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WHO’S WHO AMONG

THE WOMEN OF CALIFORNIA

1922

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Page 27

AMERICAN WOMEN OVERSEAS LEAGUE

 

   After months or years of very active work overseas it is quite natural that those women who were privileged to be with the American Expeditionary Forces should wish to carry over into after-the-war days, the spirit of service of the war.  United by the close bond of common experience the eight thousand women who served abroad with any of the twenty welfare organizations or with the army or navy have formed a national organization known as the American Women Overseas League.  In California there are two strong chapters, one in Los Angeles the other in San Francisco.  Although many governmental and welfare organizations are working for the ex-service man and woman, there are many cases where for technical reasons needy men are not entitled to governmental aid, many others where emergency aid is necessary and still a larger group where pride or bitterness or some mental difficulty brought on by war’s experience, makes the man or woman unwilling to go to charitable organizations for aid.  There is a close tie and wide friendship among those who served overseas and for this reason hundreds of worthy cases come to our notice.  The legal provision of aid, food and clothing for mother and young babies, clothing for men who have secured jobs and have no suitable clothes, advice to discouraged or puzzled men who are entitled to governmental aid but do not realize how to obtain it—all these are our immediate problems.

   Our purposes are to meet these needs of ex-service people, to hold ourselves ready to serve again the government in time of emergency and to co-operate with all welfare organizations in their work at home and overseas.

(signed) Mrs E. K. Sturgis

President

The other officers of the American Women Overseas League include: Mrs. Elizabeth Potter, recording secretary, and Mrs. R. H. Hunt, treasurer, San Francisco; Mrs. J. K. Maxwell, corresponding secretary, now in Paris; Mrs. Marjoria McKillop, Seattle;  Mrs. Louis Zianette, Pasadena;  Mis Louis Wisler, and Miss M. Hill, Los Angeles;  Mrs. Douglas Brookman, Mrs. Sarah Young, and Miss Marian Crocker, San Francisco.

 

Page 29

 

THE FERRY CANTEEN

San Francisco

 

   The Ferry Canteen conducted under the supervision of Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale in the Ferry Station at the foot of Market Street, San Francisco, stands out as one of the great tributes to the work of women in the American Red Cross.

   Women from the fields of industry, from society circles, from the philanthropic and from the civic enterprises, were among the faithful and ardent workers at the Ferry Canteen.  Soldier-boys on their way to war; soldier-boys returning, and others in transportation from camp to camp were welcomed with that ring of hospitality which wrote indelibly on their hears something too sacred to record in terms of adulation or printed appreciation.

   The Ferry Canteen had a system of daily participation in the Red Cross Service which made it possible for each listed member to serve on certain days, at scheduled hours.  The personnel of the list of workers at the Ferry Canteen, included a coterie of women whose continued service is inscribed not alone in the annals of “Who’s Who Among the Women of California” but within the heart of every soldier or sailor visitor.

   When Mrs. Hale visited France this past year, she officially represented America in the national observance of decorating the graves of American heroes.  Her participation in the activities of the Red Cross, her work on the playground commission, her devotion to the various causes of this city are historical.  During the fire of 1906 she was especially honored by the Fire Department in the formal presentation of a silver plate, the inscription thereon expressing their gratitude.

      Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale was chairman of Women War Workers, San Francisco Chapter, American Red Cross, and chairman of the Women War Workers Committee for the San Francisco Armistice Day ceremonies, November 11, 1921, held in the Civic Auditorium.

   Other prominent women of San Francisco serving on the official committee were: Mrs. A. S. Baldwin, Miss Anna Beaver, Mrs. George Cameron, Mrs. J. H. Deering, Miss Alice S. Griffith, Mrs Latham McMullin, Mrs. Thurlow McMullin, Mrs. John F. Merrill, Mrs. T. M. Potts, Mrs. Max C. Sloss, Mrs. W. S. Berry, and Mrs. James Rolph, Jr., wife of Mayor Rolph.

 

Page 30

 

THE NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR

WOMEN’S SERVICE CLUB

San Francisco

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. Harry Staats Moore, 2310 Divisadero……………………………………….President

Mrs. Marcos S. Koshland, 3800 Washington………………………………..Vice-President

Mrs. A.S. Baldwin, 2 Presidio Terrace……………………………………………Treausurer

Miss Edith Black, 2224 Sacramento……………………………………Recording Sectretary

Mrs. Henry Crocker, 433 California……………………………….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. R.P. Hankerson, 835 Arlington, Berkeley…………………………Executive Secretary

 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 

Mrs. A.S. Baldwin

Mrs. A.P. Black

Dr. Adelaide Brown

Mrs. S.G. Chapman

Mrs. Henry Crocker

Miss Jean Doub

Mrs. Katherine Phillips Edson

Miss Anna L. Fetherstone

Mrs. Cleveland Forbes

Mrs. Willian B. Hamilton

Mrs. Wendell Hammon

Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland

Miss Gail Laughlin

Miss Marion Whitfield Leale

Mrs. Alexander Lilley

Mrs. William Palmer Lucas

Mrs. Parker S. Maddux

Mrs. Ernest Meiere

Mrs. F. S. Moody

Mrs. H. S. Moore

Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall

Miss Lillian Palmer

Miss Esther Phillips

Mrs. Willis Polk

Miss Edith Slack

Mrs. H. A. Stephenson

Mrs. H.L. Terwilliger

Mrs. Wm. Warren

Miss Ethel A. Young

Mrs. Duncan McDuffie

Mrs. George Kelham

 

 

 

   The San Francisco branch of the National League for Women’s Service was formed in June, 1917 and performed much valuable work during the war.

   After the crisis caused by the war had passed, it was decided to carry on the work at the National League for Women’s  Service Club and through its activities meet certain community needs not covered by other organizations.

The aim is to promote a big democratic organization—democratic enough to satisfy members of every industry, profession, business and social affiliation.  Every effort has been put forth to make quarters of the League comfortable and attractive, and yet, inexpensive enough to come within the reach of all, and general enough, to allow for its use by smaller, more definite groups.

   The Volunteer Service department is kept in action by service rendered within the league—in the lounge, shop and restaurant.

    The League maintains a restaurant for the convenience of its members where attractive lunches and dinners are served at moderate prices.

  The Shop is one of the most popular activities but must be seen to be fully appreciated.

   The Vocational Guidance Bureau is the one only kind in San Francisco where women may go for information concerning any employment open to women—where they may count on receiving wise counsel without cost.

(signed) Elizabeth Hogue Moore

 

Page 31 & 32

WOMEN ON THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE

 

CONFERENCE ON THE

LIMITATION OF ARMAMENT

 

Washington, D. C.

