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Arrivals and Departures to and from Sydney during 1844
from and to New Zealand Ports

New Zealand Bound
from the
 Sydney Shipping Gazette
 a weekly newspaper

1845
Source: Australian Cooperative Digitisation Project    Place names


Sydney Shipping Gazette
Volume 1, No. 1 1844 Saturday March 23, 1844 Exports for the Week
March - 20 - Sir Archibald Campbell, brig, Keppell, master, for Singapore, via New Zealand; 10 casks brandy, 500 sheep and 150 bags flour, 80 boxes tea.

Vol. 1 No. 2  30 March 1844
Departures: March 26 - For Singapore, via New Zealand, the brig Sir Archibald Campbell, Captain Keppell, with sundries. Passengers - Mr J. Smithers, Mr D. Macfarlane, and Mr W. Porter.

Boyd Town Shipping -
Departures - March 8 - Bolina, barque, Johnson, for New Zealand, with cattle and horses. Mr Imlay passenger.

Imports for February
Feb. 6 - Star of China, schooner, 106 tons, Ward, master, from New Zealand; 25,000 slates, 12 hogsheads and 24 cases wine, 11 planks, 1 hogsheads gin, 1 hogsheads loaf sugar, 1 ton iron, 30 kegs and 70 tins whitelead, 1 bale thread, 2 casks loaf sugar, 28 boxes candles, 3 bales paper, 1 keg ink, 2 cases molasses, 1 parcel stationary, 3 bales rugs.
Feb. 16 - Thomas Lord, schooner, 70 tons, Brown, master, from Auckland, via the Bay of Islands; 2 bales pilot cloth, Campbell Hill, and Co.; 20 tons manganese ore, 1 box gum, W.E. Macintosh; 2 bales wool, Campbell and Co.: 14 casks fat, 2 puncheons, 3 cases ironmongery, 18 pairs tortoise shell combs, 5 hogsheads and 7 quarter-casks Cape-wine, Order.

Exports for February
February 3 -Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Burns, master, for Port Nicholson; 25 tierees beef, 8 tierees pork, 80 bags flour, 16 bags maize, 2 tons hoop iron, 1 case slops, 2 chests tea, 8 casks sugar, 2 coils whale line, 4 boxes soap, 60 tons shooks, 4 cases wine, 3 casks bottled beer, 1 bag coffee, 2 kegs nails,2 grindstones, 1 can oil paint, 13 ash oars, 2 boxes Manila rope, 2 kegs tobacco, 6 boxes arrowroot, 4 boxes and 2 bales slops, ..45 barrels pork, 38 bags sugar, 2 casks fruit, 17 kegs tobacco, 21 hogsheads porter, 4 cases champagne, 20 brandy, 63 bags flour.

Feb. 3. Calypso, brig, Harrold, master, for New Zealand. 80 barrels pork, 200 sacks flour, 20 hogsheads porter...
Feb. 15 - Nimrod, brig Mulholland, master, for New Zealand; 15 hogsheads, 4 hogsheads rum, 12 kegs tobacco, 1 barrel glass, 18 spades, 1 cart, 1 package saddlery, 1 parcel books, 1 case woolllens, 72 casks beef, 1 package flannel, 1 case lamp chamnies..
Feb. 21 - Tryphena, brig, Horn, master, for Auckland and Tahiti; 50 quarter casks gunpowder, 2 boxes oilman's stores, 2 cases drugs, 1 bundle scythes, 2 ploughs, 1 jug oil, 11 crates earthen ware, 1 parcel books, 1 cask kettles, 127 iron pots, 1 case stationary, 33 lead bars, 10 cases lead shot, 5 casks hardware, 8 barrels flour, 1 case paper, 9 trunks shoes, 1 cask glassware, 1 box window glass, 5 cases soap, 7 bags rice, 1 case blacking, 1 case cheese, 5 cases slops, 3 cases mustard, 7 cases nails, 1 case (lamp), 7 cases nails, 6 casks 1 case earthenware, 2 boxes sperm candles, 9 bundles spades, 20 cans boiled oil, 66 bags flour,2 rolls sheat lead.

Vessels Expected in Sydney from New Zealand
Scotia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward
Challenger, schooner, 83 tons, Hayes
Terror, schooner, 85 tons, Douglass
Lively, cutter, 37 tons, Pearce
Calypso, brig, 106 tons, Harrolds
Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Burns
Star of China, schooner, 190 tons, Ward
Isabella Anna, barque, 226 tons, Beard
Vixen, cutter, 46 tons, Winter
Amelia, brig, 200 tons, McDougall
Thomas Lord, schooner, 70 tons, Brown

Volume 1, Number 3 (6 April, 1844)
Newcastle Shipping
April 5 - The ship Urgent took on board 1034 sheep on Thursday, and will sail for Nelson (NZ), tomorrow (Saturday morning); she has now 70 head of cattle, 5 horses and 1034 sheep, in good order.

Imports for March
March 2 - Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilfold, from NZ; 61 casks black oil and 58 bundles whalebone, M. Joseph; 4 kegs butter, Mrs Moore.

Exports for March
March 2 - Isabella Anna, barque, Beard, master, for Auckland; 120 logs, 100 boards cedar, 10 bales wool, 20 casks tallow, 16 bags horse hair, 4 casks porter, 6 casks 4 cases furniture, 10 bundles whalebone, 95 bags flour, 2 cases apparel, 1 saddle, 1 chaff cutter, 1120 sheep, 9 horses
March 9 Amelia, brig, McDougall, master for New Zealand
March 11 - Thomas Lord, schooner, Brown master, for the Bay of Islands and Auckland.

Volume 1, Number 4 (13 April, 1844)
Ships in Harbour
Tobago, brig, 136 tons, Pockley, at Fotheringham's Wharf; J.B. Metcalfe, agent. Loading for Auckland and the Bay of Islands

Expected Arrivals from New Zealand
Vanguard, schooner, Pelfols
Marion Watson, schooner, Saunders

Volume 1, Number 5 (20 April, 1844)
Departures
April 18 - For the Chathams Islands, the schooner, John Pirie, Captain Simpson, with part of original cargo from Adelaide.

Volume 1, Number 6 (27 April, 1844)
Arrivals
April 23 - Lady Leigh, schooner, 118 tons, Captain Reid, from Port Nicholson the 17th and Poverty Bay the 25th March, with three tons flax and three tons sperm oil. Passengers - Mr Burleigh, Mr Butler, and Mr Murray. Imports: 3 tuns sperm oil, 2 casks tobacco, 5 bales and 2 tons flax, 3 casks sperm oil.
April 24th - Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Captain Brown from Port Nicholson the 27th March, Queen Charlotte's Sound the 7th April, with oil, &c. Passengers

Asher 		Mr
Bannatyne 	Mr
Duvachelle 	Monsieur
Fraser 		Mr
Jones 		Mr
Jones 		Mr E
Joseph 		Mr
Macfarlane 	Captain
Miller 		Mr
Pearce 		Mr
Phillips 	Mrs
Roberts 	Mr

Imports
April 25 - Wanderer, schooner 131 tons, Burns, master, from Port Nicholson,: 14 casks sperm oil, 11 bales wool, 8 casks sperm oil, 10cwt whalebone; 8 tons flax, J.B. Metcalfe.

The Wanderer has had a very tedious passage from Port Nicholson having put into Queen Charlotte's Sound through stress of weather, where she was detained several days.
The schooner Star of China was to leave Port Nicholson for Nelson and Sydney on the 30th March.
The schooner Scotia was at Port Nicholson, bound south ward.
The Isabella Anna had arrived at Port Nelson and was going on to Auckland to load for London.
The Lively, cutter, had left Port Nicholson for Sydney via Port Nelson.
The schooner Governor, had arrived at Port Nicholson from London.
At Akaroa the following vessels are lying:-
    American whaler Gideon Howlan, 18 months out, with 2000 barrels black oil;
    French whaler George, 17 months out, with 3500 barrels black oil;
    and the French man-of-war Le Rhin.
The schooner Sisters was at Port Nicholson when the Lady Leigh left.
The Vanguard had arrived at Port Nicholson, and had left for Akaroa; but was expected back again to take passengers for Sydney.

Volume 1, Number 7 (4 May, 1844)
The Shamrock, Captain Daldy, was about to sail for Uraine, after which she would come on to Sydney via New Zealand.
Terror, 257 tons, Harper, hence 24th December, 1843, spoken off New Zealand, 16th February, 1844, with 120 barrels sperm; B Boyd and Co., owners.

Vessels expected in Sydney from New Zealand
Soctia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward
Terror, schooner, 85 tons, Douglass
Lively, cutter 37 tons, Pearce
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pelfold
Waterlily, schooner, 155 tons, Hayle
Marian Watson, schooner, 144 tons, Saunders
Calypso, brig, 106 tons, Harold
Star of China, schooner,190 tons, Ward
Viren, cutter, 46 tons, Winter
Amelia, brig, 200 tons, McDougall
Thomas Lord, schooner, 70 tons, Brown
Shamrock, schooner, 85 tons, Daldy

Hardy's Shipping List Dec. 23
Vessels laid on for New Zealand
Sydney, 343 tons, Potter; January 6
Bella Marina, 563 tons, Ashbridge, January 10


Volume 1, Number 8 (11 May, 1844)
Ships in Sydney Harbour
Lady Leigh, schooner, 118 tons, Reid, at the Queen's Wharf; JB Metclfe, agent Loading for Port Nicholson.
Mary Nixon, barque, 391 tons, McDonnell, at Campbell's Wharf. Discharging and advertised for the Bay of Islands, and Valparaiso.
Star of China, schooner, 112 tons, Ward, at Fotheringham's Wharf. Giblett, owner. Loading for Nelson and Port Nicholson.
Strathisla, barque, 387 tons, Simpson, east side of the Cove. V and E Solomon, agents. Loading for Auckland.

Arrivals at Sydney
May 5 - Tryheena, brig, 136 tons, Captain Horn, from Auckland, 14th April, with manganese, &c. Passengers
Bradbury Mr
Joseph Mr
Kenn Mr A.W.
Wright Mrs and two children

May 7 - Waterlily, schooner, 155 tons, Hayle, master, from Auckland, 19th April, with sundries. Passengers -
Lockhart Captain and Dr Grammie of the 80th Regiment, 30 rank and file of 80th Regiment, 5 women, and 12 children.

May 7 - Thomas Lord, schooner, 72 tons, Captain Brown, from Auckland, the 12th, and the Bay of Islands, the 34th, with oil, &c.

Passengers - 
Bulger 		Captain
Bulger 		Mrs, two daughters and son
Clendon 	Miss
Haywood 	Mr J
Jones 		Mr and Mrs
Sims 		Mr
Thompson 	Mrs

May 7 - Shamrock, schooner, 85 tons, Captain Daldy, from Riatea 6th March, Auckland the 12th, and the Bay of Islands the 34th April with sundries.

Passengers - 
Quaife 	Rev. Mr (Independent Minister)
Quaife 	Mrs and two children
and nine in steerage

May 8  - Star of China - schooner, 112 tons, Captain Ward, from Nelson 11th April, and Taranaki 26th April, with sundries.

Passengers - 
Benlen Mr
Brooking Mr and Mrs and two children
Brown Mr G
Dixon Mr and Mrs and three children
Giblett Mr
Hall Mr and Mrs and three children
Hind Mr
Marshall Mr E
Paul Mr and Mrs and two children
Robb Mr and Mrs and two children

May 9 - Marian Watson, schooner, 146 tons Captain Saunders, from Auckland, 19th April, with sundries

Passengers - 
Bumbury 	Major
Wellman 	Lieutenant, 80th Regiment
Shephard 	Mr
thrifty-two rank and file of the 80th Regiment, five women and ten children.

Arrivals - in Auckland, New Zealand
March 14 - Calypso, brig, Harrold, from Sydney, via Russell
18 - Tryphena, brig, Horn, from Sydney
21 - Comet, brigantine, Cork, from Twofold Bay, with 62 heifers and calves
Bolina, barque, Johnson, from Twofold Bay, with cattle and horses
Thomas Lord, schooner, Brown, from Sydney via Russell
April 3 Isabella Anna, barque, Beard, from Sydney via Nelson
Shamrock, schooner, Daldy, from Tahiti 8th March; Passenger, Mr Jeffray

Departures from Auckland
Feb. 26 - Nereus, Fedarbe, for London, with 1200 barrels sperm
Sisters, Clarke, for Wellington
March 27 - Calypso, brig, Harrold, for Wellington
April 1, Comet, schooner, Cork, for Hobart Town via Twofold Bay, in ballast. Passengers -

Cork 		Mrs
Gimble 		Mr
Harris 		Mr
Williamson 	Mr
the convict 	Ellis
and two constables

April 12 - Thomas Lord, schooner, Brown,
Shamrock, schooner, Daldy, for Sydney via Russell [ passenger on board the latter Mr Jeffray.]

The schooner Lady St Kilda, hence via NZ, arrived in Tahiti in December last, where she was refreshed.
The cutter Lively was going into Taranaki as the Star of China left. The Theresa, Bacon, was at Nelson. The Deborah had gone with a surveying party to the southward, to form a new settlement.

The Strathisla, Captain Simpson, has taken to convey a cargo of cattle to NZ, after which she will proceed to the South Sea Islands on a sandal wood expedition.


May 18 1844
Arrivals
May 12 - Sir Archibald Campbell, brig, 205 tons, Captain Bawtree, from Port Nicholson 28th April, with sundaries. Passengers - Captain Richmond and servant, Mrs Souter, and Mr Smithers.

Departures
May 16 - Lady Leigh, schooner, Captain Reid, for Port Nicholson, with sundaries. Passengers - Messrs. R. Murray, A. Asher Johns, T. Frazer, Bryant, Chambers, E. and G. Johns and Mrs Turton and child.

English Shipping
The Sydney left Gravesend for New Zealand on the 22nd January, and the Bella Maria cleared outwards for the same destination on the 23rd.

