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WHO’S WHO AMONG

THE WOMEN OF CALIFORNIA

1922

____________

 

 

Page 55

 

Friday Morning Club

Los Angeles

 

Officers

Mrs. J. A. Osgood, 617 W. Montecito Avenue, Sierra Madre……President Emeritus

Mrs. Andrew Stewart Lobingier, 511 S. Westmoreland Avenue……….…...President

Mrs. Arthur C. Wier, 1030 W. 48th…………………….………….First Vice-President

Mrs. Randall Hutchinson, 2817 Menlo Avenue…………….….Second Vice-President

Miss Helen Louise Kimball, 1801 ½  N. Western Avenue, Hollywood……..Recording

Secretary

Mrs. William Waller Slayden, 4543 Pasadena Avenue…….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Harry R. Callender, 2313 S. Hope……………………………………...Treasurer

 

Directors

 

            Dr. Julia R. Johnson                                                  Mrs. Sarah M. Johnson

            Mrs. H. H. Koons                                                      Miss Therese Levy

            Miss Elizabeth Pepper

 

The purposes of the club are “advancement and promotion of literary, social, and education interests.”  All women of Los Angeles and vicinity are eligible to membership.  The club motto: “In essentials, Unity; in non-essentials, Liberty; in all things, Charity.”

 

The club was founded April 16, 1891.  Madame Caroline M. Severance was elected president and the meetings were held in the parlor of the Hollenbeck Hotel.  It was incorporated in 1892 and joined the General Federation of Women’s Clubs the same year.  It sent delegates to the Woman’s Congress at the Chicago Fair in 1893, and in 1900 became a member of the State Federation.

 

On January 12, 1900, the eightieth birthday of Madame Severance, the club celebrated the opening of the clubhouse, at 940 South Figueroa Street.  At present these quarters are proving inadequate to the needs of the club and a new building upon the same site is contemplated.

 

The regular weekly meetings of the club are devoted to subjects of general interest along the lines of art, literature, science, or public affairs, and the programs are given by speakers of nations and international fame in these several lines.  Thus the club has welcomed to its platform during the past thirty years many famous men and women.  The morning meetings are followed by a luncheon at 12:15 o’clock to which visitors of note are invited and are asked to speak.

 

The Standing Committees include those of Art, Music, Literature, Drama, Public Affairs, House, and Hospitality.  Meetings of the Literature, Drama and Public Affairs Committees are held once a month on Tuesdays.

 

 

Through its Public Affairs Committee, the club keeps in touch with all progressive movements of the day, municipal, state, and national, and both in forming public opinion and by aiding all measures aimed toward social betterment it takes an active part in civic matters.  The club administers many philanthropies and fosters education by material means.

 

An eight-page bulletin is issued each month, and a yearbook at the close of the season.

 

 

Mrs. Sarah M. Johnson,

Chairman of Literature.

 

 

 

Page 57

 

Woman’s City Club

 

Los Angeles

 

Officers

 

Mrs. James Bert Streans, 2632 Monmouth Avenue………………….………President

Mrs. Emma L. Reed, 1010 W. 10th………………….……………..First Vice-President

Mrs. Frederick Hickok, 1109 Ingraham………………………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. Robert T. Brain, 1440 Albany………………………….……Secretary Treasurer

Mrs. J. A. Osgood, Montecito Avenue, Sierra Madre………….…….Parliamentarian

Mrs. Amy Patry, 1307 N. Avenue 54……………………………………………Auditor

 

Directors

 

Mrs. John T. Coleman           Mrs. Paul E. Flammer           Mrs. John W. Summerfield

 

The Woman’s City Club of Los Angeles is a non-partisan body of women citizens.  The aim of the club is to produce in women alertness of mind and sanity of judgment.

 

We are held together by a common interest in public questions, and we aim to be thoroughly democratic in spirit.  Our great object is Instruction in Citizenship.  Knowledge of public questions is essential to intelligent voting.

 

We do not indorse the sentiments of our speakers; we aim to get their point of view and we reserve judgment.

 

Our aim has been to make our women conversant with current topics from three general standpoints: the economic, the educational and the financial.

 

Intelligent woman citizenship depends on a vari-sided interest in, and understanding of, city, state, national and international affairs.

 

The Woman’s City Club has had a phenomenal growth this past year, adding over seven hundred new members, making a total membership of thirteen hundred.  The membership committee has set the goal for fifteen hundred, and when this is attained the number of new members admitted for this year will have reached over one thousand.

 

This large increase in membership has brought us face to face with a housing problem, and necessity has compelled us to have a home of our own.

 

A Building Committee has been created and plans for a future club house for the Woman’s City Club are taking shape very fast.

 

 

The Woman’s City Club is a civic factor in the community of Los Angeles, and as such occupies first place among the clubs in its earnest and serious consideration of public questions.

 

All of our programs are of an important and vital nature, and are given to us by speakers of authority and world wide reputation.

