Craig 		Mr
Hill 		Mr
Guthrie 	Mr
Hannan 		Mr
Macdonald 	Mr
Williams 	Mr
Sanders 	Mr
Morrison 	Mr
Stewart 	Mr
Rainey 		Mr
Copeland 	J
And 25 steerage

Dec 22 - India, barque, Griegs, from Launceston. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Wilson 		Mrs W jnr
Duncan 		Mrs
Simmons 	Mr (2)
And 5 steerage

Woodville, barque, 362 tons, Arnold, from Newcastle. Harbour Steam Co, agents. Passenger: Mrs Condy
Tararua, ss, 520 tons, Clark, from Melbourne via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Dartnelt 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Black 		Mrs and Miss
Glynn 		Miss
Knight 		Dr
Woon 		Mr
Sonall 		Mr
Matthews 	Mr
Reid 		Mr
Stead 		Mr
Von Blarcom 	Mr
Fulton 		Mr

Departures
Dec 21 - Albion, ss, 591 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Cook Strait. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Carnall 	Mr
One in the steerage
For Wellington -
Park 		Mr
Douglas 	Mr
For Melbourne -
Fergusson 	Miss
Brown 		Mr

Dec 23 - Tararua, ss, 520 tons, for Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Fitzgerald 	Miss
Matthews 	Mr
Richardson 	Mr
And 20 steerage
For Bluff -
Beale 		Mr
Mason 		Mr
And one steerage

Otago Witness 26 Dec 1874, Page14 Telegrams
The Tararua, with the outward English mail, sailed south at noon. A gentleman passenger stated that on the voyage from Melbourne she encountered a terrific gale, and was hove to for fifty hours. Eighteen valuable draught horses were killed. The lifeboat was nearly washed overboard. The passengers were huddled together in the saloon, and hardly expected to see land again.


 Leave-taking

The seamen shout once and together,
The anchor breaks up from the ground,
And the ship's head swings to the weather,
To the wind and the sea swings round:

With a clamour the great sail steadies,
In extreme of a storm scarce furled;
Already a short wake eddies,
And a furrow is cleft and curled
To the right and left.

About me, light-hearted or aching,
" Good-bye !" cry they all, taking hand—
What hand do I find worth taking ?
What face as the face of the land ?
I will utter a farewell greater
Than any of friends in ships—
I will leave on the forehead of Nature
The seal of a kiss—let the lips
Of a song do this.
......

The last of her now is a brightening
Far fire in the forested hills,
The breeze as the night nears is heightening,
The cordage draws tighter and thrills,
Like a horse that is spurred by the rider,
The great vessel quivers and quails,
And passes the billows beside her,
The fair wind is strong in her sails,
She is lifted along.

When the zone and the latitude changes
A welcome of white cliffs shall be,
I shall cease to be sad for white ranges
Now lost in the night and the sea:—
But dipped deep in their clear flowing rivers
As a chalice my spirit shall weigh
With fair water that flickers and shivers,
Held up to the strong, steady ray,
To the sunlight of song.

by Frederick Napier Broome.