Arrivals at Sydney During the Months of January, February and March 1844
JANUARY
17. Wanderer, schooner, 49 tons, 1st January; 5 passengers.
18. Falcon, schooner, 49 tons, Finley, from Port Nicholson, 1st January; 1 passenger.
23. Tryphena, brig, 131 tons. Horn, from the Bay of Islands and Barrier, 7th and 11th January; 4 passengers.
27. Bee, brig, 134 tons, Le Grand, from Port Nicholson and Twofold Bay, 1st and 20th January; 6 passengers.
28. City of Sydney, brig, 106 tons, Munro, from Auckland and Bay of Islands, 11th and 18th January; 4 passengers.
31. Isabella Ann, 226 tons, Beard, from Auckland and the Bay of Islands, 17th and 20th January; 6 passengers.

FEBRUARY
  5. Ariel, schooner, 72 tons, Browning, from Port Nicholson and Bay of Islands 24th December and 18th January; 8 passengers.
  8. Star of China, schooner, 100 tons, Ward, from Nelson and Taranaki, 20th and 27th January; 1 passenger.
  8. William Stoveld, brig 187 tons, Davidson from Port Nelson, 25th January; 15 passengers.
15. Thomas Lord, schooner, 78 tons, Brown, from Auckland and Bay of Islands, 29th January and 3rd February; 12 passengers.

MARCH
2. Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pelford, from Manakow, 10th and 18th February; 4 passengers.
3. Amelia, brig, 200 tons, McDougall, from Auckland via the Bay of Islands, 15th and 22nd February; 9 passengers.
12. North Star, H.M.S. 26 guns, Sir E. Home, from Port Nicholson, from Port Nicholson, 26th February.

Departures During the Months of January, February and March 1844 from Sydney

JANUARY
13. Lively, cutter, 37 tons, Pearce, for Port Nicholson; 4 passengers; Fearnley, agent.

FEBRUARY
  4. Calypso, brig, 106 tons, Harrold, for New Zealand; 2 passengers; H. Fisher, agent.
  4. Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Burns, for Port Nicholson; 3 passengers; A.B. Smith and Co., agents.
28. Vixen, cutter, 40 tons, Winter, for Auckland; 4 passengers; C. Abercrombie, agent.

MARCH
  3. Star of China, schooner, 190 tons, Ward, for Nelson and Port Nicholson; 2 passengers;. Giblett, agent.
  4. Isabella Anna, barque, 226 tons, Beard, for Auckland; 7 passengers; Johnson, agent.
11. Amelia, brig, 200 tons, McDougall, for New Zealand; 1 passenger; J.B. Metcalfe, agent.
12. Thomas Lord, schooner, 70 tons, Brown, for the Bay of Islands and Auckland; 4 passengers; Campbell and CO., agents.
26. Sir Archibald Campbell, barque, 205 tons, Keppell, for Singapore via New Zealand; 3 passengers. Hayes, agent.

Colonial Whalers at Sea
(with their last reports)
Clarence, 120 tons, Carrol, hence 25th February; left Bay of Islands 24th, clean; Cole, owner.

Volume 1, Number 11 (1 June, 1844)
Arrivals
May 25 - Terror, schooner, 110 tons, Captain Douglas, from Auckland the 10th May, with manganese, &c. Passengers - Messrs. Riley and Devlin.

Departures
May 27 - Mary Nixon, barque, Captain McDonell, for the Bay of Islands and Valparaiso, with sundries. Passengers -
Boyd Mr and Mrs
Donovan Mrs and one child
Dwyer Mr and Mrs and three children
Strange Mr and Mrs E and three children
 

May 27 - Mary Nixon, barque, Captain McDonell, for the Bay of Islands and Valparaiso, with sundries.
Passengers -

Adams 		Mr S
Boyd 		Mr and Mrs
Brown 		Mr M
Butler 		Mr
Day 		Mr S.C.
Donovan 	Mrs and one child
Donovan 	Miss
Dwyer 		Mr and Mrs and three children
Hine 		Mr T.B.
Lacourt 	Mr
Lofroy 		Mr
McCarthy 	Mr J
McKellar 	Mr
Nichol 		Mr
Seaman 		Mr C
South 		Mr F
Strange 	Mr and Mrs E and three children

May 31 - Star of China, schooner, Captain Tinley, for Port Nicholson, with sundries.

Passengers - 
Bidwell 	Mr J.G.
Browne 		Mr J
Christian 	Mr J
Mullens 	Mr M and R
Perry 		Mr C

May 29 Exports for Port Nicholson  Star of China
17 boxes candles, 12 boxes currants, 2 cases cheese, 2 bales blankets, 3 cases drapery,
1 bundle cloth, 2 trunk shoes, J Christian;
2 bales canvas, 1 box books G. Thorne;
2 cases thread, 1 case parchment, R. Ford;
3 casks tobacco, E.H. Pollard;
4 kegs brandy, 1 case matches, J.O. Glenham;
30 kegs tobacco, 25 kegs butter, 3 cases lucifers, 89 bags shot, 1 bale and 1 case slops, 2 cases shoes,
5 tierces beef, 13 hogsheads porter, 5 bolts canvas, l bale blankets, 3 cases wine, 1 box soap,
3 cases drugs, 1 bag linseed, 2 bales canvas, 1 case ironmongery, 199 boxes soap, 277 cheeses,
19 kegs and 10 casks nails, 192 iron pots, 4 cases glass, 10 bundles spades, 1 keg percussion caps,
1 cask and 1 bundle ironmongery, 20 boxes soap, 10 kegs nails, 326 bags flour, C. Perry;
1 case saddlery, 2 drays, 2 carts and harness, 23 bags barley, 2 bales blankets,
107 bar and two bundles iron spades, 1 bale haberdashery, 2 packages drugs,
1 package hosiery, 1 box of tin plates, 1 crate earthenware, 1 jar rennet,
58 bars thread, 1 cart, 4 bales hops, 80 sheep, J Giblett;
8 cases haberdashery, 1 bag ginger, 1 bag saltpetre, 20 boxes soap, Rowand, Macnab, and Co.,
3 cases Buyers and Lockhead;
16 half-chests tea, 1 barrel tongues, J. Tinley;

The 'Terror" - The schooner Terror arrived on Saturday evening, from Auckland, having completed the passage up in fifteen days, during which she met with a succession of gales of wind, in which she carried away the head of her foremast, and was thus incapacitated from carrying the whole of her sail. The Terror was built at Coromandel Harbour, and is made throughout with the produce of New Zealand, independent of her rigging. Her sailing qualities are said to be superior, and the cargo now on board of her proves that she is capable of carrying equal to her measurement, viz.- 80 tons manganese, 18 tons dyewood, and 25 cwt flax. Her dimensions are -
length over all, 80 feet;
breadth of beam, 15 feet;
and depth of hold, 10 feet;
On the 10th May, the Terror left a place called Cappo, about twenty miles from Auckland, where the barque Isabella Anna, Captain Beard, had been on shore, but was got off again with no damage; she was loading with timber for Hobart Town when Captain Douglas left there. On the Terror's return from Newcastle she will be coppered, on the Patent Slip.

The Oratava is expected to sail for New Zealand this afternoon with 40 head of cattle and 200 sheep on board.

Arrived at Hobart Town the ship Bella Marina, Asbridge, master from Plymouth 5th February, with a general cargo. Passengers for this place [7 named]

Passengers for Wellington -- 
Bateman 	Mr
Chetham 	Mr
Corser 		Mr
Gledhall 	Mr
Richards 	Mr
Robertson 	Mr
Rowlands 	Mr and brother
Wakefield 	Mr and Mrs, two children and servant

The Strathisla has now all her cattle and sheep on board for Auckland; they have been taken in at the Queen's Wharf. The tame cows were all slung in canvas slings whilst the others were hoisted in by a strap round the neck and one of the fore legs, which prevented strangulation. By this method not one received the least injury, thus proving it far preferable to the barbarous system of slinging them by the horns. The only purchase was a luff tackle suspended from a pendant made fast to the main-topmast head, with an out-haul tackle on the main-yard; the fall being taken through a lead on board, and made fast to a dray on the wharf, which ran the cattle up, with a single horse. The time occupied in hoisting in and lowering each beast did not average more than half a minute.


Volume 1, Number 12 (8 June, 1844)

Arrivals Sydney June 5 - Calypso, brig, 105 tons, Captain Harrold

Beit 		Mr
Betts 		Mr
Bowen 		Mrs and son
Chapman 	Mr
Johnson 	Mr
Moulder 	Mr and Mrs, son and daughter
Nock 		Mr and Mrs, two sons and two daughters
Ogilvie 	Mr
Reitz 		Mr

June 6 - Governor, schooner, 147 tons, Captain Williamson, from Port Nicholson, the 23rd May, in ballast. Passenger - Mr Boulcott.

Departures  Sydney -
June 2 - Oratava, schooner. Captain Hay for Port Nicholson and the South Sea Islands, with sundries, 40 head cattle, 100 sheep, 4 quarter-casks brandy, Boyd and Co.; 1 puncheon geneva, Henry Hay. Passengers - Mr. G.S. Johnstone.

June 3- Strathisla, barque, Captain Simpson, for Auckland. with cattle, sheep, *c. Passengers - Messrs Mars, Lassiter, Mullins, Smith, Hill and Elsington.
June 7 - Thomas Lord, schooner, Captain Brown, for Auckland, and the Bay of islands, with sundaries.

Passengers - 
Carfade 	Mr and Mrs J and two children
Daldy 		Captain
O'Brien 	Mr L.M.
Fligg 		Mr H.
Hayward 	Mr John
Simes 		Mr T

June 8 - Tryphena, brig, Captain Hindmarsh (Horn), for Auckland, with sundaries; 2 bales woollens, 2 boxes cottons, 10 hogsheads brandy, 1 puncheon whisky, 6 tierces tobacco, 80 half-cases Geneva, 2 puncheons and 2 hogsheads rum, 23 casks beer, 144 bags sugar, 3 bales slops, 1 cask salt, 2 cases shirts, 90 boxes and 60 half boxes soap, 2 tons rice, 1 medicine chest, 90 cans linseed oil, 1 hogshead refined sugar, 30 bags sugar, 2 bales blankets, 4 cases port wine, 7 chest 7 half-chests and 3 boxes tea, 3 crates earthen ware, 8 bundles spades, 5 bales oakum, J. Graham and Co.,: 2 cases haberdashery, 1 bale calico, Ray and Glaister; 2 puncheons rum, W.T. Boyce; 1 bale slops, R. Mears, 1 bale calico, J.N. Smith; 1 horse, 1 case slops, 38 bags flour, M. Joseph...

Passengers - 
Buchanan 	Mr	
Hart 		Mr William
Harvey 		Mr and Mrs
Jones 		Mr W.
Murray 		Mr J

The Urgent, from Newcastle, with 76 head of cattle, 5 horses, and 1200 sheep, arrived at Port Nelson the beginning of May, having had a long passage, in which 600 of the sheep died; The schooner I-don't know, left Nelson for Port Nicholson in company with the Calypso, having on board the Roman Catholic Bishop and suite. The whaling barque Juno had been at Port Cooper, where she obtained one right whale. The brig Dawson, Carder, hence 3rd May. arrived in Nelson after a passage of 11 days. Only six sheep died on the passage out of 1100. She was to sail again for Launceston on the 16th ult.

The Urgent, chartered by Mr Beit, arrived yesterday, with cattle and sheep, from Sydney and Newcastle, after a run of thirteen days. Severe weather was encountered. Loss of 600 sheep and 22 cattle. The number on board was 1000 of the former and 76 of the latter. - Nelson Examiner, May 20.

The schooner Scotia left Port Nicholson for Otago on the 20th May, having Mr J. Jones on board as passenger.

Colonial Whalers at Sea: Mary, 368 tons, McDonald, hence, 4th October 1841; at the Bay of Island 24th April, 1844 with 1150 barrels sperm. Hughes and Hoskings, owners.


Volume 1, Number 13 (15 June, 1844)
Departures Port of Sydney - June 8 - Magnet, barque, Captain Lewis, for NZ, with sundries. passenger - Mr J.J. Curtis and Mr Sea.


Volume 1, Number 15 (29 June, 1844)
Departures
June 28 - Bee, brig, Captain Purcell, for NZ and the South Seas, with sundries.


Volume 1, Number 16 (6 July, 1844)
Arrival- July 2- Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Captain Pilfold, from Port Nicholson 6th, and New Plymouth 16th June, with sundries. Passengers: -

Atkinson 	J.W.
Bell 		T
Dixon 		Mr
Donald 		W
Greenwood 	J.D.
Hardiman 	T
Hay 		W
Henlings 	H
Marshall 	Mr
Miller 		J
Mills 		T
Nathan 		Mr and Mrs
Niblett 	C

Departures
July 4 - Hazard, H.M.S., 18 guns, Captain Bell, for Auckland.


Volume 1, Number 17 (13 July, 1844)
Departures
July 6 - Harlequin, schooner, Capt. Cooney, for the Bay of Islands and Tahiti, with sundries. Passengers - Mr Williams and Mr W. Ainsworth
July 11 - Vanguard, schooner, Captain Pilfold for Akaroa, NZ, with sundries; 52 tons flour, 498 mutton hams, 2 casks oranges, W. Donald. Passengers -

Cooper 		Mrs and Miss 
Dickson 	Josiah
Donald 		Mr W. 
Myles 		Thomas

Arrivals Launceston
June 21. Sir John Franklin, schooner, 52 tons, Campbell, from Nelson, NZ. Campbell, agent. 15 cwt flax, 7 cwt. tons copper, C. Campbell. Passengers -

Bray 		Mrs
McHugh 		Mrs
Campbell 	J.H.

Volume 1, Number 18 (20 July, 1844)
Departures:
July 15 - Eleanor, brig, Captain Macfarlane, for Port Nicholson, via Newcastle, with sheep &c. Cargo from Sydney - 14 hogsheads porter, 324 bags sugar, 280 bags flour, 17 cases wine, 4 cases slops, 107 cheeses, 1 scale, 1 beam, 1 set weights, 2 bags rivets, 9 kegs tobacco, 15 cases gin, 30 tons asks, 10 tons shooks, M. Joseph; 1 cask oranges, 1 case lucifers, 1 case pipes, J. Johnson... Cargo to be shipped at Newcastle - 700 sheep, 40 bullocks, 1 horse, 1 ton flour, M. Joseph. Passengers -

Bannatyne 	Mr W
Brown 		Mr W.
Davis 		Mr M
Devonuchelle 	Monsieur
Greenwood 	Mr J.D. (R.D. Greenwood)
Johnson 	Mr John
Jones 		Captain
Joseph 		Mr Israel
Lee 		Mr A.F.

