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WHO’S WHO AMONG

THE WOMEN OF CALIFORNIA

1922

____________

 

 

Page 136

 

 

DAUGHTERS  OF  AMERICAN  REVOLUTION

California

 

VICE-PRESIDENT GENERAL, CALIFORNIA

Mrs. CLASSIUS C. COTTLE..................................……………1412 Victoria Drive, Los Angeles

 

STATE  OFFICERS

1920-1922

REGENT

Mrs. OSWALD H. HARSHBARGER.....................……………………269 Mather Street, Oakland

VICE-REGENT

Mrs. LYMAN POLK STOOKEY............................………….1240 West 29th Street, Los Angeles

RECORDING  SECRETARY

Mrs. ALLEN H. VANCE..........................................……………..170 Central Avenue, Sausalito

CORRESPONDING  SECRETARY

Mrs. IVY PERKINS CERKEL..................................…………….586 24th Avenue, San Francisco

TREASURER

Mrs. E. K. ROBERTS................................................…………2957 Hillegass Avenue, Berkeley

AUDITOR,  NORTHERN  DISTRICT

Mrs. K. L. EVANS.....................................................………………..913 17th Street, Modesto

AUDITOR,  SOUTHERN  DISTRICT

Mrs. O. P. BURDG......................................................……………441 Lemon Street, Riverside

HISTORIAN

Mrs. WILLIAM P. NYE..............................................……………………………………Covina

CHAPLAIN

Mrs. CHARLES W. CARTER....................................………..424 N. Madison Avenue, Pasadena

DIRECTOR,  NORTHERN  DISTRICT

Mrs. LISBETH HOBART CURTIS............................………….510 Stockton Street, San Francisco

LIBRARIAN

Mrs. CHARLES BOOTH.........................................………..1515 Garfield Avenue, So. Pasadena

CONSULTING  REGISTRAR

Miss SARAH LOUISE KIMBALL.............................……………822 Kohl Building, San Francisco

 

CHAIRMEN  OF  STATE  COMMITTEES

PATRIOTIC  EDUCATION  AND  AMERICANIZATION

Mrs. C. F. LEWIS......................................................………...125 Lyon Street, San Francisco

VICE-CHAIRMAN

Mrs. J. C. INGHRAM.................................................………..1131 W. 53rd Street, Los Angeles

MAGAZINE

Mrs. CORNELIA A. TIBBITS...................................……………..1427 Oxford Street, Berkeley

INTERNATIONAL  RELATIONS

Mrs. ELSIE CHAPLINE CROSS................................…………………1485 Alice Street, Oakland

VICE-CHAIRMAN

Miss LOUISA P. MERRITT........................................……………………….Box 315, Pasadena

PRESERVATION  OF  HISTORIC  SPOTS  AND  OLD  TRAILS

Mrs. JESSE H. SHREVE.........................................………..2265 Fort Stockton Drive, San Diego

CORRECT  USE  OF  FLAG

Mrs. MAY H. SMITH...............................................…………..222 East E Street, Ontario, Calif.

VICE-CHAIRMAN

Mrs. HELEN CRITTENDEN IRVINE.....................…………………1715 Bushnell Place, Berkeley

HISTORICAL  AND  LITERARY  RECIPROCITY

Miss ALICE N. HAYES............................................…………………………Stanford University

CONSERVATION  AND  THRIFT

Mrs. ROBERT E. LEE JEWETT...............................…………..45 Ashbury Terrace, San Francisco

VICE-CHAIRMAN

Mrs. GEORGE K. PATTERSON...............................……………...1616m Fuller Street, Hollywood

LIQUIDATION  AND  ENDOWMENT  FUND

Mrs. GEORGE C. CODDING…………………………………………….348 34th Street, Oakland

REAL DAUGHTERS

Mrs. THOMAS B. STOWELL................................…………..2702 Hobart Boulevard, Los Angeles

REVOLUTIONARY  RELICS  FOR  MEMORIAL  CONTINENTAL  HALL

Mrs. ALEXANDER HILTON.................................………………..106 18th Avenue, San Francisco

PUBLICITY

Mrs. O. C. VOGEL...................................................………….2901 W. 15th Street, Los Angeles

Mrs. AGNES R. BURT.............................................………..2524 Lombard Street, San Francisco

RECIPROCITY  LUNCHEONS

Mrs. J. M. BAILHACHE...........................................……………2901 Scott Street, San Francisco

Mrs. J. C. GREENE...................................................…………….1115 Pacific Avenue, Alameda

Mrs. L. B. ALLISON.................................................………...546 S. Serrano Street, Los Angeles

 

 

PAGE 137

 

DAUGHTERS  OF  AMERICAN  REVOLUTION

California

 

 

All branches of the Daughters of the American Revolution stand unitedly:  "For love of country; for service to the country; for unswerving loyalty to the Government; for inculcating these principles in children, both native and foreign-born; for encouraging the study of American history."

     The Daughters of the American Revolution was organized in California by Mrs. A.S. Hubbard in 1891.

     Mrs. John Franklin Swift now of Berkeley, formerly of San Francisco was a Past Vice-President General from1906 to 1912 and again from 1914 to 1916.  Mrs. Cassius C. Cottle, of Los Angeles, has been Vice-President General, California, from 1920 to 1922.

     Mrs. George Maynard Minor, President General, Daughters of the American Revolution, was the guest of the California members this spring, attending the annual convention held at Los Angeles.

     During the past year new chapters were organized in Bakersfield, Fresno, Sacramento, Chico, Red Bluff, and at Pacific Grove.  This list now totals fifty-five chapters in California at the close of the fiscal year 1921-1922.

     California ranks one hundred per cent in three national Daughters of the American Revolution undertakings, being one of the first ten, of the forty-eight states, to support the work of erecting a fountain in memory of the Pilgrim Mothers at Plymouth; the Immigration Manual; and, the painting of ships and convoys.

     Mrs. O. H. Harshbarger, State Regent for California, said in her recent report that eleven books on California history have been given by Chapters to the National Library, with a copy of the "California Society of Mayflower Descendants," the gift of California's State Registrar.

     Substantial sums were given to the French orphans, to the Far East, to the Armenians, and to China, as part of the "International Relations" work.  To Conservation and Thrift aims the Daughters of the American Revolution gave to the Hoover Fund, to Social Welfare, to Redwood Conservation, to public schools, to the Young Men's Christian Association, to the Young Women’s Christian Association, to the Salvation Army, to the Indians, to the Maternity Hospital, to the Soldiers' Relief Fund, to the Red Cross, to the purchase of Liberty Bonds and Thrift Stamps.  They sent seeds to the Belgians, in addition to contributing to other worthy projects.

     One California member assisted by others gave an entertainment which netted the sum of fifteen hundred dollars, sent to the starving children of Europe.  For patriotic education in California, the Daughters of the American Revolution of the State contributed considerable sums of money to schools, including the Albion School and Paul Revere School of California.

     Other organizations received aid from the California chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution.  These included the George Junior Republic, Maternity College, Edna Alter Settlement, House of Neighborly Service, Tubercular Children, Chinese Rescue Home, Soldiers' Home, The Mobilized Women's American House.

     On Washington's Birthday, many chapters in San Francisco combined in a memorial celebration at the Palace of  Fine Arts.  Wreaths were placed by the Daughters of the American Revolution, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the Navy League, the Children of the American Revolution, and the local consuls of England, France, Japan and Panama, at the foot of the Houdin statue of Washington in the Palace of Fine Arts.

     The Southern California Chapters on June 14, 1921, placed a "Memorial Tablet" in Victory Grove, Los Angeles, to honor the service in the World War of all men and women from the families of the State Daughters of the American Revolution, and in memory of twenty-two Californians who made the supreme sacrifice.

     Seven celebrations have been held marking California's historic spots.  Chapters from the Bay Cities presented two large silk flags to the battleship California, during the month of February, Mrs. George Maynard Minor, President General, Daughters of the American Revolution, being the honor guest on this memorable occasion.

     The State Conference was held at Los Angeles in May, 1922, and was one of the most successful and best attended conferences recorded in the annals of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

     Mrs. George Maynard Minor, President General, Daughters of the American Revolution, went to France last August, to direct the dedication of the water system installed by the Society at Tilloloy, France.  California Chapters contributed their full pro rata toward the fund for the installation of this water system.  In fact, California Chapters stand on hundred per cent in all projects in which the Daughters of the American Revolution are unitedly interested.

 

PAGE 138

 

CHILDREN  OF  THE  AMERICAN  REVOLUTION

Golden Gate Society

 

Portrait of Mrs. W. D'EGILBERT here.

 

     On February 9, 1922, the Board of Management National Society Children of the American Revolution, honored me by the appointment of president Golden Gate Society, just three hundred and two years since the landing of the Pilgrims.

     The Trinity of inspiration--Plymouth Rock, on the Atlantic shores in 1620, the organization of Golden Gate society on San Francisco Bay, the Portals of the Pacific, in 1922--and the union completed in person by my good friend, the revered founder Mrs. Daniel Lathrop, a national figure in patriotic, literary and social circles, who has chosen in this idealistic manner to thus immortalize her dearest memories.

     As there were two score children on the Mayflower, who braved the storms, trials and hardships of those pioneer times, so must that dominant thought be ever present to encourage us to bear the standard of American liberty, freedom and independence passing it down through the years, from child to child, with the simple, though significant message, "Carry On."

