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Merope
New Zealand Bound

Gravesend to Lyttelton, New Zealand 1879

MEROPE left Gravesend at 4 p.m. on May 2nd, 1879 and arrived Lyttelton 26th July 1879

 The Lyttelton Times 28th July 1879  

                       Arrivals 26th July, Merope, Ship 1054 tons, Sutherland, from London
                      
Edwards, Bennett and Co. agents.

 A full account of the voyage was reported in The Lyttelton Times.  The report is reproduced  below 

Among the arrivals from England on Saturday was Messrs Shaw Savill and Co.�s favourite vessel, the Merope, still under the command of our old friend, Captain I. Sutherland. Since the Merope�s last visit, her rig has been altered, the vessel being now barque rigged.  This change has by no means spoilt the appearance of this fine ship, and notwithstanding the fact that her skysail masts have been boen out of, the vessel still presents her usual taut appearance.  The alteration in her rig has not decreased her sailing powers, in fact Captain Sutherland says that she is far easier without the after-yards.  

Her passage 85 days from Gravesend and 79 from land to land - is a very good one indeed, and  shows that barque rig is suitable for the vessel.  On the vessel anchoring, a number of Captain Sutherland�s friends went off to welcome him back to Lyttelton, and all were accorded most hearty reception.  

Mr Thomas couples his old post of chief officer, and the general appearance of the ship did him infinite credit, while among the numerous passengers he has been deservantedly popular.  The Merope has a large passenger list, comprising 26 Saloon, 9 second cabin and 25 steerage passengers. They all seems to have been extremely comfortable on board the ship, both Captain Sutherland and Mr Thomas having as usual used every acertion to make things pleasant.  

The passage has been a fine weather one, the only Galwaye met with being off the Snares on Wednesday. The Equator was crossed twenty-four days out and on the thirtieth day the vessel was in 23 S. Here, however, the wind failed her, and it was not until three weeks later that the meridian of the Cape was crossed.  There were no westerly winds until the Crosets were passed, so that the hopes of those on board of making, as they anticipated a very smart passage were not verified.  The health of the passengers throughout the voyage was good, no sickness if any note having occurred. One birth occurred, Mrs Pentelow, a steerage passenger, being delivered of a daughter on July 13.  The medical officer was Mr P Hider Tivy, who was exceedingly attentive to all on board.  

Captain Sutherland furnishes the following report of the passage. 

Left Gravesend at 4 p.m. on May 2, and Deal the next day.  Had light and favourable winds down the channel and landed the pilot at 10 p.m. on May 5 off Start Point.  Favourable but light  weather was experienced, moderate north-east winds being carried to 7� north 24 deg west, when light variable winds and calms succeeded.  Met with the south-east trades in 2� north, and crossed the equator on May 26 in 24� west.  The south-east trades were light and left the ship in 23� south on June 2, 30 days out.  From there to the Cape a continuance of light variable winds and Galwayes was experience, the wind veering from north east to south east.  The meridian of the Cape was passed on June 23 with a light south south-east breeze.  Nothing like westerly winds were fallen in with until passing the Crosets, when a fair westerly breeze sprang up, bringing the vessel to the southward of the New Zealand coast, the Snares being supposed to have passed at 10 p.m. on July 23 80 days from the Cape and 79 from the Start.  A hard westerly Galwaye was then encountered, accompanied by thick snow and a tremendous sea.  Southerly carried the vessel up the coast to off Akaroa at noon on Friday, when the wind shifted to the north-west.  Light west-south-west airs prevailed during Saturday morning the vessel being taken in tow by the tug in the afternoon, and anchoring at 5 p.m.  Spoke and passed the ship, Carlisle Castle in 29 south 27.20 west on June 7, bound from Plymouth to Melbourne. The Merope comes consigned to Messrs Edwards, Bennett and Co.

