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CALIFORNIA

STATE OFFICIALS

BIOGRAPHIES

1911


Contributed by Natalie Huntley (NHuntley@aol.com)

 

Source: California Blue Book, or State Roster, 1911

Compiled by Frank C. Jordan, Secretary of State

Friend W. Richardson, Superintendent of State Printing, Sacramento, CA, 1913

 

Part V.

 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT

 

Page 445

 

Governor.

 

HIRAM WARREN JOHNSON (Republican) was born at Sacramento, Sacramento County, California, September 2, 1866. He attended the public schools and was graduated from the Sacramento High School in 1884. He entered the University of California with the class of 1888, but left in his Junior year to engage in the study of law. He was admitted to practice in 1888 and practiced his profession thereafter in Sacramento until 1902. In 1899 he was appointed Corporation Counsel of the city of Sacramento by Mayor George H. Clark, and served in that capacity throughout Clark's administration. In 1902 he took up his residence in San Francisco, and in partnership with his brother, Albert M. Johnson, opened a law office in that city. He was nominated for the office of Governor in August, 1910, at the first direct primary election held in the State of California, and elected to that office November 8, 1910; inaugurated January 3, 1911.

 

Lieutenant Governor.

 

ALBERT J. WALLACE (Republican) was born in Wellington county, Province of Ontario, Canada, February 11, 1853. He was educated in the public school and in Victoria University. The condition of his health overthrew his plans for a professional career and he located on the prairies of North Dakota in 1878, engaging in farming, merchandising, and banking until 1886, when he removed to southern California, where he has made his home for over a quarter of a century. He has been active in oil and land business, was a member of the Los Angeles City Council for three years, and has been closely identified with various movements for betterment of conditions in city, county and State; elected Lieutenant Governor on November 8, 1910, and inaugurated at the same time as the Governor (January 3, 1911).

 

Secretary of State.

 

FRANK CHESTER JORDAN (Republican) was born at Haycrafts Ferry, near Redding, Shasta County, April 3, 1860. Received a common school education in Oakland, his home from 1868 to 1906. Since 1906 has resided in Auburn, Placer County. Engaged in commercial pursuits until 1894, when he was elected County Clerk of Alameda County. Reelected in 1898. Elected Clerk of Supreme Court November 4, 1902. Was nominated for office of Secretary of State at the first direct primary election held in the State of California and elected November 8, 1910, for the term 1911-1915.

 

Page 446

 

Controller.

 

ALFRED BOURNE NYE (Republican) was born at Stockton, California, October 25, 1853; he received his education in the public schools of Massachusetts and in the academy at Falmouth, in the same State; became a newspaperman, and was residing in Oakland, California, at the time when Governor George C. Pardee selected his as his private secretary, in which capacity he acted from January, 1903, until November 23, 1906, when he was appointed by Governor Pardee as State Controller to take the place of E. P. Colgan, deceased; on January 7, 1907, Governor Pardee again appointed his to the same office, vice self and E. P. Colgan, deceased. In 1910 he was nominated for Controller by both the Republican and Democratic parties, and in the general election following was elected for the term 1911-1915.

 

Treasurer.

 

EDWARD D. ROBERTS (Republican) was born in Cambria, Columbia County, Wisconsin, July 8, 1864; attended public school at Pittsburg, Pa., and Western University of Pennsylvania. In 1883 went to Bridgewater, South Dakota, and engaged in banking business. In 1887 came to California and engaged in banking business at Colton. Is president of First National Bank of Colton and also of San Bernardino National Bank, San Bernardino County Savings Bank and First National Bank of Rialto. Is largely interested in culture of oranges and lemons. Upon the resignation of W. R. Williams he was, on February 20, 1911, appointed to succeed his a State Treasurer.

 

Attorney General.