 

   The Advisory Committee to the American Delegates to the Conference on the Limitation of Armament was appointed by the President.  The members of this Committee represented all shades of opinion of the citizens of this country, both men and women.  There were four women members of the Advisory Committee. These women were not appointed as a separate woman’s committee, but were on the Committee just as any other citizen.  They served on the general committee and on all sub-committees.  They did not organize themselves in any sense as a woman’s committee but took part in all discussions just as American citizens.

   The women’s organizations of the East had been very insistent that the President appoint women as delegates to this Conference.  The President was exceedingly anxious to recognize women, but the necessity of having a small delegated group made it practically impossible to include a woman among the Plenary Delegates because they must of necessity be men in large representative positions such as the Secretary of State, Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee of the Senate, and the leader of the Democratic opposition.  Besides that, any country having the good fortune to possess a man with a great knowledge of international law that is possessed by former Secretary Root, would be doing itself an injustice no to use such expert service.  Therefore, it was generally understood that it was imperative that Mr. Root should be one of the four delegates.

    The President was exceedingly anxious that such representation as the women had would be real, and he discussed with the women leaders of the Republican Party the propriety of putting women on the Advisory Committee.  These women leaders said they would be very glad to have women appointed, provided the Advisory Committee’s functions were real and not just honorary.  The president assured them that the Advisory Committee was to play a most important part in the deliberations of the Conference.  He then asked them to submit names, and among the names submitted were chosen the following:

   Mrs. Charles Summer Bird, of East Walpole, Massachusetts, the Chairman of the State Republican Club of Massachusetts, and also an active member of the National League of Women Voters in Massachusetts.  Mrs. Bird is a Progressive Republican and she and her husband were active participants in the Roosevelt Campaign in 1912.

   Mrs. Thomas G. Winter, of Minneapolis, the President of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs.  Mrs. Winter is a Republican but a woman who has taken no active part in partisan politics.  She is a great orator and splendid thinker and brought to the Advisory Committee splendid balanced judgment.

   Mrs. Eleanor Franklin Egan did not in any sense represent organized women of this country.  She is a brilliant magazine writer and has had large experience in the Far East, having lived in the Philippine Islands nine years and spent three or four years in China and Japan.  Her husband is Mr. Martin Egan, Publicity Manger of the J. Pierpont Morgan firm.  Mrs. Egan has the honor of being a personal friend of Secretary Herbert Hoover and of General Pershing.

(signed) Katherine Philip Edson

 

Page 34

THE VALUE OF INDIVIDUAL

ORGANIZED LIFE

 

   Since my first participation in creating an organization for women, "The Alphi Phi Sorority" just fifty years ago--I have believed in group activity.

   As early as 1887 I came from Los Angeles to San Francisco to help form the old time Chautauqua Circles and following that I was definitely interested and active in the formative years of California's organized womanhood under its various phases of church, educational, philanthropic, eleemosynary and political development.

   I have believed in these groups of people with common interests, in the community of work as the finest foundation for understanding and enduring friendliness.  I believed that devotion to a common cause, loyalty to a common task would transcend pettiness and local narrowness as well as accomplish some of the definite objects desired by those thus banded together.

   I was convinced these compact organizations could have a driving power, where most needed, to accomplish results.

   If these group activities have not justified the dreams of those who "saw visions"--my analysis is that the failures have resulted from the lack of the organized individual life of those participating.

   “We are non-organized” has been the cry since the marvelous success of wartime organizations has so stimulated us to any form of co-operation

   But this cannot be true until each woman has organized her own life that she may not only know herself, the community, the state, the nation, the world; but the relation of her individual life each of these units.

   Is it suggestive then to ask?  Have you organized your life?

   Familiar as most women are with the usual form of Constitution and By-laws, we recall that the first article reads, “The Name of the Organization shall be etc."

   What is the name of your Life Organization?  Selfishness?  Undue Ambition?  Indifference?  Service?

   Second-What shall the Object of your Organization be?  Self-indulgence? 

Display?  Money?  Betterment of mankind?  Enrichment of the world?

   Third-Who is your Executive Officer?  Your physical Self?  Mental Self? or Spiritual Self:  If it is the latter do you starve or nourish your Executive Officer?  A weak and aenemic executive never builds an efficient, effective organization.

   Fourth--The Recording Secretary is always provided, but Memory will only record the minutes you dictate.  And pray there may be no page you could wish to blot out.

 

 

Page 35

   Fifth—The Treasurer of your organization keeps a debit and credit account of every hour, whether you add or subtract to the sum total of the world betterment by what you think, say and do.  Only you can keep the balance on the right side of the ledger.

   In this form of the organization there must always be provision for Amendments that there may be a re-evaluation of life each day, which is, after all, the fullest expression for education.

   The educational process by which we glimpse the splendor of life is truly an inward, individual process.

   What John Fletcher wrote of men is equally true of women:

“Man is his own star; and the soul that can render an

honest and a perfect man commands all light, all

influence, all fate, nothing to him falls early, or too late.”

 

   The value of organized effort whether singly or in groups then, lies in the fulfilment of this prophesy:

“When the Soul of a women conquers,

And God’s banners are unfurled,

We may catch a glimpse of Heaven

From the hill-top of the world.”

 

 

(signed) Elane B. Burdette

 

 

Page 36

 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF

UNIVERSITY WOMEN

San Francisco Bay Branch

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. E. E. Brownell, 1700 Broadway……………………………………………..President

Miss Emma Nooman, 1302 Hayes Street……………………………………Vice-President

Mrs. Wm. J. Drew, 67 Buena Vista Terrace…………………………..Recording Secretary

Mrs. E. W. Curries, Broderick Street……………………………..Corresponding Secretary

Miss Carol A. Rehfisheh, Standford University, Box 984……………...Business Secretary      

Mrs. T. J. Bagigalupi, 179 22nd Avenue…………………………………………..Treasurer

Mrs. E. W. Newhall, Jr., 2972 Pacific Avenue……………………………………..Auditor

DIRECTORS

Mrs. Marion Delany                                Miss Effie McFaden         Mrs. Anne Whitley

                  Mrs. T. T. C. Gregory                                      Miss Ella Barrows

COUNCILLORS

                  Mrs. Frederick Faulener      Miss Marion Leale    Miss Mabel Pierce

Mrs. Frederick Faulkner, President-Elect

 

   After thirty-five years activity as the California Branch of the National Association of Collegiate Alumnae of the local Organization, numbering three hundred and fifty college graduates, has been known during the past year as the San Francisco Bay Branch of the American Association of Univeristy Women.