Signature of Ida Jewell D'Egilbert

 

 

PATRIOTISM  THEIR  HERITAGE

 

The State of California Chapter, National Society of the Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America was organized by Mrs. Helen Crittenden Loveland, of Berkeley, California, on October 7, 1916 at the Hotel Alexandria, Los Angeles, Mrs. Loveland was the State President for a period of four years up to the year 1920.  The State Vice-President elected at this time was Mrs. James W. Johnson, of Los Angeles,  She, too, served in office until the year 1920.  Officers elected for the year 1922 are:  State President, Mrs. Theodore Gray, Berkeley; State Vice-President, Mrs. Alice Stowall McKevitt of Los Angeles; State Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. W. O. Fennimore, San Francisco; Assistant Secretary, Mrs. G. K. Patterson, Los Angeles; State Recording Secretary, Mrs. Robert Allan Reid, San Francisco; State Registrar, Mrs. A. B. Chase, San Francisco State Treasurer, Mrs. W. B. Gester, Berkeley; State Historian, Miss Joey Denton, Los Angeles; State Color-bearer, Miss Marie Stowell, Los Angeles; State Chaplain, Mrs. M. P. Waite, Los Angeles; Councillors, Mrs. William M. Taylor, Berkeley; Mrs. Raymond Perkins, San Francisco; Miss Mary Lambery Crittenden, San Francisco.  Those to serve from 1923 to 1924 are: Mrs. Frederick Hewlett, San Francisco; Mrs. O. H. Harbarger, Berkeley; Mrs. C. C. Cottle, Los Angeles.  Those elected for the period of 1924 to 1925 are: Mrs. W. J. Johnson, Los Angeles; Mrs. W. C. Leonard, Los Angeles; Mrs. C. S. Cuillian, Los Angeles.

     The Colonial Dames of California is headed by Mrs. Osgood Putnam, State President.  Mrs. J. J. Tully of Oakland, is the State President for the office of National State President for the New York State Colonial Dames.

 

PAGE 139

 

 

UNITED  DAUGHTERS  OF  THE 

CONFEDERACY

 

Portrait of MRS. GEORGE H. CABANISS here.

 

     Patriotic organizations of women identical in ideals and fealty, yet differing in affiliated groups, interest an observer.  "Self-reverent each, and reverencing each," these groups of women are united under the organization known as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

     Many chapters, each with a leader, and her staff of officers, contribute both in purpose and revenue, to the national organization.  Each chapter is of itself a pillar in the great structure which towers its strength among women's patriotic orders.

     Locally, each chapter, or chapters, in the great chain of the United Daughters of the Confederacy devote time and concerted attention to patriotic service.  So, with a tribute to all adapters of the United Daughters of the Confederacy throughout the entire state of California, we are privileged to quote here one of the chapters, criterion of this branch of feminine endeavor.  The Jefferson Davis Chapter, No. 540, United Daughters of the Confederacy San Francisco, is recorded here in a pleasing report by Mrs. George Cabaniss, wife of Judge Cabaniss.  Her report is typical of other high records of other chapters in California.

     Mrs. George H. Cabaniss has given a splendid, brief resume of her chapter, in the words quoted below:

     The Jefferson Davis Chapter, No. 540, United Daughters of the Confederacy of San Francisco, California, was founded by the late Mrs. Sidney M. Van Wyck who, in her person embodied the ideals and traditions of the "Old South."  The key-note of the Chapter is service, and it was the fulfillment of a long felt need in rendering aid, not merely material, but loving sympathy to those who had given their services and fortunes for the Stars and Stripes.

     Primarily a relief corps, the Chapter furnished comforts to the Confederate Veterans and aid to the needy Confederate women, and when death overtakes them, the last sacred rites are ministered and a fitting interment is provided.

     Education is one of the paramount features and the bestowal of scholarships is one of our activities.

     During the World War, at Neuilly Hospital, France, seventy beds, at a cost of $42,000.00 per annum, were endowed by the Daughters of the Confederacy (of which Jefferson Davis Chapter is a branch).  In less than one year this maintenance was guaranteed for the duration of the war.

     But likewise, a work of no less importance engrosses the energies of the organization in preserving the southern heritage of noble ideals, and in making known the glorious part, the literature and history of the South have had in our American History.

 

OFFICERS  OF  THE  JEFFERSON  DAVIS  CHAPTER,  No. 540, SAN FRANCISCO

1921-1922.

 

Mrs. GEORGE H. CABANISS.................................................………………………….President

Miss NORA A. QUEEN...........................................…………………………First Vice-President

Mrs. WALTER L. LEVIN...................................…………………………..Second Vice-President

Miss TINY COOMBS.............................................…………………………Third Vice-President

Mrs. ROBERT H. BORELAND..............................……………………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. WM. H. DE BELL....................................…………………………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. L. JULIAN LE CONTE.....................................................………………………...Treasurer

Mrs. CHESTER A. GARFIELD.................................................…………………………..Registrar

Mrs. M. B. JOHNSON................................................………………………..Financial Secretary

Mrs. CHAS. FREMONT POND.................................................…………………………Historian

Mrs. FRANK HALL WILSON........................................…………………………..Parliamentarian

Mrs. HERBERT C. MILLS...................................………………………….Custodian of the Cross

Mrs. L. M. SHUCK..................................………………………..Custodian of the Flags and Pins

 

PAGE 140

 

THREE  NOTEWORTHY  PATRIOTIC

ORGANIZATIONS

 

     Three noteworthy patriotic organizations which major on California history and heritage are among the effective groups of women's clubs.

     These organizations are:  The Woman's Auxiliary of California Pioneers, the Association of Pioneer Women of California and the Daughters of California Pioneers.

     The Woman's Auxiliary is headed by Mrs. Aurelius Buckingham, whose presidency had added prestige to the organization which is expressed in the title: Woman's Auxiliary of California Pioneers.  The meetings are held at the Fairmont Hotel and many of the State's oldest families are represented on the roster of this notable Auxiliary.

     The Association of Pioneer Women of California differs from the Auxiliary in that its members are pioneer women of California.

     Mrs. Mary Coghlan, the president, in one of her recent statements, said that the Association of Pioneer Women of California was the first pioneer woman's society in California.  The objects of the association are: "to collect and preserve the history of pioneer women: and, to co-operate with those who are working for the preservation of the forests and song birds."

     The association initiated the idea of the Log Cabin in Golden Gate Park.  This picturesque cabin was dedicated to the Association of Pioneer Women of California, October 28, 1911 and is used by the association for social purposes only. 

     As an historical society, the pioneer women have collected many valuable books and papers, bearing upon the early history of the State.

     The Daughters of California Pioneers represent the status of their name in the listing of pioneer organizations.  The purposes of the society are: to promote an interest in the collection and the preservation of historical objects, scientific and literary records pertaining to California history.

     Representatives have been sent from the Daughters of California Pioneers to meetings of the Old Mission Restoration Committee.  They have assisted other organizations in the restoration of California's old and sacred missions.

     Mrs. Frederick Bartels is the president of this organization, her executive board including some of the best known women in California's pioneer families.

     Meetings are held in Pioneer Hall, on Mondays.  Some worthy programs of unusual historical value have been given recently, including an American Indian Day at the Sorosis Club Hall, 563 Sutter Street.  Mrs. Donnelly was the chairman of this memorable event.

 

CALIFORNIA  WAR  MOTHERS

     In 1917 when our country called and the training camps claimed the flower of our manhood, an organization came into being called the War Mothers.

     Motherhood spelled "bravery" and no organization could be more truly patriotic than the various groups of National American War Mothers.  Prior to the signing of the Armistice on November 11, 1918, this group of women mostly mothers banded together in our own city, San Francisco, under the name of "Mothers and Kinsfolks of Service Men."  Brave as the bravest they worked for the welfare and comfort of their own sons and of other mothers' sons, far from home.

     When peace was declared the mothers were not content to step aside, they felt the need of their services was still very urgent for the returning soldiers.  Therefore when the National American War Mothers held the first state convention in Sacramento--the first in California--San Francisco mothers took immediate steps to organize in this city and on August 2, 1920, Mrs. Cora Harris, State War Mother, organized San Francisco Chapter.  Six months later a reorganization took place with Mrs. Rose C. Sargent as president; Mrs. E A. Bagot, first vice-president; Mrs. C. Witte, second vice-president; Mrs. Agnes Appel, recording secretary; Mrs. R. E. Cowan, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Lena Krauter, treasurer.

     A Gold Star Unit was formed with Mrs. Cynthia Shaw as president.  All gold star mothers are honored members--exempt from dues.  They have never ceased in their efforts to make the path of the sick and disabled man as easy as possible, ever ready to extend the right kind of comfort.  The national officers are: Mrs. E. Digny of New York, president; Mrs. J. C. McClure of Kansas City, first-vice-president; Mrs. Rose C. Sargent of San Francisco, recording secretary; Mrs. R. Jones of North Dakota, treasurer.

M. AGNES APPEL,

San Francisco Chapter

National American War Mothers

 

PAGE 142

 

THE  PARTHENEIA

 

For the past ten years an annual masque, known as the Partheneia, has been produced on the campus of the University of California by women of the student body of the university.

     While considered quite the most artistic and scholarly event of the college year, in creative work, among the women, the Partheneia is also regarded by faculty, student body and the public in general, as representative of the best talent among the students of the current year.

     Women authors, women composers, women artists, women managers, women directors, women in the entire cast, in the male roles as well as the feminine role; in fact women, exclusively, present the masque.  They dye the cloth for their costumes, they design and make the costumes, they design the settings for the scenery-parts, they direct the orchestra.

     The theme for the Partheneia has invariably dealt with the transition of maidenhood to womanhood, the original conception being the Greek.  In later years, various motifs have been used.  Hundred of women students take part in the Partheneia, classical dancing and pageantry being consistent features.  Thousands of spectators gather in Faculty Glade seating themselves either on the sloping ground, or in the seats reserved for the production.  The natural scenery of the campus affords and ideal setting for the play.  Overhanging oak trees, a background of tall brush edging the creek over which are built practical bridges, form the wings of the stage where the students play their parts and register anew their appreciation of literature and the channels for original expression.