Saloon (26)      �
S M Kelso
John Bradshaw
Isabel Bradshaw
Frank W Bradshaw
William Reid Bell
Joseph Houston
Julia Houston
John Houston
Eleanor Houston
F W Barnett
Edward Wilson
Emma Wilson
Frank Singer
Charles Vickers
Dr Tivy
Charles E Burtt
John Buckle
Mary Buckle
Mary Buckle
John Buckle
Helen Buckle
William Buckle
Charles Buckle
Florence Buckle
Henry Buckle
Sarah Buckle�
Steerage (25)
Henry Winter
William Winter
George Crossman
Mary Crossman
Helen Gallagher
J Robinson
William T Robberds
Charles Gessick
Hiram Smith
Joseph Clare
W J Cook
John Pentelow
Martha Pentelow
William Sinton
Thomas Burnett
Henry Knight
Flora Knight
Emily Banford
Henry Knight
Emily Knight
Adeline Knight
Clement Knight
Elizabeth Knight
D Bampton (?Hampton)
John Grant

Second Cabin (9)
O Hooper
James Hopkinson
F W Robinson
J B Kaeterns
G W Frean
Thomas R Reynolds
Harriett Reynolds
Miss Elizabeth Gorrie�

Information above courtesy of Lorraine Inns. Posted 27 Nov. 2001. The Merope 1879 list is not at the Archives in Christchurch.

Timaru Herald, 29 July 1879, Page 2 The Merope.
But little over ten months has elapsed since the good ship Merope was in these waters, and her arrival on Saturday afternoon, eighty five days from London, was the occasion of much congratulation among Captain Sutherland's well-wishers. As had been reported the Merope is now a barque, the alteration of her rig from a ship having been made since her last visit. The change has if anything improved her appearance, and has very much eased the vessel, as Captain Sutherland thinks, without detracting from her sailing qualities. The voyage just completed has in a measure been one of disappointment m point of time to her commander, inasmuch as when only thirty days out he was m latitude 23deg S., remarkably good work, and such as reasonably justified his expectation of making the passage m the seventies, the almost total absence of the "bravo westerlies," however, m making his easting (weather identical with that reported by Captain Spalding in the Dochra) prolonged the voyage, though eighty-five days from port to port, and but seventy-nine from land to land cannot be said to be much prolonged. The incidents of special interest during the voyage are meagre, and with the exception of recording the very complimentary way in which the passengers speak of Captain Sutherland, and his estimable chief officer Mr Thomas, there is little to report. Fifty-nine passengers m all classes embarked at Gravesend, and their number has been increased by one during the voyage, a birth of a daughter to Mrs Pentellow having occurred on July 13th. The medical requirements of the passengers were attended by Dr Rider Tivey, who found the duties less onerous than usual, no serious sickness having occurred.

Her passengers are : � Saloon
S. M. Kelso
John Bradshaw, Isabel Bradshaw, Frank W. Bradshaw
William Reid Bell,
Jos. Houston, Julia Houston, John Houston, Eleanor Houston
F. W. Barnett,
Edward Wilson, Emma Wilson
Frank  Singer,
Charles Vickers,
Dr Tivy
Charles E. Burtt
John Buckle, Mary Buckle, Mary Buckle, John Buckle, Helen Buckle, Wm. Buckle, Henry Buckle, Charles Buckle, Florence Buckle, and Sarah Buckle

Second Cabin -
G. W. Frean
Miss Elizabeth Gorrie
 J. B. Kaeterns
O. Hooper
Jas. Hopkinson
F. W. Robinson
Thos. K. Reynolds, Harriet Reynolds

Steerage -
Emily Banford
Thomas Burnet
Joseph Clare
W. J. Cook
George Crossmnn
Maria Crossman
Helen Gallagher
Charles Gessick
John Grant
D. Hampton
Henry Knight
Flora Knight
Henry Knight, Adeline Knight, Clement Knight, Elizabeth Knight
J. Pentelow, M. Pentelow and child
William T. Robberds
J. Robinson
William Sinton
Hiram Smith
Henry Winter, William Winter


1870 passenger ticketAlfred Vernard Rump and his wife Eliza, nee Skipper, came out to Christchurch on the Merope which sailed in July 1870. In Christchurch Mr. Rump became a butcher, and the couple had several children. This is a copy of their passenger ticket, which lists full details of their fare, how it is to be repaid and their entitlement to provisions while sailing.