 

The activities of the club are far reaching, and for this reason we secure the very best talent which is willing to come to us and give their service as a civic contribution.

 

The Woman’s City Club has been in existence eleven years, and during that time has developed a keen responsibility of citizenship among our own members.  This is expressed by a ninety per cent voting average on election day, a remarkable group of intelligent voters, participating.

 

We are endeavoring to make our voting strength one hundred per cent.  This, we feel is the highest type of work that a club can do – developing civic-consciousness and citizenship within its own ranks.  We know that this kind of work is bound to be a power and an influence in the community of which the club is a part.  “By their fruits ye shall know them.”

 

(Mrs. J. B.) Dora Smith Stearns

 

 

Page 61

 

 

Ebell Society

 

Oakland

 

Officers

 

Mrs. William Nat. Friend, 333 Chicago Avenue…………………………..…President

Mrs. Magnum A. Anderson, 246 Mather Street………………….First Vice-President

Mrs. Charles Leonard Smith, 507 Peralta Apartments……….Second Vice-President

Mrs. Henry L. Parish, 277 Park View Terrace……………….….Recording Secretary

Mrs. Elijah H. Steele, 2327 Mitchell……………………………….Financial Secretary

Miss Mary C. Heaton, 4266 Terrace……………………………..…………..Treasurer

Mrs. Richard H. Genung, 216 El Cerrito Avenue…………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Edward R. Sill, 1431 Eleventh Avenue…………….…Secretary of Publications

Dr. Canna S. Aldrich, 476 Rich………………………………………General Curator

 

 

Mary K. Culbertson, first president of the Ebell Society of Oakland wrote a beautiful tribute to the society, to which she gave the title: “My Ambition for Ebell  Here is the tribute, just as she wrote it:

 

“My ambition for Ebell is this:  that from this center shall radiate influences that will broaden, strengthen, elevate and purify women advisedly, for it she be grand, unselfish, strong and pure, man will, inevitably, become so, too.  Are my dreams Utopian? It rests with you whether or not this vision becomes a reality.  If this society shall give some tangible proof of its efficiency, by some practical outcome of all its study, then will it receive honest recognition – and if needful, riches and power.

 

Miss Mary K. Culbertson will long be revered in the Ebell Society of Oakland and her ambition quoted above, in tribute to her memory, reflects the realities to be found, today, in this great, useful, influential and cultural Society of Ebell.

 

The Ebell club house of Oakland has been the setting for some of the most noteworthy events in women’s club circles about the Bay.  Prominent women visiting Oakland are greeted at some special event within the pretty club rooms where hospitality and womanly charm harmonize with the brilliancy and the intelligence of members.

 

The Ebell Society of Oakland is distinctive for the programs of scholarly attainment heard within the club rooms.  A large auditorium, a splendid stage, afford opportunities for the presentation of dramatic work.

 

Study sections, classes in the different languages, lectures, musical studios, and a thorough course of studying current events proclaim the intellectual status of the society.  An original writers’ section, an art, a parliamentary law section, and “Living Issues” pronounce some advanced departments under the supervision of the president, her assisting executives, the chairmen and the department leaders.

 

 

 

Page 63

 

San Diego Club

 

San Diego

 

Officers

 

Mrs. O. J. L. Arsenault, 3902 Ibis Court……………………………………..President

Mrs. Maud Frary, 2166 Park Avenue…………………………….First Vice-President

Mrs. Frank W. Lane, 1832 Granada Avenue…………………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. Isabella Minson, 1624 First………………………………....Third Vice-President

Mrs. R. M. Harnsberger, 439 Kalmia…………………….………Recording Secretary

Mrs. Fred O’Farrell, 1635 Second………………………..…Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. B. O. Lacey, 3913 Normal……………………………………….………Treasurer

 

Directors

 

Mrs. O. J. L. Arsenault         Mrs. R. M. Harnsberger       Mrs. Frank W. Lane

Mrs. Isabella Minson            Mrs. Paul A. Giraud              Mrs. Maud Frary

Mrs. Harry Fulton                 Mrs. J. H. Francis                  Mrs. B. O. Lacey

Mrs. Fred O’Farrell

 

The San Diego Club, founded thirty years ago by a handful of women, has grown to be an organization of about four hundred, with a history of which it may be justly proud.

 

While still a young club, they bought the lot on which the present building stands, and in time built the clubhouse which is now in use.  This house is a valuable asset, for it is downtown, the attractive auditorium is in constant demand and it brings a good revenue to the treasury of the club.  The present building is gradually becoming inadequate, and a building fund is being constantly added to, against the day when a new building shall be necessary.

 

The purpose of the club is “to promote the social, moral and intellectual improvement of the members and others.” 

 

Regular meetings are held every two weeks, with programs, which, each year, grow more ambitious; alternate meetings, in charge of one of the departments.  There are five departments: Arts and Crafts, Art and Travel, Books and Conversation, Drama, and Economics and Civics.  To all these every member is eligible.  Each department is actively and enthusiastically at work.  A large part of the benefit of the club is in these departments.