    The first Partheneia, "The Message of Maidenhood" was produced in 1912.  The author was Anna Reardon (Mrs. John Beck), Belvedere, California.  Florence Doyle (Mrs. Harry Gabbert), 2422 Hilgard Avenue, Berkeley, was the manager.  Music was taken from selections by McDowell.  In 1913 Evelyn Steele was the author of the Partheneia, "Awakening of Every Maid."  Irma Foveaux (Mrs. William B. Sawyer), 1415 Morton Street, Alameda, and Miss Katherine Carlton, 2327 Blake Street, Berkeley were managers.

     In 1914, Helen Cornelius (Mrs. Roswell Ham), Grand and Clinton Avenue, Alameda, was the author, of the Partheneia, "The Dream of Dedra."  Music was composed by Ruth Cornell, (Mrs. Paul Cook), 201 South H. Street, San Jose.  Mrs. Elizabeth F. Baker, Aberdeen, Washington, was manager.

     In 1915, "The Queen's Masque," was written by Mary Von Orden (deceased), Vinnie Robinson, (Mrs. G. H. Albertson), Denver, Colorado, was the manager.

     In 1916, Maude Meagher, in London, now, was the author of the Partheneia, "Aranyani of the Jasmine Vine," Ruth Calden (Mrs. R. W. Robinson), 5759 Claremont Avenue, Berkeley), was the manager.  Sarah Unna, composer, 403 W. 115th Street, New York.

     In 1917, Mariquita de Laguna, now in Pekin, China, was the author of the Partheneia, "Youth's Adventure."  Dorothy Wetmore, 2323 Hearst Avenue Berkeley, was the manager, Ruth Cornell, composer.

     In 1918, "The Misbehavior," written by Grace Ellis was the name of a pantomime given in the form of an entertainment at the Woman's Day dance in place of the annual Partheneia, which was not given on account of the war.

     In 1919 the Partheneia, "The Newer Pandora" was written by Sara Unna, now of New York.  Music was by Flora Rouleau, 7 Moss Avenue, Oakland; Beatrice Whittlesey, Columbia University, New York, was the manager.

     In 1920, Priscilla Cavagnero, 400 Laguinitas Avenue, Oakland, wrote  "The Poet's Answer."  Music was by Mary Millard, now of England.  Beatrice Blanchard of 845 Ashbury Street, San Francisco, was the manager.

     In 1921, the Partheneia "Lillies of the Mirones," was written jointly by Josephine Brown and Janey Brown; Josephine Brown of Alberta, Canada, and Janet Brown, 2710 Channing Way, Berkeley.  Edith Pasmore was the manager.  Two composers were Dorothy Dukes, 211 The Uplands, Berkeley, and Marjorie Tracy, 2401 Hilgard Avenue, Berkeley.

     In 1922, "The Vision of Marpessa," was written by Harlow Wilson.  The music was by Marjorie Tracy.  Ruth Prager was the manager.  Alma L. Smith, was the woman's editor of "The Daily Californian" in 1922 at the time the Partheneia, "The Vision of Marpessa" was produced.

     In "The Vision of Marpessa," by Harlow Wilson, music by Marjorie Tracy, the following were persons of the masque: "Marpessa," Juana Allraum; "Phoebe," Marie Adels; "Idas," Georgia Calumbat.

     Handmaidens of Marpessa were: "Intuition," Florence Randall; "Resaon," May McLaughlin; "Memory," Bernice Goldstone; "Fancy," Eileen Eyre; "Faith," Rose Brown.

     Other characterizations were: "Aurora," Maurine Bell; "Pan," Mary Rixford; "Bacchus," Anita Avila; "Forgetfulness," Virginia Byrne; "Grief," Violet Lecaray; "Despair," Bernice Munta; "Disappointment," Emma Brun; "Renunciation," Pauline Yeskers; "Old Age," Louise Stockle; "Death," Spencer Allan; "Vision," Virginia Martin.

     The production was under the direction of Sara Huntsman of the Department of Public Speaking, University of California.  The directors of dancing were the Misses Frances Buckius and Edith Ueland.

     The entire cast comprised the following ensembles:

     Dreams of the Future:  Francis Averell, Lois Finke, Mary Gregory, Aileen Hennessey, Geraldine Hunt, Marian Hunt, Rose Jurras, Jeannette Mainzer, Eileen Murphy, Esther Ostrow, Maty Powers, Josephine Rausch, Flora Walker, Martha Whitten, Roslyn Whitney, Mary Young, Doris Spinks, Louise Blake, Ardelia Manington, Aphra West.

 

Page 143

 

     Dryads:  Gladys Crabtree, Myrtle Danielson, Minnie Frankel, Mae French, Francesca Friend, Carlotta Heid, Dorothy Jarman, Elizabeth Monroe, Beatrice Smoot, Juna Southwick.

     Naiads:  Lily Anderson, Enid Boyce, Rebecca Bredds, Melba Burden, Annabel Clark, Ruth Crane, Sylvia Doak, Marjoria Dobbins, Elizabeth Field, Gladys Gerhardy, Alice Graham, Lois Hanscome, Phyllis Harroun, Florence Hill, Louise Kellogg, Muriel Kilgo, Elizabeth Kozer, Ellamae Lawlor, Gertrude Magie, Marie Onions, Valeria Post, Katherine Renshaw, Myrtle Ritch, Mildren Slater, Eleanor Tait, Elizabeth Witty.

     Nereids:  Mary Baber, Lottie Bear, Mary Bell, Lenora Carpenter, Eulalie Diehl, Dorothea Dudley, Alice Glasier, Frances Hitchcock, Irene Jay, Janice Kergan, Evelyn Lewis, Lorraine Parr, Lolita Stubblefield, Vera Symon, Alice Turner, Dorothy Wall.

     Yesterdays:  Grace Allen, Frances Belknap, Edith Carson, Cathrine Davis, Anne Field, Florence Glasco, Marion Jones, Dorothy Leighton, Etta Stewart, Lois Waag, Esther Williams, Lois Wylie, Rachel Young.

     Attendants of Aurora:  Dorothy Baird, Patricia Bradbury, Irene Evans, Margaret Galbraith, Claudia Gall, Dorothy Gillespie, Eva Pratt, Nelly Riedel, Martha Wickman;  Trumpeters-- Dorothy Franklin, Evalene Higbie, Rachel Ledig, Pauline Rikeman, Martha Seidl, Gertrude Tormey.

     Morning Hours:  Beulah Butler, Lucille Czarnowski, Dorothy Caborn, Katherine Thom, Esther Topham, Mary Walker, Margaret Willey.

     Attendants of Phoebus:  Trio--Marjorie Gay, Dexter Harding, Frances Hatch; Vivian Bradley, Josephine Brandy, Mary Brenna, Estelle Colgrave, Grace Condon, Eleanor Ellis, Florence Frederick, Frances Griffen, Elizabeth Hollis, Bernice Higgins, Helen Johnson, Irene Jones, Ruth Kay, Norma Keech, Phyllis Martin, Helen Matthewman, Helen McManis, Lucy Means, Gladys Moore, Alice Ogden, Lucy Pettijohn, Helen Stone, Ileen Taylor, Emily Williams.

     Bacchantes:  Lotus Alderman, Roxie Armstrong, Evelyn Barr, Rhea Boynton, Seilgwynn Boynton, Winifred Brown, Helen Carrier, Judith Chaffey, Evelyn Danham, Dolorees Escobar, Cordelia Gock, Mabel Graham, Lorraine Helke, Lula Lane, Henriette Lichtenstein, Lurana Lord, Dorothy Luck, Helen McEwen, Bessie Mendler, Evelyn Moulin, Edwina Owen, Mary Shelter, Maian Smith, Louise Stein, Zelda Taylor, Dorothy Wanzer,  Ruth Winder, Ruth Woerner.

     Toilers:  Clarida Boths, Helen Grace Davie, Dorothy Duggan, Sarah Dudley, CatherineDubrow, Lucy Gambetta, Mabel Kittridge, Helen Knapp, Marcella McBeath, Grace McNutt, Ethel Petterson, Dorice Rice, Charlotte Reed, Margaret Shader, Marjorie Shatto, Eula Lee Smith, Eula Taylor, Alice Wisenberger.

     Mourners:   Nancy Berry, Carolyn Dean, Madeline Glairn, Norma Klaus, Mabel Linderman, Henriette Nelson, Florence Ray, Helen Shafer, Miriam Sinclair, Margaret Swift, Lois Topham, Nancy Upp.

     Fears:  Vera Arnold, Margaret Brown, Alma Gede, Miriam Grove, Edna Mahan, Marion Rowe, Helen Wetzel.

 

 

PAGE 144

 

THE  MOUNTAIN  PLAY

"Where you have mountains, there you shall have free men."

 

PORTRAIT OF MRS. D. E. F. EASTON

     The Mountain Play is one of California's distinctive outdoor productions.  A mountain theatre on the top of Mt. Tamalpais, is the natural setting for high dramatic work, given annually under the direction of the Mountain Play, an organization in which many prominent women are interested.

     Each year something commanding in classical presentation is given.  This year, 1922, the tenth annual Mountain Play was Josephine Preston Peabody's prize play: "The Piper."

     As a member of the San Francisco Center of the Drama League of America my work in this direction has been inspiring for it has led to many kindred interests including the Mountain Play.  In no other state than California could such productions be given, as the ones included on Mount Tamalpais, in Marin County.