   The change in a name was nessitated by the reorganization of the National Association which is now a part of the International Federation of University Women.

   Organized nationally in 1882 primarily to advance the cause of higher education for women, the objects of the local branch have been extended to include provision for the social intercourse for college alumnae, to promote educational interests and to secure broader opportunities for women.

   As part of its contribution to the Bay communities the branch maintains two committees, Baby Hygiene and Child Hygiene, which are doing splendid constructive work for mothers and children who come within their sphere of influence.  In 1917 the Baby Hygiene Committee established the first Children’s Health in San Francisco.  It is located at 323 Haight Street.

   Particular emphasis is being placed upon the subject of International Relations, especially as they affect women. A large standing committee on International Relations is another important part of the Branch work.

   A Scholarship Loan Fund, established on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the local branch is maintained and constantly in use by women in California universities or colleges.  Among the other prominent and active committees of the branch are, the educational, housing, and membership committees, three play-reading sections and the National and Branch club-house committees.

   Monthly meetings are held on the fourth Saturday of the month, generally in the form of luncheons.

 

(signed)  Sophia P. Brownell

President

 

   Mrs. Frederick Faulkner, Leland Stanford Jr. University, is president of the American Association of University Women, Bay Branch, for the year beginning May, 1922.  On the Executive board with Mrs. Faulkner are the following: vice-presidents, Miss Emma Noonan, University of California, Dr. Mary Vost, Vassar, Leland Stanford Jr. University, Miss Anne Whitley, University of California; recording secretary, Mrs. Victor Gaines, Mills College; corresponding secretary, Mrs. James Wales, Leland Stanford Jr., University; business secretary, Mrs. Collis Mitchum Bryn Mawr; treasurer, Mrs. Tadiel Bacigalupi, University of California; auditor, Mrs. B. S. Drake, University of California, directors, Miss Marion Leale, University of California, Mrs. T. T. C. Gregory, Leland Stanford Jr. University, Mrs. F. C. Turner, University of California, Mrs. William J. Drew, University of California, Mrs. E. W. Currier, University of California.

 

Page 37

 

THE WOMEN’S UNIVERSITY CLUB

 

Los Angeles Branch

American Association of  University Women

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. Edwin Hill Brooks, 342 S. New Hampshire Ave………………………….….President

Miss Ann M. Mumford, 623 Prospect Avenue, South Pasadena…………… Vice-President

Miss Almira Mayo, 830 Park View Street………………………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. F.H. Noe, 172 N. Hobart Boulevard…………………………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Michael Creamer, 1645 S. Hobart Boulevard………………………………..Treasurer

 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN

Mrs. W.L. Woolett, President

Mrs. W.H. Olds, Printing

Miss Margaret Ray, House

Miss Ray Hanna, Bureau of Occupations

Mrs. Noel Edwards, Membership

Miss Elizabeth N. Pepper, Public Affairs

Mrs. H. Kenyon Burch, Scholarship

Mrs. Arthur S Heineman, Affiliation Secretary

Mrs. H.M. Baruch, College Information Bureau

Mrs. H. R. Hooper, Press

Mrs. Sarah M. Johnson, Secretary of the Bureau of Occupation

 

 

   The Women's University Club of Los Angeles, Mrs. Edwin Hill Brooks, president, was founded in 1917 through amalgamation of the three college women's organizations then existing in the city, the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, the College Women's Club, and the Federation of College Women's Clubs.

   The club is the Los Angeles Branch of the American Association of University Women (the new name of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae) hence part of its membership is on the standard national A.A.U.W.  basis, but it also has its college membership including women who have had two years of undergraduate college work, and its club membership whereby any organization of college women may affiliate with it.  The avowed object of the club is "to unite college women and to concentrate their influence of the problems of social service and the advancement of education and to co-operate in the general work of the national A.A.U.W."

   Besides co-operating in various fields of club activity in the city and maintaining Drama, Social and Public Affairs sections, the club has three unique departments of service, The Bureau of Occupations, the Scholarships and the Bureau of College Information.  The Bureau of Occupations follows three lines of activity, research, vocational guidance and placement, the research investigating professional opportunities for women, the vocational guidance leading undergraduates into the proper study to reach the lines of opportunity, the placement fitting the women to the position.  At present one or two scholarships are offered each year for which any Los Angeles County girl may apply who has college entrance credits, her study to be done at any college in California recognized by the A.A.U.W.  As this is a revolving fund to which an addition is made each year from the club treasury the future will see an increasing number of scholarships granted each year. The Bureau of College Information was established to stimulate a desire in the preparatory school girl for higher education and to furnish her with information concerning environment and the social life on the campus.

   The club meets the first Saturday of each month from October to June inclusive.  A luncheon with speaker at 12:30 o'clock is followed at 2:30 o'clock by the business meeting and program.  The sections likewise meet monthly.  The down-town club room, 805 Brack-Shops, furnishes convenient headquarters and a meeting place for all sections and committees, but the regular monthly meeting is held in the Ebell Club House.

   The club has an individual membership of 550 with 20 affiliated clubs.

 

(signed) (Mrs E N) Edwin W Brooks

 

 

Page 38

 

COLLEGE WOMEN’S CLUB

Long Beach Branch

American Association of University Women

 

OFFICERS

Alta B. Hall, 232 Atlantic……………………………………………………President

Mrs. R. E. Oliver, 848 Esther……………………………………First Vice-President

Elva M. Richards, 505 E. 16th…………………………………………………Second Vice-President

Mrs. O. P. Bell, 620 E. 5th……………………………………………………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. William B. Wright, 2810 E. 2nd…………………………………….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Chas. A. Wiley, 911 Pacific……………………………….Federation Secretary

Helen Elise Larsen, 325 E. State………………………………….Financial Secretary

Mrs. P.H. Grote……………………………………………………………..Treasurer

Mrs. C. H. Spence, 648 Atlantic……………………………………….Parliamentarian

 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS

Edith Brubaker, Program

Mrs. T. R. Merrill, Membership

Mrs. Fred Bixley, Philanthropy

Mrs. James Daly, Hospitality

Maude E. Hayes, Social

Carol Lewernez, Decorating

 

   With the aims of fostering higher education, the College Women’s Club and the Long Beach Chapter of the American Association of University Women unite the college trained women of the city in a common cause, and give the inspiration for increased service to the community.  In its closed membership of 225, it includes alumnae of almost every representative college and university of the East and West.  Because one of the aims of the club is to promote the college spirit of comradeship among the members, it has seemed best to limit the membership so that the social meetings may be held in the homes.  A waiting list is kept from which vacancies are immediately filled.