July 9 - Diana, brig, captain Curphey, for the South Sea islands via NZ, with supplies. Passengers -
Darce Mr R
Peppercorn Mr

July 20 - Guide, brig, Captain Addams, for NZ. 1 case slops, 2 bags cheese, R. Taylor; 10 packages oranges, 2 whaleboats, 70 mats rice, 10 boxes candles, 67 boxes soap, 1 case matches, 1 case salt, 6 boxes pipes, 1 case ironmongery, 8 boxes window glass, 2 casks saltpetre, 4 hogsheads coal tar, 2 barrels rosin, 6 tins paint, 1 bale leather, tea, 350 bushels maize, J. Beit....

Passengers - 
Beit 		Mr John
More 		Mr Issac
Peacock 	Mr J.J.
Peacock 	Mr J.S.

Volume 1, Number 19 (24 July, 1844)
Arrived Port of Sydney - July 27 - Star of China, schooner, 100 tons, Captain Tinlay, from Wellington the 6th and Nelson the 14 July, with 19 casks oil, G. Thorne, 15 casks oil Giblet; 1 case apparel James Taylor; 2 bales saddlery, Swain and Co., 5 casks oil, 41 pieces timber, J.O. Glanham, &c. Passengers:

Bidwell 	Mr
Box 		Mr
Bryant 		Mr
Christian 	Mr
Goldsack 	Mr and Mrs and child
Goodard 	Mr and Mrs and three children
Hopkins 	Mr
Howell 		Mr and Mrs
Hunt 		Mr
Kelly 		Mr and Mrs
Lawson 		Mr and Mrs
Nelson 		Mr and Mrs
Pelford 	Mr and Mrs and four children
Post 		Mr and Mr and child
Sheip 		Mr and Mrs and three children
Trabo 		Mr
Wallace 	Mr

Departures -
July 21 - Terror, schooner, Captain Menzies, for Auckland, with sundries.
Passengers -

Abererombie 	Mr R
McLean 		Mr Donald
Martin 		Mr Andrew
Mitchell 	Mr W.
Parker 		Mr, Mrs and Master

Volume 1, Number 20 (3 August, 1844) Page 137-140
Ships in Harbor
Sydney, ship, 345 tons, White, at the Commissariat Wharf. Taking in stores for New Zealand.

Arrivals
2 - Sydney, ship, 345 tons, White, from Auckland on the 16th, and the Bay of Islands the 19th July, in ballast. The Sydney arrived yesterday having been dispatched by the governor of New Zealand for troops, a symptom of rebellion having manifested itself among the natives. It appears that on the 7th ultiomo a native chief named John Hackey, of Waimatte, made his appearance on the beach of Korrorarika with fifty or sixty of his tribe, and having committed different outrages on the settlers, at length cut down the flag staff, and then left for the interior. News being forward ed to the seat of government, Captain Fitzroy instantly dispatched the Sydney with thirty soldiers to the Bay, with orders for further assistance, fearful that being a chief of great influence, Hackey would cause a general insurrection when measures were adopted to bring him to justice. H.M.S. Hazard, hence the 4th July, arrived at Auckland on the 15th, and it was expected that she would leave again for the Bay instanter. The Sydney hauled alongside the Commissarist Wharf yesterday to take in stores for the supply of about one hundred and fifty men of the 58th regiment; and it is generally reported that she will leave again on Monday next.  [spelling sic]

Page 141-144 Letter to Governor Fitzroy from C. Hector, Russell regarding cutting of flagstaff.

Passengers
Brooks 		Mr
Creighton 	Mr
Johnston 	Mr
Stephenson 	Mrs
Wright 		Mr John

The brig Tryphena cleared out at Auckland for Sydney on the 15th July.
The schooner Thomas Lord and the cutter Ranger left the Bay of Islands for Sydney on the 17th instant.

English Shipping
The Victoria, Sinclair, from New Zealand 13th December, arrived at Portsmouth 12th of April.

page 142
The Strathisla and the Thomas Lord, from Sydney, arrived at Auckland via Russell; at the latter port the Mary Nixon, since sailed for Valparaiso, also cast anchor. The ship Sydney, from London via Port Nicholson, was for charter. The cutter Ranger, after an un-precedented passage from Sydney for thirty-six days, quitted her passage for Russell, with fair winds and was a fortnight on her passage, which port successive vessels made in twenty-four hours. She was given up for lost, and the Governor employed a schooner to ascertain her whereabouts. The Caernarvon whaler was refitted at Russell.
The barque Mary Nixon arrived at Taranaki on the 7th of June, after a passage of ten days from Sydney.

Auckland Times, July 9th
The Bangalore which brought Captain Fitzory and took away lieutenant Shortland, no bad exchange by the bye, has been seized and sold at Valparaiso, to satisfy some claims of Mr Barstow. We give the report as we have it, but we must add out doubts about the accuracy of the matter, for we do not know by what means the news could have arrived.

Port Nicholson - Under the head "Nelson," we have announced the arrival of the William Stoveld from Sydney, on her way to London. This vessel it is stated will call her and afford another opportunity of direct communication with home. The Gannett, which was loading at Newcastle for London, and which was to have called here, is stated to have passed through the Straits, homeward bound, about the time the Tyne called in. Port Nicholson Paper.

Volume 1, Number 21 (10 August, 1844) Page 145-148
Arrivals
August 6 - Thomas Lord, Captain Brown, schooner, 70 tons, Captain Brown, from Auckland the 6th and Bay of Islands the 18th July, with sperm oil tuns sperm oil, Donaldson, Dawes, and Co., 4 casks old copper, J. Brown; 2 tons and three-quarters sperm oil; 110 ash oars, Order.

Passengers - 
Bromley 	Mr and Mrs, son and daughter
Clendon 	Mrs
Day 		Mrs and daughter
Edwards 	Mr W and J.
Harvey 		Captain
Harvey 		Mrs, son and daughter

Departures -
August 5 - Sydney, ship, Captain White, for Bay of Islands, in ballast.

Passengers - 
Jackson 	Lieutenant-Colonel 
Leigh 		Lieutenant
Montgomery 	Lieutenant
Reeves 		Major
Wright 		Ensign
and 200 rank and file of the 99th Regiment.

Boyd Town Shipping
Departures
- July 23 -Comet, schooner, Cook, for New Zealand, with cattle.

The Sisters from New Zealand was going up the Derwent.

The Thomas Lord left the Bay of Islands the day before the Sydney, and the following night fell in with a gale of wind. She reports the Ranger having left the same day for Sydney. The barque Stathisla, hence, arrived at Auckland, after a quick passage, which few either of the cattle or sheep died. she left there again, for the South Sea islands, on the 4th June. The cutter Rover's Bride, left Auckland, on the 12th June, for the Island of Anatam, with provisions, &c. for the supply of the brig Brigand, and the settlement formed on that island. The brig Partenia, called at Anatam, in March, with 30 tons sandal wood on board. The chief mate, (Mr William Brown), formerly of the Magnet, died at New Caledonia, on the 6th March, and was buried on shore.

Volume 1, Number 22 (17 August, 1844)
Page 149-152
Ships in Harbour
Coolangatta, schooner, 89 tons, Napper, at Dalgarno's Wharf. Giblett, agent. Loading for Auckland and Bay of Islands.
Departures
August 16 - Ariel, schooner, Captain Preston, for Wellington, with sundries. Passenger - Mr Hopkins.

Rrived Hobart Town
Arrivals - Joseph Albino, schooner, 124 tons, Finnis, master, from New Zealand; sailed 25th July, cargo, general.

Cabin Passengers- 
Baleman 	Mr
Coghill 	Mr
McCartney 	Miss
Rich 		Mr and Mrs and family

Steerage - 
Anderson 	Private
Badden 		Mr
Barr 		Mr
Clare 		Mr. I and son
Eixerman 	Mr P.
Huter 		Mr I and wife
Kempel 		Mr E., wife and two children
Kerber 		Mr H
Lauge 		Mr Courade, wife and five children
McIrvine 	Mr
Mayer 		Mr Davis
Moore 		Mr H., wife and child
Quinton 	Mr and wife and two children
Radell 		Mr F.
Sixters 	Messrs Frederick and Charles
Spinehale 	Mr J.F., wife and child

The Piscator, from Cloudy Bay, New Zealand, arrived at Newcastle on Monday night after a passage of eight days.

The schooner Shamock has been purchased by Messrs Campbell and Co., who intend running her in the New Zealand trade, Captain Brown, late of the Thomas Lord having been appointed to run her.

The Whaling Stations at New Zealand
In June, at Banks Peninsula Price's station had taken 105 tuns, and Jones's 100 tuns; at Waiawite, Jones's party 40 tuns and at Tarree, 60 tuns; at Kapiti, Jallett's 60 tuns; at Cloudy Bay, Dorresty having taken 40 tuns, Thom 40 tuns, and Whelan 40 tuns.

Volume 1, Number 23 (24 August, 1844)
Page 157-160

Arrival -Sydney
August 19 - Tryhena, brig, 131 tons. Captain Hindmarsh, from Auckland the 18th July, with manganese, &c.

Passengers -
Burns 		Mr Thomas
Chambers 	Mr
Elkinston 	Mr
Hallahaw 	Mr
Malpas 		Mr
Marrs 		Mr
Robison 	Mr Charles
Wood 		Mr

Departure - Sydney
August 22- I Don't Know, schooner, Captain Phelps, for the Bay of Islands, with sundries.

Passengers -
Bown 		Mr W.
Munro 		Mr D.G.
Shepherd 	Mr J.
Smith 		Mr H.G.
Thompson 	Mr. W.

August 22 - Maitland, steamer 103 tons, Captain Parsons, from Port Macquarie, with sundries.

Passengers -
Cohen 		Mr H.
Cohen 		Mr A.
McLean 		Mr and Mrs M.
McLeod 		Mr and Mrs Norman
McLeod 		Mr H.
Paterson 	Mrs
Strange 	Mr
Stokes 		Mr

Imports -
August 20 - Tryhena, brig, 131 tons. Captain Hindmarsh, from the Barrier, New Zealand.: 1 case cloves, 4 cases cassia, 2 cases rhubarb; A. and S. Lyons; 1 box clothing, Mrs Wright; 1 trunk clothing Melville and Lambert; 100 tons manganese, 50 tons dye wood, Charles Abercrombie.

Newcastle - Arrived, August 12: From Cloudy Bay, NZ, the 4th instant, the schooner, Piscator, 111 tons, Captain Innen, with 23 tons black oil, 2 tuns sperm oil.

Passengers - 
Clifford 	Mr Joseph
Hudson 		Mr William
Reynolds 	Mr Thomas
Captain Co.

Volume 1, Number 26 (14 September, 1844)  Page 173-176
Sydney Arrivals
Sept. 12 -Vanguard- schooner, 61 tons, Captain Pilford, from Port Nicholson the 22nd August, with black oil. Passengers - Mr Lin and Mr W. Bond.
Sept. 14 - Terror, schooner, 95 tons, CaptainW. Dunning, from the Barrier, NZ, the 2nd instant, with copper ore, manganese &c.

Passengers - 
Abererombie 	Mr R.
Evans 		Mr W. Sparkes 
Mcpherson 	Mr R.C. 
Sparkes 	Mr
Standinger 	Mr

September 14- Sydney, ship, Captain White, from the Bay of Islands the 4th instant, with stores &c.  -

Passengers - 
Jackson 	Lieutenant-Colonel 
Leigh 		Lieutenant
Montgomery 	Lieutenant
Reeves 		Major
Silver 		Assistant-Surgeon
Waldron 	Mr Commissariat department
Wright 		Ensign
9 sergeants
3 buglars
and 154 rank and file of the 99th Regiment.

The Joseph Cripps, from Launceston, arrived in Nelson on the 19th August.

The Oratava had gone on to Akaroa to take in oil for Sydney. H.M.S. Hazard had touched Port Nicholson, with Captain Fitzroy and his Private Secretary o board; having landed the latter, she sailed for Auckland and the Bay of islands. The brig Guide had gone on to Queen Charlotte's Sound. The Nelson from London, arrived at Port Nicholson on the 18th ultimo. The Bella Marina was taking oil, &c. for London. The schooner Deborah was about to leave for Nelson for New Edinburgh. The barque Raymond, from London, arrived at Taranaki on the 29th August, after a passage of 115 days. The brig Diana left Auckland on the 2oth August, for Mercury Bay and Tahiti. The Sydney had arrived at the Bay, but had not landed any troops, matters having been amicably arranged with the natives. The barque Bolina was loading at Auckland for England, Captain Daldy, late of the Shamrock, having taken command of her. Captain Fitzroy had declared the Bay of Islands to be a free port from the 1st of the present month.

The brig Amelia, Captain MacDougall, from Sydney, via New Zealand, was totally lost in the Straits of Bernardio on the 30th April; all hands had arrived safely at Manila in the long boat.
With much regret we announce the death of Captain Bell, of H.M.S. Hazard. On account of indisposition he was advised to remain in Auckland. With a view of improving his health, Captain Bell availed himself of the opportunity of going to the Bay of Islands by the Government brig. On Thursday evening went on deck, accompanied by the steward, when the latter, in consequence of blowing out of the light, was obliged to return for another. During the interval that elapsed captain bell fell overboard; the watch gave the alarm, but no effective efforts appear to have been made to save the life of the unfortunate officer, although he repeatedly called for assistance, and endeavoured to save himself by swimming. After a lapse of ten minutes, a boat was lowered, and he was taken aboard alive, but insensible, and much exhausted; and no proper attempts appear to have been made to restore animation, until it was too late. Captain Richards, the commander of the brig, was unhappily ashore when the accident occurred. Captain Bell was a brother of Colonel Bell, the late member for Northumberland. He was a well-informed, kind-hearted and generous officer, much beloved by all who knew him. His remains were interred with due solemnity in the Church-yard of Russell. He left a widow but no children - Southern Cross, August 17.