 

An additional department is the Girls’ Auxiliary, composed of daughters of members and their friends.  Its object is to provide a place where the girls, properly chaperoned may have suitable recreation.

 

Frequent teas in department meetings, and on special occasions, at the main club, give opportunity for personal acquaintanceship among members.

 

It has been the intention of the club, from its inception, to be power for good in the community.  To this end it has done much philanthropic and public-spirited work, subscribing to objects of municipal betterment and to organized charities, and taking part in all the various activities during the war.  The last year a regular fund was established for such interests.

 

The great event of the past year was the thirtieth anniversary celebration, when two hundred members sitting at luncheon in their own auditorium, paid honor to the founders and early members of the club, and prophesied for themselves a flourishing future.

 

(Mrs. O. J. L.) Florence A. Arsenault,

President.

 

 

 

Page 65

 

Parlor Lecture Club

 

Fresno

 

 

Officers

Mrs. C. H. Hotaling, 1335 College……………….…….…………………..President

Mrs. A. L. Dahlgren…………………………………….………First Vice-President

Mrs. Geo. H. Taylor, 3228 Illinois…………………..….……Second Vice-President

MRs. John T. Lee, 154 Eden……………………………...Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Effie Aaronson, 1753 Van Ness…………………….….….Financial Secretary

Mrs. Miles Humphreys, 1245 Broadway…………………………….……Treasurer

Mrs. Edith McLillan…………………………………………………………..Auditor

Mrs. W. A. Conn, 1019 N. Van Ness………………………………………….Auditor

 

Chairmen of Departments

Mrs. Will Blayney, Civic Philanthropic                    Mrs. J. H. Pettis, Literary

Mrs. W. J. Eilert, Home                                            Mrs. I. Lesser, Music

Mrs. H. B. McFarland, Home Economics                Mrs. Geo. W. Turner, Program

 

Honorary Life Member of the Board

Miss Lucy Hatch

 

The Parlor Lecture Club of Fresno one of the largest and most progressive clubs of Northern California was organized in 1894, affiliating with the State Federation in 1900 and then with the General Federation in 1901.

 

Mrs. C. H. Hotaling, the president, who has directed the club proceedings along the pathway of success, has had an eventful year.  Subjects of vital import, discussions of moment, and purposes of wide ramifications have been indelibly written in the annals of the past year.  To her executive staff, Mrs. Hotaling attributes the crowing glory following her year’s reckonings.

 

The Parlor Lecture Club is proud of its club house at 1350 Van Ness Avenue, where not only club sessions are held but where social events and lectures by famous writers, musicales by well known artists and where activities of civic and community interest, are held.  This commingling of club women in cultural pursuits merits the claim of the club for high consideration.

 

Departments of work include art, music, literature, civic-philanthropic, and home department.  Mrs. W. J. Eilert and Mrs. J. R. Turner of the Home Department presented memorable events, home economics being a factor in the club studies.  Pillow making instructions were given at one novel meeting; and the food values discussed – the use of raisins under the supervision of the California Associated Raisin Company affording an interesting day.  Then came a fashion pageant, with the query: “Which dress shall it be?” as Mrs. Clarence Haring presented the idea.

 

Mrs. J. H. Pettis, chairman of literature led the members through a consecutive series of book discussions with prominent authors as speakers.  Current events directed by that splendid authority, Mrs. Annie Little Barry; music, led by Mrs. I. Lesser and a lecture program with John Cowper Powys as speaker, was among the outstanding programs of the year.

 

Mrs. C. M. Vanderburgh, of Stanford University, will be the chairman of the program for the new year.  Mrs. George W. Turner, resident of Fresno, was elected president of the San Joquain Valley District, in May of 1921 at the Yosemite Valley Convention.

 

Mrs. J. H. Pettis is a new president of the Parlor Lecture Club of Fresno.  On her executive staff are Mrs. A. M. Loper, Mrs. Will L. Potts, Mrs. John Lee, Mrs. Fay Hines, Mrs. Effie Aaronson, Mrs. Miles Humphries, Mrs. W. G. Baymiller.

 

The coterie of chairmen in the new administration includes: Mrs. W. L. Blayney, civic philanthropy; Mrs. W. G. Eilert, home department; Mrs. H. B. McFarland,

Home economics; Mrs. Adolph Buttner, literary department; Mrs. D. L. Zimmerman, music department; Mrs. C. M. Vanderburgh, chairman of the program committee.

 

 

 

Page 67

 

Francisca Club

 

San Francisco

 

 

Officers

 

Mrs. Ferdinand C. Peterson, Belvedere……………………………………….President

Miss Ethel Hager, 2400 Divisadero……………………….…….…First Vice-President

Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor, 20 Glen Alpine, Piedmont……Second Vice-President

Mrs. Fannie C. McCreary, 2020 Pacific Avenue…………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. A. Douglas McBryde, Redwood City…………………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. William Henry Smith, Jr., 1632 Vallejo…………………….………….Treasurer

 

Directors

 

Mrs. Charles R. Blyth                 Mrs. Fentress Hill            Mrs. Horace L. Hill

Mrs. Andrew G. McCarthy         Mrs. Bernard Ford          Mrs. Sidney B. Cushing

Mrs. Robert H. Noble                 Mrs. Cyril R. Tobin        Mrs. J. B. Wright

 

 

When the Francisca Club of San Francisco took possession of the beautiful new building on the corner of Sutter and Mason Streets, many prominent women from the Bay cities participated in the gala event.