   The Virginia Hotel is the club headquarters, and alternate monthly meetings are held there, when speakers active in world affairs address the club members.  Other meetings are held in the homes of members; and are of a more purely social nature.  Among the speakers of the last year have been such leaders in education as Dr. Aurelia Henry Reinhardt, President of Mills College; Dr. Jessica B Peixotto, Chairman of the Department of Economics, University of California; and Dr. C. P. Colegrove, President of Upper Iowa University; such artists as Louis P. Mertins and Arthur B. Kachel; and such diplomats as the Hon. John Barrett, formerly Director of the Pan American Union.  As practically every artist in Long Beach is an active member in the club, the programs with the exception of the addresses, are given entirely by members.

   In aiding students to higher education, the club assisted in netting one thousand dollars last year with a garden fete for the Ethel Moore Dormitory at Mills College, and this year started its Bertha Brown Fisk scholarship loan fund.

   One of the civic activities of the last year was a Christmas pageant given in the municipal auditorium, when hundreds of the Long Beach kiddies were entertained on Christmas Eve.  The club has a glee club and a dramatic section, both of which are leading attractions at the meetings, and at other events where their services are requested.

(signed) Alta B Hall

 

 

Page 39

STANFORD WOMEN’S CLUB

San Francisco

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. J. F. Sheehan, Jr., 117 Alpine……………………………………….President

Mrs. Margaret Smith Thomas, Palo Alto………………………..First Vice-President

Miss Eva Pearsall, 333 Pine………………………………….Second Vice-President

Mrs. Elizabeth Hogue Moore, 947 Bush…………………………………...Secretary

Miss Helen Cochrane, 1663 O’Farrell……………………………………..Treasurer

DIRECTORS

            Mrs. Elizabeth Yoch Lewton                                         Mrs. Geralding Dewey

            Miss Katherine Chandler                                              Mrs. Adeline Wright Fuller

 

   The Stanford Women's Club was organized three years ago with the purpose of developing and fostering social relations of all Stanford women, and to maintain a spirit of interest in the conduct of the University and all things which pertain to the democratic ideals of Stanford.  Any woman who has matriculated at Stanford and is a resident of the City of San Francisco or within a radius of fifty miles is eligible to membership.  The club has over 150 active members and the membership drive should increase the number very materially.

   Board meetings are held the last Tuesday of the month at the Young Women's Christian Association Building, 620 Sutter Street, at 7:30 p.m.  All members are invited to attend.

   The regular monthly luncheon is held on the second Saturday of each month at 12:45 p.m. at the Clift Hotel.  A speaker for fifteen or twenty minutes is part of the program followed by informal discussions on University activities and general information on its developments so our women may keep in close touch and be rightfully informed on what is going on since they severed their closer touch with their Alma Mater.

   The past year a scholarship fund was started and the sum of two thousand dollars obtained.  This scholarship will be awarded to a San Francisco girl. The requirements, and awarding of same are being worked out by the chairman, Mrs. Verne McKinney, past president and her committee.

   The Board of Directors and officers have been actively engaged in the million dollar drive for Stanford and hope to see their efforts rewarded with the fixed sum of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, the quota for San Francisco.

   A regular calendar for the year has not been mapped out, but the usual luncheons and teas will be given and emergency duties met by the very active and efficient officers.

   The housing committee are looking for permanent and suitable headquarters and the year’s work will be actively centered in making the Stanford women of San Francisco realize they can give and receive much by close co-operation, loyalty and a united interest in matters pertaining to their Alma Mater, Leland Stanford University.

(signed) Josephine F. Sheehan

President

 

Page 40

COLLEGE WOMAN’S CLUB

San Diego Branch

American Association of University Women

OFFICERS

Mrs. Warren E. Libby, 450 Olive…………………………………………………..President

Mrs. A. H. Merrick, 3911 St. James…………………………………….First Vice-President

Dr. Alice E. Pratt, 2506 Collier……………………………………….Second Vice-President

Mrs. John Stone, 4811 Pamorama Way…………………………………Third Vice-President

Miss Mary C. Hristol, 3105 5th Street……………………………………Recording Secretary

Miss Nina J. Cleaver, 600 First Street, Coronado……………………Corresponding Secretary

Miss Annie H. Goodrich, 3668 Oregon Street……………………………………….Treasurer

Miss Aeline Fay, 840 Ash Street……………………………………….……Member at Large

Mrs. R. M. Morton, 3412 28th Street……………………………………………………Press

Miss Alice Halliday, 3555 First Street……………………………………………….Councillor

   The College Woman's Club of San Diego was organized for the purpose of promoting fellowship among college women, and for the furtherance of educational and social interests among its members and in the community. 

   Eighteen women were present at the first meeting held October 12th, 1911, when Mrs. Earl A. Garretson was elected president.

   So ready was the response to a college woman's organization that one week later when the second meeting was called thirty-seven women were present to voice approval of the plans for such an organization.

   Miss Belle P. Nason, a public spirited woman who had interested herself in woman's advancement, particularly in forming clubs for young girls and women was elected an honorary member of the College Woman's Club in recognition for her splendid spirit in developing higher idealism in the lives of school girls and employed women.

   During the first year plans were made for three departments of activities of vital interest to college women--civic, educational, and philanthropic.

   Social Service Committee, 1913:  After the first year's work  in the fall of 1913 plans were discussed for the establishment of a social service section, under the advisement of Miss Emma F. Way, and Miss Nason, social service among working girls was planned which later might become the nucleus for a real college settlement.

   First Funds Raised:  Under a committee composed of Mrs. F.E. Nash, Miss Belle Nason, Mrs. Mary Hill, Mrs. George Buxton, Miss Elizabeth Charles, Mrs. C.W. Winslow, president of the club, Miss Emma Way, chairman of the philanthropic committee, a play (Campus Newsers) was given by the College Woman's Club at the Spreckles Theater.  The funds accruing from the play's presentation were to be used by the Philanthropic committee for a settlement nucleus.  The sum of nearly $1,400.00 was raised.

   The Pathfinder, Social Survey:  The first step taken was to determine the definite need for such work and the best location for the settlement. A social survey of San Diego was decided upon, and "The Pathfinder Social Survey" was completed in March, 1914, by Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. King, assisted by a special committee, members of the College Woman's Club, and interested friends.  The investigation covered public health and sanitation; public education; recreation; taxation and public finance; and a list of charitable and semi-charitable agencies.  The Pathfinder, a splendid report, disclosed interesting facts and urgent need for a settlement establishment.