Daily Southern Cross, 8 November 1870, Page 2
A Mr. McQuade has succeeded in bringing out safely in the 'Merope,' from England to Canterbury, a very handsome fox.


The Merope was a full rigged clipper ship built in 1870, transferred to Shaw, Savill & Albion Line, 1882. She made 18 voyages UK to NZ.  Destroyed by fire off River Plate1890.

The Times, Monday, Jul 14, 1890; pg. 7 & Jul 15.
The Glasgow barque Salamanca, 564 tons, Captain Bryce, arrived at Queenstown on Saturday morning from Lyttelton with wheat for orders. On the 1st instant they spoke the Liverpool ship Derbyshire, which vessel reported to them having on the 28th of June sighted the London ship Merope, bound from Wellington, New Zealand, for London, on fire. The flames had got complete possession of the ship and burned away the fore and main masts, a portion of the mizzement being the only spar standing. There was nothing to save her from utter destruction. The American ship Blue, F. Babcock, bound from San Francisco for Liverpool, passed Queenstown Harbour on Saturday morning, and reported having part of the crew of the Merope on board. The other remainder of the crew had been rescued by another American ship, servantia, bound for Hull. They were landed at Deal on the 14th July. This portion comprised of the captain and 11 hands. They were in a destitute state. It appears that when about two miles off the Western Islands the Merope's cargo was discovered to be on fire, the cause being supposed to be spontaneous combustion. Every effort was made to subdue the fire, but it gained a rapid hold upon the ship. The crew abandoned the vessel and took to two of their boats, the others being destroyed. The servantia was signalled by the Merope at noon on the 27th June in lat. 40 56, long. 32 26, an d stood by until 9 30 p.m. seven being transferred 48 hours afterwards to the ship W.F. Babock, from San Francisco for Liverpool.

Additional Voyages 
Passenger list 1870 to Lyttelton

1871 to Lyttelton
wayback
1872 to Lyttelton Lyttelton Times Mon 5 Aug 1872, pg 2. Report of voyage & arrival of Merope. Births - Aug 4th, on board the ship Merope, the wife of Captain Henry Rose, of a daughter.
1875 to Timaru
and Lyttelton

Star 28 October 1870, Page 2 Arrived
Merope, ship, Rose, from London. Passengers � Saloon : Mrs Charles Reed and family (two), Mrs Hall and child, F. G. Brittan, J. J. Pendroy, J. Cunningham, E. Peter, and Dr Edw. Husband; 10 second cabin, and 215 steerage.

Star 28 October 1870, Page 2
ARRIVAL OF THE SHIP MEROPE.
This splendid new clipper composite ship, built expressly for the New Zealand trade, and commanded by Captain H. Rose (late of the Zealandia), arrived off the Heads at 10 a.m. on Thursday, after a passage of 90 days. Owing to the strong southerly gale, she tacked off the land, and ultimately anchored about two miles off Godley Heads, at 3 p.m. The ss. Moa having been chartered to convey the Health and Immigration Officers to the vessel, she left the wharf at 3.30 p.m. yesterday, and after a smart run down the harbour arrived alongside the ship. The usual questions having been asked and satisfactorily answered, the vessel was declared free, and the officials proceeded on board, where they found everything to be in first-class order. The ship, as a model, justifies all that has been said in her favour, and surpasses any vessel that has yet visited our harbour. Her lines are excellent, and she is fitted with the latest improvements that skill can suggest. Her saloon is very commodious and tastefully fitted up. The lower masts, bowsprit, lower yards, and lower topsail yards, are all made of iron, and she is fitted fore and aft with wire rigging, and from the fact of her having standing sky-sail yards, she looks unusually taunt. The 'tween decks are lofty, light, and unusually clean. The means for ventilation are very good, and admirably adapted for immigrant service. The galley arrangements are excellent, and the supply of fresh water during the voyage has been abundant. The ovens have acted well, all the immigrants having been supplied with fresh bread during the passage. The immigrants brought out are of a superior class, and they speak in the highest terms of the treatment they have received from the captain and officers of the ship. Dr E. Husband is surgeon, and the admirable state of the 'tween decks, fore and aft, speaks well for his supervision. With the exception of a few ordinary cases, there has-been no sickness during the voyage. An accident occurred to a little boy a few weeks since, who fell down and broke his thigh. The wind having changed, the vessel got under weigh this morning, and came up to her anchorage off the town. The immigrants were landed this afternoon.