    Of the Drama League, there is considerable to include in plan and purposes.  Recognition of the best in modern playwriting and hearty endorsement of worth-while plays are among some of the League activities.

     We send out printed notifications of plays before they reach our locality telling the members of the Drama League the plays which we endorse and giving a brief history of the work, including the cast of characters and the synopsis of the play.

     We recommend, but do not condemn, plays, and if a play does not warrant commendation nothing is said of it.  Our members become accustomed to these letters of recommendation and look eagerly forward to them.  While this system has been abandoned for the present, yet we shall return to this manner of information, in response to requests.

     Women who comprise the personnel of the San Francisco Center of the Drama League of America include: Mrs. D. E. F. Easton, president; Mrs. Franklin Burt, recording secretary; Mrs. W. I. Clayes, Mrs. Chester Deering, Miss Adele Elizabeth Dugan, Mrs. J. J. Gottlob, Mrs. A. L. Hart, Mrs. J. H. Robertson, Mrs. Max C. Sloss, Mrs. F. W. Vaughan.

     "Looking backward, as I think of the many organizations wherein I have labored, I can but feel that I should like to go over the grounds once more just to do the things that today seem to have been omitted.  I think that if I could do this, better results would be gained.     

     Too much can not be said in behalf of that director, Garnet Holme, and the officers who have, by sheer belief in many of our mountain play productions, brought the Mountain Play up to its high standards and have made them something worthy to be chronicled in the high dramatic work of California.

     The Mountain Play has become and established institution of scholarly attainment, one in which the Drama League of California universally is interested as it increases in worth and is finished in production.

     While the Mountain Play and the Drama League are separate institutions, not allied in any way, financially, yet they have the same high standards for dramatic work, and that is to cultivate the best talent, encourage the best work, and give as much dramatic history in manner of presentation and text as possible.

     The response of the public is criterion for the value placed by the organizations and their constituents.

 

SIGNATURE OF MRS. D. E. F. EASTON

 

PAGE 145

 

CALIFORNIA  FEDERATION  OF  MUSIC  CLUBS

 

"California,  The  Music Center  of  America"

 

PORTRAIT OF CARRIE JACOBS BOND

 

When the California Federation of Music Clubs met in annual session at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco, in April for their four-day session, April 30th to May 3rd, a decision was made in behalf of a concerted effort toward creating a music center on the coast--a center which would command the attention of the musical world.

     "'California, the music center of America'--such is our hope, such our ambition.

     We have the necessary qualifications, musically, aside from our glorious climate conducive to musical development.  We have the enthusiasm, the energy; we have the talent.  Furthermore, we have the musical mentality. 

     "Once we musicians of California make up our minds, individually, and act collectively, we can bring this noble idea to full fruition.  The enthusiasm displayed in our annual convention is a convincing challenge to these purposes pursuant to success."

     Los Angeles has a large circle of musical clubs affiliated with the California Federation of Music Clubs.  Many of these clubs rank among the leading musical organizations of the State,  The Wa Wan Club of Los Angeles stands prominently in this list.  The Woman's Symphony Orchestra of Los Angeles has been progressive, musically, and high in the estimation of the music world, generally.  Other Los Angeles clubs up to the present year affiliated with the California Federation included: Amphion Club, San Diego, under the leadership of Miss Gertrude Gilbert;  "Bella Musica", Junior Club, Inglewood, Arden Hughes, president; Burbank Woman's Club, music section, Mrs. A. W. Reese, chairman; Covina Lyric Club, Mrs. William B. Thorne, president; Dominant Club, Los Angeles, Mrs. Catherine H. Shank, president and Mrs. Edwin C. Vought, secretary; Downey Choral Club, Mrs. Lillian B. Robinson, president; Mrs. Linna Harcherode, secretary; Eagle Rock Junior Musical Club, Miss Eva Morrow, president; Ebell Club of Los Angeles, Choral section, Mrs. Charles Toll, president; Ebell Club of Los Angeles, music section, Mrs. William E. Mabee, curator; Fine Arts Club, Pasadena, Mrs. E. A. Batchelder, president; Gamut Club, Los Angeles; Glendale Madrigal Club; Glendale Music Club; Harmonia Club of Los Angeles, Mrs. Joseph Campbell, president; High School Girls' Glee Club, Glendale, Myra Johns of Eagle Rock, president; Juvenile Glendale Music Club, Miss Elizabeth Sternberg, president; Junior Music Club Glendale, Veda Knapp, president; Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra Association, Mrs. Dean Mason, president; Los Angeles Music Teachers' Association, Miss Eva F. Pike, president; Los Angeles Oratorio Society, Mrs. John Wilferth, president; Musicians' Club of Los Angeles; Matinee Musical Club, Mrs. Marshall Stookey, president; Music Study Club of Santa Barbara, Mrs. Endicott Faxon, president; MacDowell Club of Allied Arts, Mrs. Graham F. Putam, president; Orpheus Club of Los Angeles, Orange County Choral Union, Pasadena Music Study Club, Philharmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles, South Pasadena Monday Evening Musical Club, Mrs. N. C. Merritt, president; Santa Ana Musical Association, Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club, music section, Mrs. F. J. Wagner, president; St. Cecilia Club, Mrs. Glover Stith, president; Saslavsky Chamber Music Club; Spinet Club, Redlands; Students Music Club, San Diego; Society of American Music Optimist, Mrs. Joseph Zucher, president; Temple Baptist Choir, Los Angeles; The Philoneia Chorus University of Redlands, Miss Hilda Medberg, president; Tuesday Afternoon Club of Glendale, music section, Mrs. C. E. Hutchinson, president; Tuesday

 

PAGE 146

 

Musical Club of Pasadena, Mrs. H. D. Machib, president; Thursday Morning Club Mt. Eagle Rock Miss Ethel Congdon, president; Ventura Music Club, Miss Jolla Vince, secretary; Woman's Lyric Club of Los Angeles, Miss M. Louise Wharton, president; Wa Wan Club of Los Angeles, Mrs. Grace Widney Mabee, president; Woman's Club of Hollywood, music section, Mrs. H. T. Wright, president; Woman's Music Study Club of Long Beach, Mrs. C. Z. Anderson, president; Woman's Symphony Club of Los Angeles, Mrs. Edna Foy Neher, president; Woman's Twentieth Century Club, music section, Eagle Rock City, Mrs. A. Putnam, secretary.  In northern California, we have represented sections in Sacramento, in Mill Valley, San Jose, Turlock, Fresno, Oakland, Berkeley and San Francisco.

     Mrs. John F. Lyons of Fort Worth, Texas, is the national president, Federation of Music Clubs.

     Mrs. Cecil Frankel was state president.  On her board were the following women: Mrs. Mattison B. Jones, first vice-president; Mrs. E. E. Bruner, second vice-president; Mrs. Belle T. Ritchie, vice-president at large; Mrs. Hazel Ismond White, corresponding secretary; Miss Margaret Gould, assistant corresponding secretary; Mrs. Clifford Payson, recording secretary.

     Department heads were as follows: Department of Education, Public School Music, Mrs. Emma M. Bartlett of Inglewood; Church Music, Mrs. Grace Widney Mabee of Los Angeles; Junior Clubs, Mrs. Mattison B. Jones of Glendale: Library Extension Course of Study, Mrs. Josephine Crew Aylwin of Oakland Department of Philanthropy, Young Artists Contest, Mrs. Phillip Zoebelein of Los Angeles, and Mrs. Glenn H. Woods of Oakland: Department of Publicity, Printing and Publishing, Mrs. Alexander Saslavsky of San Francisco; Young Artists Registration Bureau, Mrs. Percy Brown of Ocean Park; Club Historian, Mrs. William F. Howard of Los Angeles.

     Mrs. Alfred L. Bartlett of Hollywood was chairman of the Legislative Committee.

     The county directors were as follows:  Miss Ethel Johnson, Mrs. A. Rosenthal of San Francisco, San Francisco county; Mrs. J. L. Tully of Mill Valley, Marin County; Mrs. Rose H. Ireland of Turlock, Stanislaus County; Mrs. Bertha Slocum of San Diego, San Diego county; Mrs. Mabel Price of Oakland, Alameda county; Mrs. Cecil Norton Winchester of Imperial, Imperial county.

     Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, president of the San Francisco Musical Club, was installed as the new president of the California Federation of Music Clubs at the closing session of the fourth annual convention.

     Mrs. Lena Carroll Nicholson of Piedmont was chosen second vice-president.  Belle T. Richie of Fresno was returned for vice-president at large.  Julius V. Seyler of South Pasadena, who has been treasurer of the federation since its inception, was re-elected.  Selby C. Oppenheimer of San Francisco is the incumbent auditor.

     Carrie Jacobs Bond, illustrating this article, is one of the charming composers whose musical work and lyrics have gained her unusual popularity.  She is an honorary member of the Sorosis Club of San Francisco where her songs are often heard.  Her home in the south is the scene of musical gathering where noted women are counted among her guests.  Her interest in making "California, the music center of America" should serve as an additional spur to this federation ambition.

 

Prominent women are directing the work of the Wa-Wan Club, Los Angeles.  They are:  Mrs. William Ernest Mabee, president:  Mrs. Carl Johnson, first vice-president; Mrs. Edward Dvorak, second vice-president; Anna Priscilla Fischer, third  vice-president; Mrs. Louise Anderson Henderson, fourth vice-president; Mrs. Maud Fenlon Bollman, recording secretary; Mrs. Gail Mills Dimmitt, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Pearl Cole McMullen, treasurer; Miss Letitia Williams, financial secretary; Mrs. William Anderson, as parliamentarian; and Mrs. Harry V. Baxter as auditor.