Volume 1, Number 28 (28 September, 1844)
Page 181-184

Clearances - Sydney
Sept. 17 - Tryhena, brig, Hindmarsh, for Auckland, with sundries.

Passengers - 
Bricknell 	Mr
Heydn 		Mr J.L.
Owen 		Mr G.

Sept. 20 - Wanderer, 131 tons, schooner, Captain Burns, for Port Nicholson, via Newcastle with cattle, loading at Morley and Steele's Wharf &c.

Passengers - 
Mason 		Mr Thomas
Phillips 	Mrs
Wallace 	Mr Robert

Volume 1, Number 28 (28 September, 1844)
Page 181-184
Arrivals - Sydney
Sept. 22- Star of China, schooner, 112 tons, Captain Tinley, from Port Nicholson, the 1st and Port Nelson the 7th Sept. with oil, wool, flax, &c.

Passengers - 
Bell 		Mr
Franklin 	Mr and Mrs
Mansell 	Mr
Marshall 	Mrs and two children
Webster 	Mr and Mrs
Williams 	Mr and Mrs

Departures -from Sydney
Sept. - 22- Tryphena, brig, for Auckland, with sundries. Passengers- Mr G. Owen, Mr Bricknell and Mr J. L. Heydin

Sept. 29 - Wanderer, for Port Nicholson. Passengers - see Sept. 20.

The Star of China has been about six weeks absent from Sydney, during which time she has been a fortnight at Port Nicholson and six days at Nelson. The Ariel from Sydney arrived at Port Nicholson on 1st September. The Oaotara also arrived there and was coming to Sydney via Nelson. The barque Magnet had been at Otago, and had proceeded to the adjacent stations to take oil for Sydney. The brig Guide arrived at Port Nicholson on the 24th August, from Sydney via Nelson. The schooner Joseph Cripps left Nelson on the 3rd, and the schooner Deborah on the 7th Sept., both for Launceston. The German emigrant ship Skiod arrived at Nelson on 2nd September.



Volume 1, Number 29 (October 5, 1844) Page 189-192
Latest Intelligence received in Sydney up to present date.
From New Zealand …… 7th September

Ships in Harbour (p 189)
Star of China, schooner, 113 tons, Tinley. At the Circular Wharf. J.Giblett, agent. Loading for Port Nicholson and Nelson.
Terror, schooner, 95 tons, Dunning, at Milne's Wharf. C.Abercrombie, agent. Taking in cattle for New Zealand.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilford, in the Cove. Eccleston and Hirst, owners. Advertised for Port Nicholson.

Arrivals (p 190)
October 2 - Harlequin, schooner, 62 tons, Captain Cooney, from the Bay of Islands the 14th September, with oil, flax, timber, &c.

Passengers -
Mr and Mrs Gahagan, two sons, and two daughters. 
Right Rev. Dr. Pompalier and man servant. 

October 3 - Proteus, barque, 254 tons, Captain Gale, from the Sperm Fishery, with 680 barrels sperm oil.

Departures
September 30 - Thomas Lord, schooner, Captain S?werkrop, for Tongataboo via Auckland, with sundries.

Passengers - 
Mr S Bawtree
Mr A Cooper
Mr Lewis Fulman
Mr A Pennie.

October 2 - Nelson, barque, Captain Spurling, for the Whale Fishery, with whaling gear, &c. Passenger - Master Spurling.

Imports

October 3 - Juno, barque, 212 tons, Captain Hayes, from the Whale Fishery : 600 barrels black oil, 3 tons whalebone, B. Boyd and Co.
October 3 - Harlequin, schooner, 62 tons, Cooney, from the Bay of Islands : 4½ tons of black oil, 2½ tons of flare, 6 casks slush, 3000 feet cowrie timber, P. Cooney; 3 casks sperm oil, 550 lbs. Old copper, 3 barrels slush, W. Dawes; 7 tierces beef, R. Milne.
October 4 - Proteus, barque, 254 tons, Captain Mulloney, from the whale fishery : 680 barrels sperm oil, A. Fotheringham.

Boyd Town - Arrivals -
September 17 - Juno, Hayes, from the whaling grounds.
September 28 - Comet, schooner, Cork, from Port Nicholson; which vessel reported the total loss of the barque Magnet, Captain Lewis, belonging to Sydney; at Akarraka, on Bank's Peninsula. The crew and passengers were saved with the exception of one seaman, but none of the cargo was recovered. Mr J. Jones, and Mr Curtis, were passengers on board at the time, and proceeded on to Port Nicholson afterwards in the Comet. The wreck of the Magnet was sold for £4 sterling.

Boyd Town - Departures -
September 17 - Industry, schooner, Wood, for the Whaling Grounds, with 200 barrels black oil.
September 21 - Fame, barque, Sergeant, from the Whaling Grounds, with stores, &c.
Juno, barque, Hayes, for Sydney, with oil.

THE 'JUNO', WHALER.
Charge of insubordination, revolt, and conspiracy.
The Police Court was employed for about five hours, on Saturday last, investigating a charge of insubordination, revolt and conspiracy, preferred by Captain Hayes, of the whaling barque Juno, against eleven of the crew of the said vessel. Mr John Dillon, who conducted the case for the prosecution, commenced the proceedings by an address to the Bench, in which he pointed out the necessity of protecting ship owners and the officers in command of vessels belonging to this port, from having their interests sacrificed by the unlawful conduct of the men on board their vessels at sea, particularly those engaged in the whaling trade. He then gave an outline of the charge against the men before the Court, which, as it came out in the evidence, was as follows: - In the early part of the year, the barque Juno. Captain Hayes, sailed from Sydney, on a whaling voyage, having on board a crew of upwards of thirty men. On the 6th ultimo, when within a few days' sail of Twofold Bay, one of the prisoners, named Morris, was washing the decks about seven o'clock in the morning, and when the Captain appeared on deck, commenced grumbling very loudly, about having to wash the deck at that time; on which the Captain spoke to him on the impropriety of using such language, when Morris became very insolent; on which he was ordered to go forward and scrape the top-gallant forecastle, as a punishment for his insolence; but instead of doing as ordered, he went below, and refused to come up when the Chief Officer called him. The Captain and Chief Mate then went below to compel him to come up and go to his work, when Morris seized a broad axe, and threatened to use it against them if either the one or the other of them endeavoured to lay hands on him; and at the same instant, all the other prisoners began abetting him, and stating their determination to resist his being interfered with in any way; and one of them, a man of colour, threatened, with his clenched fist, to strike the first who laid hands on Morris. The whole of them were then ordered on deck to assist in getting the vessel put in order, as there was a great deal to do to her, in consequence of her having been subjected to several days' bad weather before the row with Morris began; but all of them peremptorily refused to do anything whatever to assist the rest of the crew in working the vessel. In consequence of this determination they were confined below, and orders given for no more rations to be given to them, except bread and water, till they returned to their duty; but they persisted in demanding rations, at the same time refusing to work; and carried their insubordination so far, that the Captain was under the necessity of allowing them to be on deck during the day-time. The Chief Officer was also directed to inform them, that if they would return to their duty all would be forgiven; but they persisted in refusing to do any duty, assigning as a reason that their rations were not served out to them; the Chief Officer then told them that the instant they resumed their duty their rations would be given them, and a quantity was even served out, and they were ordered to hand along some water; but after getting the rations, they again declined to work. Under these circumstances, Captain Hayes felt himself necessitated to bear up for the nearest port, Twofold Bay, where the agent of Mr.Boyd, the owner, went on board and gave them the alternative of leaving the vessel there, or being brought on to Sydney as prisoners, on board the Juno. To have the matter investigated. They preferred coming to Sydney, and as there were neither arms nor irons on board, they were secured and kept in irons by the agent's order until the vessel left the bay, the irons were however taken off within twenty-four hours of the vessel getting under sail; and on her arrival in Sydney, they were handed over to the police. Mr.Brenan, who appeared for the prisoners, before the case was called on, applied to have the prisoners admitted to bail, and to have it postponed till Monday; but the Court considered the charge as one of too serious a nature to allow any of the prisoners bail, until it was investigated. The defence set up by the cross-examination of the Captain and the Chief Officers, the only witnesses examined, was that while the vessel was at New Zealand, one of the crew, a Frenchman, had been subjected to corporeal punishment; but, in explanation, it was sworn that the cause of his being punished was getting drunk and embezzling the ship's stores; another defence set up was, that of being overworked; but it was sworn that merely the work necessary to be done had been directed to be done, in consideration of the fatigue the men were subjected to in the boats in searching the bays for whales. The only other defence set up was, that bad provisions had been served out; but the Captain and Mate both swore that when these were complained of, others, without limitation, were served out instead of what had been damaged.

(p 191)

Mr. Dillon having stated that, in his opinion he had adduced sufficient evidence to authorize the Bench in committing the prisoners; when the Bench enquired whether he had any evidence to prove that the prisoners had endeavoured to solicit any of the other men on board to join them, so as to make out the charge of conspiracy. Mr. Dillon, in reply, stated that he had; but he thought that the case for committal was so clear, that he did not deem it necessary to bring the witnesses forward; but if the Bench deemed it requisite, he would have evidence to prove that part of the charge to the satisfaction of the Bench. The Bench deemed it necessary that evidence of the conspiracy would be adduced. Mr. Windeyer enquired of Mr. Brenan whether he claimed to be heard for the prisoners, as a matter of right, or as a favour. Mr. Brenan replied, that he wished to be heard, in order to save the time of the Court; as, although he could only be heard by sufferance, yet each of the prisoners had a right to be heard, which the Bench could not deprive them of. Mr. Windeyer admitted the truth of Mr. Brenan's statement; but reminded him that it was the practice of the Bench, when a prima facia case for committal was made out before it, to inform prisoners and their advocates, that they might reserve what they had to say until they appeared before another Court, which generally saved more time than hearing a single advocate. The Bench then ordered the prisoners to be remanded till Tuesday. Mr. Brenan applied to have the prisoners admitted to bail; but the Bench refused application, on the ground that the charges of which evidence had already been given, and that of which evidence was promised to be adduced on Tuesday, if substantiated would probably be followed by consequences of a much more serious nature that the prisoners contemplated. They were then remanded in custody of the police.

The case was closed on Tuesday, by the examination of the third mate and three of the crew, in order to prove that the prisoners had advised others of the crew to give up working until they, the prisoners were released. After the case was closed, Mr. Dillon stated that Mr. Robinson, for Mr. Boyd, had instructed him to apply to have the case summarily disposed of, as, if this was possible, Mr.Boyd did not wish to press the case further against the prisoners than what was necessary for demonstrating to seamen the state of the law, and to give warning to others that if they ventured to act as the prisoners had done, that the law was stringent enough to punish them for it; what had weighed most with his client in bringing the case before the Court to the extent he had done, was the necessity of affording protection to the commercial interests of the port. By the disobedient and disorderly conduct of the prisoners, the owners of the Juno had already been subjected to a loss of upwards of £1500, and if the case was much longer delayed that loss would be greatly augmented, as it was necessary if the case was to go before the Supreme Court, that the depositions would be forwarded with as little delay as possible to the Attorney-General, otherwise a delay of three months would be caused by the case standing over till January criminal sessions. Mr. Windeyer did not consider that the Bench had any power to deal summarily with a felony, which was the charge against the prisoners. It was one of those offences until the late mitigation of the law subjected offenders to the punishment of death, and now if convicted they would be punished by transportation or imprisonment. As the case stood at present, the Court would adjourn it till Wednesday, in order to hear Mr. Brenan for the prisoners, on the subject of bail, for as at present advised, the Court might be of opinion that there were such differences of guilt against the prisoners that to some bail might be allowed, but refused to the others. As to delay, it was not likely to take place, because, for anything yet shown before the Court, the whole of the depositions might in twenty-four hours be in the hands of the Attorney-General, who would have ample time to get the case brought on for trial before the Criminal Court which sits next week. The prisoners were then remanded till Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Mr. Brenan appeared on behalf of the prisoners, and in an address, which lasted about an hour and a half, contended that no charge of revolt had been made out against them; that the utmost of the charge was that they had been guilty of insubordination, and that only by allowing that they had disobeyed the lawful commands of the captain, who, he contended, had not exercised due caution, nor displayed such prudence as a captain of a vessel, situated as he was, ought to have exhibited. There was nothing in the evidence which showed that the prisoners contemplated piracy, which was the amount of the charge against them. In order to show the law of the case, Mr.Brenan cited largely from Tomlin's Law Dictionary, Abbott on Shipping, and the sixth volume of Carrington and Payne's Reports, and submitted that the proper mode of punishing them was by mulcting them of their wages; moreover, he offered to stake his existence that if they were committed no conviction would take place. The Court did not consider it necessary to hear Mr.Dillon in reply, and committed all the prisoners to take their trial for endeavouring to excite a revolt on the high seas. The names of the prisoners are George Scott, Richard Morris, James Campbell, Henry Moore, and Benjamin Wilson. The following were also committed, but allowed bail, each in £80, with sureties in £40 :- James Smith, Henry Watt, Charles Crawford, Thomas Neilson, and Timothy Cole.
-----

Volume 1, Number 29 (5 October, 1844) page 191
The Proteus left Sydney 15th August, 1842, and met with good success until the 17th February last, when she put into Cyrus Harbour, in the Island of Roto, with 1060 barrels of sperm oil on board. After taking in wood and water, she left again 6th March all well; but two days after, sickness made its appearance, supposed to have been caused from the heat of the sun whilst going forward and back to the ship. Two of the crew named John Ramsden and Roberts, first fell victims to the disorder, having died in a few days. On the 15th March, Thomas Francisca, a native of Manila, also expired and on the 18th, Thomas West, a New Zealander. March 20th, Captain Christal, Mr T. Wilson, chief officer, Mr T. Smith, second officer and eight of the crew were taken sick and confined to their berths. March 25th having stood for the harbour of Bangowangie to obtain medical assistance, the vessel came to an anchor and the captain and chief officer were taken on shore; the second mate died about 9.20pm the same day. They remained in this port about a month, during which Capt Christal, Mr Wilson, James Rolings, boatsteerer, John Hooper, carpenter and Charles Goodman, a seaman, all died, and were interred. The charge of the ship now devolved on Mr Maloney, the third officer, and being quite out of medicine and provisions, he took her on to Sourabayia, where she refitted, and 380 barrels of oil were afterwards landed to defray the expenses. As Mr Maloney was the only navigator on board, the Dutch Government and the agents of the Insurance Office appointed Captain Gale to the command of her, who was the chief officer of the Nereiad, lying at Batavia. Previous to their touching at Roto, a seaman called John Ramsden, and a New Zealander, died with the small pox. During the whole time the Proteus has been at sea, she has not spoken a single Sydney whaler. She left Sourabayia on the 29th June, called off Anjer, and obtained some refreshments but did not hear of any vessels passing there.