 

ULYSSES SIGEL WEBB (Republican), the present Attorney General, was born at Flemington, West Virginia, September 29, 1864. In 1870 his parents moved to Kansas, and Mr. Webb received his education in the schools of that State. In 1888, he came to California, and settled in Quincy, Plumas County, and in 1889 began the practice of law. In 1890 he was elected District Attorney and held the office until September 15, 1902, when he resigned to accept the appointment from Governor Gage of Attorney General. He has held the office since then, being elected for the third time in 1910.

 

Surveyor General.

 

WILLIAM STEPHEN KINGSBURY (Republican) was born at Oakland, California, August 3, 1870; he received a grammar school education and then commenced the study of civil engineering under private instructors; after perfecting himself in his profession he took up his residence at Los Angeles, where he held the position of Chief Deputy City Engineer; elected Surveyor General November 6, 1906; as the nominee of the Republican and Union Labor parties, and again in 1910.

 

Clerk of Supreme Court.

 

B. GRANT TAYLOR (Republican), Clerk of Supreme Court, born December 27, 1872, at Collins, Erie County, New York. After common school and business college education, served as telegrapher on Erie Railroad. Later entered New York Civil Service as stenographer and telegrapher, and while so engaged commenced study of law by correspondence. Became a Californian in 1898, and admitted to bar in 1902. Was official shorthand reporter in Superior Court in Santa Clara County 1904 to 1910, inclusive. Received Republican nomination for present office through direct primary in August, 1910, followed by election in November. Home, Saratoga, Santa Clara County.

 

Page 447

 

Superintendent of Public Instruction.

 

EDWARD HYATT (Republican) was born at Huntington, Pennsylvania, March 8, 1858, but was educated in the public school of Ohio and at the Ohio State University; he took up school teaching as his occupation, came to California in 1884, and settled in Riverside County, where beginning with 1895 he served several terms as County Superintendent of Schools, and also acted as Instructor for Teachers' County Institutes throughout the State; elected Superintendent of Public Instruction November 6, 1906, as the nominee of the Republican party and Independence League; reelected in 1910, as a Republican.

 

Superintendent of State Printing.

 

FRIEND WILLIAM RICHARDSON was appointed to the position of Superintendent of State Printing by Governor Hiram W. Johnson on November 23, 1911, upon the resignation of W. W. Shannon. Richardson is the editor and manager of the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and has for the past ten years been the president of the California Press Association. His newspaper and job plant in Berkeley is one of the best equipped of its size in the State. He was born in Michigan, but came with his parents to San Bernardino when a very small boy. He was raised in San Bernardino, and later became the editor and proprietor of the San Bernardino Daily and Weekly Times-Index. In 1901 he sold that paper and purchased the Berkeley Gazette, which he still controls.

 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT

 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

 

WILLIAM HENRY BEATTY (Republican) was born at Monclova, Lucas County, Ohio, February 18, 1838; he lived for a time in Kentucky, and came from that State to California in 1853, arriving in Sacramento in March; he received his education in the common schools of Kentucky and California, finishing in the University of Virginia; was admitted to the bar in California in January, 1861; served as City Attorney of Austin, Nevada, in 1864; as a Judge of the District Court and as Judge of the Supreme Court of that State during the years from 1864 to 1881; in 1888 he was elected Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of California, reelected in 1890, and again reelected in 1902.

 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court.

 

FRANK M. ANGELLOTI (Republican) was born at San Rafael, California, in 1861, and educated in the public school of this State and in Hastings College of the Law at San Francisco; he was admitted to practice law in 1882, and took up his profession in San Rafael; was elected District Attorney of Marin County in 1885 and served for three terms; elected Judge of the Superior Court of Marin County in 1890 and served two terms; elected Associate Justice of the Supreme Court November 4, 1902.

 

LUCIEN SHAW (Republican) was born near Vevay, Indiana, March 1, 1845; was educate din the common schools and at Indianapolis Law College and admitted to practice law in Indiana in 1869; came to California in 1883 and engaged in the practice of the law at Fresno County; removed to Los Angeles in 1886 and was appointed Judge of the Superior Court of Los Angeles County in March 1889; elected for the full term in 1890 and reelected in 1896; elected Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, November 4, 1902.