Star 5 August 1872, Page 2
THE SHIP MEROPE.
The fine clipper ship Merope, Captain Rose, arrived off the Heads on Saturday afternoon. The agents chartered the s.s. Gazelle, and at 4 p.m. she proceeded with the Health Officers down to the ship. On arriving alongside all were found to be well on board, and the vessel was declared to be free. Yesterday, the Commissioners went down to the ship in the s.s. Gazelle, and made an official inspection. The vessel maintains her reputation for cleanliness ; rarely have we seen a vessel come into port so clean. The emigrants are of a very superior class, and they all speak well of the kindness they have received from the officers on board. Dr Flint is the surgeon superintendent, and Mr M'Quade is again purser. Miss Agar, who comes out as matron, gives the single girls an excellent character. The distilling apparatus has worked well during the voyage, and the cooking galley has acted admirably. There has been no sickness on board. The voyage throughout seems to have been a pleasant one, a capital band adding greatly to the amusement of the passengers.
The following is Captain Rose's report : � Left Gravesend at 4 p.m. on Friday, May 10th, and anchored at the Mouse for the night ; May 11, 4 a.m., weighed and proceeded down the river; 7 a.m., passed through the Downs, and had light N.N.E. wind down Channel ; landed the pilot on Sunday, the 12th, off St. Albans Head ; the Lizard Point was made at 9 a.m. on the 13th ; had N.E. winds to lat. 30 deg. N., and light variable winds for three days j got the N.E. trades in 25 deg. N., moderate to lat. 8 deg. N. ; had very little calm between the trades, and one day's heavy rain ; got the S.E. trades u� 4 deg. N., and crossed the equator at noon /on June 2nd in long. 26 deg. W. ; 20 days from Lizard Point ; had fresh S.E. trades to lat. 15 deg. S., when it fell calm, and for 13 days had very light airs and calms, and a number of ships in sight passed in sight of Tristan d'Acunha on June 24 ; had variable winds all the way from lat. 15 deg. to the meridian of the Cape, which was crossed on July 3rd in Lat. 42 deg. S. ; had fresh winds between W.N.W. and S. to the meridian of Cape Leuwin, which was crossed on July 20th in at. 47 deg. S., when it fell calm for a day ; 22nd and 23rd, had a heavy gale commencing at S.E. and ending at S.S. W. ; had to keep the ship hove-to; thence to Stewart's Island had fresh southerly winds ; passed South West Cape on "Wednesday, July 31, at noon ; and passed Cape Saunders on Thursday, at 4 p.m. ; had light winds up the coast ; sighted the Peninsula on Friday, at noon. The following ships wore spoken during the voyage : � May 25, Telanak, from Amsterdam to Batavia ;
May 26, Gosforth, from London to Madras, lldeg. 40min. N., 25deg. 9min. W. ;
May 29, barque Ferdinand Pruinn, Rangoon to Falmouth, sdeg. 39inin. N., 24deg. W. ;
July 16, ship Shannon, London to Melbourne, 28deg. 18min. S., 36deg. lOmin. W. ;
June 17, Her Majesty, ship, London to Melbourne, 29deg. 45min. S., 35deg. 58min. W."
The Merope got under weigh yesterday morning, and having a fine leading wind, she came up to an anchorage off the town. The agents are Messrs Miles and Co.