 

PAGE 147

 

SAN  FRANCISCO  MUSICAL  CLUB

 

PORTRAIT  OF  MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM

 

The San Francisco Musical Club is thirty-one years old.  It was organized in 1890 by some young women who were pupils of Abbey Cheney, then a very well-known piano teacher.  At first the club was known as the "Abbey Cheney Amateurs", but it soon outgrew that name and as well the idea of confining its membership to pianists alone.  Violinists and vocalists were then admitted, and with them a limited number of associate members.  The name was changed to the Chaminade Club in honor of the woman composer at that moment most prominent before the public, Mademoiselle Cecile Chaminade.

     Miss Maud Smith, first president of the Chaminade Club, directed its energies for seven years.  At first the club met in her home, but ultimately became so large that a public hall had to be taken.

     After a time it seemed that the name Chaminade gave the impression of a limited musical appreciation and after considering numerous titles the club finally changed its name to "The San Francisco Musical Club" for the reason, as an officer of the club put it, "to honor our city and in the hope that the club should grow to be the musical club of San Francisco."

     From the date of the change of name the growth of the club has been very rapid both in personnel and in musical standing.  At this time its membership is over five hundred, more than one-third of whom are active musicians.

     The club each year gives programs of the widest variety.  Frequently the works of the best composers are covered by lectures and papers as well as by musical production, the effort being to educate, as well as to give opportunity for musical expression.

     The club has been known to give in one season a program based on the suites from the Italian classics, a program of "Scherzos-Tennyson Texts"; a program of "Preludes-Browning Texts"; a program of "Music of the Sea", and a program of "Concerto Form-French Opera."

     To enumerate the programs of the San Francisco Musical Club as they have been presented this past year would be to point with pride to musical achievements, and to tell, in glowing appreciation, of our artist friends who have made musical history.

     One of the outstanding musical mornings comes readily to mind.  It was an exceptional program, "Exposition of Mood" in five divisions, beginning with the Dramatic-Grotesque, Grieg-Sonata; Miss Mildred Jones, pianiste; Grief-Humor-Descriptive-Love-Care-free, Henri Panizza, Dupont, Grant-Shaefer, Richard-Hageman and Hugo Wolf, Lillian Birmingham, contralto, Marion de Guerre Steward at the piano.  The third division, Religious-Rhythmic-Descriptive, Miss Marion Nicholson, with Miss Helen Rust at the piano.  Gratitude-Sorrow-Joy, Mrs. Arthur Hill, soloist, with Josephine Crew Aylwin at the piano.  Dramatic, Brahms-Rhapsody, Lillian Birminghan, and the quartette; Hubert Williams, Lowell Redfield, Carl Anderson, Henry Perry, with Marion de Guerre Steward at the piano.  This was one of the most ambitious presentations of the year and the favor with which it was received argued well for a repetition of programs of similar character.

 

BEAUTIFUL SIGNATURE OF LILLIAN A. BIRMINGHAM

 

PAGE 148

 

SOCIETY  OF  AMERICAN  MUSIC  OPTIMISTS

LOS  ANGELES  CHAPTER

 

Mrs. J. T. ANDERSON.........................................................…………………………..President

Mrs. JOSEPH ZUCKERMAN...............................……………………………...First Vice-President

Mrs. FRANK COLBY.....................................……………………………..Second Vice-President

Mrs. FRANK POWELL.......................................……………………………..Recording Secretary

Mrs. HARRY M. VOORHEES..............................................…………………………….Treasurer

Mrs. GAIL DIMMIT.............................................……………………………..Financial Secretary

Mrs. HARRISON WARD.............................………………………………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. HENRY HENDERSON....................................................…………………………….Auditor

Mrs. RUTH OMEY................................................................……………………………Program

Mrs. CLAIRE ROBINSON.....................................................…………………………….Publicity

Mrs. WILLIAM HOLZER..................................……………………………..Altruistic Department

Mrs. WALTER WESSELS...................................……………………………..Courtesy Committee

Madame ANNA SPROTTE....................................................……………………………Historian

 

     The Los Angeles Chapter of the Society of American Music Optimists was founded by Mana Zucca, National President and organizer, in 1919.  The Los Angeles Chapter is Branch Number One of the National organization with headquarters in New York City.  Objectives of the Los Angeles Chapter are the same as the New York organization namely:

          Advancement of American Composition in all forms.

          Presentation of American artists.

      In addition the local chapter is earnestly endeavoring to correlate and co-ordinate the work of American musicians with that of dramatists, verse writers, and scenario writers, that better material may be used in opera, song and musical comedy.  This phase of the work is presented by speakers of note who are associated with organizations and societies prominently identified with the movement at monthly dinners given by the Society.

     Formal programs of American composition are presented the last Thursday of each month.  Each program is preceded by a club dinner and frequently a reception for artists appearing on the programs, and for visiting artists, follows the program.

     Three Musicals--Three programs have been given this year, a New Year's Party, and other social events.  The Board of Directors meets, regularly, the first week of each month.

     The Los Angeles Society of American Music Optimists is in addition to its affiliation with the New York mother organization a member of the National Federation of Music Clubs, the California Federation of Music Clubs and the California State Federation of Women's Clubs.

     Programs rendered during the season of 1921-22 include Bruno Huhn's Song Cycle, "The Divan" presented by Mme Anna Ruzena Sprotte, Myrtle Pryibel Colby, George Page Willey and Charles Henre de la Plate; Ann Thompson; The Le Fevre Trio with Carolyn Le Fevre, Violin, Lysbeth Le Fevre, Cello, and Mona Contest, Piano; Ward Stevens in a program of his own composition with the composer at the piano; Harry Clifford Lott; Flora Myers Engel; The Play-Crafters in three one-act plays, Sydney Sprague Director; Dr. and Mrs. Allison Gaw in their Drama, "Pharoah's Daughter"; Frank Geiger; Mary Levengood; Mrs. Guy Bush; Nathan Herzoff; James Anderson; Blanche McTavish Smith; Gertrude Ross; Jessie McDonald Patterson; Lenore Shanewise; Jamison Singing Quartette; Mrs. Hennion Robinson; L.E. Beheymer; Alice Lohr McDaniel; Alfred Swenton; Mrs. Cecel Frankel; Clarence Gustlin; Ruth St. Denis; and others.

     Among other club members who have this season made special contributions musically, or socially, are; Nathan Herzoff, Mme Benjamin K. Moses, Mr. and Mrs. Josef Zuckerman, Mrs. Louise A. Henderson, Florence Taylor Black, Ruth Orney, Maude Beulon Bollman, Edna Voorhees, Mrs. William Holzer, Pauline Hawes, Mrs. Morris Stoloff, Anna Sprotte, Mrs. A. Jaquith, Bessie Howell, Frank Geiger, Grace Bush, Alice Lohr McDau, Flora Myers Engel, Belle N. Hall, Mrs. H. L. De Teines, Claire A. Cates, Lillian Adams, Maurice Gradwold, Mr. and Mrs. D. Joseph Coyne, Lucile Abercrombie, Mrs. J. W. Robinson, Mr. R. B. Hegardt, Mrs. A. L. Ball, William A. Dresser, Marguerite Cooper Powell, Carrie Cooper Kraft, Alice Farish, Georgia Shropshire, Ida Gray Scott, Mrs. Florence Jones, Marie Hinckley, Mr. J. T. Anderson, Grace Grant, Mrs. J. B. Weil, Esther Rhoades, Euretta Wolf Douglas, Mrs. M. M. Morton, Mrs. Harrison Ward, Mrs. W. J. Currer, Sylvia Harding, Claire Robinson, Dr. E. E. Davis, Louise Caroline Davis, Dr. Henry Harris, Dr. J. T. Kennedy, Ann Thompson, Paula Dohrman, Alice Carpenter, Stephanie Kastnor, Lenia Herchelrode, Dr. Hamilton Forline, Lilla E. Litch, Maud Howard, Sadie Lieberman, Laura Soudea Taylor, Gail Mills Diniuth, Myrtle Pryibel Colby, Margaret Monson, Mrs. Jules Kaufmann, Mrs. Heunion Robinson, Geraldine Williams Barnett, Ruth Shaffuer, Blanche McTavish Smith, Dr. Leonard Swyer, Edith Lillian Clark, Theadora Wessels, Hulda Dietz, Franc Goldwater, Jessie Blake Franklin.

 

SIGNATURE OF MRS. J. T. ANDERSON

 

 

PAGE 149

 

PACIFIC  MUSICAL  SOCIETY

San Francisco

 

 

OFFICERS

LULU J. BLUMBERG, 3131 Jackson....................................................................….President

Mrs. LUDWIG ROSENSTEIN, 233 21st Avenue..................................……First Vice-President

Mrs. WARD A. DWIGHT, 34 Shore View......................................……..Second Vice-President

Mrs. FREDERICK CROWE, 621 Stockton...........................................……Recording Secretary

Mrs. HAROLD L. LEVI, Mill Valley...........................................……...Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. PETER J. MORCK, 27 Belmont.....................................................…...Business Secretary

Mrs. FREDERICK H. MEYER, 2756 Steiner........................................................…...Treasurer

 

DIRECTORS

Mrs. JOSEPH  KEENAN

Mrs. CHAS. W. CAMM

Miss CONSTANCE ALEXANDER

Mrs. PHILIP VICTOR HEIN

Mrs. FRANCIS EPPLEY

Mrs. PETER J. MORCK

 

OVAL PORTRAIT OF LULU J. BLUMBERG near top of page.

 

     The Pacific Musical Society was organized in February, 1910 for the purpose of musical improvement, for raising musical standards and for creating an appreciation of the highest and best in musical forms.