   The Books created much commitment and were the means of arousing public interest and some finances for the project.

   Neighborhood House, July, 1914: Subsequently with the loyal support of Miss Way, Mrs. Mary A. Hill, Mrs. Earl Garretson, Miss Marion Mitchell, Mrs. Fred King, and other interested workers, Neighborhood House, the College Settlement was started at 14th and H Streets, July, 1914, with Mrs. King as head worker.

   Scholarship Funds:  During this time other interests had developed in the club, and plans of the educational committee established a scholarship fund to assist girls through grammar school, high school or college, as the means or case might determine; and throughout the club's growth this scholarship fund has been in constant use.

   Social and Educational Development: The social and educational purposes of the club had not been neglected, and noteworthy lectures on art, English, music, drama and kindred subjects were enjoyed with profit by members and outsiders who were guests of the club.  Unique parties to introduce new members to each other and to the club in general were planned and were successful in developing a fine spirit among the members.

   State Federation of Woman's Clubs: So widespread has been the interest of the club's activities that with a beginning of eighteen members three years before, the club at its May, 1914 meeting reported 132 members with a representation of fifty colleges.  Not wishing selfishly to limit their interest to college affairs, in March, 1914, the club affiliated with the State Federation of Women's Clubs.

   Glee Club:  The fall of 1914 found a musical section added to the club committees--that of a Glee Club founded under the direction of Mrs.  Edwin P. Sample.  Remarkable results were shown from the beginning, and for several years the College Woman's Glee Club was one of the real choral organizations of the city.

Neighborhood House Association:  So successful has been the Neighborhood House work that larger quarters and better facilities were needed.  The Neighborhood House Association was formed admitting members other than college women to co-operate with the Industrial School Board in the Logan Heights district where the foreign population and thickly congested living conditions were found.

First Year-Book:  The first year-book was published September, 1914, with Mrs. Warren E.

 

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Libby chairman of press. It contained much of interest to the members, giving in detail the progress of the club, its affiliation with its varied interests, and the list of members with the colleges represented.

   General Interests of Club:  During the next three years the club took active part in many interests of civic growth such as assistance in work for the Exposition of 1915-1916, better film movement, milk inspection and distribution of milk to needy families, health and sanitation measures, and has endorsed the local organizations in their efforts to arouse civic consciousness along its varied lines.

   Drama Section 1915-1916: With the purpose in mind of increasing funds of the club, and also to allow histrionic expression of talented members of the club, a dramatic section under the able direction of Mrs. A. J.  Casebeer, assisted by Mrs. C. A. A. McGee, was formed.  Many delightful plays, playlets, and readings were enjoyed by the club, for which an admission could be charged.

   War Work:  During the World War the College Woman's Club devoted its activities to war interests.  A War Service section was formed to represent the clubs in war work, and co-operate with the government organizations in uniting for Red Cross work for convalescent soldiers at Camp Kearny; a War Fund committee was formed to assist in drives for war savings stamps, liberty loans and Red Cross Drives.

   The Strolling Players:  This band was formed under the Drama Section for patriotic service, to visit various camps and help furnish entertainment for enlisted men.  The Music Section also held itself in readiness to answer calls for patriotic service whenever needed.  The Educational committee planned work along lines suggested by Carrie Chapman Catt for the Council of National Defense, that of retelling accredited truths to spread throughout the country.  The Social Service Section of Neighborhood House adhered to the plan of Americanization of our foreign born residents as their share in war activities.

   Reorganization of College Club, 1918:  Association of Collegiate Alumnae--With the club's growth, its membership numbering 212, and with 89 colleges represented, it seemed a necessary procedure to reorganize so as to be eligible for membership in the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, a national organization founded in 1882 and composed of women graduates from about one hundred American colleges and universities whose degrees entitled them to membership.  The association was organized for the purpose of uniting alumnae of different institutions for practical educational work, for the collection and publication of statistical and other information concerning education, and for the inspiration of higher standards of education in general.  As this organization presented possibilities for greater development for the College Women's Club, in April, 1918, the club became the San Diego Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae.

   Cultural Asset to Community:  Study classes were formed November 11, 1919, and they were opened to the public as a contributor to the cultural assets of the city.

   California Woman's Legislative Council:  The club took out membership in the California Woman's Legislative Council in April, 1920.  This organization represented the interests of 40,000 women of the state.

   The American Association of University Women:  During a convention held in Washington, D.C., March 28 to April 2, 1921, upon the recommendations of a joint committee of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae and the Southern Association of College Women the amalgamation of the two Alumnae associations was consummated, a new name chosen, and certain basic changes and by-laws.  The actions taken were not retroactive. 
   Under the reorganization the name of Association of Collegiate Alumnae was changed to read American Association of University Women.

   In 1920 an International Federation of University Women was founded, and since then several countries have affiliated with the organization, including Great Britain, Canada, France, Italy, Spain, Czecho-Slovakia, Holland, and the United States.  The aim of the federation is to promote international understanding of educational movements, and to promote international friendship among students of the world.

   The American Association of University Women is the American Branch of the International Federation.  Hence every member of the American Association of University Women is not only helping to advance education in America, but is directly contributing to the support of the International Federation.

San Diego Branch, American Association of University Women:  In April, 1921, the San Diego College Woman's Club voted to remain in the National and International organization and thus become the San Diego Branch of the American Association of University Women.

   With the steady growth of the College Woman's Club the year 1921-1922 will find a membership of approximately 250 members, representing 95 colleges ready to shoulder the responsibilities already begun.

   Neighborhood House under the loyal direction of its interested workers, both of yesterday and today, finds its needs and developments calling for greater response from the college members and from the community at large.  It is with great measure of satisfaction that these members who have en ever increasing influence in the community in the advancement of the cause for the higher education of women.

   Past chairman of the Social Service committee to whom such splendid results for Neighborhood House should be credited have been: Mrs. Earl Garretson, Mrs. Mary A. Hill, Miss Anna B. Christian, Miss Helen Clark, Miss Helen Marston, Dr. Alice Pratt, Miss Emma Way, Miss Mariam Beasley, and Miss Maud Fay, present chairman of the Neighborhood House Committee.

   The past presidents of the club were: Mrs. Earl A. Garretson, Mrs. C. W. Winslow, Mrs. Charles Bentham (deceased), Mrs. H. I. Randall (Gertrude Logenecker), Mrs. W. H. Fraser, Mrs. Irving Outcalt, Mrs. H. H. Wentworth (Helen Clark), Mrs. Jesse Shreve, Mrs. George J. Champlin, Miss Arline Fay.