 

Taking possession of that three-story home built on the Colonial type, was more than a ceremony; it was an achievement.  Although the club makes no claim other than “the promotion of social intercourse among members, “ it stands for feminine force in the community.  The housewarming in the present club home was the result of seventeen years’ fellowship in rented club rooms and the growth and development of the club as an organization of prominent women.

 

In the new building there are large reading rooms, a library, writing-room accommodations and an attractive drawing room on the west side of the main floor.  The artistic dinning room, the flowering tea rooms where smart luncheons, teas and receptions are given, are additional charms which attract the Francisca members for entertainment of guests and noted visitors.

 

A limited number of sleeping rooms, arranged with the feminine requirements of a private boudoir afford accommodations for out-of-town members.  Atop the building, overlooking the San Francisco Bay, is a glassed-in sun room.

 

The personnel of the Francisca roster represents some of California’s best known families.  The membership, though limited in number, now has an enrollment of five hundred.  Social amenities, literary gatherings, with world-famous authors as honor guests, are typical of the Francisca Club’s hospitalities.

Page 67, page 2

 

The staff of executives represent many of the city’s noblest families its women are women whose quiet, effective deeds are “deeds of honor and a credit to womankind.”

 

Miss Marion Angelotti, one of California’s brilliant authors is a member of the Francisca Club, Mrs. Daniel Lathrop, author of “Five Little Peppers” is a guest member and when she visits San Francisco often entertains her literary friends in the tea room.

 

A group of young society women are counted among the Francisca Club members, Miss Marion Zeile, Miss Marion Warren, and others from San Francisco and the peninsula cities, being among the active constituency.

 

 

Page 69

 

Shakespeare Club

 

Pasadena

 

Officers

 

Mrs. Leo. G. MacLaughlin, 75 N. Orange Grove……………………...…..…President

Mrs. Lewis H. Turner, 897 N. Holliston……………………..……First Vice-President

Mrs. W. D. Crocker, 999 N. Madison……………….………….Second Vice-President

Mrs. A. J. Wingard, 1257 N. Wilson……………………………...Recording Secretary

Mrs. Frank H. Shares, 473 S. Los Robles………………..….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Frederick Gillmor, 485 Eldorado…………………………………..…..Treasurer

Mrs. Wm. A. Spill, 1091 N. Los Robles…………………………………………Auditor

Mrs. Lewis H. Turner, 897 N. Holliston…………………..………….General Curator

 

Chairmen of Departments

 

            Mrs. H. S. Sanford, Program            Mrs. W. D. Gibson, Public Affairs

            Mrs. J. F. West, Club House            Mrs. Wm. L. Blair, Membership

 

The Shakespeare Club of Pasadena, with a membership of over one thousand, has completed, under the efficient leadership of its president, Mrs. Leo G. MacLaughlin, a year of high attainment in service.

 

In Civic affairs, the committees of Public Affairs, Health and Sanitation, Education, History and Landmarks, and Industrial and Social Conditions have taken an active part.  With a vision of national and world-wide service, Americanization, International Relations, Conservation, Legislation and Social Service committees have kept in touch with world problems.

 

Notable programs by famous artists and lecturers have brought the best in music, art and literature.  Morning departments continued from past years include: Shakespeare, Music, Drama, Art and Travel, Home Economics, Book and Magazine, Political Science and Bible.  Two new and popular departments, Current Events and the Penwoman’s, have fully justified their existence.  Topics of luncheon speakers have ranged from the far-away island of Yap to the intimate problems of city government.

 

With over two hundred new members during the year the Shakespeare Club is facing the need for a larger clubhouse.  The County Fair, given at the Maryland Hotel in November, and other affairs of a social nature, have not only added to the building fund, but have interested every member in the plans for a greater Shakespeare Club of the future.

 

 

Town and Country Club

 

San Francisco

 

 

The first organization of women to be established exclusively along the lines of men’s clubs – in San Francisco, was formed in the year 1892.  This organization was called the San Francisco Town and Country Club.  From the time of its incipiency, the Town and Country Club was the center of interest, partly, because of its appearance in the social world was an experiment, and partly, because at that time, a club where out-of-town members could spend over night was really “something new.”

 

From the initial day of its formation, the Town and Country Club, has owned its own home.  The membership of five hundred and fifty is supplemented by guests and there is a waiting list of prominent women wanting to affiliate.  The extensive library, the splendid restaurant service and the accommodations given members are some of the comforts accorded.  The lounge and living rooms for temporary guests are additional conveniences.