 

FREDERICK W. HENSHAW (Republican) was born in Illinois, May 24, 1858; he arrived in California in 1873 and graduated from the University of California...

 

Page 448

 

...in 1879; was admitted to practice law in 1880; served as Justice of the Peace in the city of Oakland, and was elected Judge of the Superior Court of Alameda County in 1890; resigned December 8, 1894; elected Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in 1894 and reelected November 6, 1906.

 

WILLIAM G. LORIGAN (Republican) was born at Melbourne, Australia, February 12, 1855; came to this State in 1860; was educated at Santa Clara College, California, and at St. Vincent's College of Cape Girardeau, Missouri; admitted to practice law in California; was elected Judge of the Superior Court of Santa Clara County in 1890; reelected in 1896 and in 1902; resigned as Superior Judge of Santa Clara County and was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court January 5, 1903, to fill unexpired term of Hon. Jackson Temple, deceased; elected to full term, November 6, 1906.

 

M. C. SLOSS (Republican) was born at New York City, February 28, 1869, but was brought to this State in 1872; he received his education in the San Francisco public schools, in Belmont School, in Harvard College, and in the Harvard Law School; returning to San Francisco he took up his profession as a lawyer, and in 1900 was elected Judge of the Superior Court; on February 1, 1906, he was appointed to take the place of Walter Van Dyke, deceased, as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court; on November 6, 1906, he was regularly elected for the remainder of the unexpired term of Justice Van Dyke, ending January, 1911. On November 8, 1910, he was reelected for a full term of twelve years from January, 1911.

 

HENRY ALEXANDER MELVIN (Republican) was born at Springfield, Illinois, September 28, 1865. He came to California in 1875, and in 1889 graduated from the University of California with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy; in 1892 he graduated from the Hastings College of the Law with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. His home is at Oakland, and he has served as Justice of the Peace of Brooklyn Township, Deputy District Attorney General of California. In 1901 he was appointed to fill a vacancy on the superior bench of Alameda County, and in 1902 was elected for the full term of six years beginning January, 1903, but resigned to accept an appointment, on September 28, 1908, as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, to take the place of T. B. McFarland, deceased, until the next general election. On November 3, 1908, he was elected to fill the unexpired term of Justice McFarland, ending January, 1911. On November 8, 1910, was reelected for the full term of twelve years from January, 1911.

 

FIRST APPELLATE DISTRICT

 

Presiding Justice.

 

THOMAS JOSEPH LENNON (Republican) was born in Marysville, California, February 25, 1866; educated in public school of Marysville and at St. Mary's College, Oakland. Admitted to the bar in 1888. Elected Superior Judge of Marin County in 1902; reelected 1908. Elected Presiding Justice, Appellate Court, First District, November 8, 1910.

 

Associate Justices, First Appellate District.

 

SAMUEL PIKE HALL (Republican) was born in Monterey County, California, March 3, 1854, and received a common and high school education; he then studied law, and took up the practice of that profession in Oakland; served as Deputy District Attorney of Alameda County from 1878 to 1882, when he was elected District Attorney, to which position he was reelected in 1884 and again in 1886; he was elected Judge of the Superior Court of Alameda County in 1896, and reelected in 1902; in April, 1905, he was appointed Associate Justice of the District Court of Appeal, for the First District, elected to the same position, November 6, 1906, and allotted the twelve-year term.

 

Page 449

 

FRANK HENRY KERRIGAN (Republican) was born at Green Valley, Contra Costa County, California, September 17, 1867, and educated in the public school; he became a lawyer, with residence in San Francisco; in November, 1893, he was elected Justice of the Peace for that City and County, and reelected in 1895 and 1897; in 1899 he was elected Judge of the Superior Court for an unexpired term, elected Associate Justice of the District Court of Appeal, First District, November 6, 1906, and allotted the eight-year term.

 

SECOND APPELLATE DISTRICT

 

Presiding Justice.