     The Society has been instrumental in encouraging young and talented artists to greater efforts and in the twelve years of its existence has seen many of these artists, whom it has launched take their places in the professional world.  It introduces the unknown professional artist and gives opportunities to the resident artists.  Its concerts, which are held on the second and fourth Thursday evenings of the month in the ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, are always dignified and artistic.

     The society boasts of its Junior Auxiliary, the equal of which would be hard to find.  Four concerts a year are given on Saturday afternoons in the Fairmont Hotel, and on one Saturday afternoon in February, the parent organization gives over one of its regular concerts to the Auxiliary.  This is known as the Valentine Program. 

     The Society is interested in all things which pertain to the musical growth of the city and is always ready to co-operate in furthering the cause of good and lofty music.

 

PRETTY SIGNATURE OF LULU J. BLUMBERG 

 

Excerpts from "The Fountain of Youth" written by Mr. Edmond Coblentz, for the Family Club, formed the motif of a scholarly program presented by the Pacific Musical Society in the gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel.  Music composed by Uda Walkdrop and Rudy Sieger were played by these two artists of the piano and the violin.  Another outstanding program which closed the musical year was presented by members of the Andre Ferrier French Opera Company with Ferrier, Marion Vecki and Anna Young, prima donna, in the cast.  Musical friends from the bay cities and from down the peninsula packed the Fairmont Ballroom to hear these artists.

 

PAGE 151

 

LEAGUE  OF  AMERICAN  PEN  WOMEN,  Inc.

San Francisco Branch

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON............................................………………………President

     Fairmont Hotel

Mrs. PRENTISS COBB HALE.....................................………………………First Vice-President

     2430 Vallejo

Mrs. W. B. HAMILTON...........................................……………………...Second Vice-President

Mrs. OLIVE HULSE....................................................………………………Recording Secretary

     275 Park View Terrace, Oakland

Mrs. ANNA BLAKE MEZQUIDA............................………………………..Acting Cor. Secretary

     969 Pine

Mrs. IDA MAY BROTHERS.........................................………………………Cor. Secty (absent)

     447 Hoffman Avenue

Mrs. KATHERINE GITTINGS.....................................................…………………….Treasurer

Miss NANCY BUCKLEY.............................................………………………Assistant Treasurer

     1985 Grove

Mrs. VERNILLE  DE  WITT  WARR..........................................………………………Historian

     7002 Geary

 

DIRECTORS

 

Mrs. W. B. BONFILS

Mrs. ANNETTE ABBOTT ADAMS

KATHLEEN NORRIS

Mrs. FREDERICK H. COLBURN

Miss GENEVE SHAFFER

Miss ADA SWEET

Mrs. MARTIAL DAVOUST

Mrs. GRACE HYDE TRINE

Mrs. BLANCHE UPRIGHT

Mrs. FAY JACKSON VAN NORDEN

Mrs. RUTH COMFORT MITCHELL YOUNG

Mrs. ESTHER BIRDSALL DARLING

Dr. AURELIA REINHARDT

Mrs. W. H. MILLS

 

 

SEATED PORTRAIT OF MRS. WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON

 

Mutual benefit in creative work; world service by women of the pen, pencil and brush; betterment of literary and artistic production; progression in professional endeavor--these are the main objects of The League of American Pen Women.

     The San Francisco League of American Pen Women follows in strict accord the rules and regulations of the National League--furthering the objects, "Through aiding the formation of Leagues of Pen Women in other countries, unified in a League of World Pen Women through using National headquarters as a clearing house for the dissemination of information relative to the work; through assisting the young or unknown worker toward professional recognition."

     Something superlatively fine was presented by the San Francisco Pen Women at their initial Fall session held in the gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel.  it was a "literary tea" given in honor of the women of the University of California who created the Partheneia.

     Authors, journalists, artists, sculptors, poets, editors, publishers, genealogists, dramatic writers, scenario writers, illustrators, designers, cartoonists, lecturers of professional rank--were among the guests.

     Four hundred members of the League, with friends, sat at tables arranged for literary concourse,  At the head table were seated honor guests, among whom were the young writers of the University of California, grouped about a statue of Pegasus, the inspirational symbol of the San Francisco Pen Women.

 

PAGE 152

 

     Mrs. William D. Stephens, wife of Governor Stephens; and Mrs. James Rolph, Jr., wife of Mayor Rolph, sat at the right of the president, Mrs. William Harold Wilson.  Miss Lucy Ward Stebbins, Dean of Women, University of California, was the speaker of the day defining the Partheneia annual college play as a student activity.  Mrs. Frederick Colburn was the chairman.  She gave tributes to women whose influence led to high ideals and named three:  Phoebe Apperson Hearst, Susan Tolman Mills, Jane Lathrop Stanford.  Rising to their feet the entire assemblage paid silent tribute to these noble women.  Harp solos by Marie Hughes MacQuarrie, and a ceremonial, made an impressive rite.

     A stirrup-cup toast was pledged as a feature of this event.  Mrs. Colburn spoke the lines as the women facing "Pegasus" held high their glasses of golden-fruited punch for the toast: "Here's to inspiration, gift of the gods.  May all who mount Pegasus be guarded by Truth, Honor and Justice, and may each one ride to her heart's desire." In parting, "The End of a Perfect Day" by Carrie Jacobs Bond, was played on the harp by Marie Hughes McQuarrie in tribute to Mrs. Warren G. Harding.  "The First Lady of the Nation," who favors this member's song.

     Reggie Urdahl Smith, sculptor who made the statue, was an honor guest.

     Prior to this event the green-bronze statue of Pegasus was formally unveiled before a large gathering of the literati from the bay cities.

     The unveiling address was delivered by Mrs. W. B. Bonfils (Annie Laurie), honorary member National League of American Pen Women and active in the San Francisco branch.  Pegasus was officially presented to the president by Mrs. Vernille De Witt Warr.  Dr. Aurelia Reinhardt, president of Mills College, told the legend.  Mrs. Frederick Colburn gave "The Flight."
     Peter Clark Macfarlane addressed the San Francisco Pen Women on another occasion, when a garden-scene arranged by Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale, was the center for the program.  The author's address was: "The Popular Pulse and the Pertinent Pen."  Mrs. John Hays Hammond and Mrs. Macfarlane were honor guests.  Departments of work in the San Francisco League of American Pen Women include: poetry, pageantry, drama, research, scenario writing, the short story, water color and oil painting, sketching, cartooning, designing, exterior decorating, interior decorating, dress designing, household literature, advertising, sculpturing, modeling, art filaire, public speaking, lecturing, newspaper work, magazine contributions and kindred fields of creative endeavor.

     Several members of the San Francisco League of American Pen Women have been the recipients of high honors in various contests.

     Mrs. Anna Blake Mezquida, author and poet, has won within six months, two awards of one thousand dollars each in motion picture scenario contests.

     Mrs. Mary Lennox of San Francisco Pen Women won the honors for the best song of California offered by the State Federation of Music in a contest open to all women of the State.

     Harlow Wilson, author of "The Vision of Marpessa," the 1922 Partheneia produced by the University of California students, and Miss Ruth Harwood, winner of the prize for poetry at the State University of California, are two young members of the San Francisco League of American Pen Women.

     Our "Round Tables” are unusual in the manner of program presentation.  Whenever a famous woman writer visits San Francisco the Pen Women extend greetings, and prepare, in her honor, a "round table," appropriate to the occasion and the personal inclinations of the visitor.

     Meetings of the San Francisco Pen Women are held at the Fairmont Hotel.  Receptions, and many other social events are interspersed in the literary procedures as a potential influence which makes for camaraderie among the women who write.

 

SIGNATURE OF JOSEPHINE WILSON

 

PAGE 153

 

SPEECH  ARTS  ASSOCIATION 

OF  CALIFORNIA

 

"Speech  is  the  golden  harvest  that  followeth  the  flowering of  thought."

 

OFFICERS

 

Mrs. MABEL  GIFFORD, 2300 Van Ness Avenue...............................................President

Mrs. WILDA  WILSON  CHURCH, 609 Arlington Avenue, Berkeley.......Vice-President

OLIVE  JONES, 3522 Fulton...............................................................Recording Secretary

MAE  BAUDEN, 666 31st Street, Oakland..................................Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. WILLIAM  J.  CONROY, 731 Second Avenue............................................Treasurer

 

CHAIRMEN  OF  DEPARTMENTS

 

ANNA  HAGARTY,  Board  of  Directors         LEE  EMERSON  BASSETT, Advisory Board

BERTHA  CLARK,  Credential-Committee       Mrs. RUBY CODDING, Publicity Committee

Mrs. OSCAR MAILLARD BENNETT, Program Committee

Mrs. WM. J. CONROY, Chairman Reception Committee

 

OVAL  PORTRAIT  OF  MRS.  MABEL  GIFFORD

 

     The Speech Arts Association of California meets on the first Saturday of each month at Sorosis Club Hall, 536 Sutter Street.  The past presidents of the Association are:  Ethel Cotton, Mae Frances O'Keeffe, Ida May Bradley, Mrs. Oscar Maillard Bennett, and Mrs. Josephine Swan White.

 

     The Association is just what the name implies, and association for the advancement of the art of oral expression.  Many of its members are professionally engaged in teaching oral expression.  Dr. Aurelia Henry Reinhardt is an honorary member of the Speech Arts Association and on different occasions she has appeared before the Association.

 

     The reading of plays, discussions of timely topics and constant study of diction, and enunciation, are paramount aims.

 

     Not long ago an address was given by Dwight Watkins of the University of California before the Association, on the subject of "The Wider Meaning of Training for Public Speaking."