Newcastle- The schooner Wanderer sailed for New Zealand on Saturday last, with 38 head of cattle, 150 sheep, &c., and the Urgent was to leave for Port Nelson the following day, with 100 head of cattle, after which she would proceed on to Manila. On Thursday sen'night several sperm whales were seen cruising off Newcastle Heads, within two miles of the shore, much to the annoyance of an old spouter, who seemed to wish no better sport than a smart whaling vessel to heave in sight, capture them, and render them down. From the description given of them, relative to their spouting and sounding, it was supposed they were from 70 to 80 barrels each. After playing about for an hour or two they shaped their course southward. The ship Urgent had left Newcastle for New Zealand when the Maitland touched there yesterday morning. The Cheerful has had rather a protracted passage, having met with a continuation of light and contrary winds; she spoke nothing connected with these colonies, but saw a sail off Twofold Bay, supposed to be a whaler.

The schooner Coolangatta, from Sydney the 21st August, arrived at Auckland on the 1st September. The Harlequin spoke nothing on the passage up, but left the following vessels at the Bay of Islands:- The whaler Caernarvon, having undergone a thorough outfit, was ready for sea; the American vessels Lancaster, 26 months out, with 2400 barrels; and the William Tell, 16 months out, with 600 barrels.

12 October 1844 Pg 193

Latest intelligence received in Sydney up to the present date.
From New Zealand …… 14th September.

Ships in Harbour
Ariel, schooner, 104 tons, Preston, at Fotheringham's Wharf. Fotheringham, owner. Loading for Port Nicholson.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilford, at the Queen's Wharf. Eccleston and Hirst, owners. Advertised for Port Nicholson, Nelson, and Auckland.

P 194

Arrivals
October 7 - Ariel, schooner, 104 tons, Captain Preston, from Port Nicholson the 17th September, with 40 tuns black oil, &c.

Passengers :- 
Mr Curtis
Mr Dempster
Miss Hatton
Captain Hay
Mr Levi
Mr Lewis
Mr Robinson
Mr Seagrove
Mr Watson
And four of the crew of the Magnet.

October 8 - Soverign, steamer, 119 tons, Captain Cape, from Moreton Bay, the 4th instant, with sundries.
Passengers:-

Mr Archer
Captain Coffin
Mr Irvine
Mr Rostron
Mr W. Thompson
And thirteen of the crew belonging to the American Whaler Thule.

Departures
October 6 - Terror, schooner, Captain Dunning, for Auckland, with sundries.

Passengers -
Mr Andrews
Mr Chalmers
Mr Falconer
Mr and Mrs Jones and child
Mr Ross
Mr Taylor
Mr John Thomas
Mr Willis

October 6 - Surprise, ship, Captain Miller, for the Whaling Grounds, with gear, &c.
October 11 - Star of China, schooner, Captain Tinley, for Port Nicholson and Nelson, with sundries.

Passengers -
Mr J. Hopkins
Mrs Tinley and child

October 12 - Piscator, schooner, Captain Kemp, for Nelson via Newcastle, with cattle, sheep, &c.

Passengers -
Mr William Hudson
Mr William Prentice

Imports
October 9 - Ariel, schooner, 104 tons, Capt. Preston, from Port Nicholson.

Exports
October 3 - Surprise, ship, Captain Miller, for the Whaling Grounds: whaling stores, gear, &c.
October 5 - Terror, schooner, Captain Dunning, for Auckland.

P195
October 9 - Star of China, schooner, Captain Tinley, for Port Nicholson and Nelson.

MORETON BAY (from a Correspondent.)
October 3 -
The following particulars of the loss of the American whaling ship Thule, from Nantucket, Coffin, master, out twenty-seven months, with 1050 barrels of sperm oil on board, have been communicated to me by Captain Coffin, who arrived at this port, in company with his second and third mates, and thirteen hands, on the 20th ultimo, in two of the boats belonging to the ship:- The Thule left Rotamah near two months since, with the intention of fishing on this coast, and putting into Sydney about Christmas for refreshments. They made the Mineroo Reefs, or Booby Shoals, on the 10th ultimo, and stood off during the night; at two p.m. they tacked, and again stood towards the reef, supposing they would again sight them at daylight, and run through; but unfortunately at 4.30 a.m. she struck, the current having in two hours set them, with astonishing rapidity, off their course. No time was lost in getting the boats lowered down, but the bow boat was knocked to pieces before she could be cast off from the davits. A few minutes after she struck, the second mate, Mr. Neale, cut away her masts; but from the heavy manner she was striking against the side of the shoal all hopes were abandoned of getting anything out of her; in fact, so rapid did the vessel break up it was found impossible to save even a cask of water. In less than an hour after she struck the bottom was out of her, and the oil forced its way up to the surface of the water. The Captain got into the boat - almost in a state of nudity, saving only his chronometer, a chart, and a few other small articles; the whole of the crew were also obliged to abandon everything, on their finding it useless to remain by the wreck any longer. Three boats, containing twenty-four souls, shoved off, intending to keep company until they made Moreton Bay; but unfortunately the mate, Mr. Nicholson, parted company with his boat during the following night, and has not, up to this time, reached the Bay. The Captain, with the third mate, (Mr. Harris, formerly master of the Lady Blackwood, of Sydney, and since chief officer of the Genii,) got first into the Bay after being six days at sea. The second mate and his crew were also as fortunate; they suffered dreadfully for want of water, but had all their wants supplied on making a station belonging to the German Mission, near the entrance of the Brisbane River. The master and a portion of the crew, take their passage per steamer to Sydney; the inhabitants of Brisbane have contributed their mite towards relieving the wants of the destitute seamen, each being furnished with a new shirt, trousers, shoes, blanket, and one pound of tobacco. I am sorry to say we have had no intelligence of the missing boat, containing the chief officer and seven hands; it is feared they have landed on the main to the northward of this, and been surprised by the blacks, who are a cruel and revengeful race, ever ready to commit mischief. Captain Coffin, I believe, is part owner of the Thule, and has insured for the hull, but not for cargo, consequently will be a severe loser. He reports the Tigress, of Sydney, at Rotomah, with 700 barrels of sperm; and the Hecla, of America, with 1000 barrels of sperm, bound home through Torres Straits; and the Cora, of America, with 1000 barrels. The Potamac, American, was about going to Sydney for refreshments.

P196
Loss of the Magnet.
An extract from a letter received by the owners of the barque Magnet, from Mr J. J. Curtis.
"The loss of the Magnet on Tuesday morning, 3rd Sept. about 3 o'clock, on the coast south side of Banks Peninsula, near Cerackia, in a sudden S.E. gale. We went on a reef of rocks. Had kind assistance from Mr Cria, at the nearest whaling station who at daylight on top of his look-out-hill observed the wreck, and immediately came down and got hold of the poor fellows in the surf, many would have perished. As we jumped out of bed we came ashore, losing everything in the world.".

Captain Lewis, Mr. Seagrove, chief officer, and the crew of the Magnet, have arrived in Sydney by the schooner Ariel. From Mr. Seagrove we have been favoured with the following account of the loss of that vessel :- "August 31st. Left Akaroa harbour with a light breeze from the N.W.; at 6 p.m. brought up at Ecolacke, a whaling station on the south side of Bank's Peninsula, and anchored in ten fathoms water, with fifty fathoms of the small bower chain, the head of the bay where the station was, bearing N.N.W. distant about one mile and a half. Put the slip buoy on the chain, double reefed the topsails, and furled sails; everything being prepared for slipping in case the wind should come in. Sunday, September 1st. Light N.W. winds, and fine weather; busily employed taking in oil and bone for Port Nicholson, on account of Mr. J. Jones. September 2nd. Calm and pleasant weather; employed as the preceding day; at eight bells set the anchor watch, with orders to call the Captain and myself at midnight, there often being a change of weather at this time; went on deck, and found there was a light N.W. wind off the land, with every appearance of a continuation of fine weather. At three in the morning, a sudden shift of wind from the N.W. to S.E., which came like a clap of thunder; turned the hands up immediately, loosed the topsails and set them, found the vessel was bringing in towards the land, slipped the chain and stood in towards the long beach that formed the bight, under the courses, double-reefed topsail, and mizzen; when well in, tacked ship and stood to the eastward, thinking to fetch a harbor called Perack, the vessel burying herself with the press of sail, and the sea running mountains high. Finding it was impossible to get out on account of the vessel missing stays, occasioned by the heavy sea, and being in by a bluff head, squared the after yards, and ran in to the first opening for the preservation of the lives of those on board. About a quarter after four in the morning we struck on a hard stony bottom; cut the whaleboat on the skids adrift, and got her into the water with four hands; but having been stove under the quarter, they were compelled to return on board. We then thought it advisable to stop by the wreck until daybreak, hanging on by the weather mizzen rigging, this being the only safe place, as the sea was running fore and aft the decks. At break of day, myself and one of the crew got into the weather quarter boat, this being our only resource; watched the smooth of the sea, and lowered the boat, with two single lines, having one fast on board and the other in the boat, thinking to haul her from the shore to the ship and back again, in the event of our landing in safely. Providentially, this was accomplished, and the boat was then hauled back towards the wreck, when we found the line on shore too short, and were compelled to let it go, being up to our waists in water. The boat then got foul of the main yard, when one of the hands on board got into her; after which Mr. J. Jones, Mr. J.J. Curtis, and Captain Lewis, got into her from the mizzen boom with two others of the crew, and reached the shore in safety. The ship was by this time breaking up fast, and the remainder of the crew got ashore by different parts of the wreck, with the exception of William Davis; assistance having been rendered from the shore by Mr. Price and one of his men. Three hours after the ship first struck, she was completely in pieces, forming a complicated mass of rigging, chains, spars, oil casks, and whalebone. The cargo on board consisted of 50 tons of oil, and 9 tons of whalebone; together with a quantity of slops, and £350 cash, Mr. J. Jones being the chief loser. We received the greatest kindness from Mr. Price at the whaling station, likewise from the people in Wellington, especially from Mr. Joseph and Mr. Sea.

--------

The schooner Elizabeth arrived on Tuesday from the Richmond, with a cargo of cedar, and a portion of the wreck of the Clarence whaler. On the 9th September, she spoke the barque Mary, McDonald, between Wreck Reef and Cato's Shoal, with 1400 barrels of sperm oil on board, and two whales alongside, which they were then cutting in and trying out.

Whaling News. - The Lady Blackwood, Captain Butcher, from Sydney, 23rd June, 1843, put into Port Stephens on the 7th instant, with 320 barrels sperm oil on board. The owners have sent orders for her to come on to Sydney to refresh, to enable her to proceed on the voyage; some of the crew being sick with scurvy. She has not seen any whalers since last reported.

The "Australian". - Captain Coffin, late of the American whaler Thule, reports the Australian, Captain Willes, at Ocean Island, in May last, with 750 barrels of sperm oil on board. She was then eleven months out, having left Sydney on the 14th June, 1843. Captain Willes intended proceeding on to Strong's Island to refresh, after which he would cruise on the line.

New Zealand. - By the arrival of the Ariel, we have received the following news from New Zealand :- Captain Wakefield had returned from Nelson to Port Nicholson per schooner Sisters, having paid off all the labourers around Nelson, in accordance with peremptory orders received from the New Zealand Company. A meeting of the chief settlers in Nelson had been held for the purpose of employing those who were suddenly thrown out of employment. The schooner Oratava was at Cloudy Bay on the 21st September, and was about to leave for Sydney, via Nelson. The Raymond was about to proceed along the coast to load for London. The brig Eleanor had left for Akaroa and Pakaki, to load with oil for Sydney.

The Seamander was to leave in the course of the week for the whaling grounds.


26 Oct 1844 (p205)
Latest Intelligence received in Sydney up to Present Date.
From New Zealand …. 26th September.

(p206)
Arrivals.
October 26 - Shamrock, schooner, 85 tons, Captain Brown, from Auckland 28th September, and the Bay of Islands the 9th October, with oil, &c.

Passengers -
Brown 		Mr
Conolly 	Mr
Darling 	Mr
Jones 		Mr
Maher 		Miss
McLean 		Mr
Sims 		Mr
Smith 		Mr and Mrs and six children
Western 	Mr
Williams 	Mr

(p207)
The brig Henry, Captain Tregurtha, from Launceston, had arrived at Auckland before the Shamrock left. The Carnarvon, whaler, was lying at the Bay of Islands and would proceed to the Whaling Grounds in a few days. The Nelson, from London, was lying at New Plymouth. The natives at the Bay had resumed their depredations: John Heke had called an assemblage of the neighbouring tribes, and had sent word to the inhabitants of the township that they should visit them in a day or two, and cut down the flag-staff again. They had been at Captain Wright's station, and stolen eight horses. Another party had broken into the jail, and robbed the jailer of money and wearing apparel. At Waiamate, the tribe belonging to the chief William Ripper, had also commenced their depredations; five of them broke into the house of a person called Smith, during the night, and not contented with taking the bedding and other moveable articles, broke open the chest, and either carried off or destroyed the contents.

Central Criminal Court - The Juno -
William Carnegie, Henry Moore, James Campbell, George Smith, Timothy Call, Thomas Nelson and Henry Watt, under committal for a revolt on board the barque Juno, were overally discharged by proclamation on Saturday last.

(p208) Imports.
October 21 - Jane, barque, 356 tons, Fairweather, from the Whale Fishery: 820 barrels sperm and 6 barrels black oil.

October 21 - Lady Blackwood, barque, 253 tons, Butcher, from the Whale Fishery, 300 barrels sperm and 20 barrels black oil; Lamb and Parbury.