 

MATTHEW THOMPSON ALLEN (Republican) was born at Greenville, Ohio, September 17, 1848; he was educated in the common schools of his native State, with a partial course at Otterbein University; in February, 1887, he came to California, and took up the practice of his profession of attorney at law in Los Angeles; for a time he served as United States Attorney for the Southern District of California; he was elected Judge of the Superior Court for Los Angeles County in November, 1896, and reelected in November, 1902; on April 10, 1905, he was appointed Associate Justice of the District Court of Appeal, Second District; elected Presiding Justice for the Second District, November 6, 1906, and allotted the eight-year term. At this election he was the nominee of the Republican and Democratic parties.

 

Associate Justices, Second Appellate District.

 

WILLIAM PARRY JAMES (Republican) was born near Buffalo, New York, January 10, 1870; was brought to California by his parents when three years of age and has resided in Los Angeles County every since; studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1894; appointed to fill a vacancy on the superior bench of Los Angeles County in April, 1905. In the fall of 1906 was elected to same position for term of six years. In July, 1910, was appointed to fill the vacancy on the bench of the District Court of Appeal for the Second District, to take the place of James W. Taggart, deceased. At the November election of the same year was elected to serve the unexpired term of Justice Taggart, that term being for eight years.

 

VICTOR E. SHAW (Republican) was born in Pettis County, Missouri, December 15, 1857; he received his education in the common schools of Missouri and Oregon, in Willamette University at Salem, Oregon, and Ann Arbor Law School, Michigan; came to California in March, 1888, and practiced law in San Diego, which was his home when elected November 6, 1906, as Associate Justice of the District Court of Appeal, Second District, and allotted the four-year term. At the election November, 1910, was elected to succeed himself for the full term of twelve years.

 

THIRD APPELLATE DISTRICT

 

Presiding Justice.

 

NORTON PARKER CHIPMAN (Republican) was born at Milford, Union County, Ohio, of New England parentage, his father and mother being natives of Vermont. The family soon afterwards moved to Iowa and resided variously at Keosauqua, Mount Pleasant, and Washington, in that State. He attended school at these places, receiving most of his education at Howe's Academy in Mount Pleasant and at Washington College. He commenced studying law at the latter place, but graduated at the Cincinnati Law School, entering practice just before the Civil War, at Washington, Iowa. At the call of President Lincoln, in 1861, he enlisted in the Second Iowa Infantry, the first three-year regiment from that State; was made...

 

Page 450

 

...Second lieutenant of Company H; appointed by Col. Samuel R. Curtis regimental adjutant; elected by the officers as major to fill the vacancy caused by the promotion of Colonel Curtis to the rank of brigadier-general; was detailed to serve as chief of the latter's staff; returned to his regiment and took part in Grant's campaign on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers; was severely wounded in a charge of his regiment upon the Confederate works at Fort Donelson; was back at his post at the siege of Corinth, where he received promotion as colonel and additional aid-de-camp in the regular army on the staff of Major-General Halleck, and was assigned to duty with his old commander, Curtis, now major-general, commanding the Department of Arkansas, and was made his chief of staff; was sent to Washington, D. C., on special duty, his services while there attracting the attention of Secretary of War Stanton, who refused his earnest request to be returned to field duty, and he served in the War Department to the close of the war; he successfully performed some important and hazardous special service as bearer of dispatches to commanders in the field, by the personal detail of President Lincoln, and came near capture by "Mosby's Guerrillas" on one of these occasions and on another by the retreating army of General Early; as judge-advocate he tried and convicted the Andersonville Prison jailer, Henry Wirz, who was hanged in "Old Capitol Prison" for his atrocious cruelties to prisoners of war; he also tried many other important military commission cases as judge-advocate; was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers at the close of the war, and resigned to enter the practice of law at Washington, D. C., in November, 1865; when the District of Columbia was given a territorial form of government he was appointed Secretary of the District by President Grant in 1870, but resigned and was elected Delegate to Congress, where he served two terms (1871-1875) and was the only representative ever given the district in Congress. In 1868 and 1869 he was adjutant general of the Grand Army of the Republic on the staff of its commander-in-chief, General John A. Logan, and was largely instrumental in effecting a reorganization, on a sound and enduring basis, of that remarkable society of Civil War veterans; it was while adjutant general in 1868 that he wrote the memorable order creating Memorial Day. He came to California to reside in 1876, since which time he has been prominently connected with the industrial, political, and social welfare of the State. No man has written more or with better effect or given more of his time and energies to advertise to the world the attractions of California. For a number of years he was the president of the California State board of Trade, and to him is due the credit of promulgating the dictim that "the climate of California is the State's most valuable asset." In April, 1897, he was appointed by the Supreme Court as one of the five commissioners of that court, and served in that capacity until appointed by the five commissioners of that court, and served in that capacity until appointed by Governor Pardee in 1905 as Presiding Justice of the District Court of Appeal, for the Third District; he was regularly elected to that office in November, 1906, and allotted the twelve-year term.