 

MABEL GIFFORD

President

 

 

SAN  FRANCISCO  TEA  CLUB

 

The  "San Francisco Tea Club" was founded nearly thirty years ago and is purely a literary and social club, never having taken up civic affairs.  The membership is limited to fifty and the meetings are monthly, being held, by invitation, at the home of some member.  A program of about an hour is followed by social chat "over the tea cups."  Various subjects are taken up, book reviews, art, travel and current subjects, with one "Musicale" each year and the "Christmas Jinks."

     Among the founders of the club, was the late Mrs. Frank Fredericks, at on time its president.  The present officers of the club are: Mrs. Victor Marshall Law, President; Miss Helen Bristal, First Vice-President; Mrs. Charles Shurtleff, Second Vice-President; Mrs. W. C. Morrow, Secretary; Mrs. Wm H. Jordan, Treasurer.

 

PAGE 154

 

THE  BROWNING  CLUB

Los Angeles

 

OFFICERS

Mrs. J. ALLISON GAW, 1912 Cordova.....................................................……………President

Mrs. H. B. BATES, 405 W. Adams...........................................…………….First Vice-President

Mrs. R. W. FRANCIS,2106 Aubrey Avenue........................………………Second Vice-President

Mrs. J. E. SIMPSON, 1734 N. Wilcox Avenue........................………………Recording Secretary

Mrs. GEORGE A COLBY, 1848 N. Kingsley Drive........………………..Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. N. SHANNON, 4311Victoria Park Drive..........................................…………….Treasurer

Mrs. K. L. S. CUMMINGS...........................................................................………….Curator

 

COUNCILLORS

 

Mrs. INGLE CARPENTER

Mrs. A. J. SCOTT

 

 

STANDING COMMITTEES

 

Mrs. NOVELLE ESTES

Program

Mrs. J. VINCENT LEHIGH

Music

Mrs. J. J. MARTIN

Hospitality

Mrs. K. L. S. CUMMINGS

Printing

Mrs. R. W. FRANCIS

Librarian

 

     The Los Angeles Browning Club had its inception in a Browning Study Class, organized by Mrs. Kate L. S. Cummings and Mrs. F. H. Webb, in June, 1911.

     In January, 1912 a Constitution with By-laws was framed, when the organization became known as The Browning Study Club, and shortly afterwards was admitted to membership in the California Federation of Women's Clubs.

     In the course of time another Browning Club was organized.  It then became advisable to change the name to the Los Angeles Browning Club.  The classes continued to meet weekly for study and the club monthly for an entertainment program.

     The object of the club is the cultivation of an intelligent interpretation of the poetry of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

     Not only does the club aim to promote a more comprehensive interest in the poems because of their great literary value, but it also endeavors to stimulate the art of arranging appropriate musical settings to the lyrics by having at least one Browning song on each of the monthly programs.

     The annual Commemorative Festival of the Club on May 7th, Robert Browning's birthday, observed by all Browning Clubs, is a day of unusual felicity.

 

SIGNATURE  OF  EHELIAN J. GAW

 

     Mrs. A. L. Hart is president of The Browning Club of San Francisco, one of the substantial literary study clubs whose poetic programs are ever in the ascendant.  Browning pictures, both of Elizabeth and of Robert Browning, valuable autographs and editions de luxe are possessions of the club.  The one policy, and premise, based on their initial step is plainly in evidence at all the Browning Club meetings.  

 

 

 

PAGE 155

 

LEAGUE  OF  AMERICAN  PEN  WOMEN,  Inc.

San Diego--San Jose--Carmel--Berkeley

 

The National League of American Pen Women Inc., with headquarters in Washington, D. C., has branch leagues in practically every state and in most of the large cities throughout the nation.  National headquarters are at 1722 H. Street, Washington.  In California, the League of American Pen Women has a number of active branches, all contributing to the National League as part of the great chain of Pen Women throughout the nation.

     San Diego Branch of the League of American Pen Women is one of the most active branches in the State, contributing to the National League.  Many of the members are prominent in the affairs of club circles, Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, former president, being a past president of the California Federation of Women's Clubs.  Other members of the San Diego Branch of the League of American Pen Women are: Mrs. Eva B. Adams, Mrs. Isabelle Churchill, Mrs. Ella Copley Collier, Mrs. Grace Sherburne Conroe, Mrs. Lydia Fossler Frank, Miss Lorena C. Harden, Margaret Olive Jordan, Mrs. Pearl La Force Mayer, Miss Emma L. Maynard, Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, Mrs. Stella Jaques Penman, Mrs. Rae Copley Raum, Mrs. Sibyl Wilbur Stone and Mrs. Rose Hartwick Thorpe. Mrs. Lydia Fossler Frank is president of the San Diego Branch.

     One of the newest branches of the League of American Pen Women was formed at San Jose, April 1922, the initial event being a Book Fair given at the Hotel Vendome, under the direction of the newly elected president, Mrs. Katherine Dunlap Cather.  This Book Fair and Authors' Luncheon attracted prominent writers of the State.  Many well known musicians, painters and authors, special guests, were also in attendance to lend their active approval to the event.  A display of books by California authors was a feature of the Book Fair.  Characters from the books on display costumed, under the leadership of well known directors, added to the worth of the event.  The membership enrollment of the San Jose Branch of the League of American Pen Women includes: Miss Ruth F. Amet, Miss Katherine Dunlap Cather, Mrs. May Roberts Clark, Miss Elva Sawyer Cureton, Mrs. Edith Daley, Marjory M. Fisher, Miss Mildred Hamilton, Miss Mayo A. Hayes, Mrs. Pauline Grace Hunt, Mrs. Katherine Kennedy, Mrs. Ada Jane Kimball, Mrs. Clara Louise Lawrence, Annette D. MacDonald, Flora S. Matthews.

     A branch has also been formed of the League of American Pen Women at Carmel-by-the-Sea with Miss Mary de Neale Morgan, the well known artist as the president.  Another Branch is being formed at Berkeley, California, under the leadership of Miss Cora Williams, whose school of learning is one of the state's best known institutions.

     Mrs. Bertha Lincoln Heustis, a past-president National League of American Pen Women, is State National Vice-President and representative California (south).

     Mrs. Josephine Wilson is California state representative, (north) and by virtue of the office, State Vice-President National League of American Pen Women.  Both Mrs. Heustis and Mrs. Wilson hold the two official positions of president and State National Vice-President, their territories extend over the southern and the northern part of California, respectively.

 

     Mrs. Louis Geldert is president of the National League of American Pen Women, elected to office at the Silver Jubilee Convention held in Washington, D.C., April 24-29, 1922.

     In her initial letter to the Pen Women of the nation, Mrs. Geldert said: "We are extremely anxious that every member of our organization shall be in touch with the field at large as well as with headquarters, and most earnestly ask the co-operation of every branch and state official toward that end.  The branch presidents are requested to send in brief notices of their important work.  Particularly the output of individual members which may be exploited to their advantage throughout the country.  For instance: any new book by a member will be bulletined at headquarters as soon as notice of its publication reaches us, and every branch of our organization from Florida to Alaska, will be requested to post the name of the author and the title of the book, and in every possible way interest the public in its sale and favorable reception.

     Mrs. Louis N. Geldert is supported by a staff of brilliant women including: Mrs. Harry Atwood Colman, vice-president; Mrs. Ernest Thomspson-Seton, vice-president; Mrs. Homer Hoch, recording secretary; Mrs. Hamlin Cogswell, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Harry J. Cunningham, registrar; Mrs. William H. Moses, treasurer; Mrs. Crete P. Hutchinson, auditor; Mrs. Amos A Frier, historian; Mrs. G. G. White, librarian, Miss Eliza Pope Van Dyne is the national executive secretary.  Promotional directors include: Mrs. Grace Richmond, Mrs. Daniel Lothrop, Mrs. Anna Katherine Greene Rohlfs, Mrs. Kate Marcia Forbes, Mrs. Isaac Pearson, Mrs. Harry Atwood Coleman is editor and director of the official magazine: "THE PENWOMAN."

 

PAGE 157

 

CAP  AND  BELLS  CLUB

San Francisco

 

OFFICERS

 

Mrs. JESSE M. WHITED, 30 Belvedere Street......................................................…..President

Mrs. MARSHALL C. HARRIS, 1401 Willard Street.............................…….First Vice-President

Mrs. J. EMMET HAYDEN, 162 Fifteenth Avenue............................……Second Vice-President

Mr. J. A. KUYKENDALL, 1220 Sixteenth Avenue..............................…….Recording Secretary

Mrs. HARRY BAEHE, 2295 Broadway.........................................……Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. WALTER SCOTT GRAY, 1375 Sixth Avenue................................…...Financial Secretary

Mrs. J. E. GILSON, 439 Page Street......................................................................….Treasurer 

       

DIRECTORS

 

Mrs. CHARLES E. KER

Mrs. JAMES B. HATCHER

Mrs. JOHN H. SAMMI

Mrs. C. FRANK ADAMS

Mrs. GEORGE VRANIZAN

 

 

 

     Wit and humor--these were two foundation stones on which the Cap and Bells Club was built. Wit--the kind of wit of which poets and ministrels sang; the kind of wit which conquers turmoil and urges the heart to victory. Humor--the more profound allurement of cheer, the kind which tempers the way and tests the strength of intelligence; the kind which prizes laughter and lightens human woes.

     "Cap and Bells" has for its emblem a jester, and since its organization in 1904 it has been noted not only for its fun and frolic, but also for the study it has given to the drama, languages, music and kindred subjects.