Colonial Whalers at Sea (With their last Reports)
Mary, 368 tons McDonald, hence 4th October 1841 spoken by the Elizabeth, 9th September 1844, with 1400 barrels sperm and two whales alongside; Hughes and Hosking, owners.

Caernarvon, 220 tons, Irvine, hence 22nd August 1842; at the Bay of Islands, 16th September; refitting. Irvine owner.

Jane Eliza, 419 tons, Bradley, hence 7th March 1843; touched at Tahiti in July, with 300 barrels; H. Moore, owner.

Merope, 313 tons, Hogg, hence 26th March 1843, spoken in June 1844, with 500 barrels; Blaxland, owner.

Tigress, 192 tons, Eury, hence 10th May 1843; reported at Rotumah with 700 barrels sperm; Hughes and Hosking, owners.

Australian, 300 tons, Wiles, hence 14th June 1843; at Ocean Island, May 12th 1843, with 750 barrels sperm; Cooper and Holt, owners.

Lindsays, 200 tons, Williamson, hence 15th June 1843; left Port Stephens 9th September 1844, with 700 barrels sperm; Williamson, Mitchell and Russell, owners.

Clarkstone, 244 tons, Stewart, hence 13th September 1843; spoken by the Jane, 6th instant, with 1000 barrels sperm. H. Moore, owner.

Woodlark
, 243 tons, Smith, hence 24th September 1843; spoken by the Lindsays 4th July, with 610 barrels sperm oil on board H.Moore, owner.

Seamander, 230 tons, Nixon, hence 6th October 1843, put into Port Stephens 14th September 1844, with 600 barrels sperm; Mitchell and Co., owners.

British Sovereign, 365 tons, Cooper, hence 5th November 1843' left Port Stephens 12th September 1844, with 370 barrels sperm, 50 barrels black; Lamb and Parbury, owners.

Terror, 257 tons, Harper, hence 24th December 1843, at Twofold Bay, 23rd October with 200 barrels sperm, 400 barrels black. B.Boyd and Co., owners.

Fame, - tons, Sargeant, from Twofold Bay 8 October, spoken on 22nd October with 80 barrels black oil. B. Boyd & Co., owners.

Bright Planet, 187 tons, Kyle, hence, March 20th; Mitchell and others, owners.

Jane, barque, 250 tons, Fowler, hence 28th April 1844; spoken by the Nimrod, 9th June with 30 barrels sperm; Flower, Salting and Co., owners.

William, 344 tons Bolger, hence 19th June 1844; at the Bay of Islands, 8th August clean; B. Boyd and Co., owners.

Nimrod, barque, 232 tons, Sullivan, hence July 25, 1844. Lamb and Parbury, owners.

Nelson, barque, 274 tons, Spurling, hence 2nd October 1844. Fotheringham, owner.
--------

Vessels Expected in Sydney from New Zealand.
Scotia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward.
Orotava, schooner, 92 tons, Hay.
Terror, schooner, 95 tons, Dunning.
Star of China, schooner, 113 tons, Tinley.
Guide, brig, 147 tons, Addams.
Tryphena, brig, 131 tons, Hindmarsh.
Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Burns.
Coquette, schooner, 72 tons, Rogers.

BOYD TOWN.
Arrivals -
October 1 - Mary Ann. Brig, Lindsays, from the Whaling Grounds, seven months out from Hobart Town, with 600 barrels black oil.
Adelaide, schooner, Gay, from the Whaling Grounds, fourteen days out, from Hobart Town, with 112 barrels black oil.
October 6 - Prince of Denmark, from the Whaling Grounds, four weeks from Hobart Town, with 80 barrels black oil.
October 19 - Terror, barque, Harper, from the Whaling Grounds, with 200 barrels sperm and 400 barrels black oil, having left Sydney 2nd December 1843.
October 22- Shamrock, steamer, Gilmore, from Port Phillip and Launceston, reported the Fame, fourteen days from Boyd Town with 80 barrels black oil on board.

Departures -
October 2 - Adelaide, schooner, Gay, for the Whaling Grounds
October 4 - Mary Ann for the Whaling Grounds.
October 10 - Comet, schooner, Cork, for Port Nicholson, with cattle.
October 11 - Prince of Denmark, schooner, for the Whaling Grounds.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA - THE HALYCON. (p209)
The Halcyon, American whaler, wrecked at the Vasse, will be sold on Tuesday the 3rd proximo, as she lies, two miles from Toby's Inlet, with all her masts, running rigging, sails, tryworks, gear &c. also 1000lbs whalebone and 600 barrels of oil. This will afford a fine opportunity for speculators, as the whole, with the exception of the bone and oil, it is understood must be disposed of without reserve. It is anticipated there will be but little competition, the money of our capitalists being employed in various pursuits calculated to forward and promote the productive industry of the colony. It is said, that the Insurance Companies in America have declined insuring vessels destined for the bay whaling on our coast; but it may be questionable whether this will have the effect of preventing vessels from resorting to our shores, as their profits will fully cover all risk. The vessel now a wreck, with another, which rode out the gale, - both, as we are informed, the property of one owner, - had taken, in the course of a very short time, whales yielding upwards of 125 tons of oil, and of course, a considerable quantity of bone. - Perth Gazette, August 14.

LOSS OF THE AMERICAN WHALER CERVANTES.
This vessel was wrecked in Jurien Bay, about 100 miles to the northward of Fremantle. She was anchored for the purpose of fishing, but a sudden gale of wind coming on, before the necessary preparations could be made to get a fair offing from the coast, she was driven on a sandy beach. It is reported she has received no further injury than breaking her back but the difficulty of any repairs being effected at so great a distance from the port, has left to the announcement of the sale of the wreck, and the properties contained in the Bessel. The ship had been out from America only a few months, and had taken about ten barrels of oil. Some of the seamen made their way to Fremantle, and communicated the untoward event to the Government Resident, R. M. Brown, Esq., who is understood to be the Consul for the American Government, the men were provided for, and assistance was sent to Jurien Bay, to secure every protection to the property, and to afford relief to those who were considered to be suffering under the calamity. The sale of the wreck, it is anticipated, will realize but little, although, under more favourable circumstances of the colony, it might be made available for bay whaling, as all the gear, tryworks &c., on the spot. - Perth Gazette, June 20. (The wreck was sold in the first week of July, for £155 cash, and the chronometer for £23.)

Photo taken by Irene in Sept. 2007.

Photo of the sign at the town of Cervantes, West Australia. In 1844, Western Australia was largely uninhabitated - the survivors of the shipwreck had to trek to the nearest town (Fremantle) 100 miles to the south. The present town of Cervantes is not large, and was not started until the early 1960s. It has one tavern, one petrol station, one general store and several others. Mining is booming in West Australia, and quite a few miners have holiday homes (some beautiful new homes) in the town. Photo and note courtesy of Irene, Oct. 2007.

The American whaler William Tell put into Fremantle on the 22nd May, for provisions; seven months out, with 500 barrels on board.


2 Nov 1844
(p 213)

Latest Intelligence
Received in Sydney up to present day
From New Zealand …. 26th September.

(p214)
DEPARTURE.
October 30 - Ianthe, American ship, Captain Woodberry, for the Bay of Islands, with part of original cargo.

Passengers -
Rogers Master
Rogers Mr R.S

----------

The barque Jane, Captain Fairweather, is about to discharge her oil at Jones Wharf, after which she will be refitted for another whaling expedition.

(p 215)
The John Williams reports the following: Lat 39? 37' S. long. 48? 58' E, spoke the American ship Portland, of Sag Harbour, out on a whaling voyage, and bound to New. Zealand.

WHALING NEWS -
The whaling barque Eamont, of Hobart Town, Captain Scott, put into Jervis Bay, on the 26th September, with 70 tuns black oil. The American whaler London Packet, of New Bedford, put in there on the 18th October, with 800 barrels black oil. The brig Grecian, of Hobart Town, put into Jervis Bay on the 26th October, with 70 tuns black and 12 tuns sperm oil; also, the schooner Industry, of Hobart Town, with 10 tuns black oil.

The First Whalers from Hamburgh [sic] -
A Hamburgh letter states - "The first whaler ever fitted out at this port has just sailed for the South Polar Seas. She is called the Anseat, and measures 650 tons. The crew have engaged to abstain from spirituous liquors, and to be content with two rations of coffee a day. It appears that temperance is much more necessary on board whalers than any other ships; it having been proved by experience that nine-tenths of the diseases and deaths on board the Danish and Swedish whalers have been caused by the excessive use of spirituous liquors."

(p216)
IMPORTS
October 28 - Shamrock, schooner, 85 tons, Brown, from Auckland and the Bay of Islands.

EXPORTS
October 28 - Ianthe, American ship, Captain Woodberry, for the Bay of Islands.

Vessels Expected in Sydney from New Zealand. (p 219)
Scotia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward.
Orotava, schooner, 92 tons, Hay.
Terror, schooner, 95 tons, Dunning.
Star of China, schooner, 113 tons, Tinley.
Guide, brig, 147 tons, Addams.
Tryphena, brig, 131 tons, Hindmarsh.
Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons. Burns.
Coquette, schooner, 72 tons, Rogers.
Eleanor, brig, 253 tons, Macfarlane.
Piscator, schooner, 111 tons, Kemp.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilfold.

CAUTION TO MARINERS - Sunken rock between Capiti [sic] and Port Nicholson. -
The following is an extract of a letter received at Devonport from an officer on board H.M.S. North star, and transmitted to Lloyd's:-
"New Zealand, February 10, 1844, H.M.S. North Star, Port Nicholson.
We have been knocked about shockingly on this boisterous coast - nothing but gales of wind. We had a very narrow escape last Wednesday on our passage from Capiti to this place with his Excellency, having nearly run on a rock that has been improperly laid down in the charts. We were within sixty yards of it, going nine knots in a gale. Had we struck, nothing could have saved us but the interposition of Divine Providence. The following are the bearings, as taken the moment we passed. We could not see it (although every one at his station and in mid-day), owing to the sea being one sheet of foam. Our log says:- 'Passed close to a sunken rock two feet under water, and with the white rocks S.W. by S. Outer island of the Brothers, S.E. by S., see chart of Cook's Straits.' It does not appear that the actual existence of this rock is known, though since our escape it is said that it has several times been reported to have been seen. We intend, if possible, to survey the rock when we leave, which we do in a few days, for Stuart's Island, Hobart Town, and Sydney." - United Service Gazette, June 15.


9 November 1844
(p221) Latest Intelligence received in Sydney up to Present Day-
From New Zealand …. 26th September, 1844

(p222) Arrivals.
November 8 - Columbus, American barque, 313 tons, Captain Hutchins, from the whale fishery, having been seven months and eight days from New Bedford.

Departures.
November 4 - Cooloongatta, schooner, Capt. Napper, for Auckland.

Passengers -
Beattie 	Mr
Guff 		Mr R
Haswell 	Mr
Mill 		Mr John
Wright 		Mr

Clearances.
November 6 - Juno, barque, Captain Hayes for the whaling grounds.

(p224) Exports
November 2 - Coolangatta, schooner, Captain Napper, for Auckland.
November 6 - Juno, barque, Captain Hayes, for the whaling fishery.

Vessels Expected in Sydney from New Zealand.
Scotia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward.
Oratava, schooner, 92 tons, Hay.
Terror, schooner, 95 tons, Dunning.
Star of China, schooner, 113 tons, Tinley.
Guide, brig, 147 tons, Addams.
Tryphena, brig, 131 tons, Hindmarsh.
Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Burns.
Coquette, schooner, 72 tons, Rogers.
Eleanor, brig, 253 tons, Macfarlane.
Piscator, schooner, 111 tons, Kemp.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilfold.

(p225) Vessels Laid on for New Zealand.
Caledonia, 489, Case, August 1.
Slains Castle, 504, Petrie, October 1.

Coastal Whalers at Sea.
Mary, 368 tons, McDonald, hence 4th October 1841; spoken by the Elizabeth, 9 September 1844, with 1400 barrels sperm and two whales alongside; Hughes and Hosking, owners.
Caernarvon, 220 tons, Irvine, hence 22nd August 1842; at the Bay of Islands, 16th September; refitting. Irvine owner.
Jane Eliza, 419 tons, Bradley, hence 7th March 1843; touched at Tahiti in July, with 300 barrels; H.Moore, owner.
Merope, 312 tons, Hogg, hence 26th March 1843, spoken in June, 1844, with 500 barrels sperm; Blaxland, owner.
Tigress, 192 tons, Bury, hence 10th March 1843; reported at Rotumah, with 700 barrels sperm; Hughes and Hosking, owners.
Australian, 300 tons, Wiles, hence 14th June 1843; at Ocean Island, May 12th, 1843, with
750 barrels sperm; Cooper and Holt, owners.
Lindsays, 200 tons, Williamson, hence 15th June, 1843; left Port Stephens, 9th September, 1844, with 700 barrels sperm; Williamson, Mitchell and Russell, owners.
Clarkstone, 244 tons, Stewart, hence 13th September 1843; spoken by the Jane, 6th instant, with 1000 barrels sperm. H. Moore, owner.
Woodlark, 243 tons, Smith, hence 24th September 1843, spoken by the Lindsays 4th July, with 610 barrels sperm oil on board; H. Moore, owner.
Salamander, 230 tons, Nixon, hence 6th October 1843, put in Port Stephens, 14th September 1844, with 600 barrels sperm; Mitchell and Co., owners.
British Soverign, 365 tons, Cooper, hence 5th November 1843, left Port Stephens 12th September 1844, with 370 barrels sperm, 50 barrels black; Lamb and Parbury, owners.
Terror, 257 tons, Harper, hence the 24th December 1843, at Twofold Bay, 23rd October with 200 barrels sperm, 400 barrels black. B. Boyd and Co., owners.
Fame, - tons, Sargeant, from Twofold Bay, 8th October, spoken on the 22nd October with 80 barrels black oil. B. Boyd, and Co., owners.
Bright Planet, 187 tons, Kyle, hence, March 20th; Mitchell and others, owners.
Jane, barque, 250 tons, Fowler, hence 28th April 1844; spoken by the Nimrod, 9th June, with 30 barrels sperm; Flower, Salting and Co., owners.
William, 344 tons, Bolger, hence 19th June 1844; at the Bay of Islands 8th August, clean; B.Boyd and Co., owners.
Nimrod, barque, 232 tons, Sullivan, hence July 25, 1844. Lamb and Parbury, owners.
Nelson, barque, 274 tons, Spurling, hence 2nd October, 1844. Fotheringham owner.

