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Shipping News Otago Witness 1873 
 

Otago Witness 10 January 1874, Page 17

Immigrant ships to Otago in 1873

1873 Arrivals at Port Chalmers, Otago, New Zealand

City of Dunedin  	30 Dec. 1872 37 pass.
Zealandia 		10 Jan. 1873 80 pass. 
Ferndale 		20 Jan.  No passengers
Margaret Galbraith 	30 Jan.  18 passengers
Charlotte Gladstone 	16 Feb. 350 passengers 
City of Bombay 		 7 Mar.  17 passengers
Euterpe 		 4 Apr. 106 passengers  
Lutterworth 		 5 Apr. 104 passengers
Wild Deer  		 1 May   36 passengers
William Davie  		 1 May   10 passengers
Oberon 			 2 May   No passengers
Naomi 			22 May   13 passengers
Michael Angelo  	28 May  140 passengers
James Nicol Fleming 	 1 Jul. 280 passengers 
Cospatrick 	 6 Jul.  45 pass. 
Araby Maid  	14 Jul.  18 pass.
St. Kilda 	19 Aug. 1873 20 pass.
Allahabad 	 1 Sep. 273 U 
Peter Denny  	 3 Sep. 321 immig. 
Bebington 	26 Sep. 7 passengers
Dover Castle  	10 Oct. 167 passengers U 
Rokeby Hall 	15 Oct. from Liverpool  8 pass.
Otago 		11 Oct. 161 passengers 
Lady Jocelyn 	 3 Nov. 1873  182 immig. U
May Queen  5 Nov.  5 pass. in steerage 
Christian McAusland  21 Nov. URL 
Zealandia 	29 Nov. 9 URL 
Jessie Readman  30 Nov 225 pass  
City of Dunedin 29 Dec 18 cabin 147p. 

Reference online: Papers Past Images online.

Otago Witness January 4 1873 pg13
Port Chalmers - Arrivals

Dec. 30 - City of Dunedin, ship, 1085 tons, Ross, from Glasgow, 20th Sept. Passengers: Mr Arthur Morris, Mrs Morris, family (9), and 2 servants, Mr Thomas Andrew, jun., and Mrs Andrew, Mrs Law and 2 children, Miss J. Bathgate, Messrs Charles Shaw, James Galloway, Archibald Russell, D. Yuile, James Walls and 13 in the steerage.

Jan. 1 - Georgina, barque, 315 tons, Dagleish, from Hong Kong, 24th Oct. Passengers: 6 Chinese.

The City of Dunedin, from Glasgow, under command of Captain Ross, late of the William Davie, Viola, &c., arrived at Port Chalmers on Monday. To N.E. winds and foggy weather is attributable her lengthy passage in running down her easting. Besides a large general cargo, she brings 37 passengers, including 24 saloon. Amongst the latter are some well-known Otagonians, including, as they do, Mr and Mrs W. Morris and family (9), Mrs Law and 2 children, and Miss Jane Bathgate. On the 2nd December a steerage passenger named John Robertson, a carpenter, succumbed to pulmonary congestion. As deck passengers she brings two beautiful entire Clydesdale horses, without a blemish; they are the property of Mr James Walls, a passenger, and are intended for Canterbury Province. Their names are Sir Walter Scott, 3 years, and Lord Lorne, 2 years; both took prizes at the Highland Society's Show held on July 30 and 31 and August 1st, 1872.

pg 15. The Clydesdale horses were safely transhipped to the s.s. Wellington for conveyance to Canterbury.

The barque Faldin, with teas, left Foo-Chow-Foo for Port Chalmers on the 1st November, the three-masted schooner Bonnie Dunkeld is also expected from the same quarter.

Otago Witness January 11 1873 pg12

Arrivals
Jan. 4 - Zealandia, ship, 1116 tons, Curry, from London, 8th October, via Bluff 2nd inst. Voyage account. The Zealandia, a magnificent and noble ship belonging to Messrs Shaw, Savill, and Co.'s line of London packets, arrived on Saturday morning under canvas. Immigrants passed clean and all were conveyed to Dunedin by the p.s Geelong during the afternoon. Passengers:
Mr and Mrs J. Blarney and two children
Miss Williams
Messrs P.J. Digby
Mr D.R. Rhodes
Mr Hiram Rhodes
and 72 second cabin and steerage passengers.
Jan. 5 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, 424 tons, Arnold, from Newcastle, 24ult.

Departures
Jan. 8 - Bulwark, ship, Kelly, for Newcastle.

Otago Witness January 18 1873 pg 7
Shipbuilding in Otago.
Messrs. Bogden and their Navvies.  "A Bebington Navvy"

Otago Witness January 18 1873 pg12

Jan. l6 — Conquest, American barque, 516 tons, Small, front Boston, 24th September. Bates, Sise, and Co., agents. Passenger — Mr John de Witt.

Jan. 11 — Dakota, U. S. mail steamer, 2135 tons, Ingersoll, from San Francisco, 5th December, via Honolulu, 16th December, and Northern Ports.  Passengers : Colonel and Mrs Parnell, Mrs Howden aud servant, Mr and Mrs Buckingham, Mr and Mrs Short, Mr and Mrs Felix, Miss Moody, Messrs J. A. Paterson, C. D. Smith, W. S. Blair, E. A. Elsworth, J. Newman, Cross, W. Green, G. Wellsman, W. M 'Master, Ryley, Prosser, Inglis, and three in the steerage ; three saloon, and eight steerage for Melbourne.

Alhambra, s.s., 497 tons, Pearce, from Melbourne, 4th inst.  Passengers: Hon. and Mrs J. J. Casey, Mrs Ireland, Mr and Mrs Pope, and family (6), Rev. Mr and Mrs Nish, and family (6), Mr and Mrs Croom, Mr and Mrs Cameron, Mrs Goodsir, Mrs Hannah, and 2 children, Rev. Mr Crowley, Messrs Cargill, Heymanson, Godfrey, Chisholm, Marsden, Mothersill, Misses Liddle, Williams, Walcott, and 18 in the steerage.

Page 14
Bluff, January 10th. The s. s. Alhambra, Captain Pearce, left Melbourne on the 4th, at 3 p.m. ; she arrived off the Bluff at midnight on the 9th. She brings 40 saloon and 22 steerage passengers, and 260 tons cargo for all ports. She sails for Dunedin at 4 p.m. to-day. Passengers : — Messrs Cargill, Heymanson, Hon Mr Casey and Mrs Casey, Messrs N. Mothersill, Ireland, Godfrey, Pope, Mrs Pope and 6 children, Rev. Father Crowley, Rev. Mr and Mrs Nish, and 6 children, Mr and Mrs Groom, Mr and Mrs Cameron, Messrs. Chisholm, Marsden, Miss Hiddle, Mrs Goodsir, Miss Williams, Mrs Hannah, and 2 children, Miss Walcott ; and 20 in the steerage. The Hon. J. J. Casey, Minister of Land and Agriculture, Victoria, accompanied by Mrs Casey and Miss Williams, are passengers per Alhambra on a pleasure trip through the Middle and North Islands.

Tararua, s.s., 522 tons, Rouse, from Melbourne, 30th ult., via West Coast and Northern Ports.  Passengers : Mr and Mrs Thompson, Miss Jarrett, Messrs King, James, Bratt, Keogh, Fisher, Tutchen, Ferguson, Wood, Donelly, and 3 in the steerage ; 46 for Melbourne and Bluff.

Jan. 12 - Helena, American barque, 603 tons, Snow from Melbourne, 28th ult. Passenger: Mrs Snow.
Arrived - Jan. 15 - Harriet Armitage, barque, 288 tons, Mailer, from Sydney 4th inst. Passengers: Miss Holdenburg and Mr Mann.

Otago Witness January 18 1873 pg14
The Immigration and Emigration returns for the port of Dunedin during the quarter ended December 31st, 1872, give the following results: -
Arrivals from the United Kingdom:
305 males and 221 females; departures, 8 males and 5 females.
Arrivals from the Australian Colonies:
163 males and 79 females, departures, 262 males and 55 females.
Arrivals from North Germany:
125 males and 141 females. Departure from New Zealand port, 1 male.
This leaves a balance in favour of the Province of 703 souls.

Otago Witness Saturday 25 January 1873 pg 5
Gas at Sea

January 25 1873 pg 12

Arrivals Port Chalmers
Jan. 18 - Foldin, jackass-barque, 234 tons, Daa, from Foo Chow Foo 3rd November.
Jan. 20 - Ferndale, barque, 416 tons, Fraser, from Liverpool. Oliver and Ulph, agents. Towed up by the Geelong. The vessel herself is a facsimile of the barque Clairellen, that brought to our shores the first consignment of plant for the Port Railway. The barque sailed from Liverpool on the 16th of October. A good passage of 96 days. The vessel comes into port tidy and aloft.

Southerly and westerly gales have continued with more or less violence for a week. Captain M'Culllum, the overseer of the harbour company's and other lighters, was proceeding single-handed in a small skiff with a reduced sail to give orders to a lighter, the skiff broached-to, close to the ship May Queen, a heavy puff coming away at the time the sheet was let go; and he stepped forward to unship the mast. In endeavouring to do so she capsized. The boat rolled over and over and he held on. and hailed the May Queen - whose lifeboat is fitted with Douglas's patent boat-lowering apparatus, which was on alarm immediately dropped from the davits fully manned. The May Queen's boat picked him up, and he was saved, apparently a little exhausted. The steamer Peninsula perceiving the accident put off from the Port wharf, and brought M'Cullum on shore. On landing he walked steadily up the jetty, retired home. Mr Jewiss in his large skiff, accompanied by four other watermen, on perceiving the accident, at once put off from shore to the rescue. The watermen, however, saved all the material and assisted to get M'Callum's boat hoisted on board the Galliot, lighter.

Departures:
Jan. 18 - Georgina, barque, 315 tons, Dalgleish, for Melbourne.
Jan. 22 - Thomas and Henry, brig, 215 tons, Clark, for Newcastle. Passenger : Mrs Clark.
Jan. 22 - Southern Cross, barque, 333 tons, Johnson, for Hobart Town. Master, agent.
Jan. 22 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, 470 tons, Arnold, for Newcastle. Passengers : Mr and Mrs W. Wood and child.


1st February 1873 pg12

Arrivals - Jan. 30 - Margaret Gallbraith, ship, 841 tons, Cowan from Glasgow, October 25th, Greenock 2nd November. Patrick Henderson's Company vessel packet ship. Understood to be 93 days out from the Clyde. Passengers:
Rev. Mr Fleming
Mr and Mrs McKerrow
Mrs Hervey and son
Miss Williams
Mr and Miss Wilson
and 10 in the steerage.

Departure
Jan. 25 - E.P. Bouverie, ship, 997 tons, Stevens, for London. Towed out by the tug Geelong. The Bouverie is a full rigged ship, and is in fine trim for making a smart passage home. We wish her good speed. The Bouverie would have sailed earlier, but was detained for hands, and even up to the last moment there was a strike amongst those on board, which was happily settled. Passengers:
Mr Baker
Miss Cair
Mr and Mrs Littlejohn and family (4)
Mr and Mrs Maitland
Mr and Mrs Minn
Mr Reid
Mr Riley
Mrs Stevens
Mr A. West
and 13 second and steerage

Departed Jan 27 - Peter Denny, ship, Adam, for London. Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co.'s clipper ship Peter Denny, the third of this season's wool vessels, took her departure from the Port at noon on Monday, in tow of the tug Geelong. The latter left the vessel clear of the bar, took the pilot boat in tow, and parted with her pilot, and sped on her course towards Cape Horn with a rattling fair wind. By the time the Geelong had returned to the Heads with the pilot boat, the Denny was observed bowling along with her mainroyal set, apparently meaning to catch the E.P. Bouverie - which had 46 hours' start of her. Several bets have been made on the respective passages home of both vessels. The Denny, besides a full cargo, has eight intermediate and steerage passengers, is in fine trim, and ought to make a good passage to the old country.

A serious accident to the lighter Reinaux Engelkens, or as she is more generally known, the Galliot lighter. She loaded cargo from the ship Zealandia, from London, and was taken in tow on Friday night about 2 o'clock by the s.s. Wallabi for Dunedin, the steamer being lashed alongside her. After rounding Observation Point, both vessels took the ground on the steep bank close to the battery. The Galliot was soon found to leak, her stern sinking in the deep water, while her bow stuck hard and fast on the bank. As the tide made, the water wash throughout the hold. During the day labourers were busily employed in getting out what cargo they could, part of it brandy, boots and shoes, paper, candles, &c. The principal article now left in her is galvanised iron, to recover which she will have to be lifted, or a diver engaged to sling it. The Wallabi got off on Saturday afternoon, and came on to Dunedin. An investigation into the matter will take place.

pg 16 Seaman named Stephen Willis of the ship Zealandia, was convicted for rescuing a prisoner from legal custody of the police at Port Chalmers. Fined. £5 11s. , if defaults six weeks hard labour.

February 8 1873 pg6 DERELICT
A Crew of Skeletons
18th August the Lancaster, Captain Martin, fell in with a dismasted vessel, the Glenalvon, Master Robert C. Hart. Had written a letter to Kate, 16 Hope Street, Liverpool. Vessel was at Martinique, May 30 1872. Heading for St. John's New Brunswick. Crew died of starvation. ...

February 8 1873

Feb. 5 Agnes Muir, ship, 851 tons, Anderson, from Auckland 22nd ult. One of Patrick Henderson and Co.'s Clipper Packet Ships. Arrived in harbour from Auckland on Wednesday morning, bringing part of her original home cargo, consisting of railway plant.

Departures
Feb. 1 - Conquest, American barque, 516 tons, Small, for Guam.
Otago, ship, 993 tons, Stuart, for London. She was towed to sea by the tug Geelong, and left with an offing of six miles with all sail set to a southerly breeze. Passengers:
Dr Concarran
Mr M'Kenzie
Mr Robertson
Mr Thomson
and 4 in the steerage

The schooner, Mary Ogilvie was launched at the yards of Messrs Murray and Co. adjacent to their floating dock. owners -Messrs Anderson and Mowatt. Captain Falconer. She is 70  tons register and has been built for the coasting trade.

Feb. 8 1873 pg 25
Feb. 15 1873 pg 25
Feb. 22nd 1873 pg5
The Cruise of the Luna.
Tatuku, Waikawa, Southland Coal Explorations, etc.
The Government steamer Luna, Captain Fairchild, left Dunedin on 30th Dec. to the West Coast Inlets via Bluff Harbour.

Otago Witness February 15 1873 pg 12

Departure Feb. 12 - Ferndale, barque, 416 tons, Fraser, for Lyttelton.

The clipper ship Euterpe, shortly expected to arrive here from London, after discharging cargo, proceeds to Adelaide, S.A., to load wheat, &c., for home. She left for Otago on December 7th, brings 92 immigrants, of whom 37 are Scotch.

The Agent-General despatched, between July 1871 and November 1872 38 ships, with 6516 immigrants, of whom 3698 were English, 570 Scotch, 842 Irish, 64 Welsh, 397 Germans, 403 Danes, 11 Swedes, 535 Norwegians, and 26 of various other nationalities. They were distributed as follows:
Otago - 1721
Canterbury - 1604
Marlborough - 138
Wellington - 1452
Hawkes Bay 795
Auckland 8_6
2057 were for Messrs Brogden and Sons.