     The dramatic section has attracted a large part of its membership and many celebrated plays have been produced by that section.  The most notable were "Sister Beatrice" and "Mary Magdalen" by Maeterlinck, "Madame Sans Gene" by Sardou, and the "Man of Destiny" and "Candida" by Shaw.  Comedies, operas, operettas and gay travesties have not been overlooked nor neglected, and the same standard of excellence that marked the drama was maintained in these production.  During the presidency of Mrs. D. Richard Martens, the well-known Chinese play, "A Thousand Years Ago", by Percy MacKaye, was staged at the St. Francis Hotel.  The modern club woman was not recognized in the assumed characters of austere mandarins, princes, soldiers and vagabond adventurers.

     As a co-worker with the Dramatic Section, with the same standard of excellence is the Woman's Orchestra, composed of musicians of ability, and of which, the club is justly proud.  The orchestra not only assists at the social days of the club, but has been honored by being asked to participate in programs of other organizations.

     A dancing section and a swimming section provide recreation for the athletically inclined members, while the studious member finds pleasure and profit in the sections devoted to the study of literature, Shakespeare and art.

     Pilgrimages to noted art galleries have supplemented the actual study of art.  An exhibition of paintings of the women artists of California was held in the club rooms in 1912-13, during the presidency of Miss Adele Elizabeth Dugan.

     Believing that constructive individual work has the greatest results, the club has endeavored to perform that service for its members rather than to participate as an organization in the field of public affairs.  On its roster are the names of women who have contributed to the upbuilding of our beloved city, as well as those who have been of service to others in educational an philanthropic movements.

 

SIGNATURE  OF  MRS.  JESSE  M.  WHITED

 

     Mrs. John Hammond Crabbe is the new president of the Cap and Bells Club and on her board are: Mrs. Henry Hastings, First Vice-President; Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden, Second Vice-President, Mrs. Arthur L. Shannon, Recording Secretary; Mrs. Edward Janssen, Financial Secretary; Mrs. Frank Adams, Treasurer; Mrs. J. A. Simpson, Corresponding Secretary,.  The directors are: Mrs. James Hatcher, Mrs. E. P. Heald, Mrs. George Vranizan, Mrs. Herbert Jones, Mrs. Clarence Hunt.

 

PAGE 158

 

KATE  TUPPER  GALPIN  SHAKESPEARE

CLUB

Los Angeles

 

OFFICERS

 

Mrs. W. E. SILVERWOOD, 122 N. Vendome Street.........................................……….President

Mrs. CAROLINE  BRADLEY....................................................................……...Vice-President

Mrs. L. C. DIGGS, 2615 W. Seventeenth Street................................………..Recording Secretary

Mrs. H. A. McCLAIN, 1072 Camulos Street..............................…………Corresponding Secretary

Mrs. R.W. BULPIN, 930 Bushnell Avenue.........................................................………Treasurer

 

PORTRAIT OF MRS. W. E. SILVERWOOD

 

In 1892 when the average woman of fifty felt the time for learning was past, came one, Kate Tupper Galpin, with an unfailing remedy for breaking the crust of the mind in rust, and releasing latent powers of which the possessor had never dreamed.

     She opened a class in Shakespeare for mature women, the study beginning with King Lear.  Fifteen women of the Channing Branch of the Unity Church met in the Church Parlors, and later, with added numbers, moved from place to place as convenience dictated, meeting for a number of years, in Mrs. Galpin's own home on Fremont Avenue, where happy associations were formed.

     In 1901 when Cumnock Hall, an exact replica of Shakespeare's home, was built, Mrs. Galpin was of the faculty.  One room was planned for Shakespearean work, and here, the classes, and later the club also met until 1916 when the property changed hands and both class and club followed the Cumnock School to two hundred South Vermont Avenue.  A more central location being desired, two years ago quarters were taken with the Friday Morning Club at 940 South Figueroa, the club's present home.

     Mrs. Galpin's method of teaching was original and effective.  Only one act was studied at a time, the first lesson always treating of the source for the plot, the historical setting and the relation of the country to the world generally.  To instill confidence and elicit every shade of meaning, written questions were distributed, and an experienced leader knows the support of the system of a slip of paper.  Mrs. Galpin encouraged thinking.  If help were needed the whole class was questioned before she added her opinion. Her smile was power.  Free discussion prevailed.  A drama closed after a thorough analysis of the text followed by written character sketches.  The study of Hamlet took three months.

     When four of the pioneer class had covered twenty plays, certificates to this effect were granted, and in 1901 the Alumni thus formed organized the Kate Tupper Galpin Shakespeare Club to meet monthly, the class to continue meeting weekly.

     At Mrs. Galpin's great desire--and just before her passing in 1906--yearly Commemorative Programs were instituted to occur on Shakespeare's birthday, April 23rd, when new members are received into the Club.

     Various teachers, most of whom were Alumni, continued the beloved Founder's method, and at their head stood Mrs. Merrill Moore Grigg, and Miss Helen Brooks, successive presidents of Cumnock.  The past two years Professor Anthony P. Blanks, University of California, Southern Branch, has led the class, and this year he has led the club.  An outside class under an Alumnus, Mrs. C. B. McClure, contributed five new members.  Three others were accepted for meritorious work elsewhere.  Age qualification to eighty-eight years.  Membership increases slowly because of unusual requirements.  Shakespeare sections are found in nearly every club today.

     The club once changed its course of study to Browning and gave some thought to Greek literature, but returned to the inexhaustible resources of the Beloved Bard.  Active members number on hundred and thirty.

 

MRS. R. H. F. VAIEL.

 

PAGE 159

 

A  SKETCH  OF  SOUTHERN  CLUB  LIFE

 

PORTRAIT  OF  BERTHA  LINCOLN  HEUSTIS

 

     It does not seem probable that any other city in the world can claim as much activity in Women's Clubs as Los Angeles.  Here there are hundreds of splendidly equipped clubs with charming, well worth while members, all striving for up-lift and betterment of conditions in civics, philanthropy, arts, and letters.

     The influence is wide and lasting.  The interest is maintained by means of well attended meetings made brilliant by selected speakers whose subjects are of world interest as well as of local pride.  Of the hundreds of Women's clubs the Friday Morning Club is claiming the largest membership of over twenty-three hundred accredited members.  Ebell Club follows closely with twenty-two hundred.  The Southern California Woman's Press Club, Matinee Musical, Harmonia, Drama League, Scribblers, Short Story, Civics and Philanthropy Club, Verse Writers, and the League of American Pen Women, Western Branch are among others distinctively prominent.  There are many patriotic organizations, many chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution and also United States Daughters of 1812.

     The Los Angeles League of American Pen Women has the distinction of being the first organized auxiliary having been given its Charter No. 1 in 1915.  Mrs. Florence Pierce Reed was the first president and Mrs. Inez Townsend Tribit first secretary.  The World War and the many activities of that time prevented meetings until 1918 when the past national president, Mrs. Bertha Lincoln Heustis re-organized the Los Angeles Branch and accepted the local presidency.  The growth of the local membership has been steady while the state is no proud of the splendid list of members.  When Mrs. Heustis visited California in 1915, during the San Francisco and San Diego Fairs, there were only thirteen Los Angeles Pen Women members in California to assist in celebrating the special days allotted by the Fairs to the League.  At present Los Angeles has an active list of sixty-one and a guest membership of thirty.  The officers of the local League have retained their offices since 1918 with the exception of the secretary, Mrs. Forrestine Cooper Hooker who has moved to Washington, D. C.

     The president, Mrs. Bertha Lincoln Heustis, author of short stories and verse; musical compositions, newspaper work.  Member of: Friday Morning Club, Los Angeles, Southern California Woman's Press Club, Lyric Club, Colonial Dames of America, Descendants of Mayflower Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, United States Daughters of 1812, W. R. C. Women of the Civil War, Shiloh Circle, P. E. O. Order of the Crown, National Press Association, Colonial Dames Club of Washington, D. C., past-regent of Dubuque Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, associate member of Patriots Memorial Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Los Angeles Lyric Club, Drama League and others.

     Our first vice-president is Mrs. Emma Livingston Reed, has been active in newspaper work for many years, member of Friday Morning Club, past president of the Southern California Woman's Press Club, a member of the Legislative Council and Reciprocity Chairman of Friday Morning Club.

     The recording secretary is Mrs. Inez T. Tribit, illustrator, artist, verse writer, short stories, and scenarios, member of many clubs beside the Southern California Women's Press Club.

     The corresponding secretary is Miss Lou Cox, whose work for the Blind has been unceasing and her mastery of the Braille system putting her out of the amateur class.  A splendid writer and an able aid in League activities.  Her assistant corresponding secretary is Mrs. Emily Hughes Wright, whose clever story won the first prize in the competition in the Los Angeles Branch a year ago.

     The treasurer, Mrs. Helen Lukens Gaut is active in the Fine Arts Club of Pasadena and the Press Club.  Mrs. Gaut won distinction by he many descriptive articles appearing in leading magazines and newspaper.  Her garden and bungalow stories, illustrated from photographs of her own, made a distinctive place for her.  She is successfully writing exquisite songs, composing both the words and the charming musical setting.

     The auditor, Mrs. Helen Richardson Brown, is a newspaper and short story writer.

     The librarian, Mrs. Eva Hamilton Young, is a member of many clubs of Los Angeles and the Writers' Club of Oakland.  Mrs. Young has made a specialty of verse writing, publishing many and has now entered the growing army of scenario writers with success.

     The historian is Mrs. Blanche A. H. Verbeck, member of the Hollywood Woman's Club, Southern California Woman's Press Club, writer of music, short stories, one act plays and verse.

 

SIGNATURE OF BERTHA LINCOLN HEUSTIS

 

 

Transcribed by Suzanne Wolden.

Proofread by Betty Vickroy.

 

 


© 2005 Nancy Pratt Melton




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