Evening Post, 28 September 1874, Page 2
Christchurch. 28th September.
The British expedition for observing the transit of Venus in Canterbury has arrived in the ship Merope, The party consists of Major Palmer, R.E., Chief Astronomer ; Lieut. L. Darmin, Royal Engineers, Assistant Astronomer and Photographer; Lieut. H. Crawford, R.N., Assistant Astronomer, and three non-commissioned officers of the Royal Engineers. They bring a large equipment of instruments, observatory huts, and other apparatus, about 80 tons in all. The site for observing the transit will be selected when the party have viewed the various localities, the selection being left to Major Palmer's decision, It will probably be near Christchurch.

Hutt News, 6 September 1939, Page 5 82nd Birthday
The family of Mr. John Lusty, who attained his 82nd year on Saturday, entertained a large number of friends in Tua Rua Hall, in his honour on Saturday night. Mr. Lusty was born in Gloucestershire, England. He left England for New Zealand in 1874 by the sailing ship Merope, commanded by Captain Williams. After a trip of 90 days the ship arrived at Lyttelton. Mr Lusty went to Timaru, where after some years' work as a builder, he went to Nelson, then to Blenheim, and finally to Lower Hutt, where he has lived ever since. He was employed at the Woollen Mills as a carpenter. Mrs. Lusty died two years ago. Mr. Lusty is a very well known identity in the Hutt Valley. He bears his years remarkably well and delights in reminiscences of his past life. Mr. Lusty's children are Mesdames A. West, G. Diamond and A. Pocknall, and Messrs. Foster Lusty, Fred Lusty, George Lusty, Gordon Lusty, A. J. Lusty and R. Lusty. Miss Ethel Lusty died many years ago. Mr. Lusty has 21 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. The long supper tables at the gathering presented a springlike appearance, the floral decorations being of golden daffodils and rama-rama, the red and white birthday cake holding pride of place. Mr. Lusty received many congratulations from his friends. The evening was passed pleasantly, dancing being interspersed with games.

For sale on Trade-me in April 2004 from Christchurch
A charming account of an early immigrant's voyage to New Zealand from Plymouth, England dated June 27 1874 on board the Merope. It is nicely bound with marbled cover, written in a pleasant hand, inside cover giving dimensions of the ship, commander (Captain) H. William, owners Messers Shaw Saville & Co and the name Mr P Griffiths (possibly the author). Details of weather conditions and speed and distance travelled, the birth of 5 children and the deaths, and burials of two children. Numerous sightings of whales and a wrecked vessel upside down, and the trial of an agent "Mr Davis" for being drunk and disorderly. Also inside the back cover a commendation regarding Mr George Hale for meritorious conduct during the voyage. Ship arrived in Lyttelton exactly 3 months later. Measures 8" by 6-1/4", 42 pages.

The Star - Christchurch Thursday 1 August 1878
Merope ship, 1125 tons, Sutherland, from London. Edwards, Bennetts and Co. agents. Passengers -
Saloon -
Mr and Mrs Hill
Mr Fred Hill
Mr C. Campbell
Mr A. Dolman
Mr C.H. Rhodes
Miss Quinney
Mr Styles Rich
Mr T.T. Roscoe
Mr E.H. Ball
Mr A. Taylor

Second cabin -
Mr P.E. Hubbard
Mr R. Felton
Mrs Elizabeth Baker
Miss E. Baker
Miss F. Baker


Diaries

1872: Diary by Edward Button,  Canterbury Museum
1874: Diary kept on board the 'Merope' on her voyage from Plymouth to Lyttelton, with Captain Williams 27 June - 28 September 1874, by Austin S. Griffiths. Canterbury Museum and Canterbury City Library

New-Zealand as It Is. by John Bradshaw, J.P. 1883.
CHAPTER II. OUTWARD BOUND.