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Feb. 8. — Alhambra, s.s., 479 tons, Pearce, from Melbourne, 1st inst., via Bluff Harbour.  Passengers from Melbourne : Mrs Lees and servant, Mrs Simpson, and 2 children, Mrs Jameson, Mrs Fenwick, Mrs Chiaroni, Mrs Cooper and child, Mrs Ritchie, Masters Ritchie (2), Messrs Baudinet, Lees, Sampson, Ferguson, Allen, Thompson, Ritchie, Atwood, Thompson, Captain Malcolm, Rev. Mr Campbell
From Bluff:: Mrs Meikle, Miss Young, His Honour the Superintendent, Messrs Holmes, Calder, Mussen, Tombes, M'Caxday, Martin, Murdoch, White, Poison, and 9 in the steerage from all ports.
Samson, p.s., 124 tons, Edie, from Oamaru. J. Mills, agent. Passengers : Messrs Holmes, McDonald, Otto, Ramsay, O'Brien, Curie (2), Miller, Winter, Bews, Ford, Benson, Sounes, Mr and Mrs Jones.
Beautiful Star, ship, 547 tons, Bilton, from London 21st Oct., Portland 28th. Bright Bros., agents. Feb. 10— Waratah, barque, 202 tons, Fisher, from Hobart Town. Master, agent.

Departures -
Feb. 10 - Alhambra, 497 tons, Peirce, for Melbourne via Northern and West Coast ports. — Passengers : For Lyttelton — Mrs Co .b and two children, Capt. Baldwin, Mr Wilson. For Wellington— Mr Wilson, Mr Sherman. For Nelson — Mr Grant, Captain Boyd. For Greymouth — Mr Caldwell. For Melbourne — Mrs Dunning; and child, Miss Ingram, and 10 in the steerage for all ports.
Feb. 13 - Emulous, brigantine, 157 tons, Paterson, for Auckland. G. S. Brodrick, agent.

Saturday 22 Feb. 1873 pg12

Feb. 15 - Chattanooga, barque, 547 tons, Freeman, from New York, 19th Oct. Neil and Co., agents. Passengers Mrs and Miss Freeman.
Feb. 16 - Charlotte Gladstone, ship, 1304 tons, Paddle, from London, 29th October. G.G. Russell and Co., agents. Voyage account. Sailed from Gravesend on the 2nd November 1872. The pilot departed with on the 11th off the Start. Captain Puddle wrote "We have experienced a remarkably fine weather passage. In all my experiences of 40 years at sea, I have never witnessed finer weather; we never had a gale or even a squall; only reefed the top sails once, and then only for three or four hours." The vessel is well adapted for immigrants, having lofty between decks, with 38 feet 6 inches of beam. She left London with 320 statute adults, but on a former occasion she had for the Victorian Government 40, under the charge of the late Captain White, of the Blue Jacket and Zealandia, showing ample space and good accommodation were allotted to all. But, still, with all this, there has been much sickness son board - 9 children, 7 adults and 2 ordinary seaman having died from various causes. A great number of immigrants are reported to have been in an unhealthy condition when they left Gravesend. This statement is made by several persons, including Dr Bakewell, the surgeon-supintendent, on whose advice the vessel was put in at the Cape for medicines &c. The Gladstone brings a large quantity of birds for Canterbury; they are in charge of Mr Bills. All the sick people have been removed to the Quarantine Island, along with their families and friends, to the number of about 40, all told and are progressing favourably. The ship, after getting clear, will discharge at the Railway Pier. Dr Hocken, who was quarantined with the passengers, has been doing duty as surgeon to those on board, and looking after their comfort. The single men were removed to the Quarantine Island for the purpose of cleansing of their clothing.. Passengers:
Mrs Bakewell and 4 children
Mr and Mrs Boore
Mr Boore
Mr Brown
Mr Bushby
Mr Ernest
Mrs Hocken, sen.
Mrs Hocken, jun.
Mr and Mrs Marriot and 4 children
Captain M'Intyre
and 330 steerage

Arrived on Sunday. Sickness on board and was brought up in the Quarantine ground. Sickness during the voyage proved fatal to seventeen passengers. Eight died of typhoid fever, and nine from others causes.

The names of those who died were _
E.O.J. Field 	aged 17 months
Alfred Gudley 	20 months
George Amble 	 6 months
Henry Smith 	14 months
Media Bond  	22 years (a married women)
Alfred Evans 	19 years
M.A. Mackford 	 1 year
Andrew Willis 	20 years
Reuben Powell 	16 months
John Nichols 	22 years
John Cox 	11 months
Mary Amber 	 3 years
W. Baker 	22 years (married man)
Henry Pocock 	36 years (single man)
Richard Dubber 	20 years (single man)
Ambrose (cook) 	25 years
Thomas Hall seaman

The mortality has exceeded any of the late arrivals and the cases of sickness on board, the ravages would have been serious if the passengers of this ship have been admitted at once in our midst. The Health Board were alive to this, and every precaution was taken. The passengers and immigrants were removed to the proper Quarantine Island, where everything was prepared for them to make their temporary imprisonment as light as possible. Altogether there were 60 cases of sickness during the passage, consisting of 38 typhois,19 febricula or ephemeral fever; three of the crew were affected by typhoid, and one died.

Otago Witness Saturday March 8 1873 pg 15
A young man, named James Bennett, aged 19 years, a passenger by the Charlotte Gladstone, died of typhoid fever, on the Quarantine Island, at one o'clock on Saturday morning.

Saturday 22 Feb. 1873 pg12

page 13 Passing Notes
Another pest ship has arrived in our harbour. Small-pox, scarlet fever and now typhoid fever, have all been brought to New Zealand during the last few months by immigrant ships. No language is too strong to condemn the criminal neglect of the person or persons by whom unhealthy immigrants were allowed to proceed on the voyage, instead of being at once made to disembark. The people of New Zealand have a right to demand that their paid officers (Agent-General) should not, by their carelessness, expose colonists to such consequences as are likely to follow from the arrival of these floating lazar houses in their ports. Let them raise their voices as one man against such flagrantly iniquitous conduct.

February 22 1873 pg 25  
Mr James Seaton on New Zealand as an Emigration Field


March 8 1873 pg 6
Highland Immigration

March 8 1873 pg 7
Captain Marryat

Frederick Marryat, was born in Westminster in 1792. A Cockney - born within the sound of Bow Bells. Wrote novels, about a Naval officer, when he withdrew from active service...

April 12 1973 pg 1.
Mr Seaton's  and Mr Birch's Salaries

March 8 1873 pg 12

Arrival -March 5 - Glencoe, barque, 159 tons, Lewis, from Hobart Town, 18th ult.
Passengers: Messrs Samuel Goodwyn, William Sly, George Coleman and Thomas Norman.

March 15 1873 pg 12

Arrivals - March 7 - City of Bombay, ship, 990 tons, Adair, from London, Nov. 20th; Gravesend 28th; Downs Dec. 2nd; and Plymouth, Dec. 3rd. Passengers: 16 intermediate. An addition to their number was made on the 31st of January, when Mrs Liddle gave birth to a male child. She was attended by a fellow female passenger, and both mother and youngster have prospered.  No sickness, saving  that of home and sea. Voyage account. A smart looking iron clipper. Passage lengthy. Pleasant weather.

Arrivals
March 7 - Woodville, barque, 362 tons, Hodge, from Newcastle, 17th ult.
March 8.— Alhambra, s.s., 497 tons, Pearce, from Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Passengers : Mrs Spedding, Mrs Martin and family (5), Mr and Mrs Ridley and child, Mr and Mrs Hanna, and family (4), Mr and Mrs Peploe, Rev J. and Master Patten, Messrs Barry, Hall, Renwick, Chas. Eva, McKellar, Denniston, Trestrail, and 20 in the steerage.

Departures
March 10- Alhambra, s.s., Pearce, for Melbourne via Northern and West Coast ports. Passengers : For Lyttelton — Mrs Habiens, Mr Max Gull. For Wellington — Mr and Mrs Carruthers, Mr and Mrs Meek, Mr and Mrs Graham, Mr Wardrop. For Hokitika — Mrs Charles. For Melbourne — Mr and Mrs Campbell, Mrs Hellicar, Mr and Mrs Ostler and child, Mrs Roberts and child, Mrs Scoular, Mr and Mrs Taine and three children. Mr and Mrs Brown, Mr Colbath, and 20 in the steerage.

March 13 - Glencoe, barque, 159 tons, Lewis, for Hobart Town.

March 22 1873

Arrivals
March 14 - Margaret Campbell - 3 masted schooner, 122 tons, Bowman, from Bay of Islands. master, agent.
March 15 - William Ackers, barque, 290 tons, Greenwood, from Newcastle, 24th ult. Master, agent
P.C.E., barque, 291 tons, Sampson from Newcastle. J and D. Findlay, agents. Passenger: Mr Howie.
March 16 - Swordfish, brigantine, 155 tons, Harvey, from Hobart Town, 5th inst.
March  19 - Rangitoto, s.s., from Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Passengers : Mr Stobo, Miss Spinced, Miss Watt, Mrs Hirard, Miss Solomon, Miss Simson, Miss Moore, Miss Lind, Mrs Carl, and child, Mrs Burke, Mr and Mrs Glass, Miss McKinnon, Mr Reichelt, Mr Baylee, Mr Wilson, Mr Campbell, Mr Price, Mr Oram, Mr Wentham, Mr Vautin, Mr Marian, Mr Wood, Mr Walter, Mr Genet, Mr Wilson ; Magnet Troupe — Mr Richardson (manager), Miss Lottie Angle, Mr Victor Angle, Mr Frank Angle, F. Buckley, T. Holly, J. Herman, J. Munyard, L. Serrall ; and 14 in the steerage.
March 20 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, 470 tons, Arnold, from Newcastle.

Departures
March 14 - Woodville, barque, 362 tons, Hodge, for Newcastle.
March 18 - Ottawa, brigantine, 222 tons, Best for Bluff Harbour.

Otago Witness, 29 March 1873, Page 12

Port Chalmers Arrivals
March 20 - Albion, s.s. 599 tons, M'Lean, from Melbourne, 13th inst., via Bluff Harbour, 19th. Passengers : Mrs J. Eva, Mrs Barraud, Mrs Tipper, Mr and Mrs Traill, Hon. W. H. Reynolds, Messrs H. Driver, U.S.C.G., Turner, Whitestone, Leslie, Wood, W. R. Warren, Curran, A. Payton, J. Gulland, Mr C. and Master Lister, Gillies, Captain Mailler and 15 in the steerage.
March 20 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, 470 tons, Arnold, from Newcastle
March 24 -Free Trader, barque. 200 tons, Miles, from Hobart Town, 14th inst. Passengers : Mrs and Miss Fisher, and 2 in the steerage.

Otago Witness, 22 March 1873, Page 13
The s.s. Albion, McLean, master, cleared Melbourne Heads at 5.20 p.m. on the 13th instant, and arrived off the Bluff at 11.30 p.m. on the 18th ; she came alongside the wharf at daylight this morning. She brings 33 saloon, and 25 steerage passengers, and 482 tons cargo. She brings the English Mail for all ports. She sails for Dunedin at 4 p.m. to-day. Passenger List : Saloon— Messrs Gulland, Reynolds, Driver, Curran, Payten, Warren, Hellins, Lister, Wood, Barraclough, Leslie, Whitestone, Turner, Walsh, Captain, Mailer, Mrs Barraclough, Mrs Eva, Master Lister, and 15 steerage passengers. She brings 260 tons cargo.

Departures:
March 20 - Rangitoto, s.s., 449 tons, Mackie, for Melbourne, -via Bluff Harbour. Passengers : Mr and Mrs Davies and 5 children, Mr and Mrs Towsey, Miss Le Cren, Rev. Mr Telford, Mr Murray, Mrs Cowan, Mr Martin, Mr Howlon ; and 20 in the steerage.
March 20 - Albion, s.s., 591 tons, M'Lean, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. 
March 20 - Southern Cross, barque, 323 tons, Johnson, for Hobart Town.


Saturday 5 April 1873 pg12

Arrivals
Formosa, barque, 380 tons, Romney, from Newcastle, 15th inst. Passengers : Mrs and Miss Romney.

April 3— Tararua, s.s. Rouse, from Melbourne 22nd ult., via West Coast and Northern Ports.  Passengers : Miss Stephenson, Bishop Moran, Messrs Solomon, Arming, Crawshaw, Adam Barnes, Littlejohn, Walcott, Rose, Burford, Johnson, 21 steerage, and 23 for Melbourne.

Departure - March 29 - Christian M'Ausland, clipper ship, 962 tons, Tilly, for London. She was towed to sea by the tug Geelong, and left outside with a good offering and a light fair wind, which increased towards evening. Besides fourteen passengers, she takes about 7000 ounces of gold. Passengers:
Mr and Mrs Fitzherbert and family (6)
Mr Trevor
Mr Parker
and 4 in the steerage.

April 1 - Thomas and Henry, brig, Clark, for Newcastle.
April 2 - Charlotte Gladstone, ship, 1304 tons, Paddle, for Adelaide.
April 2 - Freetrader, barque, 206 tons, Miles for Hobart Town.
April 3 - Euterpe, ship, 1197 tons, from London.
The clipper ship Agnes Muir, of Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co.'s line of Clyde packets, took her departure for London on Monday afternoon. She was towed to sea by the tug Geelong and left outside with a favourable fair north-easter.

Otago Witness, 12 April 1873, Page 12 Port Chalmers arrivals

Albambra, s.s., 497 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Passengers : Mrs Larnach and 2 children, Mrs James Smith, Miss Alleyne, Mrs Strachan, Mrs Sibbald, Misses Lockley, Sibbald, Barretts (4), Master Barretts (2), Miss Pogson, Messrs Pogson, Main, Smith, Carter, Sutton, Matheson, McIndrie, Thompson, Muston, J. Nisbett, Master Main, and 19 in the steerage.

April 5. — Lutterworth, ship, 883 tons, Clark, from London 28th Dec. Bright Bros., agents. Passengers : Mr Davis, and 103 in the intermediate and steerage.

The Lutterworth, the prettiest specimen of naval architecture, without exception, that has visited Otago, was towed up from the Heads on Saturday, and brought up to an anchorage off Deborah Bay. She brings a large cargo of railway plant, also 1041 passengers. including a number of navvies for the Messrs Brogden, who have been engaged for three years, and proceed by the steamer Paterson, on her return from the Bluff, to Moeraki. The vessel comes into harbour neat and tidy, after a splendid passage of 85 days 12 hours from off Start Point, and her passengers are highly satisfied with Captain Clark, her commander, and her surgeon, Mr Ryley. Of her passage : She left Gravesend on the 28th December, had very bad weather in the Channel, and passed Lizard Point on the 8th January ; strong W.S. W. gales prevailed then for eight days. The N.E. Trades, when met with, were light, and carried to lat. 2 S. ; no variables whatever being experienced till at once catching the S.E. Trades, which were light, but hung well to the eastward. The Line was crossed on 3rd February, in long. 26.30. She was then baffled with adverse variables for ten days, when westerly breezes set in, and the meridian of the Cape of Good Hope was crossed on the 8th March. In running down her easting on the parallels of long. 45 and 46, she has made the quickest passage on record from the Cape, and this speed does not deny her looks. The Snares and Traps were passed on the 3rd April, and the Heads reached on the following day, when she anchored. She discharges at the Railway Pier. One death occurred on the voyage — that of James White, aged 19 years, on the 10th February, of liver complaint. The ship herself is only a youngster of about four years of age, built at Hartlepool by the Messrs Watt and Milburn, and right well have they done their work in turning this model of our merchant service. While off Scilly, on the 8th of January, the Lutterworth passed a vessel bottom up, uncoppered, apparently 500 tons register ; and 90 miles S. W. of Cape Finistere, a water-logged ship of American build, of at least 800 tons register. She was loaded with deals, portion of which was seen to be jutting out between her deck-beams and and planking. The Lutterworth stood by her for some time, but not a living soul was visible. One small boat was on the skids. The crew of the vessel are supposed to have been saved in the other boats, and picked up. On the Lutterworth being thoroughly overhauled by the authorities, the following endorsement by the boarding officer was made on her passenger list : — " Ship inspected and passengers. I consider the vessel to be well fitted and ventilated, and the passengers made no complaint to me. I would, however, recommend that the passenger's galley should be separated from the ship's, and larger."