(signed) Mrs. R.M. Morton

Press Chairman

 

Page 42

Photo of Myra Nye

 

Page 44

 

WOMEN’S ATHLETIC CLUB

 

OFFICERS

 

Miss Jane C. Humphrees, 2326 Scarf

President

Mrs. Frank A. Gibson, 2301 Scarf

First Vice President

Mrs. Hancock Banning, Banning Place, Wilmington

Second Vice President

Mrs. Roy Jones, 308 Commonwealth

Third Vice President

Mrs. Florine H. Wolfstein, 671 South Coronado

Secretary

Mrs. Homer Laughlin, Jr. 666 W. 18th

Treasurer

Mrs. A. B. Barret, 1235 Orchid, Hollywood

Auditor

 

DIRECTORS

            Mrs. Robert J. Burdette                                                            Mss Caroline Kellogg

            Mrs. W. I. Hollingsworth                                                          Mss Clara Erickson

            Mrs. Willis G. Hunt                                                                   Mss Rosario Dockweiller

            Miss Florence E. Shindler                                                         Mss Frances Holmes

 

   The Women’s Athletic Club of Los Angeles is an organization formed for the specific purpose of building a Woman’s Club House in Los Angeles that will serve the double purpose of affording full club privileges to its member and as headquarters and meeting place for the various women’s organizations of the city.

   The club was organized April 26, 1921.  Mrs. Mathew S. Robertson was elected as the first president and served in that capacity until her death, which occurred December 1, 1921.  The Board of Directors voted at once to include in the new building a Memorial Library and Reading Room dedicated to Mrs. Robertson.

   In less than a year the club has enrolled over eleven hundred members and purchased property valued at $200,000 for a building site.  The property consists of three lots, 150 x 155 feet between Eighth and Ninth Streets on flower Street, one of the most desirable locations in the city for such a club, as it is adjacent to the best shopping district and yet outside the congested traffic zone. 

   The Membership of the club is representative of groups of women of wide interests and varied activities and includes leaders in club life, social circles, the professions, and business enterprises.  A large and most interesting group is made up of representatives of the Pioneer families of California, and it is planned to create within the club some form of permanent memorial to the courage and vision of the pioneer women whose sacrifices made possible today’s achievements.

   This will be the first club of its kind to be built in the Southern part of the State, and will serve a long felt need in the community.  One of the special features of the club will be the conveniences it will afford to its out-of-town members who will find there a convenient and comfortable headquarters during the pleasure or business trip to the city, offering a place for rest and recreation and for meeting and entertaining friends.

   The club quarters will include a lounge, a dining-room, library and reading room, rest rooms, gymnasium, swimming pool, etc., completely equipped departments of hairdressing, manicuring, massage, Turkish baths, etc.; bedrooms for permanent and transient use of the members and for persons holding guest cards in the club.

   In addition to the club quarters, it is planned to include in the building, halls and executive headquarters for the use of various organizations of women desiring such housing accommodation, and thereby securing to the club an income which will enable the monthly dues of the members

 

Page 45

 

to be kept at a low figure.  The initiation fee for membership in the club at present time is $125.00 plus 10% war tax for regular members, and $1,000.00 for life memberships.

   The life memberships are limited to one hundred in number and are exempt from dues. As life memberships are for the life of the club, they furnish the most desirable membership offered.

   The life members enrolled to date are: Mrs. Charles A. Andrews, Mrs. Harold Arnold, Mrs. Maria Bastanchury, Mrs. William T. Bishop, Mrs. Boardman, Mrs. Norman Bridge, Mrs. Robert J. Burdette, Mrs. Harry Chandler, Mrs. E. A. Clampitt, Mrs. Louis Cole, Mrs. E. L. Doheny, Mrs. Eldridge M. Fowler, Mrs. Kate C. Gartz, Miss Evelyn Hamburger, Mrs. Irving Hellman, Mrs. W. I. Hollingsworth, Mrs. Willis G. Hunt, Mrs. Fred Keeler, Mrs. Lee Phillips, Mrs. Otto Sweet, Mrs. John Milner, Mrs. William Lee Wollett, Mrs. Thomas Bard, Mrs. W. E. Clark, Mrs. Horace Laughlin, Jr., Mrs. W. T. McArthur, Miss Josephine Izard.

   The members of the present Board of Directors are:  Mrs. Hancock Banning, Mrs. A. B. Barret, Mrs. Robert J. Burdette, Miss Rosario Dockweiler, Miss Clara Erickson, Mrs. Frank A. Gibson, Mrs. W. L. Hollingsworth, Miss Frances Holmes, Miss Jame C. Humphreys, Mrs. Willis G. Hunt, Mrs. Roy Jones, Miss Caroline Kellogg, Mrs. Homer Laughlin, Miss Florence Shindler, Mrs. Florine Wolfstein.

 

                                                (Signed) Martha L. Cable (Mrs. Herbert A. Cable)

           

 

Page 47

WOMAN’S ATHLETIC CLUB

San Francisco

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. James A. Black, Stanford Court Apartments………………………………………………President

Mrs. P.E. Bowles, Union and McAdam Streets, Oakland…………………………….First Vice-President

Mrs. H.M.A. Miller, Stanford Court Apartments…………………………………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. William Roth, 2251 Jackson……………………………………………………………….Treasurer

Mrs. William J. Shotwell, 1869 California……………………………………………………….Secretary

Mrs. Daniel Volkmann, 1901 California…………………………………………Corresponding Secretary

 

DIRECTORS

 

Mrs. Edson F. Adams                          Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz                         Miss Jean Boyd

Mrs. Samuel Boardman                        Mrs. Frank Dray                                  Mrs. Milton Esberg

Mrs. Wickham Havens                         Miss Josephine Moore                          Miss Laura L McKinstry

Mrs. Samuel Pond                                Mrs. Patricia Webster

 

   The story of the building of the Women’s Athletic Club of San Francisco, the strength and value of the club in the community, the pleasures and comfort accorded members, the respect the club commands from both men and women in the commonwealth, form the nucleus for a story of courage, valor, determination, business ability, integrity, optimism and romance.  Furthermore, the story of the Women’s Athletic Club of San Francisco is a story of feminine foresight.

   When the small group of representative San Francisco women first planned to have a club, and a club building, something after the manner of men’s clubs—a club which should be all that the name implies—many husbands of the women who had dreamed of such a plan, many business men who admired the business audacity displayed, gallantly withheld smiles.  Some women, who were originally, among the doubters, as whether such a thing as a Women’s Athletic Club were feasible, or, even possible, were finally stirred to profound respect when the dauntless women made their “dream” a firm realization.