Recommended by " an old colonial" to come by sail round the Cape, on the ground that as time was of little object, we and all our belongings would, by so doing, arrive together. This was very good advice for a family man; but the untrammelled bachelor would probably prefer to come by Suez or San Francisco. The extra fares by steamer and the expense of transhipping in Australia or carrying a large family across the American continent, would generally prove prohibitory. Steamers do not always serve in connexion, and hotel bills have to be encountered.. Transhipments, too, cost more to a stranger than to one well acquainted with the ways and customs of the road. The farmer, ignorant of usual charges, and unwilling to seem a niggard, is apt to pay heavily for any little services which may be rendered, just as he would do under similar circumstances either in Liverpool or New York. Then come boatmen, cabmen, theatres, and other places of amusement, the latter rendered all the more irresistible by the tedium of a long voyage. Practically, therefore, our friend was right. By all means come by sail, if economy is to be studied. But in that case it is necessary to be prepared for a few discomforts which are not ordinarily to be found by the more expeditious, if costlier, steam service via, Australia or the States. When making a selection from one of the many ways by which the colony can be reached, it will be advisable for a proposing settler, unless he happens to be a millionaire, to take the cheapest. As a rule, six weeks, more or less, are, when leaving old ties for the purpose of undertaking new responsibilities, but of little moment. Money is likely to be of far more. Supposing a man, by the sale of his property, to have a larger sum standing at his credit in a bank than was ever the case before; he is inclined to think twenty pounds spent here, and twenty pounds spent there, of little consequence. He will still have a large sum left, he argues, to take out to the colony. He is apt to run into wild extravagances which hereafter he may consider had better have been left alone. A person about to emigrate should recollect that he will shortly arrive in a new country where past experience will avail him little, but ready money form a large ingredient in his future. It may be longer than he thinks before he can even settle down; it will certainly be much longer than he thinks before any return from his labour can place him in easy circumstances. "With such a prospect the wise man will spend as little as he can in coming out, and arrive with as much cash as possible in his pocket.
    To those intending to come by sail, a few suggestions may tend to make the voyage somewhat less irksome, and minister considerably to the comforts of the traveller. A small private store of luxuries, when a voyage of long duration is in prospect, is of more importance than might at first sight appear. Talk to shipping agents, and they will assure the applicant that any private supplies are altogether unnecessary�that their company invariably finds all the stores that can possibly be wanted, and that not to do so would be both a slur on the management, and in a short time bring it to irretrievable discredit. True it is, that most vessels are well stored with live sheep, pigs, and poultry of all descriptions ; that they carry a certain supply of potted meats, good butter and bad, biscuits, preserves, potatoes, and cheese. Yet sheep do not seem to thrive after being a month at sea; pigs have a foolish habit of jumping overboard, cutting their throats by suicidal contact with the waves, or dying asphyxiated in their sties; poultry moult at improper times; potatoes take to growing when least wanted so to do, and cheese emits an odour far from appetizing. Knowing all this, we would recommend a small supply of jam and some really good tinned potted meats; also some tinned " coffee and milk"�a comforting and popular beverage at sea, whatever it may be on dry land. Nor should a small swing lamp be forgotten, with kettle over head, from which to brew a cup of coffee after the galley fires are out, or perhaps the last hot glass of grog. A few other trifles will greatly add to the comforts of the voyage, and some of these are almost necessary. The traveller by sail round the Cape must, as a rule, fix up his cabin. This may be done in two ways�either at his own cost and under his