A Sailor's Description of a Ride on Horseback.


 

April 12 1873

Arrived -April 5, Lutterworth, ship, 883 tons, Clark, from London Dec. 28th. Passed Lizard Point on the 8th January. Passengers: Mr Davis, and 103 in the intermediate and steerage including a number of navvies for Messrs Brogden, who have been engaged for three years, and proceed by the steamer Paterson, on her return from the Bluff, to Moeraki. Voyage account. The Lutterworth, the prettiest specimen of naval architecture, without exception, that has visited Otago, was towed up from the Heads on Saturday, and brought to anchorage off Deborah Bay. She brings a large cargo of railway plant. The vessel comes into harbour neat and tidy, after a splendid passage of 85 days and 12 hours from off Start Point. Mr Ryley - her surgeon. She discharges at the railway pier. One death occurred on the voyage - that of James White, aged 19 years, on the 10th February, of liver complaint. The ship herself is only a youngster of about four years of age, built at Hartlepool by the Messrs Watt and Milburn, and right well have they done their work in turning this model of our merchant service. The Lutterworth being thoroughly over hauled by the authorities, and the following endorsement by the boarding officer. "Ship inspected and passengers I consider the vessel to be well fitted and ventilated, and the passengers made no complaint to me. I would however, recommend that the passenger's galley should be separated from the ship's , and larger."   Smith, Henry Cox

Derilects

While off Scilly, on the 8th January, the Lutterworth passed a vessel bottom up, uncoppered, apparently 500 tons register; and 90 miles S.W. of Cape Finistere, a water-logged ship of American build, of at least 800 tons register. She was loaded with deals, portion of which was seen to be jutting out between her deck-beams and planking. Not a living soul was visible. One small boat was on the skids.

April 8 - Luna Government despatch, p.s. Fairchild, from Wellington, 5th inst. Passengers: Minister of Public Works, Messrs Oliver, D. Proudfoot, Murdoch, Higgson and Hepburn.
April 9 - Nebraska, Harding from Honolulu via Auckland. Passengers; Mrs Fincher, Miss Muncoe, Messes Jones, Coote, Jibben, Perriman, Rhodes, Rich, Neirney, Gill and Biddle.

Departure
April 10 - Formosa, barque, Romney, for Newcastle. Passengers: Mr Anderson and 1 in the steerage.

The clipper ship Euterpe, from London was towed up to an anchorage off Deborah Bay on the 4th inst. Her passengers and immigrants will be brought to Dunedin by the steamer Golden Age. this forenoon. The vessel is a beautiful model, and is high classed, but unfortunately on this trip through a series of adverse weather, has made a long passage. Her population of passengers appear happy as sandboys. Testimonial in another column. One death occurred, that of a child named Paul Smith, occurred on the 21st March, from pneumonia. Three additions were made to her population _
by Mrs Young, on the 26th of January, giving birth to a female child
On the 21st February, Mrs Palmer, of a son
and on the 7th March, Mrs Gilbbertson, of a son.
Dr Summerhayes and Mrs Herman, the matron. Altogether there are four cabin, four second cabin and 98 steerage passengers. Voyage account. She left Gravesend on the 7th December, and took her final departure from off Start Point on the12th.

Otago Witness April 19 1873

Port Chalmers Arrivals
April 15.— Rangitoto, s.s., 409 tons, Mackie, from Melbourne 3rd inst., via West Coast and Northern Ports.  Passengers : Mr and Miss McFarlane, Rev. Father Lenehan, Dr and Mrs Ebbs and child, Mrs Anning and child, Messrs R. Allen, Shrimpton, J. H. Wood, R. H. Wood, Pierce, Hawden and 20 in the steerage.
April 17 — Albion, McLean, from Melbourne, 10th inst., via Bluff Harbour, 16th.  Passengers: Miss Brown, Miss S. Foster, Mr and Mrs Campbell, Mr and Mrs Mowatt, Mr and Mrs Macgowan, Mr and Mrs Dalgleish, Captain A. McKinnon, Rev. G. Smith, Messrs H. J. Gibbs, J. Marbey, Holmes, A. J. Smyth, Rennie, Captain Main, 15 steerage, and 20 for the North.

April 19 1873. Bluff.
April 16th  The Albion, McLean, master, has arrived, bringing the English mail. She brings 22 saloon and 30 steerage passengers and 524 tons of cargo for all ports. Passengers: Messrs Walker, G. Coates, Campbell, Mowat (Mowatt), Mesdames Campbell, Mowat, Miss Brown, Miss S. Foster, Rev. G. Smith, Mr and Mrs Lauchlan MacGowan (comedians), 20 in the steerage.

Departed -April 16 - City of Dunedin, ship, 1085 tons, Ross, for London.  Passengers -
Miss E. Curle
Mrs and Misses Etty (2)
Mrs Watson and five children
and 12 in the steerage.

Zealandia, ship, 1116 tons, Curry, for London. Passengers:
Miss Cargill
Mr Digby
Dr and Mrs Ebbs and two children
Mr Eggers
Miss Kennedy
Miss Kettle
Mr and Mrs Macassey and child
and 16 in the steerage

Otago Witness, 26 April 1873, Page 12 Departures

April 18 — Albion, s.s., McLean, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Passengers : For Lyttelton— Mr and Mrs McGowan, Miss Mills Mr R. H. Wood. For Wellington— Mr N. Bell. For Hokitika — Mr Graham. For Melbourne- Mr and Mrs Walter, Mrs and Miss Low, Messrs Shephard, T. Duncan, and one in the steerage.


Otago Witness, 3 May 1873, Page 12

Port Chalmers Departures
April 24 — Margaret Galbraith, ship, 841 tons, Cowan, for London. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passengers : Rev. Jas. Lauchton, Messrs Galloway, A. Russell, and 7 in the steerage.
April 25 - Chattanooga, American barque, 527 tons, Freeman, for Hong Kong. Master, agent. Passengers : 170 Chinese.
East Lothian, barque. 348 tons, Williams, for Auckland.

Otago Witness, 10 May 1873, Page 12

Port Chalmers arrivals.
May 1 — Speedy, brig, 274 tons, Maynard, from Melbourne, 3rd April. Neill and Co., agents.
William Davie, ship, 840 tons, Peacock, from Glasgow. Cargills and M'Lean, agents. Passengers : Messrs Stevenson, Kilstour and 8 steerage.
Oberon, ship, 1193 tons, Burgoyne, from London, 22nd January, Gravesend 27th, Start Point 29th January.  No passengers.
Claud Hamilton, s.s., 500 tons, Clark, from Melbourne, 19th ult., via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols, and Co.. agents.
May 2— Wild Deer, ship, 1126 tons, Whitson, from Glasgow, 29th December, 1872 ; Greenock, 22nd January, 1873. G. G. Russell and Co., agents. Passengers :
Mr Begg
Misses Mouat (2)
Messrs M'Kerrow
Mr M'Rae
Mr Sinclair
Captain and Mrs Thomson
Mr Welch
and 27 in the steerage.

Storm Bird
, s.s., 68 tons, Fraser, from Southern ports. H. Houghton and Co., agents. Passengers :
Mr Aitkin
 Mrs Freeman
Miss Preston
Mrs and Master Preston
Mr Roskruge
Misses Thomson (2)
Mr Vauhouse
and three in the steerage.

May 2, Glencoe, barque, 159 tons, Lewis, from Hobart Town, 13th ult. G. F. Reid, agent. Passengers : Miss Rose, Messrs Brown, Simmonds, and Hughes.
Sydney Griffiths, barque, 350 tons, from Newcastle, 27th March. J. and D. Findlay, agents.
May 3 — Alhambra, s.s., 497 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, 26ult., via the Bluff, 2nd inst.  Passengers: Mr and Mrs Gillond and servant, Mr and Mrs Wood, Mrs Ross, Miss Murray, Miss Donovan, Mrs Dunning and child, Mr and Mrs Barrett, Messrs Prosser, Dennett, Richards, Trestrail, Swanston, Trotter, Daniels, and 17 in the steerage.

The Oberon, a splendid composite clipper ship of 1193 tons register, with the salmon ova on board arrived at the Heads from London on the 1st inst., after a passage of 94 days, and was towed up in the evening to a berth in the Quarantine Ground, where, having powder on board, she anchored.

Messrs Patrick, Henderson, and Co.'s clipper ship Wild Deer, from Glasgow, arrived off the Heads on Thursday, 1st inst., and was towed in the following day by the tug Geelong, to an anchorage close to the Port jetty, where she, moored with both anchors. The Wild Deer was expected here a mouth previous, but through unforeseen circumstances was prevented from putting in an appearance, as the following report of her journey shows : — Took passengers on board on the 21st December. Left Greenock on the 29th, bad a succession of heavy westerly gales in the Channel, and sprung rudder stock, in consequence of which put back to the Clyde. Having repaired damages, sailed again from the Tail of the Bank (Greenock) on the 22nd of January, and experienced fine weather in clearing the land. On the 27th, in hit. 48 N., long. 10.40 WNW she fell in with a derelict barque, named the Emmeline, laden with copper and copper ore. The weather was calm at the time, and a boat's crew were sent on board. They found seven feet of water in the hold, and cargo shifted. This being reported, more men were sent on board to pump her out. Towards evening, a strong breeze sprang up from S.W., and all hands were compelled to leave her and go on board their own ship. The derelict had then a strong list to starboard. On the following morning there was no appearance of her, and the supposition was that she had foundered. The Wild Deer then shaped her course towards the Line, .and had variable weather till reaching the Heads. She brings a few passengers. The health of all throughout the passage was good. We are, however, sorry to have to record the death of John Louden, an apprentice, son of Captain Louden, of Port Chalmers, who died on 7th April when the vessel was off Kerguelen's Land, of rapid consumption, and was buried at sea. Young Louden was a promising lad. He was educated at the Port Chalmers Grammar School, and was looked forward to to obtain a prominent position in the profession which he had chosen.

Otago Witness, 17 May 1873, Page 12

Port Chalmers Arrivals
May 13 — Rangitoto, s.s., Mackie, from Melbourne, via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgetv, Nichols, and Co., agents. Passengers : Mr and Mrs Carruthers. Mr, Mrs, and Master Reynolds, Miss Beckham, Miss Warren, Miss McKenzie, Capt. McIntyre, Messrs Ruddock, Fryer, Mackie, Rice, Macgoun, Cobb, Guthrie, Richmond, Hannah, Gilbrath, and 8 in the steerage.

May 15 - Albion, s.s., 599 tons, McLean, from Melbourne (8th inst.), via Bluff Harbour.  Passengers: Miss Skelly, Mrs R Lowe, Mr and Mrs Branson, Rev. J. and Mrs Clark, Miss Fyans and servant, Dr Knight, Messrs Seed, Campbell, Jackson, Crocombe, Musses, J. Southern, Benjamin, Leckie, Tennent, E. P. Houghton, Walters, Hall, Rees, A. Campbell, and seven in the steerage.

The Rev. Mr Williams, who comes to Otago, is highly extolled as a hard-working East London clergyman.

Otago Witness, 24 May 1873, Page 12

Albion, s.s. 599 tons. McLean, from Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Passengers : For Lyttelton — Mr and Mrs Carruthers, Mrs Mills, Messrs Guise, Hayman (2), Levien, Mackay. For Wellington — Judge Chapman, Dr Crawford, Messrs G. E. Barton, B.C. Haggitt, J. K. Logan. For Melbourne— Mrs Lees and son, Dr Ryley, and 10 steerage for all ports.

May 20 — Sydney Griffiths, barque, 330 tons, Knarston, for Newcastle. Master, agent.
Hadda, German barque, 333 tons, Henrichson, for Newcastle.
May 19th. The clipper ship City of Bombay, 991 tons,  Adair, for London, took her departure on Monday last with a full cargo of meats, wheat, wool, &c. She was towed to sea by the tug Geelong, and left with a good offing and a fair wind.
The ship Euterpe clears out here in ballast for an unknown port. It was expected that she would load partly here and partly at Lyttelton, for London.

Otago Witness, 31 May 1873, Page 12

Port Chalmers Arrivals
May 24 - Naomi, ship, 712 tons, Robertson, from Liverpool, January 30th. Calvert and Campbell, agents. Passengers : Mrs Thomas and 2 children, Messrs Harvey, W. Smith, and 8 steerage.
May 24 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, 470 tons, Arnold, from Newcastle, 14th instant. J. and D. Findlay, gents.
May 26- Lyttelton, barque, 585 tons, Hosvner, from Newcastle 12th inst. Passenger : Mr Rice.
May 27 - Black Watch, 491 tons. Kerruish, from Batavia. 9th April. Neill and Co., agents. Passengers; Mrs Donaldson and child Miss Robertson, and 176 Chinese in the steerage.
May 28 - Michael Angelo, ship, 1174 tons, Luckie, from London, March 1st. Calvert and Campbell, agents. Passengers : Mr and Mrs Crossman, Messrs Scott, Collins, Welsh, and 140 in the steerage.

Departures
May 26 — Frowning Beauty, barque, 365 tons. Black, for Newcastle.
May 28 - P.C.E. barque, 291 tons, Samson, for Newcastle. J and D Findlay, agents

The ship Naomi, from Liverpool, arrived at the Heads on the 22nd instant, and was towed up to Port. Channels on Saturday. Of her passage, Captain Robertson informs us that she left Liverpool on the 30th of January, and had heavy easterly winds with thick weather until the 4th February, when the wind suddenly veered round from S.E to N. W., and blew a perfect hurricane, doing great damage. The ship carried away several of her starboard main chain plates, lost all the best of her sails, and at one time was in jeopardy of losing her masts. During the gale, which lasted about two days, the ship laboured and strained heavily in a pot-boil of mountainous seas. Light easterly winds afterwards prevailed, carrying her straight to the Line in lat. 15 S , the Line being crossed on the 2nd March in long. 21 W. On the 20th March, in lat. 22 41 S., she encountered a terrific rotatory gale, commencing from E. 5.8., veering round southerly to N. W., and back again to E.S.E., causing a fearful sea. The gale lasted till the 23rd, when light variables set in. Crossed the Meridian of Greenwich on 8th April, in lat. 36.30 S., and that of the Cape on the 14th. Her easting was principally run down between the parallels of 45 and 48, and was characterised by westerly and S.W. winds, which being taken advantage of, she made a good passage (considering her heavy draught) of 37 days from the Cape to the Heads. The Snares were sighted on the morning of the 19th inst., and the Nuggets light at 10 o'clock same evening. The Ocean Beach was passed on the 21st ; but through light baffling winds and calms, the Heads were not reached until the 22nd, when Pilot Kelly boarded her. She brings a heavy cargo, consisting principally of railway material, as well as five cabin and eight steerage passengers. The health of all was good throughout the passage. One sad calamity, however, occurred, casting a gloom over all viz, the drowning of Alfred Williams, a fine lad of sixteen years. It was on the 8th May in lat. 46.6S., long. 123.8 E., the ship at the time going 8 or 9 knots with a stiff sou-wester. At a quarter to nine in the evening Williams, who was heavily clothed, and last seen leaning over the lee rail of the poop, with his hands in his pockets, is supposed to have been jerked over during a heavy lee lurch. The first intimation of the accident was cries being heard astern by the man at the wheel. The ship was immediately wore round, and every search, under the circumstances, made, but without avail.