 

Situated as it is, overlooking Union Square, in the very center of the business district, the Town and Country Club is an ideal place for those who seek its enjoyment.

 

Mrs. Seward N. McNear is the president, Mrs. Willard O. Wayman, vice-president; Mrs. Federick W. Tallant, treasurer; Miss Eleanor Morgan, secretary; and Miss Margaret Casserly is librarian, Associate directors are; Mrs. Robert Roos, Mrs. Henry Poett, Mrs. Perry Eyre, Mrs. Harry J. Knoles, Mrs. Horace Van Sicklen and Mrs. Robert Lewis Coleman.

 

 

Page 71

 

Women’s Club

 

La Mesa

 

 

Mrs. E. C., Upp, Lemon  …………………..……………………….President

Mrs. A. C. Wright, La Mesa……………………...….....First Vice-President

Mrs. M. B. Christopher, Lookout………….………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. E. G. Allen, La Mesa……………………………...Recording Secretary

Mrs. R. F. Thomas, La Mesa…….………………  Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. S. H. Washburne, East Third ………………………………... Treasurer

 

DIRECTORS

 

Mrs. E. C. Upp

Mrs. A.C. Wright

Mrs. E. G. Allen

Mrs. R. F. Thomas

Mrs. M. B. Christopher

Mrs. Isadora Barney

Mrs. A. C. McClelland

Mrs. Henry Levy

Mrs. S. H. Washburne

 

Service, Harmony and Friendship are the dominating influences that have pervaded the club ever since its organization in 1902.  It immediately fedrated with the state, and in 1905 with the National Federation.  The clubhouse was built in 1912. 

 

The organization has always fostered and encouraged enterprises of a community nature.

 

The first work of the club after the completion of the club house was to organize and house the city library, and it has, ever since, taking a leading part in the city’s civic affairs.  The membership has enjoyed a steady growth and now has 125 members.

 

A very active Arts’ Crafts department has been an important factor in its recent growth.  Mrs. Ida Masters, a pioneer in Arts’ Crafts work, is the very efficient chairman.  This year’s program has been carried out almost to the letter under the chairmanship of Miss Sarah Palmer, assisted by the music chairman, Mrs. Lillian Freeman

 

The main social event of the year was an elaborate banquet at which affair it was our rare privilege to have Mrs. Robert Burdette as a guest of honor.

 

For the past three years the club has presented a successful lecture course.  The talent has all been donated by numerous talented friends of club members---the most notable of whom is our honorary member and neighbor Carrie Jacobs Bond.  Over twelve hundred dollars has been raised by this method to liquidate the club house debt.

 

In every way each year’s work has been one of pleasure and profit and the bond of and fellowship that is so strong in this club has been continuously strengthen.

 

Mrs. E. C. Upp,

President.

 

 

Page 73

Sorosis Club

 

San Francisco

 

 

Officers

 

Miss Florence Agnes Stull, 3377 Pacific Avenue……………………..……….President

Mrs. A. E. Buckingham, 2808 Jackson……………………...….....First Vice-President

Mrs. A. C. Rulofson, Jr. 52 West Clay Park………….………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. Milton E. Unger, 321 Lake………………………………….Third Vice-President

Mrs. W. J. Landers, 972 Bush……………………………..……Fourth Vice-President

Mrs. Mary N. Lawton, 15 Walnut……………………………...…Recording Secretary

Mrs. John B. Tufts, 1000 Lake…….……………………..….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. A. Z. High, 3902 Clay………………………………….………Business Secretary

Mrs. Josephine Borda, 1899 California………………………………...…….Treasurer

 

Associate Directors

 

Mrs. A. C. McLaughlin            Mrs. William Hannam             Mrs. Jesse L. Andrews

Mrs. J. H. Barbet                     Mrs. William J. Drew              Mrs. R. V. Whiting

 

The Sorosis Club was the first literary club to be formed in this country.  Soon after Sorosis clubs were initiated along similar lines throughout America.

 

The Sorosis Club of San Francisco was founded by the following prominent women:  Mrs. Charles Aull (deceased), Mrs. Adele Brooks, Mrs. George J. Bucknall, Mrs. Alban B. Butler, Mrs. William Carr (deceased), Mrs. Andrew S. Rowan, Mrs. Guy C. Earl, Mrs. Eli Lewelling, Mrs. Frederick Sanborn (deceased), Mrs. Irving Scott, Mrs. Irwin C. Stump.

 

Mrs. Irving M. Scott was the first president of the Sorosis Club in the years 1894-96.

 

Following Mrs. Scott the women who, in sequence, directed the Sorois Club in the capacity of president were: Mrs. William B. Carr, Mrs. Frederisk Sanborn, Mrs. George Busknall, Mrs. William R. Eckart, Mrs. Willard B. Harrington, Mrs. Luis Lane Dunbar, Mrs. Akin Hiller Vail, Mrs. Lyman A. Kelley, Mrs. Edward B. Young, Mrs. John Loosley, Mrs. Thomas E. Haven, Mrs. John H. Robertson, Mrs. Joseph Fife, Mrs. Thomas E. Haven (reelected), Mrs. Sewall Dolliver, Mrs. A. D. Shepard, Mrs. Charles A. Shurtleff, Mrs. Everett Welsey Wilson, and the presiding  officer of today, Miss Florence Stull.