   The Women’s Athletic Club of San Francisco is a success, in every sense of the word—financially, socially—a convincing argument in favor of women who build.

   Having outgrown the capacity of their present quarters, the club bought a lot adjoining the present structure, and soon a new building will be erected with sixty more rooms.  The new building will contain a larger swimming pool, almost twice as large as the handsome marble swimming pool in the present building.  Other additions will include a larger tennis court, indoor golf accommodations, more equipment for the gymnasium, which ranks now as one of the “last word” in women’s athletics.  The new building will have more rooms for hair-dressing and Turkish bath departments.

   The Women’s Athletic Club of San Francisco was organized in 1915.  While a lure of lovers of athletics, it is the center for social and cultural activities, a pretty place where famous women are feted, dinned and honored on noteworthy occasions.  It forms an attractive setting where hostess members greet the travelers or speed the parting guest; it is a place where debutantes tell their romances and announce their betrothals.  It is a place where young mothers assemble for home economics talks.  The giving of smart luncheons for girl friends, dinners, once in a while for father, or brother, or man guests are honors conferred by members, as features of the club.

   Many of San Francisco’s most prominent families are enrolled on the membership list which now numbers 1,784.  The present board of managers headed by the popular president, Mrs. James Black, and her splendid staff, merit universal commendations.  The vision of things now so thoroughly a part of the Women’s Athletic Club of San Francisco certainly belongs to the original board who watched their first thoughts thrive to fruition.

   Mrs. H. D. Pillsbury was the first president, and on her board were the following women: Mrs. Latham McMullin, Mrs. Lawrence Harris, Mrs. James A. Black, Mrs. Raymond Wilson, Miss Elizabeth Livermore, Mrs. Julian Thorne, Mrs. Geo T. Cameron, Mrs. Thomas A. Driscoll, Mrs. E. S. Heller, Mrs. John Lawson, Mrs. Oscar Fitzalan Long, Mrs. Geo. D. Lyman, Mrs. Aetholl McBean, Mrs. Silas H. Palmer, Mrs. Wm. Henry Smith, Jr., Mrs. James Ellis Tucker.  Among charter members were: Mrs. Edson F. Adams, Mrs. Wallace Alexander, Miss Marion Angelotti, Miss Mary Armsby, Mrs. John Barneson, Miss Marion Baker, Mrs. P..E. Bowles, Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz, Mrs. John Breuner, Miss Winifred Braden, Miss Lynda Buchanan, Mrs. Wm. Cluff, Mrs. Charles J. Deering, Miss Christine Donohoe, Mrs. Miton Esberg, Miss Mary Eyre, Mrs. Paul Fagan, Mrs. W. B. Faville, Mrs. Wm. Fitzhugh, Mrs. John Gallois, Mrs. Alice Gartenlaub, Mrs. J. J. Gottlob, Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, Mrs. J. R. Hanify, Mrs. Richard Heiman, Miss Jennie Hooker, Mrs. Frederick J. Koster, Mrs. Peter B. Kyne, Mrs. Geo. Lent, Mrs. Louis F. Monteagle, Mrs. E. W. Newhall, Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, Miss Amy Requa, Mrs. Lloyd Robbins, Miss Else Schilling, Miss Gladys Sullivan, Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Miss Emelie Tubbs, Mrs. Geo. H. Tyson, Miss Hilda Van Sicklen, Miss Johanna Volkmann, Mrs. W. F. B. Wakefield, Mrs. Willis Walker, Dr. Agnes Walker, Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler, Mrs. Robert White.

 

 

Page 49

 

EBELL

Los Angeles

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. Charles Hulbert Toll, 1635 Kenneth Road, North Glendale…………………………………….President

Mrs. Oscar A. Trippet, 943 S. Hoover…………………………………………………...First Vice-President

Mrs. Emerson Clyde Gates, 5334 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood………………………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. Leslie R. Hewitt, 1212 S. Alvarado…………………………………………………Third Vice-President

Mrs. John Stearns Thayer, 2656 Brighton Avenue……………………………………….Fourth Vice-President

Mrs. Berney Donnell, 1410 Sherman Drive………………………………………………..Recording Secretary

Mrs. Edward Crumley, 2283 W. Twenty-first………………………………………...Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Lewis Clark Carlisle, 1849 W. Twenty-first…………………………………………………….Treasurer

Mrs. Edward A. Tufts, 2666 Vermont Avenue………………………………………………...General Curator

 

DIRECTORS

            Mrs. Charles Hulbert Toll                                             Mrs. Matthew Sparks Robertson

            Mrs. Grantland Seaton Long                                         Mrs. Benjamin Franklin Perkins

            Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey                                           Mrs. William Read

 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS

 

Mrs. Almon Bartlett Ross, Ebell Rest Cottage Association                     Mrs. Ilot Johnson, Scholarship

 

   The Ebell of Los Angeles, the third of several Ebells in the state to be organized, and now grown to be the greatest in point of numbers, was formed in 1894 for “advancement in all lines of general culture,” as its by-laws state.

   The twenty-eight years of existence have witnessed many changes.  The club now numbers twenty-two hundred members, including a flourishing Junior Auxiliary of a hundred members. The sections are now fourteen, as follows: English, French, Spanish, Parliamentary Law, Social Science, Art and Travel, Bible Literature, Books and Current Literature, Browning, Choral, Music, Drama, Shakespeare and Psychology.

   In addition to this section work, the club maintains “Rest Cottage,” an institution where from four to eight guests are cared for at a nominal charge (if guest is financially able) or free of charge. The guests are those women who have been discharged from local hospitals as convalescents, but who find their strength insufficient to enable them to assume the burdens of employment.  Here they may gain the necessary strength which shall enable them to return to active life.  Positions are secured for those for whom employment is not waiting.

   This year twelve young women who have been recommended by the deans of the high schools or colleges where the girls are students, and whose scholarship is of the best, have been assisted with a regular sum of money each month, by the club’s Scholarship Department.  The money advanced is in the form of a gift.

   The Practical Relief department has assisted local philanthropic organizations by co-operation in providing clothing from its stores for the needy, and by sewing for emergency calls.  This department has practically clothed Ebells’s Scholarship girls.

   The club meetings are held every Monday; and the programs presented cover a wide range of interests.  All meetings are held in the club house, erected in 1906.

   An attractive feature of the club is its weekly guest luncheon, at which men and women in various activities in life are the speakers.  Every important current topic is here discussed.