The clipper ship Michael Angelo, was towed up on Wednesday's afternoon flood, and moored handy to berthing alongside the Railway Pier. Captain Luckie, her master, repots leaving Gravesend on the 1st of March, and the Downs on the 2nd. Had adverse weather in the Channel, and indifferent N.E. Trades. Crossed the Equator on the 1st of March in long. 18.6 W., having had previously six days of light and variable winds. The S.E. Trades were fair, and carried to 27 S. Tristan D'Acunha was sighted and passed on the 20th of April, and the meridian of Greenwich crossed on the 22nd, and that of the Cape on the 27th., in lat. 40.17 S. Passed Prince Edward Island on the 3rd of May, and ran her easting down between the parallels of 45 and 48, which was characterised by winds chiefly from NE. to S.W. The Snares were rounded on Monday last, and the Nuggets sighted on Tuesday morning, arriving at the Heads same day. She brings a large cargo, as also upwards of 140 passengers. The latter have enjoyed good health throughout the voyage, no infectious disease having occurred. An increase to her population occurred on the 20th of May, in lat. 49.5 S, long. 129 8 E., when Mrs Sayers gave birth to a female child. The vessel comes into port in fine order alow and aloft. All the passengers' accommodations are very clean, especially that of the single females.

A telegram we publish to-day announces the total loss, off the Cape of Good Hope, of the steam collier Fidelia, bound for New Zealand. From a recent issue of the Hawke's Bay Herald we take the following paragraph relating to this vessel : We learn that the screw steam collier Fidelia, Swamston, master, a fine vessel of 1600 tons burthen, fitted with all the latest improvements, sailed from Cardiff during March last for Dunedin, N.Z., via Newcastle, N.S.W. The vessel is owned at her port of destination, and it is intended that she should run in the trade between there and Newcastle.


Otago Witness, 7 June 1873, Page 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
May 30 - Tararua, 522 tons, Rouse, from Melbourne, 22nd inst., via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne - 
Fairclough 	Mr (tragedian) 
Gessner 	Mr
Hancock 	Mr
Holt 		Mr and Mrs
Howison 	Mr
Le Grand 	Mademoiselle
Moser 		Mr
Witchel 	Mr
From Bluff - 
Brunton 	Mr
Bain 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Carruthers 	Mr
Osborne 	Mr
Toombs 		Mr
32 in the steerage from all ports

Otago Witness, 14 June 1873, Page 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
June 7 - Alhambra, ss 297 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, 26th ult, via West Coast and Northern ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Brown 		J
Wilson 		T

June 10 - Rangitoto ss, Mackie, from Melbourne, 29th ult, via West Coast and Northern Ports.

Passengers:
Bastian 	Mrs
Coombes 	Mr
Graside 	Mr
Gray 		Mr
Groom 		Miss
Mills 		Mr and Mrs
4 steerage

June 12 - Albion, ss, 599 tons, McLean, from Melbourne 5th inst, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

 Passengers:
Burt  		Mr T and Mrs 
Burton 		Mr and Mrs
Caldwell  	Rev J
Fulton 		Mr
Hardwick 	Miss
Harker 		Mr
Moore 		Mr
Murray 		Mr
Pell 		Mr
Pizey 		Mrs
Robertson 	Miss
Rolenisoll 	Mr
Ross 		Mr and Mrs and child
Sargood 	Mr
Southern 	Mr and Mrs
Young 		Mrs 
15 in the steerage
25 for other ports

Departures
June 8 - Alhambra, ss, 497 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers: 
For Melbourne -
Emanuel 	Mr and Miss
Blair 		Mrs J B 
Carr 		Mrs
Chiaroni 	Mr
Christopherson 	Mr
Crowther 	Mr
Drake 		Miss
Gill 		Mr and Mrs
Glen 		Mr
Grahame 	W S
Lun Hing 	Mr
McDonald 	Mr and Mrs and child
Moody 		Mr
O'Hagan 	Mr
For Bluff -
Barr 		Mr
Lusk 		Mr
McArthur 	Mr
Osborne 	Mr
Russell 	Miss
Ward 		Judge
16 in the steerage for all ports

June 11 - Rangitoto, 449 tons, Mackie, for Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Arkman 		Mrs
Curran 		J B
Douglas 	Mrs
Green 		R
Joel 		Mr and Master
Levy 		Mrs and 2 children
Liddle 		Miss
McKinlay 	Mr
Menlove 	Mr and Mrs
Morrison 	Mr and Mrs
Ryan 		Mrs and 2 children
Wain 		Mrs and 2 children
20 in the steerage
For Bluff -
Brunton 	Mr
Leary 		Mrs J
McLaggan 	Mr and Mrs
Steward 	Mr
Swale 		Mr

Otago Witness, 21 June 1873, Page 12

Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
June 19 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 530 tons, Clark, from Melbourne 7th inst, via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Ballantyne 	J
Campbell 	Mr
Coote 		J M
Ford 		Mr and Mrs
Shaw 		Mr
Strong 		Mr and Mrs
3 in the steerage

Departures
June 13 - Albion, ss, 599 tons, McLean, for Melbourne via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Bell 		Lady, daughter and servant
Bell 		Mr
Coombes 	Mr
For Wellington -
Fraser 		Hon Captain
12 in steerage for all ports

Otago Witness, 28 June 1873, Page 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
June 24 - Horatio Sprague, American barque, Small, from New York, March 3rd. Neill and Co, agents.
Passengers: Mrs Small and  Masters (2)
June 25. — Maori, s.s., 124 tons, Peterson, from Lyttelton. J. Mills, agent. Passengers : Messrs Heyman, Ross, Huar, F. Russell, P. H. Russell, Calvert, and Master Cobb.

June 26 - Tararua, ss, 522 tons, Rouse, from Melbourne. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

From Melbourne -
Campbell  	Mr R and Mrs
Carr 		Mrs and child
Chisholm 	Mr
Coneys 		Miss
Gathercole 	Miss
Hanchard 	Mrs and Miss
Miller 		Mrs and child
Perrin 		Mr and Mrs, Misses (2) and Master
Snell 		Mrs and child
Steinhoff 	Mr
Trestrail 	Mr
13 in the steerage
From Bluff -
Campbell 	Thomas
Cowell 		Mr
Rogers 		Mr
Shipton 	Mr
Southern 	Mr
Ward 		Judge
Wood 		Mr and Mrs
Three in the steerage
31 for other ports

Departures
June 20 - Claud Hamilton, 530 tons, Clark, for Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:
5 cabin for Melbourne
14 steerage
4 cabin for Bluff
1 steerage


Otago Witness, 5 July 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
June 28 - Yorkshire ship, 1057 tons, Anderson, from Melbourne for London, put in for repairs, having rudder injured. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers for London:
Anderson 	Mrs
Bean 		Jas
Clarke 		Mr
Crawford 	Edward
Gossett		Mr D W and Mrs, 2 children and governess
Holmes 		James
Holt  		Mrs E B
Jamieson  	Mr Robert, Mrs and 2 children
Melville 	Mrs
Noel 		Arthur
Ogilvie 	C
Splatt 		C H
Splatt 		E B
Splatt 		Mr E L and Mrs, Misses (3), Masters (2) and servant
Splatt 		W L
Tempest 	William
Wheeler 	Mr
and 133 in the second cabin and steerage

July 1 - James Nicol Fleming, ship, 992 tons, Logan, from Glasgow, 19th April. Cargills and McLean, agents.

Passengers:
Barron 		Mr
Burgess 	Mr
Gilkinson 	Mr
Greff 		Miss
Johnson 	Mr
Kinloch 	Mr
Lindsay 	Mr
Mundie 		Miss
Ridley 		Mr
Scott 		Mr
Stevens 	Mr
Swanson 	Mr
Wills  		Rev. J H and Mrs
and 266 in the steerage

Departures
June 29 - Tararua, ss, 522 tons, Rouse, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Lyttelton -
Burston 	Mrs
Collins 	Mrs
Tewsley 	Miss
Tewsley 	Mr
Sargood 	Mr
For Wellington -
Cowan 		C
Smith 		T
For Nelson -
Engel 		Mr and Mrs and 2 children
For Melbourne -
Barry 		Mr and Miss
Colehon 	Mr
and 5 in the steerage

Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co's composite clipper ship James Nicol Fleming, from Glasgow, has astonished even her best well-wishers by making the passage from the land of the old country to New Zealand in 69 days and 11 hours. This is from the time she parted with her pilot and sent letters on shore off Inistrahull, to rounding and sighting the Snares on Sunday last, the 29th June. She is still in command of Capt. Logan, who, together with his officers, has made her make tracks when opportunity offered. Her greatest run was 320 miles in one day and for two days off the pitch of Cape Leeuwin, she logged 632 miles. From her log the following is culled: - Left the Tail of the Bank, Greenock, at 7pm on the 19th April; parted with her pilot on the 20th at 3pm, off Inistrahull. Had favourable weather to the Equator, crossed on the 11th May, in long. 22W. Doldrums were not met with and the SE Trades were at once picked up. They also proved favourable till losing them on the 21st in lat. 23.40 S. Southerly winds then detained her for six days, the ship making an average of 80 miles per day. They were followed by westerly breezes and the meridian of Greenwich was crossed on the 31st in lat. 38 S, and that of the Cape of Good Hope on the 4th of June in lat 40 S. Her easting to the meridian of Cape Leeuwin, passed on the 20th, was run down on the parallel of 43 S. A more southerly course was then shaped and the remainder was run down on the parallel of 47 S - the meridian of Melbourne being crossed on the 25th June 67 days from Greenock. Westerly winds continued and the Snares were sighted and rounded at 3pm on the 29th. On the following day she was 50 miles to the SE of Cape Saunders and arrived at the Otago Heads at daylight yesterday morning, the 1st July; was towed up against the three-quarter ebb tide by the tug Geelong and berthed close to the Railway Pier, where she will come alongside early this morning, and her passengers brought to Dunedin by train. The Fleming brings 280 passengers, the majority being assisted immigrants, including 58 single females. The health has been good throughout. Shortly after leaving a case of measles occurred, which, being taken in time, was soon cured, and the spread prevented. One death, however, took place, that being on Saturday last, the 28th June, when Mrs Wishart, aged 23 years, succumbed to consumption. On the 28th April, Mrs Scott, a steerage passenger, gave premature birth to a male child, which only lived two days. On the 4th May, Mrs McPhee gave birth to a female child; both of whom have done well. The different compartments of the passengers proved clean; more especially that of the single females, presided over by Miss Helen Anderson, the matron. Captain Logan looks a fresh as ever, and brings his ship into port in splendid order.

Ship Yorkshire
The above noble vessel of Money Wigram and Co's line of Melbourne and London packet ships has sought our shores in distress. She is bound from Melbourne to London, with 163 passengers and a large cargo of commodities. She left Hobson's Bay on the 14th inst, cleared Port Phillip Heads same evening, but owing to light adverse winds and calms was compelled to put back to the Heads, from whence she took her departure on Thursday the 19th inst. Had SSW winds in the Strait and took her final departure from off Rodondo at 8 am on the following day. The wind continued from the same quarter till Tuesday evening the 24th, when the barometer suddenly fell from 29.50 to 29.10, the wind coming down to a dead calm, a heavy sea running and incessant rain. Shortly afterwards a light breeze sprang up from NW and gradually veered round northerly to SE with a high, confused sea. At 8am on the 25th the south-easter increased to a heavy gale; hove the ship to under close-reefed main and foretopsails and headed towards SW, a fearful sea running, coming up on the vessel like a wall. At 6.30pm a heavy sea struck the counter, carrying away her rudder-stock. Finding the tiller would not act, broke down the rudder casing and lashed the presumedly defective part with chains. This being done it was found that the rudder-stock was gone lower down. A chain lashing with considerable difficulty, by cutting away part of the sternpost was here placed. By this time the gale partially abated. She was then 80 miles SW of the Snares, which were passed at 3.45am on Friday the 27th, bearing NNE 5 miles. Considering it unsafe to proceed on her homeward voyage, Captain Anderson deemed it prudent to bear up for the first port for repair. Light winds and fine weather favoured the ship from the Snares to arrival at the Heads, when she was taken in tow by the tug Geelong at a five-mile offing, and towed in at dark on Friday night, arriving in Port Chalmers at 9.30pm. This is the first ship of Money Wigram's fleet that has visited out port and an inspection of her, although she has a number of passengers on board, will well repay a visit, as everything appears to be in excellent order.

Otago Witness, 12 July 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
July 6 - Alhambra, ss, 497 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne 28th ult, via Bluff 5th inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Beattie 	Mr
Boot 		Mr
Campbell 	Mr
Denniston 	Mr
Dodson 		Mr
Kingswell 	Mr
Mackay 		Mr
McGowan 	Mr
McVicker 	Mr
Martin 		Mrs
Moffatt 	Mr
Morton 		Miss
Morton 		Mr
Pearson 	Mr
Perkins 	Mr
Solloman 	Mrs
Stevens 	Mrs and 2 children
and 15 in the steerage

Cospatrick, ship, 1199 tons, Elmslie, from London 20th March. G G Russell and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Beard 		Mr
Mitchell 	Mr
Wood 		Mr
4 second class and 38 in the steerage

July 7 - Rangitoto, ss, 479 tons, Mackie, from Melbourne, 24th ult. via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Bennet 		Mr
Booth 		Mr and Mrs
Calcutt 	Mr
Colville 	Miss and servant
Croker 		Mrs
Dennister 	Mr, Mrs and 4 children
Drake 		Mr
Hoskins 	Mr
McGregor 	Mr
Newton 		Mr
Price 		Mr
Sargood 	Mr
Scott 		Mr
Tewsley 	Miss
Tewsley 	Mr
Yock 		Miss
and 10 steerage

July 10 - Albion, 599 tons, McLean, from Melbourne, 3rd inst, via Bluff Harbour, 9th inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Cargill 	W
Graham 		Mr
Meyer 		Miss
Stack 		Mr
Wilson 		Miss
From Bluff -
Harris 		Mr
McGregor 	Mr
West 		G R
and seven in the steerage and 20 for other ports

Departures
July 8 - Alhambra, 497 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Bathgate	 Hon
Reynolds 	Hon
Richardson 	Major
Will 		Rev and Mrs
and 10 in the steerage

Rangitoto, ss, 449 tons, Mackie, for Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols, and Co, agents.

 Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Dansey 		Mr
Forrester 	Mrs and child
Fulton 		E H
Fulton 		Miss
Fyans 		Miss
Gordon 		D G
Henry 		Mrs
Kilgour 	Miss
Ross 		R
Simpson  	Mr Neil and Miss
Tewsley 	Miss
For Bluff -
Ferguson 	Misses (2)
Harvey 		C S
Hayman 		Mr
Kingswell 	Mr
McLean 		Jas
Menzies 	Mr
Thomson 	Mr
and 36 in the steerage for Melbourne

Mr Mills, the diver, went down on Thursday morning and examined the new rudder of the ship Yorkshire. Finding it properly shipped, he put the woodlock in, returned to the surface and reported all right, thus finishing a most important work. We understand that Captain Anderson is well satisfied with the work done and the harbour in general. The ship sails today for London (weather permitting) and takes with her additional passengers from this Port.

Otago Witness, 19 July 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
July 14 - Araby Maid, ship, 837 tons, Potter, from London. (see below)
Southern Cross, barque, 323 tons, Boon, from Hobart Town 2nd inst. Guthric and Asher, agents.