 

Associate directors with Miss Stull include:  Mrs. A. C. McLaughlin, Mrs. William Hannam, Mrs. Jessie S. Andrews, Mrs. J. H. Barbat, Mrs. William J. Drew and Mrs. Randolph V. Whiting.

 

The Sorosis has an art section, a current events section, a dancing section, a card section, a drama section, a literature and education, a travel, a practical aims section, a music and a science section.

 

A library section and a house section, a hospitality section and an auditing section pertaining to club development are also part of the working body of Sorosis.

 

The first of third Mondays or both, unless otherwise provided for by the Constitution, or for special reasons is observed as guest days.  Where either of these days is not observed as guest day, it is kept for drawing-room day.

 

 

 

Page 75

 

Philomathean Club

 

Stockton

 

 

Officers

 

Mrs. E. L. Gibbens, 1430 N. Baker………….………………………..……….President

Mrs. E. D. Taylor, 327 W. Park………………………..…………..First Vice-President

Mrs. E. Woodruff, 27 E. Maple……………………….……..….Second Vice-President

Mrs. J. B. Cory…………………………………………….…..…..Third Vice-President

Mrs. A. C. Cullahan, 122 W. Rose………………………………..Recording Secretary

Miss Elizabeth Perry, 807 N. El Dorado…………….………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. J. H. Jackson, 1230 N. San Jose……………………………...Financial Secretary

Mrs. G. A. Willard, Magnolia and Hunter…..……………………………….Treasurer

Mrs. Emma Webb, 432 W. Poplar…………..………………………………..Librarian

 

Directors

 

Mrs. E. L. Gibbens         Mrs. J. L. Craig                Mrs. James P. Moy

            Mrs. C. F. Bertholf          Mrs. A. E. Pryor              Mrs. Edward S. Munford

            Mrs. M. Murphy             Mrs. F. E. Goodell                       Mrs. E. C. Stewart

                                                      Mrs. H. R. McNoble

 

 

The Philomathean Club of Stockton ranks as one of the largest clubs of the Alameda District California Federation of Women’s Clubs.  It was organized in 1893 and federated with the State in 1900.

 

The club has sections devoted to the study of history, literature, art, civics, music and drams.  Book reviews are part of the regular section work in addition to study and discussions on current topics.

 

Philomathean Club has one of the most attractive club houses in the District, and within its walls are held many sessions sought by others, in addition to the club work.  We call our club house the “Home of Philomathean Club” for the home-atmosphere is pronouncedly part of the spirit which prevails here.

 

Philomatheans are proud of the music department, as many of the members have been wanted by clubs throughout the state for programs.  An active literary section, with book reviews, makes for the high cultural tastes of our Stockton club members.

 

The part in community welfare work maintained by the by members, individually and collectively is in strict accord with the co-operation which prevails in the commonwealth.

 

The State president, Mrs. W. A. Fitzgerald, and the District president, Mrs. George A. Rigg, of Oakland, have been honor guests at Philomathean events.

 

Among the prominent club leaders in Philomathean Club are the past-presidents who maintain their active interest.  They include:  Mrs. Margaaret Davis, Mrs. S. N. Cross, Mrs. W. D. Buckley, Mrs. J. E. Budd, Mrs. J. L. Phelps, Mrs. Edward S. Munford, Mrs. C. S. Sargent, Mrs. E. L. Dodge, Mrs. C. J. Haas, Mrs. H. H. Hewlett, Mrs. F. S. Holley, Mrs. W. H. E. Fellfer, Mrs. A. E. Pryor, Miss Lottie Ruggles, Mrs. R. R. Smith, Mrs. C. L. Six, Mrs. J. L. Craig, and Mrs. E. C. Stewart.

 

One of the special programs of Philmathean Club this last February was a tlak on “The Redwoods” with a strong appeal made to the club women for conservation of California trees.

 

                                    “I think that I shall never see,

                                      A poem lovely as a tree;

                                      Poems are made by fools like me,

                                      But God alone can make a tree.”

 

The officers of the Building Association of the Philomathean Club to whom a debt of gratitude is due because of their excellent judgment and business enterprise include:  Mrs. J. W. Barrett, president; Mrs. E. S. Munford, Miss Lottie Ruggles, Mrs. Percy Kenyon, vice-presidents; Mrs. E. C. Stewart, secretary; Mrs. A. M. Noble, treasurer.  The following women were directors of the Building Association: Mesdames J. W. Barrett, E. S. Munford, Percy Kenyon, F. R. Clarke, A. M. Noble, J. L. Craig, E. C. Stewart, C. F. Bertholf, E. L. Gibbens and Miss Lottie Ruggles.  Mrs. E. C. Stewart is chairman of the rental committee.