personal supervision, or the ship will undertake to do it on such terms as may be arranged. The latter course is preferable, and will be found in the long-run cheaper. In either case a few brass hooks, on which to hang the boot and clothes' bags; a square piece of ticking, or some such strong material, to be nailed to the side, and containing a couple of rows of pockets, in which to fit brushes, private supplies are altogether unnecessary�that their company invariably finds all the stores that can possibly be wanted, and that not to do so would be both a slur on the management, and in a short time bring it to irretrievable discredit. True it is, that most vessels are well stored with live sheep, pigs, and poultry of all descriptions ; that they carry a certain supply of potted meats, good butter and bad, biscuits, preserves, potatoes, and cheese. Yet sheep do not seem to thrive after being a month at sea; pigs have a foolish habit of jumping overboard, cutting their throats by suicidal contact with the waves, or dying asphyxiated in their sties; poultry moult at improper times; potatoes take to growing when least wanted so to do, and cheese emits an odour far from appetizing. Knowing all this, we would recommend a small supply of jam and some really good tinned potted meats; also some tinned " coffee and milk"�a comforting and popular beverage at sea, whatever it may be on dry land. Nor should a small swing lamp be forgotten, with kettle over head, from which to brew a cup of coffee after the galley fires are out, or perhaps the last hot glass of grog. A few other trifles will greatly add to the comforts of the voyage, and some of these are almost necessary. The traveller by sail round the Cape must, as a rule, fix up his cabin. This may be done in two ways�either at his own cost and under his personal supervision, or the ship will undertake to do it on such terms as may be arranged. The latter course is preferable, and will be found in the long-run cheaper. In either case a few brass hooks, on which to hang the boot and clothes' bags; a square piece of ticking, or some such strong material, to be nailed to the side, and containing a couple of rows of pockets, in which to fit brushes, bottles, and other little articles, will help to make the cabin more shipshape. A supply of line, to prevent the cabin boxes from rolling from side to side as the ship lurches, will add to the immunity of shins, and greatly assist the placidity of their owner. By all means take a lounging-chair, in which to enjoy the soothing pipe, or rest when feeling ill at ease. Label it, ticket it, do all you can to make it private property, and from the very first assert your rights, or some one in time will come to think it his, and make you feel an intruder, where by all law you should be owner. There always are a few on board who think the deck or skylight seats will make an easy resting-place until they try. To such short-sighted ones true kindness is to show no pity. If so improvident at first, how can they hope to make good settlers ? Tell them to net a hammock or shift as best they can. A sea voyage always presents features more or less similar. To the sailor, busy with his professional duties, time slips rapidly away ; but the passenger must occasionally feel the tedious monotony of three months passed between the cabin and the poop. Any little excitement, such as the passing sail or harmless joke, is gladly seized upon to occupy the vacant hours. In our case the usual squalls and succeeding calms of the favourable breeze and adverse winds never exceeded a medium intensity. Once only during the " southing" were we under doubled-reefed topsails. Thus we were compelled to look within ourselves for any variation in our daily life. Of course there were little quarrels and little tiffs, but the general harmony was maintained. Myself and wife, a brother-in-law, a west-country farmer with his wife, four daughters, and four slouching boys, a Wellington wine-merchant and his bride, a north Ireland family, a hydropathic doctor, an ex-officer, an. ex-bank-clerk, a Scotch engineer, steady and hardworking, with two or three young men who seemed to have no idea of why they had left the old country, or what they were going to do in the new, constituted a fair sample of the human cargo generally carried by such ships as ours. The details may differ�the general type remains.