Passengers:
Clark 		Mrs and 3 children
Prescott 	Mrs
Sutterlay 	Misses (2)

Departures
July 11 - Yorkshire, ship, 1057 tons, Anderson, for London. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:
163 from Melbourne and 26 from Otago
Albion, ss, 592 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Benjamin 	Mr
Neill	 	P C
Sheriff 	G
For Wellington -
Bradshaw 	J B
Croker 		Major
Murray 		W A
Shepherd 	T L
Steward 	W J
For Nelson -
Brodrick 	Mr G S
Rutherford 	Mr and Miss
For Melbourne -
Hepburn 	Mrs and Master
Lawson 		Mr and Mrs
Steinhoff 	Mr
Walcott 	James
and 7 steerage for all ports

Messrs Money Wigram and Son's clipper ship Yorkshire, having received a new rudder, sailed for London on the 11th instant. She was taken in tow for sea by the tug Geelong, which, owing to the strong NE breeze, did not take the ship outside the Heads, but left her safely anchored inside them, in charge of Pilot Louden. The Yorkshire takes 7 second-class and 19 steerage passengers from this port, in addition to 163 original Melbourne passengers whom she had on board when she put in here, on the 28th ult, with a damaged rudder.

The Araby Maid, a handsome iron-built clipper ship, from London, sailed from Gravesend on the 15th of April; took her final departure from off Start Point on the 20th; had moderate weather to the Equator, crossed on the 12th of May in long. 18 W, where she was driven by strong NW breezes after losing the Trades. The SE Trades were picked up in lat. 6 S. They were indifferent. The Meridian of Greenwich was crossed on the 4th of June and that of the Cape of Good Hope on the 8th. In running down her easting, between 45 and 46 S, northerly breezes prevailed, with thick, dirty, unsettled weather. Sighted the Snares on the 10th inst, after which she encountered a very heavy NNW and westerly gale, in fact the heaviest experienced on the whole passage. She brings 18 steerage passengers, all of whom have enjoyed good health throughout the passage, and the vessel arrives in harbour in good condition.

If this will meet the Eye of WILLIAM CAMPBELL, who left Strathpeffer, Rossshire in 1851, for Victoria, by the ship Sir George Seymour and was last heard of in Otago in 1862, he will hear of something to his advantage by writing to MRS SUTHERLAND, Highland Home, Dunedin.

Otago Witness, 5 February 1908, Page 37
THE PASSING OF A PIONEER.
The funeral of Mrs Sutherland, which passed quietly through Dunedin from Lawrence recently. Mrs Sutherland was born at Lochbroom, Ross-shire, and in company with her husband sailed from Scotland in the Sevilla, landing at Port Chalmers late in 1859. Nine months later, in September, l860, her husband died, leaving her to brace life's struggle (which she nobly did) with her two children — Alexander, who died seven years ago, leaving a large family, and Catherine, now Mrs Hugh Brown, of Lawrence. It was at her daughter's residence, surrounded by many homely ties and much love, that Mrs Sutherland passed away into the saints' rest. For many years Mrs Sutherland kept the Highland Home, a name dear to the memory of many old settlers. The house was situated in Cumberland street, and known far and wide as a place where immigrants, with thoughts of the heather hills still fresh in their memories, might come into touch with Celtic cheer and comfort. It was in reality a Highland home. Men now, who were lads then, remember listening from the surrounding hills to the pipers who in the vicinity of the home, were wont to stir themselves and their compatriots with strains dear to soldier and lover. Nor was the home without its own romance. Many of the early settlers were married there, the marriages being generally conducted by Dr Stuart. A large number of families now scattered over the Dominion will have pleasant memories in this way of the Highland Home and the venerable doctor. One of the grey-headed mourners remembered the day — 40 years ago — when a waggon got bogged in Cumberland street opposite Mrs Sutherland's house, and graphically described the efforts of the team, breast deep in mud, to extricate it — a state of affairs hardly imaginable in these days of macadamised roads and electricity. One old colonist could only remember that even in those far distant days Mrs Sutherland took great interest in the education question and that she was a good woman and true, whose aid was never sought in vain.

Otago Witness, 26 July 1873
Nothing of interest in shipping

Government Notice
Nominated Immigration
Free Passages to single women
Four Pounds in Cash, or a Promissory Note for Six Pounds, per Statute Adult for other Immigrants.
Two Pounds for Children under Twelve.
Infants Free
NB - Colonists desirous to bring out Labourers, Servants, or Artisans, can arrange for their selection by friends at home.
Particulars can be obtained from the Immigration Officers, Government Assurance Agents, or at any Money Order Post Office.
C E Hughton, Under Secretary for Immigration. Wellington, 10th July.


Otago Witness, 2 Aug 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers - Arrivals
July 25 - Claud Hamilton, ss, Sinclair, from Melbourne, via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne - 
Heriot 		Mr
From Nelson -
Brodrick 	G S
From Wellington -
Blahin 		Mr
Brown 		E
Solomon 	Miss
From Lyttelton -
Jones 		Mr
Thompson 	Mr
Nine steerage from all ports

July 30 - Phoebe, ss, 416 tons, Worsp, from Sydney 14th inst, via Manukau 23rd inst and Northern Ports. W F Wheeler, agent.

Passengers:
Aldred 		Mrs, Miss and Master
Barber 		Mr
Barker 		Mr
Bayden 		Miss
Dillon 		Mr
Eadie 		Mrs and 2 children
Gentz 		Mr
Gunder 		Mr
Hatwood 	Miss
Hussey 		Mr and Mrs
McLennan 	Mr
Mitchinson 	Mr
Moore 		Mr
Palmer 		Mr
Robinson 	Mr
Shrimpton 	Mr
Snow 		Mr
Thompson 	Mr

Departures
26 July - Claud Hamilton, ss, Sinclair, for Melbourne via the Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Anderson 	Alfd
Christopherson 	Mr
Duncan 		Geo
Engel 		Mr
Fulton 		Edwd
Fulton 		Jas
Goodsir 	Mr and Mrs
Holmes 		Allan
Holmes 		Miss
Matheson 	Mrs and Miss
Murray 		Thos
Phillips 	Mr and Mrs
Rennie 		Mr
Strode 		A C
Swanston 	W G
Bluff -
Sheen 		Mr
and 28 steerage for Melbourne

July 29 - Wild Deer, ship, 1016 tons, Whitson, for London. G G Russell and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Cantrell 	Mrs
Corrie 		Mr
Gardner 	Misses (2)
Gardner 	Mr
McGaw 		Mr and Mrs
Oswin 		Mrs
Vivian 		Mr and Mrs and child

Otago Witness, 9 Aug 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers - Arrivals
Aug 3 - Alhambra, ss, 497 tons, Underwood, from Melbourne, 27th ult, via Bluff, 2nd inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Blyth 		Mr
Joel 		Mr and Mrs and child
Lorenzen 	Mr
McDonald 	Mr and Mrs and child
New 		Mr
Walker 		Mr
Williams  	Rev E
Williams 	Mrs and family (7)
Talford 	Mr
and 15 in steerage

Departures
July 31 - Southern Cross, barque, 302 tons, Boon, for Hobart Twon. Master, agent.

Passengers:
Howley 		Mrs
Watt 		Miss

Aug 5 - Alhambra, 497 tons, Underwood, for Melbourne, via the Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne - Chapman Mr, Mrs and Master
Coleman 	Mr
Espie 		Mr
Fountain 	Mr
Pritchard 	Mr
Smith 		Mrs and 4 children
Tewsley 	Mr
For Bluff -
Farmer 		Mr
George 		Mr
Harrington 	Mr
Jones 		Mr
Mitchell 	Mr
Walker 		Mr
Whittaker 	Mr
Wood 		Mr and Mrs
and 16 steerage for both ports

From the circular of Messrs Benjamin Rionda and Co, dated New York, May 28th, we learn that the Gemsbok was to sail thence on June 14th for Dunedin, Wellington and Auckland. From the same source we learn that the barque Skimmer of the Waves sailed from New York for this port on the 19th May.
The barque Queen of the Sea, from this port to Hobart Town, we learn by the Mercury, made a smart passage across in six days. The Otago Daily Times files sent by her were received some days previous to those sent by mail steamer via Melbourne.

Otago Witness, 16 Aug 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers - Arrivals
Aug 8 - Albion, ss, 599 tons, McLean, from Melbourne 2nd inst, via Bluff Harbour 7th inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Menlove 	Mr and Mrs
Ferguson 	Miss
McLean  	Miss E
Kennedy 	Mr
Elliott 	Mr
Pierce 		G G
Copeland 	Mr
Plummer 	Mr
and nine in the steerage

Aug 11 - Cutwater, American ship, 985 tons, Knowles, from New York - Melbourne, 27th ult; Port Phillip Heads, 31st. W and G Turnbull and Co, agents. Passengers:  Mrs Knowles and child
Aug 13 - Melanie, 3-masted schooner, 136 tons, Welch, from Sydney 29th ult. James Copeland, agent. Passengers: Mrs Welch and child.
Departures
Aug 9 - Albion, ss, 566 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Millar 		Mr
Steele 		Miss
For Wellington -
Stratten 	Mrs and family (5)
Lyster 		Mr and Mrs
For Nelson -
Lorenzen 	Mr
For Melbourne -
Purcell 	Mr W C H 
and one in the steerage for Hokitika

Otago Witness, 23 Aug 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers - Arrivals
Aug 20 - Swordfish, brigantine, 155 tons, Harvey, from Hobart Town. Guthrie and Asher, agents. Passenger:
Mr Cockerill
Aug 21 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 530 tons, Rouse, from Melbourne 9th inst, via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Douglas 	Mrs
Hughes 		Mrs
Aikman 		Mr
Grant 		Mr
From Hokitika -
Harris 		Mr and Mrs
From Wellington -
Gillies 	Mr
Rawson 		Mr
From Lyttelton -
Coote 		J M
Smith 		A L
and five for the South

The ship St Kilde, from Liverpool, was towed up on Tuesday afternoon by the rug Geelong, against a strong head wind and ebb tide, to a berth close to the Railway Pier, where she will discharge. The St Kilda left Liverpool on the 9th of May; took her departure from the Tuskar light on the 11th; The Equator was crossed on the 7th June, in long, 28,3G W; Cape of Good Hope on the 10th in lat. 42 S. Sighted Stewart Island on the 14th inst. She brings a heavy cargo of railway material, &c, as also 20 passengers.

Otago Witness, 23 Aug 1873, Pg 13 Marriage
On the 14th August, at the Registry Office, Dunedin, by the Registrar, Alexander Graham of Wanaka, to Jane Forster, of Blue Spur.

Otago Witness, 30 Aug 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers - Departures
Aug 22 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 530 tons, Rouse, for Melbourne 9th inst, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

For Melbourne -
Barry 		Mrs
Best 		Mr
Clayton 	Mr
Hall 		Mr
Mark 		Mr
Moody 		Mr and Mrs
Morrison 	Mr
Roberts 	Mr
Taylor 		Mr
and 20 in the steerage

Otago Witness, 6 Sep 1873, Pg 12
Shipping Port Chalmers

Arrivals
Sept 1 - Alhambra, ss, Underwood, from Melbourne 19th inst, via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers -

Arkle 		Miss
Bell 		Mr
Holmes 		Mrs
Gabets 		Mr
Gunn 		Mr
Hill 		Mr
Hobbs 		Mr
Hood 		Mr
Jamieson 	Mr
Thompson 	Mr
Tolmie 		Mr
White 		Mr
and six in the steerage

Allahabad, ship, 1200 tons, Crispin, from London, via Gravesend 31st May. Calvert and Campbell, agents. Passengers - 273 all told, including 229 immigrants and others.

Sept 3 - Albion, ss, McLean, from Melbourne, 28th ult, via Bluff Harbour, 3rd inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

Anderson  	Miss Ada
Anderson 	Mr Alfred 
Anderson  	Miss Gertrude
Anderson  	Mrs J H
Anderson  	Miss Linda
Anderson  	Master Walter
Beras 		Miss
Bews 		Master
Christopher 	Mr
Curran 		J B
Curran  	Mrs J B
Dixon 		Mr
Drable 		Mr and family (7)
Edminston 	Miss
Goodsir 	Mrs
Gordon 		T
Harper 		W
Hepburn 	Master
Hepburn 	Mrs
Henry 		Mrs
Lang 		Rev Dr
McCaul 		Mr
Martin 		Mr
Mitchell 	Mr
Murray 		T
Simpson 	Mr
Sherriff 	Mr
Smyth  		Mrs W J
Webb  		Mrs J A
and 17 in the steerage

Peter Denny, ship, 900 tons, Adams, from Glasgow 13th June. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passengers:

Bissett 	Mrs and 2 children
Campbell 	Rev Mr and Mrs
Johnstone 	Mr
Morton 		Mr
Seaton 		Mr
and 340 in the steerage, including immigrants and assisted passengers

Otago Daily Times 4 September 1873, Page 2
Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co's Al powerful clipper ship Peter Denny has made a nipping passage from the Home country of 81 days, and brings to our shores 387 souls ('including crew of 39). The deaths on the passage from Greenock were seven—all children—and the births three. No infectious disease occurred. The vessel left the Tail of the Bank, Greenock. at b p.m. on the 13th of June, apparent time parted with her pilot and tug at 9 a.m. of the 14th, off the Maidens; and took her final departure from off Bardsey at 4 a.m. on the 17th. Had moderate weather-to the Trades- caught in lat. 37 N., lost in 12 N. ; favourable breezes, however, were experienced across the the vicinity of the doldrums, and the S.E. Trades were picked up before reaching the Line, which I was crossed on the 17th July in long 25 23 W The Trades were light, and lost in 30 S The meridian of Greenwich was passed on the 2nd of August. A rattling breeze enabled her to clear the meridian of the Cape, of Good Hope on :the 5th. Westerly winds prevailed in running down her easting on a general parallel of 47 S. The Snares were made at noon on the 1st inst and was off Otago Heads at 8 p.m. on the 2nd. At 10.30 p.m., received Mr Pilot Kelly on board, who kept her standing off and on for the night; signalled for a tug at daylight yesterday morning, and was towed up by the
Geelong in the forenoon, and anchored close to the Railway Pier, where she will be brought alongside to-day, and her passengers conveyed to town per train. The passengers and immigrants are a healthy looking lot—Mr James Seaton being amongst them—and the vessel comes into harbour in good order. The general health was good throughout the passage.

The deaths that occurred were:
Margaret Yeoman, aged 3 months, on the 29th June;
John Connell, aged 6 months, on the 2nd July;
Francis A. M'Rae, aged 11 weeks, on the 7th July;
George Ruthven. aged 15 months, on the 11th July;
Janet Allan, aged 13 months, on the 16th July;
James Walker, aged 15 months, on July 22ud;
and Andrew Sinclair, 11 months, on the 21st August.

The whole of these deaths were caused by diarrhoea and dysentery. The births were —
Mrs Sutton, of a female child, on August 16th
Mrs Gurnan, of a male child, on August 18th;
and Mrs Marsden, of a female child, on August 24th.

All the compartments of the ship are in good order, and the health of all has been ably looked after by Dr. Whitlock, the surgeon while the comfort and good guidance of the single females have been attended to by Mrs Mary Macdougall. After arrival, Captain Adams was presented with a testimonial which appears in another column—thanking him and officers for their kindness during the passage.