 

 

 

Page 77

 

The Wednesday Morning Club

 

Los Angeles

 

Officers

 

Miss Martha Thompson, 3637 Pasadena Avenue…….…….……..President Emeritus

Mrs. F. W. Fuller, 134 S. Eastlake Avenue…………………………….……..President

Mrs. S. B. Welcome, 3022 S. Western Avenue……………………First Vice-President

Mrs. Harold Bailey, 942 N. Western Avenue……………..……Second Vice-President

Mrs. Walter J. Van Valkenburger, 1711 Serrano Avenue….…..Recording Secretary

Mrs. Helen L. Gottschall, 1407 S. Vermont Avenue……...………Financial Secretary

Mrs. Hector Zahn, 128 S. Ardmore Avenue…………….….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. C. E. White, 2814 Pasadena Avenue………………………...………….Treasurer

Mrs. L. Paul Zahn, 5254 Virginia Avenue…………………………..…………Curator

Maud E. Butler, 774 E. Kensington Road……..…….Federation Extension Secretary

 

Chairmen of Departments

 

Mrs. John N. Hogg, Finance                         Mrs. G. L. Charette, Press

Mrs. A. R. Creighton, House                                    Mrs. George Loveday, Printing

Mrs. John Hokum, Membership                              Mrs. Orla D. Spray, Decorating

                                    Mrs. F. A. Willis, Courtesy

 

The Wednesday Morning Club believing that “He who does advance goes backward” upholds the object for which it was formed, namely, advancement along literary, civic and philanthropic lines, by maintaining several study sections under the leadership of competent instructors, and its weekly programs, which feature artists in various lines, lecturers and speakers on live issues of the day.

 

The Shakespeare section with its large and enthusiastic enrollment presents one or more of Shakespeare’s plays each year.  Members of this section who take a four year course, study four plays each year, and write a paper on each play receive from the club a diploma and pin.  Then they become members of the Wednesday Morning Club Shakespeare Alumnae.

 

Music section members receive careful instruction in sight reading, correct breathing, voice placing and artistic rendering of solo and concert music.  These members, in addition to regular class-work give selections for shut-ins and church gatherings, often furnishing music for afternoon programs presenting at least one operetta during the club year.

 

The study of Spanish is proving most interesting and the class is doing excellent work.

 

To create a deeper interest in our mother tongue that we may use it more intelligently, the class in English has two lessons a month devoted to proper pronunciation and intelligently, the class in English has two lessons a month devoted to proper pronunciation and the correct use of words.

 

Current events and public welfare receive a full share of attention, the open forum affording an excellent opportunity for the expression of individual opinions.

 

Drama was taken up as a new study this year and is already doing splendid work having a pageant called “The Spirit of the Trees” already well under way for presentation in the very near future.

 

In the Parliamentary section we are sitting at the feet, as it were, of our District Parliamentarian, Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey, who likens the various motions to a kit of tools with which we may do our work decently and in order.  In this way we are gaining a knowledge of Parliamentary Usage which will be useful not only to ourselves but to any assembly in which we are participants.

 

Social affairs are featured in this enterprising club, especially the weekly luncheons, and the dances, when the members and their friends to the accompaniment of excellent music prove the truth of the saying that “To live, to laugh, to love one’s friends and be loved by them is the essence of happiness.”

 

The club belongs to the Women’s Legislative Council of California which concerns itself in State Legislation concerning women and children.

 

A lively interest is also displayed among the membership in the production of better films for moving pictures.

 

Bearing in mind the injunction of Shakespeare “To thine own self be true” we have sought to comfort the poor, protect and shelter the weak, remembering that “In as much as ye have done it unto the least of these ye have done it unto me.”

 

Mrs. Fred W. Fuller,

President

 

 

Page 78

 

History Club

 

Los Gatos

 

 

The History Club had its beginning in a little class of six women, who were called together by Mrs. R. A. Urquhart of Los Gatos to study the history of the world.  In 1907, the little class having grown into a club of thirty, it was decided to build a club house so the club incorporated.  Bought a lot and put up a house at a cost of $3,000.00.  The money was borrowed from a friend of Mrs. Urquhart’s who proposed to lend it without interest, to be paid in ten years.  It was paid in nine years.

 

It was agreed in the beginning between the members, that the amount should be paid by the members themselves.  They were to earn the money, not to ask their

men folks for it, nor was the club to give public entertainments to raise money.  The membership was increased to fifteen.  Each one was to pay $5.00 a year toward the debt and the rental of the club house.  Revenue from private dances and parties, and so forth, was to be added to the amount contributed by the members.

 

The club has now a membership of seventy-eight.  It is divided into sections, History, Current Events, Music, and Dramatics.  It meets once a week.