English Shipping-
The Tyrian
, from New Zealand, arrived home on the 3rd July.

(p226)
Dangerous Reefs in the South Pacific Ocean -
The following important information has been received at New Bedford, from the American consul at the Bay of Islands:- "I have obtained information of three dangerous rocks in juxta position with the Contis Islands in the South Pacific Ocean: the position of these rocks lit directly in the track of ships cruising from Spain, while in lat. 31 14.long. 178 3, bearing E.N.E. by compass from the French Rock 85 miles distant: said to be 12 feet of water on the first, but no breakers were discovered on it. The second rock lies in lat 31 13, long, 179, W., bearing W.N.W. of the French Rock 10 miles distant, just a wash with the surface of the sea and breaks high in boisterous weather. The third was observed in lat 31 29 S., long. 178 28 E. bearing W. from the French Rock about 133 miles distant, and heavy breakers on it in rough weather." - Times, July 18.

The Missionary ship, JOHN WILLIAM and it's departure - p223 columns 2/3


23 Nov 1844 (p234)
Latest Intelligence received in Sydney up to Present Date
From New Zealand ….16th October.

Arrivals.
November 20 - Orotava, schooner, 91 tons, Captain Hay, from Port Nelson the 16th October, and Port Hardy the 3rd November.

Passengers -
Johnston 	Mr
Lester 		Mr and Mrs and Son
Murray 		Mr and Mrs and Son and Daughter

Departures.
November 20 - Columbus, American barque, Captain Hutchins, for the Whale Fishery, with stores.

(p235)
HOBART TOWN
Arrivals.
November 8 - John Pirie, schooner, 105 tons, H. Simpson, master, from New Zealand, sailed 8th October, with 4 male convicts.

Steerage Passengers -
Bartlett 	George
Chamring 	J
Denby 		P and Wife
Fraser 		Hugh
Hickbottom 	C and Wife and two Children
Phillips 	G
Rowe 		J and three Children
Ryan 		R
Steel 		Mr and Miss
Tomlinson 	G and Wife
Townshend 	J
-----

The Terror, from Sydney 24th December 1844 [sic] [should be 1843], was off the Heads at the time of our going to press, with 500 barrels black and 200 barrels sperm oil.

The schooner Orotava left Port Nelson on the 12th October for Sydney, but was compelled to return through stress of weather; she finally left there on the 16th October, and touched at Port Hardy. On the 3rd instant she left that port in company with the schooner Sir John Franklin, which vessel was not in sight on the following morning, and Captain Hay fears that she went on shore in the night near Cape Farewell; she had on board thirty-three passengers for Launceston.

The Urgent, from Newcastle, arrived at Nelson on the 13th October.

The following vessels had been at Pigeon Bay from the 29th August 1844:-
Romulus, Holdredge, twenty-seven months out, 2400 barrels black and 80 barrels sperm;
San Crois
, Paulsen of Hamburgh, twenty-two months out, 150 barrels sperm and 1850 barrels black;
Wallaby, Gardner, Hobart Town, five months out, 650 barrels black and 500 barrels sperm;
Eamont, Lovett, four months out, 650 barrels black;
Marianne, Lindsay, five months out, 300 barrels black;
Fortitude, Bailey, four months out, 900 barrels black;
Joanna, Chamberlain, of Hobart Town, six months out, 650 barrels black;
Cheviot, Mansfield of Hobart Town, four months out, 800 barrels black;
Terror, Harpur, Boyd Town, eight months out, 230 barrels sperm and 400 barrels black;
Juno, Hayes, Sydney, six months out, 600 barrels black;
China, Potter, (in Akaroa), 1100 barrels black and 500 barrels sperm;
Favourite, Young, American, five months out, 500 barrels sperm and 500 barrels black.

(p236)
COLONIAL WHALERS AT SEA (With their last Reports)
Caernarvon, 220 tons, Irvine, hence 22nd August 1842; at the Bay of Islands, 16th September; refitting. Irvine owner.
Jane Eliza, 419 tons, Bradley, hence 7th March 1843; touched at Tahiti in July, with 300 barrels; H. Moore, owner.
Merope, 312 tons, Hogg, hence 26th March 1843, spoken in June 1844, with 500 barrels; Blaxland, owner.
Tigress, 192 tons, Eury, hence 10th May 1843; reported at Rotumah with 700 barrels sperm; Hughes and Hosking, owners.
Australian, 300 tons, Wiles, hence 14th June 1843; at Ocean Island May 12th 1843 with 750 barrels sperm; Cooper and Holt, owners.
Lindsays, 200 tons, Williamson, hence 15th June 1843' left Port Stephens 9th September 1844, with 700 barrels sperm; Williamson, Mitchell and Russell, owners.
Clarkstone, 244 tons, Stewart, hence 13th September 1843; spoken by the Jane 6th instant with 1000 barrels sperm. H Moore, owner.
Woodlark, 243 tons, Smith, hence 24th September 1843, spoken by the Lindsays 4th July, with 610 barrels sperm oil on board; H. Moore, owner.
Seamander, 230 tons, Smith, hence 24th September 1843, put into Port Stephens 14th September 1844, with 600 barrels sperm; Mitchell and Co., owners.
British Sovereign, 365 tons, Cooper, hence 5th November 1843; left Port Stephens 12th September 1844 with 370 barrels sperm, 50 barrels black; Lamb and Parbury, owners.
Fame, - tons, Sargeant, from Twofold Bay, 8th October, spoken on the 22nd October with 80 barrels black oil. B.Boyd, and Co., owners.
Bright Planet, 187 tons, Kyle, hence, March 20th; Mitchell and others, owners.
Jane, barque, 250 tons, Fowler, hence 28th April 1844' spoken by the Nimrod, 9th June, with 30 barrels sperm; Flower, Salting and Co., owners.
William, 344 tons, Bolger, hence 19th June 1844; at the Bay of Islands, 8th August, clean; B. Boyd and Co., owners.
Nimrod, barque, 232 tons, Sullivan, hence July 25, 1844. Lamb and Parbury, owners.
Nelson, barque, 274 tons, Spurling, hence 2nd October 1844; Fotheringham, owner.


VESSELS EXPECTED IN SYDNEY
From New Zealand
Scotia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward.
Terror, schooner, 95 tons, Dunning.
Star of China, schooner, 113 tons, Tinley.
Guide, brig, 147 tons, Addams.
Tryphena, brig, 131 tons, Hindmarsh.
Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Burns.
Coquette, schooner, 72 tons, Rogers.
Eleanor, brig, 253 tons, Macfarlane.
Piscator, schooner, 131 tons, Kemp.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilfold.
Coolangatta, schooner, 88 tons, Napper.

(p237)
AN ACCOUNT OF THE SEISURE OF THE BRIGANTINE HANNAH
At Chatham Islands by William Ellis and others, whilst on a trading and whaling voyage to New Zealand and the islands in the South Pacific.

(p238)
SAILING DIRECTIONS FOR ENTERING PORT OTAGO; OR, NEW EDINGBURGH.
(From a letter of Captain Hay, of the schooner Orotava, to Lloyd's agent, at Wellington.)
-----
The Terror left Twofold Bay on Sunday last, and has come in to discharge. The only vessels reported by her are - the Fame, about six weeks since, a few days from Twofold Bay, with a right whale alongside; November 1, spoke the Marion of Hobart Town, eight months out, with 600 barrels oil; American whaler London Packet, eleven months out, with 250 barrels sperm and one right whale; and the Eamont, of Hobart Town, oil on board not ascertained.

(p239)
The Mary. The following vessels were spoken at sea by Captain Macdonald:- December 3, 1843, the barque Winslow, of New Bedford, thirty-nine months out, 1350 barrels sperm oil. December 23, 1843, The ship James Loper, of Nantucket, fourteen months out, 400 barrels sperm oil. The American ship Christopher Mitchell, of Nantucket, twenty-seven months out, 1000 barrels sperm oil. January 18, 1844, La Grange, of Fairhaven. 27 January, 1844, the Emeline, of London, clean. February 7, the Alpha, of Nantucket, twenty-one months out, 1999 barrels sperm oil. February 17, saw the Mars, of New Bedford. March 15, the Arabian, of London, fifteen months out, 1650 barrels sperm oil. May 21, boarded the colonial whaler Caernaven, twenty-one months out, 500 barrels sperm oil; the Caernarven was lying at anchor in Pharoa Bay. July 3, the United Kingdom, of Liverpool, bound to Bombay. July 21, the American whaler Cora, of New Bedford, thirty-six and a half months out, 100 barrels sperm oil.

OIL CASKS -
Commodore Berard, of the French corvette Le Rhin, has sent the following communication to the New Zealand Gazette respecting the method adopted at Akaroa for plying oil casks:- "I caused a cask to be made thirteen English feet long, and rather more than three feet at its greatest diameter, to hold about 714 gallons, and to contain a calf whale. This cask has now been full of water for more than one month, and has not yet leaked a drop. The wood we have made use of is the kawia or gowal. Mr Clark, an English cooper, for some time established at Akaroa, is the person who pointed it out to me as the best for this purpose. He has already made, for the fisheries on this part of the coast, a great number of casks of this wood, and assures me they have answered perfectly well, inasmuch as no leakage of oil has taken place. The kowal is a mimosa, common in the Middle Island - the elianthus puniceus of the celebrated botanist Allan Cunningham. It grows generally near the sea shore, or on the banks of rivers, where it is found of great size; but those are not the best kinds, for it is remarked that the old trees of this species are nearly all rotten at the heart. This wood splits extremely well and very straight. Thus Mr Clark obtains his staves with ease, by merely splitting the trunk. But for our cask, the staves of which are very long, we have found it impossible to use this cheap method, and have sawed the trees into planks about four inches wide, and 1¼ inch thick; and, as we have used them at once, it has not been found necessary to heat them in order to bend them. Mr.Clark, however, informs me that to make smaller casks he used fire to render the staves flexible. In splitting the kowai, it is to be observed that there are two woods of different colours, one brownish red and the other yellow; the first is always the best and solidest, and if possible this only should be made use of. Nevertheless, a small portion of the yellow part may be left if it should be hard; otherwise water, and much more oil, will filter through it. When it is necessary to use these mixed staves, attention should be paid to placing them in the upper part of the cask, near the band, for there the pressure of the liquid is less."


30 Nov 1844 p241
Latest Intelligence Received in Sydney up to Present Day
From New Zealand ….10th November.

P242 Arrivals.
November 23 - Terror, barque, 257 tons, Captain Harper, from the Whale Fishery, with 500 barrels of black and 200 barrels of sperm oil, having left Sydney on the 24th September, 1843.

November 24 - Potomac, ship, 356 tons, Captain Hussey, from the Whale Fishery, having left Nantucket 14th November 1841, with 2200 barrels sperm.

November 24 - Lady Leigh, schooner, 116 tons, Captain Reid, from Port Nicholson the 8th and Queen Charlotte's Sound the 12th instant, in ballast.

November 27 - Tryphena, brig, 131 tons, Captain Hindmarsh, from Auckland the 29th October.

Passengers -
Aldwell 	Mrs and son
Caudlin 	Mr J.
Godfrey 	Colonel
Hughes 		Mr
Johnson 	Dr.
Lackey 		Mrs
Salter 		Mrs and child

November 27 - Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Captain Burns, from Port Nicholson the 1st, and Queen Charlotte's Sound the 10th instant.

Passengers -
Asher 		Master
Asher 		Mr M.
Boulton 	Mr
Harvey 		Mr P.M.
Hayes 		Dr.
Inglis 		Mr W.
Mason 		Mr T.
McQuade 	Mr Edward
Neale 		Mr W.
Parker 		Mr W.
Phelps 		Mrs
Toms 		Mrs and child

November 27 - Eleanor, brig, 253 tons, Captain Macfarlane, from Port Nicholson the 4th, and Port Nelson the 10th instant.

Passengers -
Abbut 		Mrs and son
Boyes 		Mr
Burns 		Mr and Mrs and son
Carter 		Mr
Dillon 		Mr E.
Faithful 	Mr
Harvey 		Miss
Heath 		Mr Jacob
Henesy 		Mr
Jolis 		Mr
Joseph 		Mr Israel
Ladbrook 	Mr and Mrs and daughter
Leaths 		Mr
Moulen 		Mr
Molesbong 	Mr T. and two daughters
Parker 		Mr S.E.
Price 		Mr
Roge 		Mr W.
Scott 		Mrs and daughter
Smith 		Mr W.
Tatler 		Mr
Wansey 		Mr
Wetherby 	Mr
Wilkinson 	Mr
Youlden 	Miss

November 29 - Star of China, schooner, 100 tons, Captain Tinley, from Port Nelson the 15th instant.

Passengers -
Alexander 	Miss
Allen 		Mrs
Beit 		Mr
Cowley 		Mr
Drake 		Mr
Green 		Mr
Hemmings 	Mr George
Hill 		Mr and Mrs
Hindson 	Mr
Musgrave 	Mr
Parkinson 	Mr
Perry 		Mr
Sandford 	Mr
Scott 		Mr
Sparks 		Mr and Mrs and son and daughter
Spooner 	Mr and Mrs and daughter
Stubbs 		Mr
Tinley 		Mrs and son

November 30 - Terror, schooner, 107 tons, Captain Dunning from Auckland the 4th, and Kawau the 13th November.

Passengers -
Falkner 	Mr
Munro 		Mr and Mrs and two children
Taylor 		Mr

Imports.
November 25 - Terror, barque, 257 tons, Captain Harper, from the Whale Fishery: 16 tuns sperm oil, 43 tuns black oil, and 15 cwt. Whalebone.
November 25 - Lady Leigh, schooner, 118 tons, Captain Reid, from Port Nicholson, with 7 barrels pitch, 1 case sperm candles, 1 package cooking utensils, 1 case of models, F. Mitchell and Co.
November 27 - Wanderer, schooner, 131 tons, Captain Burns, from New Zealand; Cargo from Port Nicholson and from Queen Charlotte's Sound.
November 9 - Typhena, 131 tons, Captain Hindmarsh, from Auckland.
November 29 - Star of China, schooner, 100 tons, Tinley, from Nelson and Wellington, New Zealand.