Departures
Sept 4 - Albion, ss, McLean, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Hayman 		Mr (2)
Hobbs 		Mr and Mrs
Hume 		Mr
Kidd 		Mr
Prince 		Mr
White 		Mr
and four in the steerage

Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co.s all powerful clipper ship Peter Denny has made a nipping passage from the Home country of 81 days and brings to our shores 387 souls (including crew of 39). The deaths on the passage from Greenock were seven - all children - and the births three. No infections disease occurred. The vessel left the Tail of the Bank, Greenock, at 6 pm on the 13th June, apparent time parted with her pilot and tug at 9 am of the 14th, off the Maidens; and took her final departure from off Bardsey at 4 am on the 17th. The Snares were made at noon on the 1st inst and was off Otago Heads at 8 pm on the 2nd. At 10.30 pm received Mr Pilot Kelly on board, who kept her standing off and on for the night and was towed up by the Geelong in the forenoon and anchored close to the Railway Pier, where she will be brought alongside to-day, and her passengers conveyed to town per train. The passengers and immigrants are a healthy-looking lot - Mr James Seaton being amongst them - and the vessel comes into harbour in good order. The general health was good throughout the passage.
The deaths that occurred were:
Allan Janet aged 13 months on the 16th July
Connell John aged 6 months on the 2nd July
McRae Francis A aged 11 weeks on the 7th July
Ruthven George aged 15 months on the 11th July
Sinclair Andrew 11½ months on the 21st August
Walker James aged 15 months on July 22nd
Yeoman Margaret aged 3 months on the 29th June
The whole of these deaths were caused by diarrhoea and dysentery.
The births were -
Marsden Mrs of a female child on August 24th
Gurnan Mrs of a male child on August 18th
Sutton Mrs of a female child on August 16th
All the compartments of the ship are in good order and the health of all has been ably looked after by Dr Whitlock, the surgeon; while the comfort and good guidance of the single females have been attended to by Mrs Mary Macdougall. After arrival, Captain Adams was presented with a testimonial thanking him and officers for their kindness during the passage. The ship follows the James Nicol Fleming for London.

Otago Witness, 6 Sep 1873, Pg 13 Death
On the morning of the 22nd August, suddenly, at the residence of her parents, Nicholson street, Carlton, Melbourne, Alma Rivers, eldest daughter of Robt. P Whitworth, aged eighteen years.

Otago Witness, 13 Sep 1873, Pg 4
In Memoriam
The late Andrew Fleming, Rector of the Invercargill Grammar School
The numerous friends of the late Mr Andrew Fleming will be prepared for the announcement of his lamented death, which took place on the morning of Saturday last, at his father's residence, Rakahouka Bush, near Invercargill. Mr Fleming's memory will be held in affectionate remembrance by a wide circle of friends throughout Otago; and his removal from his important work at the early age of 30, and at the very outset of what promised to be a most useful and honourable career, has left a blank in the educational staff of the Province which it will be difficult to fill up. Mr Fleming was native of the West of Scotland. In early youth he attended all the classes embraced in the Arts Curriculum of the University of Glasgow. After leaving the University he was engaged for a short time as a Classical and English Master in the Academy at Helensburgh. Soon after his arrival with his parents in Southland, he was engaged as tutor at Morton Mains, at that time one of the principal stations of the New Zealand Land Company. He entered the service of the Otago Education Board in 1867, as master of the Lower Harbour School, near Port Chalmers. He was next employed as teacher at the Totara station, near Oamaru then he was appointed Second Master of the Oamaru Grammar School on its establishment in the beginning of 1869. Mr Fleming at an early age seems to have resolved to give himself to the work of the ministry, in connection with the Presbyterian Church and he had placed himself under the supervision of the Synod of Otago. He finished the course of studies a year ago and resigned his appointment in the Oamaru School with a view to receive a license from the Presbytery and to enter on the work as a clergyman. Realising he would never be a successful public speaker he resolved to adhere to the work of school teaching.
On the establishment of the Invercargill Grammar School last year, he was appointed to office of Rectorship. His anxiety for the success of his school caused him to overtask this strength. He neglected a severe cold, which unfortunately settled on his lungs and this no doubt proved the pulmonary disease, which so speedily proved fatal.
Men like him can ill be spared, and his removal has no doubt caused a gloom over Invercargill and its neighbourhood, where his labours have been so successful and so fully appreciated.

Otago Witness, 13 Sep 1873, Pg 12
Shipping Port Chalmers
No shipping news from overseas

Otago Witness, 13 Sep 1873, Pg 8
Landing of Immigrants
By the large number of immigrants brought to our port within the last fortnight the labour market has received a much needed reinforcement. For weeks previous to the arrival of the Allahabad, the demand for female servants and still more for some kinds of workmen, such as shoemakers and tailors, was very great, with threatened strikes, and wages were consequently at a high figure. This abnormal state of things the plentiful supply of labour now received may be expect to remedy. The immigrants just landed comprise tradesmen, stonemasons, agricultural labourers, domestic servants and supply of farm servants adequate to present wants. Mr Colin Allan, the Immigration Officer, has had his hands full and deserves credit for the manner in which he has attended to the speedy conveyance of the immigrants to Dunedin from the Port and had effected at the Barracks all arrangements necessary for their comfort. The means of conveyance from Dunedin to the Barracks however, appear to have been overlooked, as the immigrants, on landing were considerably astonished to learn that they must hire vehicles at their own expense, or accept the alternative of walking to Caversham. Their luggage was bundled into waggons. On arrival at the Barracks, the immigrants were set down to a plentiful meal, consisting of tea, meat, bread and vegetables, adlibitum. The general appearance of the immigrants is one of good health and contentment. The little ones, of whom there were a large number, were, generally speaking, well looked after by their parents.
The Immigration Officer superintended the contracts and entered the agreements, which stated the length of engagement and terms of salary. One sturdy, cleanly-dressed man hire himself to a farmer for six months at £16 and keep. This was considered rather low, the average being £20. The barrack arrangements have been well planned, with a view to the immigrants being comfortably housed during their stay.
A number of the female servants and single farm servants were engaged at the Immigration Barracks, Caversham, last week. The rates of wages given were as follows: Female servants £30 to £35; ploughmen £55 to £60; farm servants £52 to £55; boys 10s to 12s 6d per weeks; general servants £30 to £36; cooks £40; nursemaids 7s to 10s per week; shepherds £55 to £60; carpenters £2 10s to £3 per week; coopers £2 per week. A number of masons, carpenters, blacksmiths, rope-spinners, boilermakers and other mechanics are still open for engagements.

Otago Witness, 13 Sep 1873, Pg 9
Death of Mr St John Branigan
A very large number of persons, not only in Dunedin and Otago, but throughout the entire Colony as well, will read with sincere regret the announcement of the death of Mr St John Branigan on Wednesday. Mr Branigan had been suffering for more than three years from a malady cause by exposure when engaged in the discharge of his arduous duties as Commissioner of the Armed Constabulary in the North Island. He leaves a widow and family to mourn his loss.
Mr Branigan was 49 years of age at the time of his death. He was a native of King's County, Ireland and at an early age he entered the army, joining the 45th Regiment. In this regiment he proceeded to the Cape of Good Hope, where he left the army and entered the police force. He rapidly rose to the rank of Inspector and during the Caffre war the Cape Police were employed on frontier duty, while engaged in which Mr Branigan was wounded but received a medal for his gallantry. Shortly afterwards the news of the wonderful gold discoveries in Australia induced Mr Branigan to leave the Force and he entered into a commercial speculation, purchasing a schooner, which he loaded with merchandise, and sailed to Melbourne, where he arrived in 1854. His speculation not proving a remunerative one, he entered the Victorian Police. Within a short space of eighteen months he had passed through the intervening grades and risen to the rank of Sub-Inspector. He remained in Victoria until 1861, when he was appointed to form a Police Force in Otago. With the title of Inspector he arrived at the beginning of spring of that year with twenty volunteers from the Victorian Force. Not long afterwards he received the designation of Commissioner. In September or October 1869, Mr Branigan resigned his post in Otago to undertake the organisation of the Armed Constabulary Force in the North Island, under the General Government. Prior to leaving on the 22nd Oct there was a public meeting where His Honour the Superintent gave his address recounting his services to Otago and expressing his appreciation of Mr Branigan in preserving law and order and helping establish the Otago Industrial School.

Otago Witness, 13 Sep 1873, Pg 14
Arrival of the ss Claud Hamilton
The arrival of the ss Claud Hamilton at Hokitika, from Melbourne, was telegraphed yesterday, and also the sad news that her commander (Captain Rouse) had been swept overboard during the voyage and drowned. She left Melbourne on the 5th and two days afterwards encountered a severe gale. At 11pm on the 7th the vessel was struck by a heavy sea, carrying away the captain's cabin and sweeping Capt Rouse overboard.

Otago Witness, 20 Sep 1873, Pg 12
Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Sept 18 Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, from Melbourne, 11th inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passengers:

From Melbourne -
Haswell 	Mrs
Henry 		Mr
Hunter 		Miss
Lawson 		Mr and Mrs
Mills 		Mr and Mrs
Morrison 	Mr
Nichols 	Mr, Mrs and Miss
Rayner 		Mr
Tewsley 	Miss
Tewsley 	Mr
Trestrail 	Mr
and 30 in the steerage.
From Bluff -
Bohn 		Mr
Bricker 	Mr
Edwards 	Mr
Gage 		Mr
New 		Mr
Woods 		Mr
and two in the steerage

Departures
Sept 16 - James Nicol Fleming, ship, 992 tons, Logan, for London. Cargills and McLean, agents.

Passengers: 
Bridger 	Mr
Burgess 	Mr
Gilkison 	Mr and Mrs
Kinloch 	Mr
McLean  	Mr J and Mrs 
McMaster 	Miss and Master
and fourteen in the steerage

The ship James Nicol Fleming, with a full cargo of Otago produce and 24 passengers, left the Railway Pier, Port Chalmers, at 10am on Tuesday for London, in tow of the tug Geelong for sea. Prior to the tug leaving, it was discovered the Fleming had not her clearance on board, whereupon the vessel was hove to and the tug sent back for it. The tug returned put it on board, and the Fleming, having her mainroyal and all plain sail set, took her departure from the Heads with a slashing southerly wind, at half-past one o'clock. Her time of arrival at Gravesend is looked forward to with interest, as the knowing ones aver that she will make the fastest round voyage from home to Otago and back.

Otago Witness, 20 Sep 1873, Pg 3
Mr Branigan's Funeral
The remains of the late Mr St John Branigan were interred in the Southern Cemetery on Saturday afternoon. In the afternoon nearly all the shops in Princes street were closed and a long time before the funeral procession appeared, its route, from the Octagon to Custom House square, was lined with people. A four-horse hearse, with black plumes, conveyed the coffin to the Octagon, where it was transferred, wrapped in the Union Jack, to a gun carriage, drawn by four black horses, with head feathers and trappings. The coffin was covered with black cloth, mounted with gilt and black furniture, and on the inscription plate were the words -
St John Branigan
Died 10th September, 1873
Aged 49 years
The order of procession was as follows:
Two Mounted Constables; Provincial Band; Gun carriage with Body; Mourning coach containing Archdeacon Edward and two sons of the deceased; Chief mourners; 54 children of Industrial School, led by Mr Britton; 17 Members of the Police Force and Officers and Retired Officers; 10 Officers and Warders of the Gaol; Volunteer Force; 25 Members of the Fire Brigade; Executive; City Councillors; and citizens.
Spectators crowded the streets along the line of march, and the band played the Dead March in "Saul". The chief mourners were the Commissioner of Police, Dr Hocken, Messrs Hodgkins, Martin and Logan. Lieut, Colonel Cargill and Major Atkinson, the staff-sergeants and the captains of the town companies, were present among the volunteers, but, with the exception of the Artillery, the companies were poorly represented. A large number of the late Police Force, organized by deceased, also joined in the procession. On arriving at the cemetery, the coffin was borne by Sergeants Bevan, Dean, Golder and O'Neil, to the grave the pall bearers being Messrs G K Turton, W D Murison, P Power, R B Martin, J T Wright and Dr Hocken. The burial service was read by Archdeacon Edwards.

Otago Witness, 20 Sep 1873, Pg 13 Death
On the 29th of August at Balclutha, after a long illness, Ann, wife of John Finn; aged 35 years.

Otago Witness, 27 Sep 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Sept 20 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 530 tons, Sinclair, from Melbourne, via West Coast and Northern Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
McKenzie 	Rev Mr and Mrs
and 4 steerage
From Costal Ports -
Baker 		Mr
Burston 	Mrs
Creighton 	Mr
Cuddeford 	Mr
Dale 		Mrs and child
Ferrar 		Mrs
Harris 		J H
Johnston 	C
Johnston 	Mr and Mrs
Robertson 	Mr
Rutherford 	Miss
Rutherford 	Mr
Steele 		Miss
Walcott 	Mr
and 8 in the steerage
4 cabin and 3 steerage for Melbourne

Sept 24 - Chanticleer, brig, 187 tons, Phillips, from Hobart Twn 10th inst. Guthrie and Asher, agents. Passenger:
Steele Mr
Hadda, barque, 367 tons, Henrichsen, from Newcastle 1st inst. Master, agent. Passengers:
Stevenson Mr and Mrs, Misses (3) and Masters (2)
Thomas and Henry, brig, 215 tons, Clark, from Newcastle 5th inst. Clark and Son, agents. Passenger:
Mrs Clark
Departures
Sept 21 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 530 tons, Sinclair, for Melbourne, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Melbourne -
Ferguson 	Miss
Ferguson 	Mr
Gibson 		Dr
Simpson 	Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Thomson 	Mr
and 13 in the steerage
For Bluff -
Begg 		Mr
Connell 	Mr and Mrs and 2 children
Coote 		Mr
Instone 	Mr and Mrs

Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Roberts 	Mr
Taylor 		Mrs and 2 children
and 5 in steerage

Otago Witness, 20 Sep 1873, Pg 5
The Immigrants by the Berar (New Zealand Herald, Sept 6th)
The immigrant ship Berar arrived in our waters on Wednesday last, from London. There were on board 100 male and 103 female adults, 55 male and 43 female children, besides 10 infants. These were made up of 49 married couples, having in the aggregate 108 children, from the suckling infant to boys and girls maturing towards manhood and womanhood. On Thursday morning, between ten o'clock and midday, the whole of the passengers were landed on the wharf. There was no official to receive them, none to render them an information, and all the immigrants could learn was that there were barracks in the vicinity of the city where they could be quartered. The single men found their way to the bars of the public hotels, and we fear also several of the single females. Towards afternoon, the married couples with their families found their way to the barracks ; and, enquiring where they were to be lodged, a long room was pointed out for their reception. On either side of this room was a row of rough pine bunks, resembling in their construction enlarged candle boxes. Here, in this room, without any partitions - without as much as a pretence for dividing off the families - without the slightest regard being paid to the most ordinary requirements for observing the decencies of life - over forty married couples with one hundred and eight children were huddled together to pass the night. One dormitory for nearly two hundred souls, is treatment worse than was ever dealt out to a cargo of Polynesian barbarians. The modesty of decent married women outraged, no nourishment beyond dry bread, and tea without milk for the children ; and no provision made for quiet, rest, or refreshment for exhausted mothers, many of them with suckling infants, coming off a long and weary voyage. For the single females a room had been provided separate from the young men, but there was no attempt made to keep the worst of characters from holding communication with them. Yesterday raw meat and uncooked potatoes were served out to the immigrants, and only one small stove was allowed for the cooking necessary for over three hundred people, including, of course, children of both sexes. It was not until late in the afternoon that a supply of fuel came to hand, no previous order having been given for it. The matron placed in charge of so many immigrants is a feeble woman, fast approaching to her three score years and ten. The only other official was comprised in an old man, whose duty it was to serve out the stores, and who, in the very nature of the work he was called on to perform, was quite unequal to the task. Many and bitter were the complaints of the married women at being unable to obtain proper food for their children, or decent sleeping accommodation for themselves, or fuel to cook with. The surgeon of the Berar was indefatigable in his efforts to see the reasonable wants of his late passengers supplied, but all that he could do at the utmost was very little indeed, and every protest he made passed unheeded. His self-imposed work he soon discovered to be utterly unavailing. Quarters were found for the single men, but there was no one placed in authority over them. They were permitted unchecked to smoke and expectorate through the room, to scatter their bedding broadcast over the floor, to return from their perambulations in a state of semi-intoxication, and to conduct themselves in wild disorder. It will naturally be asked who was responsible for so much mismanagement? The answer is that the reception and treatment of immigrants arriving in Auckland was taken out of the hands of Provincial powers by the Government at Wellington. The authorities there undertook the charge of making all arrangements and we have seen what these consist of.