 

 

                                                (signed)   Mrs. Charles Hulbert Toll

 

 

Page 51

 

WOMAN’S CLUB

Hollywood

 

OFFICERS

 

Mrs. Henry T. Wright, 8300 de Longpre Avenue………………………………………………President

Mrs. Joseph J. Carter, 1801 La Brea………………………………………………..First Vice-President

Mrs. John F. Mead, 7231 Hollywood Boulevard…………………………………Second Vice-President

Mrs. H.G. Bentham, 5526 Lexington Avenue……………………………………….Third Vice-President

Mrs. Alfred L. Bartlett, 1647 Sierra Bonita………………………………………….Recording Secretary

Mrs. Walter G. Hudson, 7120 Sunset Boulevard……………………………….Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. F.W. Bartlett, 7558 Hollywood Boulevard………………………Assistant Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Chas. T. Hovey, 1725 El Cerrito Place…………………………………………………...Treasurer

Mrs. Chas. Stewart, 1529 Courtney Avenue………………………………………….Assistant Treasurer

Mrs. B.F. Bailey, 1260 Harper Avenue……………………………………………..Federation Secretary

Caroline Spalding…………………………………………………………..Financial Secretary and Clerk

Mrs. J.R. Dudley, 981 Sanborn Avenue…………………………………………………..Parliamentarian

Mrs. Jesse B. Roberts, 1400 Hayworth Avenue………………………………………………….Curator

 

DIRECTORS

            Mrs. Thomas Cooke                                                                Mrs. F. M. Douglass

            Mrs. E. B. Latham                                                                    Mrs. Chas. H. Richmond

            Mrs. Llewellyn A. Banks

 

      Our club was organized May, 1905, joined the State Federation in 1908, and was incorporated in 1913.  We have, to date, thirteen hundred members, and a property worth over two hundred thousand dollars.  We have five departments: Music, Art, Literature, Drama, and Public Affairs; and nine study sections.  The English and Shakespeare sections were added last year, as also were the Bible Study and Woman’s Chorus sections.  These, I am proud to state, were organized during my administration.  This year we added a Political Science section.

   The club enters into all community affairs and lends its influence to any and all things for the betterment of the people. Our club is used as the meeting place for: The Apollo Club, a men’s chorus; The Post War Service League, an organization for the welfare of disabled soldiers; The Velada Club, a group of girls employed during the day; and for the Children’s Community Center, a group that it was my privilege to organize, consisting of a chorus of about two hundred children meeting on Saturday afternoon to sing under the leadership of Mr. Hugo Kirchoped; and a play section, which is doing excellent work producing children’s dramas.

   We build this year our new auditorium, a fire-proof building, seating one thousand, and which, with the enlargement of the kitchen and dinning-room, cost $65,000.00.

   We gave an evening reception on May third to the State officers and delegates who were attending the State Convention of C. F. W. C. held in Los Angeles.

   We give a monthly “Prom” for the Junior and Senior students in the Hollywood High School, and also an annual scholarship to one of its students. Contributions are made to all worthy causes.

 

                                                (signed)   Janette Bray Wright

 

Page 53

CALIFORNIA CLUB

San Francisco

 

OFFICERS

 

Mrs. A.W. Scott, Fairmont Hotel……………………………………………………………….President

Mrs. O.H. Fernbach, 1902 Leavenworth……………………………………………..First Vice-President

Mrs. F.M. Sponogle, 1902 Leavenworth…………………………………………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. Chester Le Noir, 1508 Lake……………………………………………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. Loran E. Barnes, 400 36th Avenue…………………………………………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. Chas. S. Rosener, Hotel Whitcomb………………………………………………………..Treasurer

Mrs. John S. Phillips, 2235 Leavenworth……………………………………………….Financial Secretary

Mrs. W.J.B. Lee, San Mateo……………………………………………………………..Social Secretary

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

            Mrs. Jos. Victor                                                                       Mrs. Walter Scott Gray

            Mrs. Davis Loudenback                                                           Mrs. Helen S. Treat

            Mrs. Walter V. Walsh                                                              Mrs. John R. Jones

            Mrs. A. John Archer                                                                 Mrs. L. H. Thompson

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS

 

            Mrs. Jas. C. Crawford, Education                                             Mrs. A. D. McLean, Social Science

            Mrs. Hamilton J. Riggins, Civics                                                Mrs. George T. Marsh, Outdoor Art

 

   The California Club holds a place in clubdom all its own, virtually a civic club, yet with departments and sections covering almost every line of educational and welfare work.  The Civic Department is active in every branch of civic demand.  The Social Science Department in Hospital and Welfare work, the Educational Department has many sections and branches, the Outdoor Art, in the interest of the out-of-doors, in the preservation of our forests, wild flower, birds.

   The sections of the several departments are: Literacy, Choral, Players, French, Shakespeare, Art, History, Whist, Dancing, New Citizenship and Parliamentary.  The Literary Section is a joy, bringing to us wonderful days of nearness and companionship, with the best authors and writers and their works; these days are always looked forward to with greatest interest.  An Open Forum held once a month is most interesting, bringing the members into a line of active thinking and expression and greatly enjoyed by all.

   A club Cotillion is given once a month, and lends a happy trend to the club life.

   We were happy to full measure in the burning of the mortgage on our club home.  Our celebration of it was unique and delightful, a day never to be forgotten by the members of the club who participated in it.

   Thus the California Club studies, works, plays, a band of capable, busy, united, wonderful women.

 

                                                            (signed) Mrs. A.W. Scott

 

   Chairmen of the different sections who served with Mrs. A. W. Scott were: Mrs. William H. Wilson, literature; Mrs. Edward J. Morser, players; Mrs. Arthur Flood, American Citizenship; Mrs. Walter Walsh, French; Mrs. W. S. Leske, dancing; Mrs. Richmond Revalk, choral; Miss Mary Fairbrother, parliamentary law; Mrs. Lydia Lister, Shakespeare section;  Mrs. William S. Howard, whist.

   Mrs. F. M. Sponogle is the new president of the California Club. On her executive staff are: Mrs. Sidney Strickland, first vice-president; Mrs. John S. Phillips, second vice-president.  The board of directors include: Mrs. Loren Barnes, Mrs. Hamilton Riggins, Mrs. Clovis Farnsworth, Mrs. John S. Mills, Mrs. A.D. McLean, Mrs. Samuel Dannebaum, Dr. S. B. K. Hewitt, and Miss Elizabeth Hill.

 

 

Transcribed by David Rugeroni.

Proofread by Betty Vickroy.

 


© 2005 Nancy Pratt Melton




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