CHAPTER III. FIRST IMPRESSIONS.

We sighted land the day previous to reaching Lyttelton. It was afternoon, and although the sun, setting in full blue ether, bathed the distant mountains in a flood of mellow light, it rendered the shore-line hazy, and its objects indistinct. We were not therefore prepared for the lovely panorama which warmed our hearts when first stepping on deck next morning. In front, the verdantly clad hills of the Peninsula and Port Lyttelton ; behind, a long range of snow-capped mountains, distant about sixty to eighty miles, their peaks rising from 3000 to 5000 feet above the sea. Behind these again might have been seen, had the intervening ranges permitted, Mount Cook, the loftiest mountain in the middle island, its summit 13,000 feet high, and clothed with perpetual snow. Above was a clear blue sky, unstained by the slightest fleck of white. We had seen views quite as lovely, but none which possessed exactly the same shade of colouring. ...

"New-Zealand as It Is". by John Bradshaw, J.P. 1883.
But what manner of men make suitable colonists?


The Star, Saturday, July 26 1879
Arrived
July 26 - Docbra, barque, 966 tons, from Glasgow. C.W. Turner, agent. She left Glasgow on April 13 and Greenock on April 16, her passage being 101 days from the latter place. The vessel brings a large cargo of general merchandise, drain pipes, &c, besides four passengers. Four Clydesdale stallions were shipped in Glasgow for Mr R. Wilkin; two of then, however died on the passage, it is supposed from diseased kidneys. The names of the two that died were Glasgow Laddie and Bothwell and the two that arrived are Meriton and Billy Fairplay; they are in good condition. During the passage one of the ordinary seaman, W. Connor, was lost overboard. It was on the night of June 25 , in 41.30 south, 53 east; there was not much sea on at the time, and it is not known how the lad fell overboard. Two life bouys were thrown him and the ship laid aback. Captain Spalding hailed him, asking if he had the life bouy, and he said no. A boat was then lowered, but after searching for nearly half an hour, returned to the ship, being unable to see anything of the unfortunate lad.


Evening Post, 13 July 1880, Page 2
THE SHIP MEROPE, FROM LONDON.
A telegram was received yesterday afternoon Stating that this vessel was sighted off Lyttelton Heads. The Merope, under command of Capt. Sutherland is a splendid ship, owned by Messrs. Shaw Savill & Co., and, this voyage, is under charter to the N.Z. Shipping Company, she is reported as having left London for Wellington on the 19th of April, which gives her a very good passage from London of 85 days to to-day, and 78 from Plymouth. She has several first and second cabin passengers, but no Government immigrants. It is probable she will beat up this evening. The following is her passenger list :� Saloon� William and Mrs. Wright, Rev. G. and Mrs. Tonge, A. and Mrs. Forrest, Dr. Porter, Miss Butler. C. Strange, and G. O'Neil. Second Cabin � William Mansell and Mr. Charlton. Steerage- Eliza., Edith and Elizabeth Pearae ; Robert, Margaret (2), and Mary Exley ; William, Lucy, Elizabeth, Abraham and Matthew Rantley; Elizabeth Roberts, Eli Higgins, William Walker, Dundas Logan, E. Wickham, H. Martinson, and George Forbes.


Evening Post, 15 July 1880, Page 2
The steamer Huia was sent out last evening to tow the Merope into port, but owing to the N.W. wind having increased she had to return to port without her. She reported all well. Up to 3 p.m. to-day she had not been able to make our harbor, in consequence of the adverse wind. The rig of the Merope has been altered from a ship to a barque.


Evening Post, 13 February 1884, Page 2 English Shipping
Evening Post, 10 April 1884, Page 2 ARRIVAL OF THE BARQUE MEROPE, FROM LONDON.
The Shaw, Savill and Albion Company's barque Merope arrived port yesterday, after a run of 99 days from Gravesend. She left London on the 3lst December last, called at Gravesend to ship a quantity of powder, and was towed to Dungeness. Had light south winds down the Channel. The pilot left her off the Lizard on the 4th Jan.... At 4 yesterday afternoon she was boarded by Pilot Holmes and brought in to the powder anchorage. ... We may mention that the vessel is under the command of Captain Sutherland, to whom the passengers presented a testimonial, signed by them for the efficient manner in which he commanded the ship. She is consigned to Levin & Co., and brings the following passengers; Saloon � Mr Daw;
second cabin � Mrs H. Lyle, Mr and Mrs Suoad and and family (8) [Amelia, Mildred, Emily, Eleanor, Percy, Dudley, Gordon and Frank], Messrs A. Leech, A. Manghan, A. Bott, James McLean, Alexander Winton and W. Banks.