Several more shiploads of immigrants are now afloat, bound for Auckland, and in the cause of humanity, decency, and the proprieties of life, we trust never again to have to place on record what was related to us yesterday, and what we were compelled to witness with our own eyes. The accounts which these immigrants will send home to their friends will tend more to prevent immigrants from coming to this Province than any other cause which could be named.

Otago Witness, 27 Sep 1873, Pg 13 Birth
On the 19th September, at Riverton, Mrs John N Simon, of a son.


Otago Witness 4 Oct 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Sept 26 - Hazel Holme, barque, Ritchie, from Mauritius, 16th ult. Cargills and McLean, agents. Passenger:
Ritchie Mrs
Bebington, ship 893 tons, Bruce, from London, 15th June, Plymouth 20th and Isle De Bass, 23rd. G G Russell and Co., agents. Passengers: Six and a half in the steerage
Gemsbok, American barque, 476 tons, Bunker, from New York. Neill and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Goodhue 	Mr and Mrs and son
Green 		Mr

Sept 27 - Albion, ss, McLean, from Melbourne, 20th inst, via Bluff Harbour. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Beattie 	Mr
Beeby 		Miss
Begg 		Mr
Collie 		Mr
Dennistown 	T J
Gabites 	G
Gordon 		Mr
Holmes 		Miss
McArdell 	Mr
McArditt 	Miss
McArthur 	Mr
Martin 		Mrs
Meares 		Mr
Ostler 		Mr and Mrs
Ostler 		Miss
Poote 		Mr
Roberts 	J
Scott 		Mr
Waldie 		Miss
Wragge 		Mr and Mrs
and 12 in the steerage

Oct 1 - Alhambra, ss, Underwood, from Melbourne, 18th Sept, via West Coast and Northern ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Blackstone 	Mr
Dorset 		Mr
Fluery 		Mr
Hay 		Mr
Holmes 		Miss
Holmes Mathew 	Hon, MLC
Macandrew 	Mr, MHR
McGregor 	Mrs
McLean 		Misses (2)
Reid D 		MHR
Roper 		Mr
Tolmie 		Mr, MHR
Walker 		Mr
and 12 steerage

Departures
Sept 26 - Phoebe, ss, 416 tons, Worsp, for Sydney, via Northern Ports. W F Wheeler, agent.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Mathews 	Mr
Smith 		Miss
Turner 		Mr
For Napier -
Miller 		Mrs and 2 children
For Poverty Bay -
Guest 		Mr
For Manukau -
Houghton 	John
Marshall 	John
For Sydney -
Bailey 		Mr
Eva 		J
and 2 in the steerage

Sept 28 - Albion, ss, 800 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via West Coast Ports.

Passengers:
For Hokitika -
Haworth 	Mr
For Melbourne -
De Lacy 	Mr
Goldie 		Mrs and two children
and one steerage

The Bebington, a noble clipper ship of 893 tons, arrived in Port from London on the 26th September. She left London on the 15th June and has made a rather long passage. She brings only six and a half passengers and comes into port in first-class order.

Otago Witness, 4 Oct 1873, Pg 13 Marriage
On the 5th August, at No. 1 Bellevue place, Edinburgh, by the Key, A S Muir Ferdinand Faithfull, son of the Rev James Begg, DD to Jessie Maria eldest daughter of F A Cargill, Esq, of Dunedin, NZ.

Otago Witness 11 Oct 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Oct 7 - Tararua, ss, 522 tons, Clarke, from Melbourne, Sept 30th, via Bluff Harbour, 6th inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Evans 		Mrs
Begg 		Rev Dr
Brodie 		Mr
Davidson 	Mr
Forrester 	Mrs and child
Jack 		Mr
Pearson 	Mr
and 23 in steerage
33 first and second cabin for North

Departures
Oct 9 - Tararua, ss, 522 tons, Clarke, for Melbourne, via Northern and West Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Matheson 	Mr
Newall 		Mr
Wise 		Mr
and in steerage
For Nelson -
Fordyce 	Mr
For Melbourne -
Alex 		Mr
Cairns 		Mr 
Morrison 	Mr
Parker 		Mr
and 2 steerage
Ports unknown 
Proudfoot  	Messrs D and G
and 1 steerage for Wellington

Shipping Telegrams
Lyttelton, October 4th
Arrived - Celestial Queen, ship, from London, with 184 immigrants, all well. One birth occurred on board to-day. The ship left Deal on 29th June.

Otago Witness 11 Oct 1873, Pg 13 Marriage
On the 1st October, at the residence of the bride's brother-in-law, J T Wright Esq, Dunedin, by the Rev Dr Stuart, J K. Cameron, Conical Hill Station, Tapanui, to Marion, second daughter of Thomas Reynolds Esq, Casilhas, Peninsula.
Death  On the 4th October, at Blacks, Samuel Pitches, storekeeper, aged 37 years. Victoria, papers please copy.

Otago Witness 11 Oct 1873, Pg 16
Coming Immigrants
The following shows in like manner the occupations of the immigrants per ship Otago, which sailed from Glasgow on the 17th July: Mason 1; labourers 9; blacksmith 1; farm labourers 9; domestic servants 20; coachman 1; nurses 2; carpenters 7; mechanics 2; miner 1; ploughmen 5; furnace heater 1; tailors 2; laundress 1; shepherds 2; shoemaker 1; power loom weaver 1; do do turner 1; tinsmith 1; housemaids 2; shipwright 1; dressmakers 2; bleacher 1. Total 76. The total number of souls to be brought by this ship is 146, equal to 119½ statute adults.

Otago Witness 18 Oct 1873, Pg 12

Immigration and Emigration
The following returns show the immigration to and emigration from Dunedin during the quarter ending September 30th - Immigration Whence
United Kingdom: Adults 391 Male, 374 Female; Children 167 Male, 145 Female; Total Male 558 and Female 519
Australia: Adults 144 Male, 56 Female; Children 21 Male, 17 Female; Total Male 165 and Female 73
Other British Ports: 1 Female Adult
Totals: Adults 535 Male, 431 Female; Children 188 Male, 162 Female; Total Male 723 and Female 593
Emigration Whither
United Kingdom: Adults 30 Male, 13 Female; Children 13 Male, 7 Female; Total Male 43 and Female 20
Australia: Adults 137 Male, 34 Female; Children 27 Male, 25 Female; Total Male 164 and Female 59
Totals: Adults 167 Male, 47 Female; Children 40 Male, 32 Female; Total Male 207 and Female 79
Total Immigration 1316 Souls, Total Emigration 286 Souls, Balance in favour of Immigration 1030

Otago Witness 18 Oct 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Oct 10 - Dover Castle, ship, 1063 tons, Culbert, from London, 30th June, Start Point, 5th July. Dalgety, Nicols and Co, agents. Nominated passengers and immigrants.
India, barque, 202 tons, Sanson, from Launceston, 28th ult. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Geeth 		Mr
Johnson 	Mr
Symmons 	Mr (2)
Smith 		Mr
and 4 in steerage

Oct 11 - Otago, ship, 993 tons, Stuart, from Glasgow, 17th July. Cargills and McLean, agents.

Passengers -
Borrie 		Rev. Jas 
Cargill  	Mr E B and Mrs. Cargill, Misses Fanny, Anne, Isabel, Helen Cargill and servant
Dick  		Miss Jessie
Ewing 		Mr. W
Haggart 	Mr. P
McLaren  	Miss Edith
Marshall 	James
Riddle 		Miss
Stuart 		Miss
Stuart 		Mrs
and 161 passengers and immigrants

Otago Daily Times 13 October 1873, Page 2
The magnificent composite clipper ship Otago, of Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co.'s line of packets, reached our shores on Saturday afternoon, with a large number of passengers and immigrants, all well, save a steerage passenger named William M'Dougall, who was suffering from diarrhoea, and succumbed on Saturday night. The general health, the doctor reports, has been really good throughout; two deaths occurred those being, George Dryden, aged 13 months, on Sept 1st, of consumption, in lat 33.32 S., long 17.40 W.; Jemima Oliver, aged 5 months, on Sept. 5th, in lat. 35.50 S., long. 5.55 W., of diarrhoea. One birth took place on the 2nd inst., when Mrs M'Donald was confined with a male child. On Friday the 10th, the child was christened by the Rev. Mr Borrie, a passenger, by the name of George Stuart M'Donald, the name being the Captain's. On a approaching the leads, the ship was boarded by Pilot Kelly, and towed up in the afternoon by the tug Geelong, and anchored close to the Railway Pier, where she will be brought alongside to-day, and her passengers brought to Dunedin by train.

Oct 14 - Skimmer of the Waves, barque, 396 tons, Gouch, from New York 13th May, via Melbourne 28th Sept. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passenger: Mr Mason
Oct 15 - Rokeby Hall, ship 1044 tons, Lindsay, from Liverpool. H J Gibbs, agent.

Passengers:
Fitton 		R J
Wright 		J
Clark 		J J 
and 5 in the steerage

The frigate-built ship Dover Castle, from London, arrived on the 10th inst. The tug Geelong proceeded down in the morning with Health Officer, Captain Thomson, J P Monson, HMC Boarding Officer, Colin Allan, Immigration Agent and Dr O'Donoghue, Medical Immigration Commissioner. Finding all satisfactory, the vessel was towed up to a berth at the end of the Railway Pier. After inspection, the authorities reported - 'Having inspected the ship and mustered the passengers, we find the vessel well fitted, ventilated, roomy; and the passengers have expressed themselves as well satisfied with provisions and treatment received on board. Dr Young, the surgeon of the ship, reports the health throughout as being first class.
One death, that of a seaman named Charles Seymour, occurred on the 26th August, from liver complaint. This occurred in lat 37.15 S, long 5.26 W. On the 22nd August Mrs Hall gave birth to a male child in lat 32.40 S, long 26.22 W, both mother and child have done well. Her passengers as a whole are a mixed class, but apparently of the right stamp for our requirements. They comprise 167 souls including 27 single females, the remainder being married couples and single men as usual in immigrant vessels.
The Dover Castle left Gravesend on the 30th June, had westerly winds in the Channel, parted with her pilot and took her final departure on the 5th July off Start Point. Greenwich was crossed on the 29th, in lat 40S, with strong NW gale. On the 1st September a heavy sea burst in stern windows, carried away port quarter gallery, filled after cabin. Shipped great quantities of water or, deck, part of which went below. Hove to for 24 hours. Passed the Cape on the 3rd September. Reached the Heads on the afternoon of the 9th.

The magnificent composite clipper ship Otago, of Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co.'s line of packets, reached our shores on Saturday, 11th inst, with a large number of passengers and immigrants, all well, save a steerage passenger named William McDougall, who was suffering from diarrhea and succumbed on Saturday night. The general health, the doctor reports, has been really good throughout; two deaths occurred - those being George Dryden, aged 13 months, on Sept 1st of consumption, in lat 33,32S, long 17.40W, Jemima Oliver, aged 5 months on Sept 5th in lat 35.50S, long 5.55W, of diarrhea. One birth took place on the 2nd inst, when Mrs McDonald was confined with a male child. On Friday the 10th, the child was christened by the Rev Mr Borrie, a passenger, by the name of George Stuart McDonald, the name being the Captain's. On approaching the Heads, the ship was boarded by Pilot Kelly and towed up in the afternoon by the tug Geelong and anchored close to the Railway Pier, where she will brought alongside to-day, and her passengers brought to Dunedin by train.

Otago Witness 18 Oct 1873, Pg 13 Marriages
On the 18th September, at Birkenshaw, Tokomairiro, by the Rev James Chisholm, William Craig, of Shag Valley, to Annie, eldest daughter of George Lindsay, Birkenshaw, Tokomairiro.
On the 18th September, at Birkenshaw, Tokomairiro, by the Rev James Chisholm, Robert Thomson, of Milton, to Margaret Christina Norris, second daughter of George Lindsay, Birkenshaw, Tokomairiro.

Otago Witness 25 Oct 1873, Pg 12

Shipping Port Chalmers  Arrivals
Oct 17 - Harriet Armitage, barque, 233 tons, Mailler, from Hong Kong, 6th July. H Houghton and Co, agents. Passengers: 4 Chinese
Oct 22 - Claud Hamilton, ss, 530 tons, Fawden, from Melbourne, 9th inst. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
From Melbourne -
Mason 		R
and 3 in the steerage
From West Coast and Northern Ports -
Buchanan 	G
Galland 	Miss
Hewling 	R
Howard 		Mr
Martelli 	S H
Mitchell 	J C
Sheppard 	Mr
and 8 in the steerage

Oct 25 - Duke of Edinburgh, barque, 470 tons, Sampson, from Newcastle, 11th inst. J and D Findlay, agents. Passengers: 1 in the steerage.
 


Otago Witness 15 Nov 1873, Pg 16

Shipping Port Chalmers
No overseas shipping
The good ship Lady Jocelyn was admitted to pratique on Tuesday morning, after being inspected by Captain Thomson, The Health Officer; Mr Colin Allan, Immigration Officer; and Dr O'Donoghue. The three gentlemen, with Mr Monson, of the Customs Department, proceeded on board at an early hour and went through the ship and finding that every soul on board was in perfect health, the word was given and the yellow rag at the main came fluttering to the deck. [more]

Otago Witness 15 Nov 1873, Pg 17 Birth
Bremner - On the 25th October, at Hampden, the wife of J. R. Bremner, of a son.

Otago Witness 15 Nov 1873, Pg 20 Quarantine Station
The little party at the Quarantine Station was partly broken up on Thursday morning, when, in pursuance with the instructions he had received from the Board of Health, Dr Cole sent off all the healthy people, consisting of seven families, numbering 25 souls. They were conveyed to Dunedin by the Peninsula Company's steamer Result.

Otago Witness 22 Nov 1873, Pg 16

Shipping Port Chalmers
Arrivals
Nov 14 - Lady Agnes, barque, 280 tons, Friend, from New York, July 31st. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents. Passenger: Mr Sherman

Otago Witness 22 Nov 1873, Pg 16 Missing Friends
Wanted, by his Brother Peter to hear from George Aitken, native of Deerness, Orkney. Address, Post Office, Invercargill.
If this should meet the eye of Jobe Lovett Kingsdon, from Tarenton, Somersetshire, he can hear of his Brother by sending his address to W I Braithwaite, Switzers.

Otago Witness 22 Nov 1873, Pg 17 Death
Duman Mary - On the 14th November, at Caverham, after a short illness, Mary Duman, aged 93, the beloved mother of Mrs J W Feger and widow of the late Jacob Duman.