P243 SOUTH AUSTRALIA
(From Port Phillip Gazette, November 23.)
The brig Prince Albert, Captain Rant, returned from New Zealand, with part of original cargo.

NEW ZEALAND
Auckland. Arrivals.
October 21 - Thomas Lord, schooner, Captain Süwerkrop, from Sydney, the 29th ultimo, and from the Bay on Saturday last, with a general cargo.

Passengers -
Bawtree 	Mr
Cooper 		Mr
Fulman 		Mr Levien
Pennie 		Mr

October 22 - Terror, schooner, Dunning, from Sydney.

Passengers -
Anderson 	Mr
Chalmers 	Mr
Falconer 	Mr
Jones 		Mr Thomas, wife and child
Ross 		Mr
Taylor 		Mr
Willis 		Mr

October 22 - Coquette, schooner, Rogers, from Sydney and Russell.
Passenger - Barrett Mr

October 25 - Raymond, barque, Hugh McKay from Wellington 7th October.

Passengers - 
Griffin 	Mr
Marsden 	Mr
Tudor 		Mr

Departures.
October 22 - H.M.S.Hazard, Robertson, Esq., commander, for Wellington, Nelson and New Plymouth, with His Excellency the Governor.

October 24 - H.M.S.North Star, Sir Everard Home, for Russell and Port Arthur.
Passenger - Wood Mr

October 26 - Terror, schooner, Dunning, for Walheke and Sydney.

Passengers -
Falconer 	Mr
Taylor 		Mr

October 28 - Tryphena, brig, Hindmarsh, for Sydney.

Passengers -
Godfrey 	Colonel
Johnson 	Dr.

October 28 - Henry, brig, Tregurtha, for Launceston

Passengers -
Brown         	Mr
Palmer     	Mr        

The Thomas Lord spoke the whaling ship Niantic, of Sag Harbour, off the north-east end of New Zealand; - all well, and bound to the east coast on a whaling cruise.

PORT NELSON.

Arrivals.
October 29 - Vanguard, brigantine, 61, Pilford, from Sydney 17th October general cargo.

Passengers -
Buckland 	Mr
Coffin 		Captain, late of the American whaler Thule.
Lauglin 	Mr
Levin 		Mr J.H.
Ling 		Mr

October 30 - Piscator, brigantine, 111, Kemp, from Newcastle 22nd October : cattle.

Passengers -
Hemming 	Mr
Hudson 		Mr
Prentice 	Mr

Departures.
November 2 - Urgent, ship, 408 tons, Thompson, for Manila.

Passengers -
Cooper 		Mr J.H.
Wilson 		Mr A.

November 2 - Piscator, brigantine, 111 Kemp, for Manila.

November 3 - Vanguard, 61 Pilfold, for Wellington, general cargo from Sydney.

Passengers -
Buckland 	Mr
Coffin 		Captain, late of the American whaler Thule.
Laughlin 	Mr
Levin 		Mr J.H.
Ling 		Mr

November 5 - Lively, cutter, 32, - , for the Moutere.

November 8 - Catherine Johnstone, cutter, 11, Taylor, for Wanganui, general cargo.
-----

LAUNCH - A splendid barque was launched on the 14th instant, from the yard of Mr Williamson, Battery Point, Hobart Town, purchased by Messrs. Nathan and Co. she was named by Mrs Nathan Henriette Nathan, as she glided gracefully and beautifully from the slips into the water. She is to be employed in the whaling trade.

The Eleanor has brought a valuable cargo from New Zealand, which consists of 112 tons black oil, 6 tons whalebone, 87 chests tea, 49 cases raisins, 30 casks vinegar, 40 casks cement and 13 casks plaster of Paris. The schooner Comet, from Twofold Bay, with cattle, arrived at Port Nicholson on the 26th October. The Star of China, was to leave Port Nelson for Sydney direct on the 12th instant; also the Thomas Cripps, for Launceston. The Eleanor saw a schooner on Monday last, supposed to be the Wanderer.

The Sisters left Port Nicholson for Nelson and Hobart Town on the 8th instant. The Eleanor left Port Nicholson for Sydney via Nelson on the 4th instant. The Star of China left Port Nicholson for Sydney in company with the Lady Leigh and was in Queen Charlotte's Sound, which she left on the 12th instant. The schooner Comet arrived at Port Nicholson on the 26th ultimo.

The Tryphena has had a protracted passage from Auckland, having had to contend with a succession of adverse gales, in which she lost her main yard, and was blown to leeward as far as lat. 28° S. She saw a whaling barque about a week since, but did not speak to her. The Thomas Lord was lying at Auckland, getting a new bowsprit, the other one having been carried away by the Raymond. The brig Nimrod, from the Sandwich Islands, had arrived at the Bay of Islands.

The following vessels are reported by the Potomac:- June 8, spoke the Mary Ann, Bonny, of Fairhaven, 25 months out with 800 barrels sperm; 10th St Peter, Foster, of New Bedford, 22 months out, with 600 barrels sperm; Java, Allen, of St.John's, New Brunswick, 10½ months out, with 50 barrels. At Strong's Island - September 27th, Australian, Wiles, of Sydney, with 900 barrels sperm; October 7th, Margaret, Courtenay, of London, with 1500 barrels sperm; and Seringapatam, of London, with 600 barrels.

The Sisters, from Port Nicholson, arrived at Nelson on the 12th November, and was to sail again a few days after for Hobart Town. The Emily has been laid on the berth for London, and is about to take on board the oil imported by the Terror. It is expected that the Eleanor will fill up with wool for London.


Sydney Shipping Gazette
Volume 1, No. 38 1844 Saturday December 7, 1844
Ships in Habour
Countess of Wilton, schooner, 111 tons, Bowles, at Campbell's Wharf. Campbell and Co., agents. Loading for the Bay of Islands, Auckland, and Tahiti.
Harlequin, schooner, 62 tons, Cooney, at Milne's Wharf. Milne, owner. Loading for the Bay of Islands and Auckland.
Lucy Ann, barque, 213 tons, off the Gas Works Wharf. Lane, owner. Advertised for Hokianga and Bay of Islands.
Lady Leigh, schooner, 118 tons, Reid, at the Circular Wharf. J. B. Metcalfe, agent. Loading for Port Nicholson and Nelson.
Shamrock, schooner, 85 tons, -, at Campbell's Wharf, Campbell and Co., owners. Advertised for Auckland and the Bay of Islands.
Star of China, schooner, 100 tons, Tinley, at the Circular Wharf. J. Giblett, owner. Loading for Port Nicholson and Nelson.
Tryphena, brig, Hindmarsh, at Milne's Wharf. C. Abercrombie, agent. Loading for Auckland.
Hobart Town

Arrivals
American whaling ship France, S. N. Edwards, master, from the Sandwich Islands 11th October, with 2400 barrels oil.
Vessels Loading for England
The cutter Jane and Emma took in her present cargo at Port Frederick, a settlement formed on the River Mersey, about thirty miles to the westward of Launceston. She saw the schooner Sir John Franklin, Captain Campbell, from New Zealand to Launceston, Monday last, off Cape Howe, which vessel had left Twofold Bay two days before, having put in to refresh.
The schooner Comet, from New Zealand, arrived at Twofold Bay on the 28th ultimo; and the schooner Ariel, Captain Lewis, had all her cattle on board, and would sail for New Zealand on Monday.

Sydney Shipping Gazette
Volume 1, No. 39 1844 Saturday December 14, 1844
Ships in Harbour
Lady Blackwood, barque, 254 tons, Cooper, near Pinchgut. Lamb and Parbury, owners. Ready for the Whaling Grounds.
Lucy Ann, barque, 213 tons, off the Gas Works Wharf. Lane, owner. Advertised for Hokianga and Bay of Islands.
Lady Leigh, schooner, 118 tons, Reid, at the Circular Wharf. J. B. Metcalfe, agent. Loading for Port Nicholson and Nelson.
Orotava, schooner, 91 tons, Cooney, at Milne's Wharf. Milne, owner. Loading for Auckland and the Bay of Islands.
Star of China, schooner, 100 tons, Tinley, at the Circular Wharf. J. Giblett, owner. Loading for Port Nicholson and Nelson.
Terror, schooner, 107 tons, Dunning, at Milne's Wharf. C. Abercrombie, agent. Loading for Auckland

Arrivals Sydney
December 12 - Vanguard, schooner, Captain Pilfold, from Port Nicholson the 27th ultimo.

Passengers - 
Blackman 	Mrs 
Dinsdale 	Mr 
Goodall 	Mr 
Johnston 	Mr 
Levien 		Mr J. H.
McDonald 	Mr 
Milsom 		Mr and Mrs 
Sweeney 	Mr

Departures from Sydney:
December 10 - Countess of Wilton, schooner, 111 tons, Captain Bowles, for Auckland, Russell, and Tahiti, with sundries.

Passengers -
Bowles 		Mrs 
Brown 		Mr S. 
Castle 		Mr J. M.
Henry 		Master
Hughes 		Mr 
Jones 		Mr 
Kyser 		Mr
Latham 		Mr 
Simms 		Mr 
Western 	Mrs 

December 11 - Potomac, ship, 356 tons, Captain Hussey, for the Whale Fishery, with stores and original cargo.
December 13 - Tryphena, brig, Captain Hindmarsh, for Auckland. Passengers - Mr Oaks, and Mr J. Riley.

Vessels Loading for London:
The schooner Orotava. Captain Cooney, is about to load for Auckland and the Bay of Islands.
The schooner Terror is taking on board about 50 head of cattle, at Milne's Wharf, for Auckland.
The Vanguard brings little or no news. The Nelson was loading at Port Nicholson for London, to sail on the 11th instant. The Vanguard saw a brig in Cook's Straits on the 28th ultimo, supposed to be the Bee. The schooner I Don't Know, arrived at Port Nicholson on the 25th ultimo, from the Chatham Islands.

English Shipping - The Slains Castle and James Petrie were advertised for New Zealand.
Boyd Town Shipping:
Arrivals - November 20. Sir John Franklin, schooner, Campbell, from Nelson, sixteen days out, called in for supplies. - 26 Comet, schooner, Cork, from Port Nicholson, in ballast.
Departures - December 1. Comet, schooner, Cork, for Port Nicholson, with cattle; Ariel, schooner, Lewis, for Port Nicholson, with cattle.

Vessels in Sydney Harbour -
India

The Tuscan, from New Zealand, arrived at Singapore, on the 21st August.

Vessels Expected in Sydney from New Zealand
Scotia, schooner, 72 tons, Ward
Guide, brig, 147 tons, Addams
Coquette, schooner, 72 tons, Rogers
Coolangatta, schooner, 88 tons, Napper
Bee, brig, 134 tons, Unthank

Sydney Shipping Gazette
Volume 1, No. 40 1844 Saturday December 21, 1844

Ships in the Harbour
Lucy Ann, barque, 213 tons, off the Gas Works Wharf. Lane, owner. Advertised for Hokianga and Bay of Islands.
Orotava, schooner, 91 tons, Cooney, at Milne's Wharf. Milne, owner. Loading for Auckland and the Bay of Islands.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilfold, at Wilson's Wharf. F. Mitchell, agent. Loading for Port Nicholson.

Departures
December 15 - Star of China, schooner, Captain Thomas Tinley, for Port Nicholson and Port Nelson.

Passengers -
Sandford 	Mr
George 		Mr
Higgins 	Mr

December 15 - Lady Blackwood, barque, Captain Cooper, for the Whale Fishery.

Passenger - Cooper	Mrs

December 15 - Terror, schooner, Captain Dunning, for Auckland.

Passenger - Wemyss 	Mr

December 17 - Lady Leigh, schooner, Captain Reid, for Port Nicholson and Nelson.

Passengers - 	
Clark 		Mr
Fraser 		Mr
Green 		Mr
Hervery 	P. M.
A New Zealander

Exports
December 14 - Lady Blackwood, barque, Captain Cooper, for the Whale Fishery: stores and whaling gear.

Sydney Shipping Gazette
Volume 1, No. 41 1844 Saturday December 28, 1844

Ships in the Harbour - Sydney
Lucy Ann, barque, 213 tons, off the Gas Works Wharf. Lane, owner. Advertised for Hokianga and Bay of Islands.
Orotava, schooner, 91 tons, Cooney, at Milne's Wharf. Milne, owner. Loading for Auckland and the Bay of Islands.
Vanguard, schooner, 61 tons, Pilfold, at Wilson's Wharf. F. Mitchell, agent. Loading for Port Nicholson.

Arrivals Port of Sydney
December 25 - Miltilda, ship, 483 tons, Captain Bliss, from the whaling grounds.
December 26 - Bee, brig, 134 tons, Captain Unthank, from Port Nicholson the 8th, and Kaffia the 12th December.

Passengers - 
Albion 		Mr
Brown 		Mr
Chapman 	Mr
Duke 		Mr
Grant 		Mr
Haynes 		Mr
Smith 		Mr
White 		Mr

Vessels Laid on for these Colonies
For New Zealand - Slains Castle, 504, Draw-on, October 1

The brig Nelson, left Port Nicholson for London, on the 7th instant, with the following passengers -

Atley 		Mr
Birch 		Mr
Durie 		Mr
Ebden 		Mr
Evans 		Dr
Ling 		Mr B
Winning 	Mrs
Woods 		Mr
Young 		Mr and Mrs

Cargo - 83 tuns black oil, 11 tons whalebone, 13 tons tanning bark, 16 logs totara, 90 tamai staves, 46 logs mairi, 57 logs mai, and 4 logs rimu wood.
The schooner I Don't Know, left Port Nicholson for the Bay of Islands on the 2nd instant; and the cutter Katherine Johnston, sailed for Wanganui on the 4th. The Bee spoke nothing on the passage up.

The English Shipping - The Norwhal, from New Zealand, arrived in the Downs on the 16th September.