 

The object of the History Club is to promote education among women, and to aid by united efforts all worthy causes that tend to the best interests of the community.  The officers are:  Mrs. Emily Cohen, president; Mrs. Mary L. Gilbert, vice-president; Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, recording secretary; and five directors who, with the above officers, form a board of directors.

 

Emily L. Cohen,

President

 

 

 

Page 79

 

Adelphian Club

 

Alameda

 

 

Officers

 

Mrs. W. E. Vaughan, 1201 Sherman………………………………………….President

Mrs. John Merrill, 1329 Caroline………………………………....First Vice-President

Mrs. Lottie Garrettson, 2004 Clinton……………………...…...Second Vice-President

Mrs. Charles Moody, 2150 Clinton Avenue………………………………….Treasurer

Mrs. Robert Hill, 1234 Hawthorne…………………………...…..Recording Secretary

Mrs. J. B. Emmal, 2516 Noble Avenue……………………...Corresponding Secretary

 

 

The Adelphian Club of Alameda stands out from many other well known clubs of Alameda County, to which it is a contributing part as one of the most hospitable clubs in California clubdom.

 

The pretty club house at the corner of Central Avenue and Walnut Street has been the setting for many ambitious literary and dramatic presentations.  Presidents from the club of the Bay cities have been entertained with that lavish hospitality for which the Adelphian Club is far-famed. 

 

Sections of club work at the Adelphian Club include: art, history, tourist, Shakespeare, music, current events, literature and “New Books,” household-arts, civic, dramatic, “Hearth and Home.”

 

The Adelphian Club was organized in 1897.  It is federated with the Alameda District and the State Federation and ranks high in the totality of altruistic achievements, not only for the club itself, but for the community in which it is a potent force.

 

On the first Thursday of the month union meetings of the club are held.  The various sections of the Adelphian Club which are, in themselves, like small club circles, have individual sessions all contributing finally to the upbuilding of the high purposes of the club, in general, and to the advancement of each division, in particular.

 

Many of the State’s most brilliant women have been honor guests at the Adelphian Club and taken part in the programs given there.  The State president, Mrs. W. A. Fitzgerald and her constituents, as well as the District and County executives are often heralded as the complimented guests on these special occasions which pronounce the Adelphian way of club participation in the enterprises of the Bay cities.

 

Mrs. W. E. Vaughan has been re-elected to office as president of the Adelphian Club of Alameda.  Several other officers were re-elected with her including: vice-presidents, Mrs. John H. Merrill, Mrs. Lottie A. Garretson; treasurer, Mrs. Charles H. Moody; general curator, Mrs. M. A. Winant; recording secretary, Mrs. Robert H. Hill; corresponding secretary, Mrs. G. E. Furbush; directors, Miss Ida Spencer, Mrs. J. Sherman McDowell, Mrs. Robert A. Laurenstein, Mrs. S. W. Cright, Mrs. C. A. Allardyce, Mrs. C. J. Lancaster; membership committee, Mrs. P. W. Barton, Mrs. W. H. Stanley, Mrs. C. J. Siegfried, Mrs. E. D. Rue and Mrs. J. W. Kearney.

 

 

Page 83

 

Women’s Club

 

La Mesa

 

Officers

 

Mrs. E. C. Upp, Lemon………………………………………….…………….President

Mrs. A. C. Wright, La Mesa………………………………….……First Vice-President

Mrs. M. B. Christopher, Lookout……………………………....Second Vice-President

Mrs. E. G. Allen, La Mesa…………………………………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. R. F. Thomas, La Mesa………………………………...Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. S. H. Washburne, East Third………………………………………...…Treasurer

 

 

Service, Harmony and Friendship are the dominating influences that have pervaded the club ever since its organization in 1902.  It immediately federated with the state, and in 1905 with the National Federation.  The club house was built in 1912.

 

The organization has always fostered and encouraged enterprises of a community nature.

 

The first work of the club after the completion of the club house was to organize and house the city library, and it has, ever since, taken a leading part in the city’s civic affairs.  The membership has enjoyed a steady growth and now has 125 members.

 

A very active Arts’ Crafts department has been an important factor in its recent growth.  Mrs. Ida Masters, a pioneer in Arts’ Crafts work, is the very efficient chairman.  This year’s program has been carried out almost to the letter under the chairmanship of Miss Sarah Palmer, assisted by the music chairman, Mrs. Lillian Freeman.

 

The main social event of the year was an elaborate banquet at which affair it was our rare privilege to have Mrs. Robert Burdette as a guest of honor.

 

For the past three years the club has presented a successful lecture course.  The talent has all been donated by numerous talented friends of club members – the most notable of whom is our honorary member and neighbor Carrie Jacobs Bond.  Over twelve hundred dollars has been raised by this method to liquidate the club house debt.

 

In every way each year’s work has been one of pleasure and profit and the bond of and fellowship that is so strong in this club has been continuously strengthened.

 

Mrs. E. C. Upp,

President

 

Transcribed by Pat Houser.

Proofread by Marla Fitzsimmons.

 

 

 


© 2005 Nancy Pratt Melton

 

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