Otago Witness 29 Nov 1873, Pg 8
The late Mr J Stumbles
The mortal remains of Mr James Stumbles were deposited in their last resting place in Port Chalmers Cemetery on Friday, the 21st inst, with a ceremonious respect denotive of the very high esteem in which he was held by his fellow townsmen of the Port. Arrangements for conducting the interment with befitting ceremony had been made by the Freemasons, Foresters and Good Templars of which Societies the deceased was a member, whilst the townspeople generally proposed to pay the last token of respect to their old friend. [abbreviated]

Otago Witness 29 Nov 1873, Pg 16

Nov 21 - Christian McAusland, ship, 962 tons, Tilly from London. G G Russell and Co, agents.

 Passengers:
Asheford 	Mr
Gillathy 	Mr
Howley 		Messrs (2)
Lankester 	Mr
Le Lièvre 	Mr
Thompson 	Mrs
Wale 		Mr
Wall 		Mr
Wynd 		Mr

Nov 22 - Albion, ss, 592 tons, McLean, from Melbourne, via the Bluff. Dalgety,
Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Ballantyne 	Mrs
Berliner 	Mrs and 2 children
Brawn 		Miss
Brunten 	Mr
Cavanagh 	Mr
Lees 		Mr
Lewis 		Mrs
McMasters 	Mr
Marshall 	Mr
Mathieson 	Miss
Mathieson 	Mr
Neale 		Mr
Kennedy 	Mr
Patterson 	Mr
Posser 		Miss
Thompson 	Mr
Wilson 		Mrs, 3 children and servant
Wright 		Mr
and 25 in steerage

Departures
Nov 27 - Tararua, 522 tons, Clark. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Saloon:
For Melbourne -
Bannatyne 	Mr and Mrs and 3 children
Begg 		Rev Dr
Begg 		C
Gushen 		Mr
Lambert 	Mr
Lilly 		Mr
McLeod 		Mr
Patterson 	Mr
Rhind 		Mr
Rhodes 		Mr
and nine in the steerage
For Bluff -
Garen 		Mr
Russell 	Mr
and three in the steerage
43 original passengers for Melbourne

Otago Witness 6 Dec 1873, Pg 10 Birth
On Tuesday, 18th of November, at Tapanui, Otago, Mrs G F South, of a son.

Otago Witness 6 Dec 1873, Pg 10

Female Immigration from Ireland (Limerick Chronicle.)
It is with much interest that we hare received from Mrs Howard, the "Immigration Agent for New Zealand," some particulars of her experience during the ten years she has resided in Dunedin, the chief town of the Province of Otago, New Zealand. She tells us that during her stay she has seen that city under all aspects, from the time when in crossing a road the mud was of the depth and thickness to endanger the safety of one leg while withdrawing the other from its recesses, until its present flourishing state, when, full of public buildings for every purpose of commerce, enterprise, education, or charity; of elegant churches, belonging to every denomination; of streets full of well-built houses; of quays, where the busy crowd are engaged in the export and import of the worlds various marts of the public gardens and other places of recreation and amusement. It now presents to the emigrants who visit its shores a most imposing picture and a cheering welcome to the seeker of prosperity "in other scenes and pastures new " that await him in this most richlyendowed "Britain of the South."
Mrs Howard tells us that the great want at present most urgently felt is the need of "single women." They are far out of proportion in number to the sterner sex, and the rate of wages paid to good female servants in Otago is the highest of any of the Colonies, and as Mrs Howard was employed to write the labour reports for many years for the Province, she may be relied on as an authority. The lowest, rate of wages given to a female servant was 10s a week, and this ranged up to 30s a week, according to ability, and from letters received by the very last mail that reached this city from New Zealand, she is still urged to send plenty of good servants, as the want is "as great as ever." These girls, if respectable and well-conducted, make excellent marriages, hence the continual demand. During Mrs Howard's residence in Otago, she travelled all over the Province, making herself thoroughly acquainted with its wants in the labour market, and also with the class of people to whom she would be sending the single women committed to her guidance. Householders, merchants, storekeepers, hotelkeepers and farmers, are all alike well-known to Mrs Howard, and her name is a household word among them, and her desire is to merit a continuance of the good opinion of her fellow-colonists by sending them only women, who, by their good conduct, will be a credit to the country they leave - ever an ornament to the land of their adoption.

Otago Witness 6 Dec 1873, Pg 13
The Immigrants

As soon as it was found that the ailments of the passengers by the Jessie Readman were of a harmless character, and that there was no necessity for detaining them in quarantine, they were released and sent to Dunedin, where they arrived by the Golden Age yesterday at noon. That their services were required was soon manifest, for before they had set foot on the jetty, some over impatient applicants requested their terms whilst they were yet on the landing-stage; but they wisely took the advice of Mr Colin Allan, who cautioned them against considering any proposal before they reached the Barracks. The first thing they had to attend to was their luggage, which was run down the jetty in trucks; part of it sent off to Caversham by rail, and a large quantity transhipped to the Wanganui, which sailed for Invercargill in the evening with a lot of the "new chums," who were going to their friends in the Southland district. After looking round the town, the remainder of the immigrants walked to the Barracks.
Tuesday being the first day on which the immigrants, per Zealandia were open for engagement, the Barracks presented a very busy appearance. The first to be employed were the carpenters, most of whom were enabled to start work in the morning. Some reasonable offers were made to a party of miners, who, being apparently in a condition of monetary independence, refused to accept the terms, as the tents were not good enough for them, and the wages did not exceed those given in Wales. The person who offered to engage them had come from Manuka Creek, and agreed to pay their journey up, supply them with tents, and pay them 8s 6d per diem. Some married couples were engaged as farm servants at £65, while one couple refused to accept £35 for six months. Single females appear to be in great demand, and few are eligible, as thirty-two applications have been sent in, and all except three of those who arrived by the Jessie Readman have left; for other places. Carpenters received 15s per day, and shepherds from £2 l0s to £3 a week. Thirty tailors arrived by the Zealandia. Only a few of them have been engaged, but some applications have been sent from the country which will probably clear them out. The occupations of the passengers by the Jessie Readman who remained in Dunedin are : - 12 farm labourers, four shepherds, two ploughmen, seven agricultural labourers, one dairymaid, one stone-dyker, seven labourers, one gardener, ten domestic servants, three general ditto, one steward, one dressmaker, one joiner, one sempstress and one tailor.
The Surat, which left London on the 28th September, being 289 immigrants, classified as follows : - Eighteen farm labourers, six carpenters, thirty-five general servants, four gardeners, four dressmakers, five dairymaids, two housekeepers, two shoemakers, three blacksmiths, one engineer and two masons.

Otago Witness 6 Dec 1873, Pg 14
Shipping Port Chalmers

Arrivals
Nov 29 - Zealandia, ship, 1116 tons, Curry, from London, August 29th. G G Russell and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Saloon -
Anderson 	Mr
Barker 		Messrs (2)
Burben 		Mr
Deires 		Mr
Dodd 		Mr and Mrs
Duncan 		Mr
Hudson 		Mr
Nicholl 	Miss
Pizzie 		Mr
Preston  	Miss W
Raynor 		Mr and Mrs
Shearman 	Mrs
Tolson 		Mr and Mrs and family (5)
Travis 		Mr
and 233 immigrants

Claud Hamilton, ss, 662 tons, Bawden, from Melbourne, Nov 22nd.

Passengers:
Saloon:
Byrne 		Mr
Christie 	Mr
Clayton 	Mr
Daidus 		Mr
Isaacs 		Mr
Lo Keong 	Mr and Mrs
McFarland 	Mrs
Mann 		Mr
Miller 		Mr
Mitchell 	Mr
Reading 	Mr
Reid 		Mr
Snell 		Miss
Taylor 		Mr 
Trestrail 	Mr 
Wallace 	Mr
Whitford 	Miss
Wilson 		Mr and Mrs
Wyndham 	Mr
and 27 in the steerage
besides 30 saloon and 10 steerage passengers for other ports

Glympse, barque, 358 tons, Hornsby, from Victoria, VI Sept 6th. Driver, Stewart and Co, agents,

 Passengers:
Saloon -
Grey 	Mrs
Kaye 	Mr

Dec 3 - Free Trader, barque, 216 tons, Miles, from Hobart Town, 23rd Nov. G F Reid, agent.

 Passengers:
Bailey 		Mrs and 3 children
Carberry 	Mrs and child
2 steerage

Southern Cross, barque, 324 tons, Boon, from Hobart Town, Nov 22. Guthrie and Asher, agents.

 Passengers:
Davis        Mr
Rose         Mrs and M

Otago Witness 13 Dec 1873, Pg 14

Shipping Port Chalmers Arrivals
Dec 6 - Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Badcock 	Mr
Bowley 		Mr
Copeland 	Mrs
Goldie 		Mr and Mrs and child
Guthrie 	Mr
Fraser 		Mrs
Fraser 		Rev Mr
Hunter 		Mr
Lightbody 	Miss
Matheson 	Mr
Moffatt 	Mrs
Pritchard 	Mr
White 		Mr
and 21 steerage

Departures
Dec 8 - Omeo, ss, 605 tons, Calder, for Melbourne, via Lyttelton and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Kennaway 	Mrs
Roskruge 	Mr
Stratford 	Mr
White 		Mr
5 steerage and 73 Chinese for Hokitika

Otago Witness 13 Dec 1873, Pg 14
The Wreck of The Pluto
The following account of the wreck of the barque Pluto, and the subsequent treatment of the crew at the hands of the natives, is taken from the Sydney Morning Herald - The Pluto, barque, 280 tons. Captain Clarke, owned by Mr Collingwood, of Sunderland, sailed from Newcastle (NSW) on 29th April, bound for Hong Kong with a cargo of coal. She got on shore on a reef outlying from New Caledonia and became a total wreck. The crew secured one of the boats, and as a strong SE monsoon was blowing, Captain Clarke determined to make for the Solomon Group and subsequently reached Port Adams (Malayta). Here a landing was effected by a portion of the crew who wanted to obtain water, the boat meanwhile lying off at anchor, but the natives came down in numbers and killed every soul that had landed. Captain Clarke at once put to sea but canoes were in chase, and unfortunately the boat got on a reef. Being without any arms, the canoes soon ranged alongside and ruthlessly slaughtered all on board the boat, with the exception of one man named John Collins, who has been spared to describe the horrible scene. This man was terribly wounded by arrows, but principally about the lower part of the body; and a superstition appears to exist among the natives of this locality that where death does not at once take place the victim must not be again attacked, and is tabooed from further harm. He was taken on ashore and would appear to have been treated well while at the Banks Group. Lieutenant Suckling received intelligence from the missionaries that a white man was in the hands of the natives at Malayta and he at once got under way and proceeded to the spot, and after considerable difficulty succeeded in getting the unfortunate man out of their hands and placing him safely on board the Renard. HMS Dido was fallen in with shortly after, and Collins transferred to her, having been in the hands of the natives for two months. Collins states that the chief officer, who was in the boat and witnessed the deaths of the shore party, killed himself with a tomahawk to avoid falling into the hands of the savages.

Otago Witness 20 Dec 1873, Pg 14

Dec 18 - Caller Ou, ship, 674 tons, Rea, from London, Sept 28th. A C Begg, agent. No passengers.

Otago Witness 27 Dec 1873, Pg 14
Shipping Port Chalmers
Dec 20 - Albion, ss, 800 tons, J McLean, from Melbourne, via Bluff. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Campbell 	Mr
Collinson 	Miss
Cuthbertson 	Mr and Mrs
Dickson 	Miss
Dobbie 		Mr
Furlong 	Miss
Greer 		Miss
Hiles 		Mr
Kelly 		Mr
Kennedy 	Mr and Mrs and family (5)
Linnay 		Mr
McDougall 	Messrs (2)
McLean 		Misses (2)
McNeil 		Mr
McNeil 		Mrs
Martin 		Miss
Martin 		Mr
Martin 		Mrs
Mitchell 	Mrs and 2 children
Nicholl 	Mr
North 		Mr
Roland 		Mr and Mrs
Rolland 	Mr
Simpson 	Miss
Scoular 	Mr
Van Blarcom 	Mr and Mrs
Van Blarcom 	Miss
Williams 	Mr
and 17 steerage

Dec 24 - Turarua, ss, 520 tons, Clark, from Melbourne, via Hokitika and Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
Saloon:
Brewer 		Mr
Cleveland 	Miss
Cobb 		Mr
Crawford 	Mrs and son
McGlashan 	Mr
McKay 		Mr
Murray		Rev Mr
Myers 		Mrs
Purdie 		Mr
Royse 		Mr
and 11 steerage

Departures
Dec 22 - Albion, ss, 800 tons, McLean, for Melbourne, via Coast Ports. Dalgety, Nichols and Co, agents.

Passengers:
For Lyttelton -
Campbell 	Mrs and child
Cavanagh 	Mr
McOwens 	Mr
Miller 		Mr
Royse 		Mr
For Wellington -
Pirie 		Mr
For Nelson -
Dick 		Miss
For Melbourne -
Wyndham 	Mr
For Hokitika -
McArthur 	Mr
and 26 Chinese and 7 steerage

Dec 23 - Peter Denny, ship, 1000 tons, Adams, for London. Cargills and McLean, agents.

Passengers:
Saloon:
Adam 		Mr and Mrs
Nichols 	Mr and Mrs
Stoddart 	Mr and Mrs
Steerage -
Allison 	Mr
Cousins 	Mr
Wallace 	Mr
Watson 		Mr and Mrs and 2 sons

Otago Witness 3 Jan 1874, Pg 14
Arrival of the City of Dunedin

Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co.'s fine ship City of Dunedin, Captain Ross, arrived at the Port on Monday forenoon, from Glasgow, after a, fair passage of 92 days. She brings 18 cabin passengers, and Government emigrants numbering according to the scale 147 statute adults. When several miles from the Heads the City was picked up by the steamer Geelong, and towed to the anchorage off the end of the Railway Pier, where she was promptly boarded by the Customs and Health Officers, and the Emigration Commissioners. Mr Colin Allan, Immigration Agent, and by reporters of the Press. Nothing in the form of infectious disease had appeared amongst them during the passage, excepting a few cases of whooping cough amongst the children and although there were two deaths, they were to be attributed to what may be termed outside causes; consumption having carried off a Mrs W ile? the wife of a Shetland fisherman, on the 29th October, whilst an infant named Rankin died of a teething fit on Christmas Day. Still, the ship comes in with as many living souls on board as there were when she left the Clyde, two births having occurred - one in the case of Mrs Macassey, a cabin passenger, who was safely delivered of a fine boy on the 14th December the other in the case of Mrs Simons, one of the immigrants, who was also safely delivered of a boy on the 2nd of December. The immigrants are a miscellaneous collection from various parts of Scotland and the North of Ireland, and comprise, besides artizans, labourers, and domestic servants, several Shetland Islands fishermen and their families. Besides immigrants, the ship brings a large cargo of general merchandise. The immigrants were classed and berthed as usual, the single men forwards, the married folks amidships and the single women aft.
The ship City of Dunedin left Greenock on the evening of the 27th September, and discharged her pilot off Dublin on the following day. The City of Dunedin is still commanded by Captain Ross, with Messrs Fitzer and M'Kersie first and second officers. Dr Stewart is in charge of the immigrants, and from all we could gather appears to have devoted himself to their welfare. The saloon passengers presented a testimonial to the captain.

Otago Witness, January 4th 1872 pg 16.

Mr Barr, the Poet Laureate for the Caledonian Society of Otago.
Dear to my heart art thou, my native land;
Home of the hard, stern, beautiful and grand.
Thy lowly valleys and thy heath-clad hills;
Thy noble rivers, and thy murmuring rills;

Otago Witness February 1 1873 pg 4
Mr Tennyson's New Volume - Gareth and Lynette