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'Helen Scott'

New Zealand Bound

 

Press, 6 January 1882, Page 2
PORT OF LYTTELTON.
Arrived - January 5. Helen Scott, barque. 1118 tons. Goldsworthy, from London. Passengers:

Sarah Beecroft
Thomas Beecroft
William, Sarah, George, and Ada Emma Beecroft
Martha Cryer
Ada Cryer
Johannah Hartnell
Hannah Hyden
Francis Hyden
Elizabeth Lottos
Mary Lynch
Patrick Bridget Lynch
James Mackie
John and Mary Moorehouse
Alfred, Theodore, David, and Gertrude Moorehouse
Mary O'Connor
Michael O'Connor
Johannah O'Connor
Timothy O'Sullivan
Elizabeth Pentney
Benjamin Whitby
Mary H. Whitby

[I am missing the name of one passenger]

Press, 6 January 1882, Page 2 THE HELEN SCOTT, FROM LONDON.
The barque Helen Scott, whose arrival has been anxiously looked for during the last three weeks, was signalled soon after six o'clock last evening. She has twenty-nine passengers on board, and was signalled as being all well after her long passage. The Helen Scott left London on August 15th, put into St. Vincent on September 24th to land one of her crew who was ill, and there got into collision with H.M.S. Tamar and carried away her steering gear. Temporary repairs thereto having been made, the vessel left St. Vincent on September 27th. She has therefore been 143 days from London and 100 from St. Vincent. The barque comes consigned to the New Zealand Shipping Company.

Press, 7 January 1882, Page 2
THE HELEN SCOTT.
Following is the report of the voyage of the barque Helen Scott, from London to this port. The Helen Scott left London on August 19th, asd experienced some fearful weather in the Chancel. Upon several occasions the ship, which is very deeply laden, was flooded by the seas that washed over her bulwarks during her heavy rolling. The passengers' quarters down aft were also flooded to such a degree that the crew were put to work to bale the water out of the compartment. The ship labored greatly, and rolled the fore-topgallant mast out of her. The rigging also had to be frapped. On September the 23rd, one of the passenger, a nephew of the owner of the vessel, having for some days previous bean laid down with sickness, & call in was made at St. Vincent, where he was landed. As already reported, the ship, when leaving St. Vincent, collided with H.M.S. Tamar, and sustained considerable damage. This necessitated a stay at St. Vincent until September 27th, on which date she resumed her voyage. The Equator was crossed on October 13th in 24 W. longitude, after having experienced poor N.E. trade winds. On November 10th the ship was off the Cape of Good Hope, asd she crossed the meridian of Cape Leuwin December 10th; that of Tasmania ten days later, having run down the easting in 42 to 43 S. Captain Goldsworthy describes the running down as rather rolling the easting down," and says he has never seen such weather but once before in a twenty-five years' experience. The Snares were passed twelve days ago, since which nothing but fresh head winds or baffling airs were met with up the coast. The Helen Scott is commanded by Captain James Goldworthy. She was built in 1863 for the Bombay and Calcutta trade, and has the appearance of a powerful iron ship. Mr T. W. Trick occupies the post of chief officer, and Mr Goldsworthy that of second mate. The entry of the vessel was made yesterday at the Customs by her agents, the New Zealand Shipping Company, by whom she is advertised to load for London.

Press, 18 January 1882, Page 2
Typhus Fever at Loburn. It is to be regretted that typhus fever has broken out at North Loburn, in a family named Moorhouse, which recently arrived in Lyttelton by the ship Helen Scott. On Sunday one of the members of the family was buried, and two are reported to be ill from the fever. The vessel has been in harbor about eight or nine days. Steps have been taken to isolate the family in question as much as possible, and the holidays for the school in the district have been given a month earlier than usual in consequence. . It is to be regretted that typhus fever has broken out at North Loburn, in a family named Moorhouse, which recently arrived in Lyttelton by the ship Helen Scott. On Sunday one of the members of the family was buried, and two are reported to be ill from the fever. The vessel has been in harbor about eight or nine days. Steps have been taken to isolate the family in question as much as possible, and the holidays for the school in the district have been given a month earlier than usual in consequence.

Press, 18 January 1882, Page 2
Typhus Fever at Loburn. It is to be regretted that typhus fever has broken out at North Loburn, in a family named Moorhouse, which recently arrived in Lyttelton by the ship Helen Scott. On Sunday one of the members of the family was buried, and two are reported to be ill from the fever. The vessel has been in harbor about eight or nine days. Steps have been taken to isolate the family in question as much as possible, and the holidays for the school in the district have been given a month earlier than usual in consequence.