 

Associate Justices, Third Appellate District.

 

ALBERT G. BURNETT (Republican) was born in the State of Oregon, April 9, 1856, but when two years of age he came with his parents to California. He received a collegiate education and for a number of years he taught in the public schools of Sonoma County. While teaching he took up the study of the law and he was admitted to the bar in January, 1887. In 1888 he was elected District Attorney of Sonoma County and reelected in 1890. In 1896 he was elected Judge of the Superior Court of that county and reelected in 1902. On November 6, 1996, he was elected Associate Justice of the District Court of Appeal, Third District, and allotted the four-year term; and at the general election held November 8, 1910, he was reelected for the full term of twelve years.

 

ELIJAH CARSON HART (Republican) was born in an emigrant wagon en route to California, on the banks of the Carson River, in the State of Nevada, on September 9, 1857; he received a common school education, and learned the printer's trade, ...

 

Page 451

 

...which occupation he followed for a time, and later engaged in various branches of newspaper work, as reporter, editor, and publisher; he then studied law under the direction of his brother, A. L. Hart, Attorney General (now deceased), and was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court in 1885; in the spring of 1886 he was elected City Attorney of Sacramento (the city elections then being held in March); in the fall of 1888 he was elected Member of the Assembly from what was then the Nineteenth District, in Sacramento, in the spring of 1890 he was again elected City Attorney, and reelected to the same office in 1892; in November, 1892, he was elected State Senator, serving through the thirtieth and thirty-first sessions of the Legislature; in 1896 he was elected Judge of the Superior Court for Sacramento County, and reelected in 1902; elected Associate Justice of the District Court of Appeal, Third District, November 6, 1906, as the nominee of the Republican and Union Labor parties, and allotted the eight-year term.

 

UNITED STATES SENATORS

 

GEORGE CLEMENT PERKINS (Republican), of Oakland, was born at Kennebunkport, Maine, in 1839; was reared on a farm, and attended public school until his thirteenth year, when he shipped on board a sailing ship for New Orleans, and followed the calling of a sailor on ships engaged in the European trade. In 1855 he shipped "before the mast" on the sailing ship Galatea, bound for San Francisco, where he arrived in the autumn of that year. Since that time he has been engaged in mercantile business, banking, farming, mining, whale fishery, and steamship transportation. He has been president of the Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco; also of the San Francisco Art Association; is a director of the California Academy of Sciences and other public institutions. He has also been grand master of the grand lodge, F. A. A. M. of California; also grand commander of the grand commandery of the Knights Templar, State of California; he is also a member of the California commandery of the military order of the Loyal Legion. In 1869 he was elected to the State Senate, serving eight years; in 1879 he was elected Governor of California, serving until January, 1883; was appointed, July 24, 1893, United States Senator to fill, until the election of his successor, a vacancy caused by the death of Hon. Leland Stanford, and took his seat August 8, 1893. In January, 1895, having made a thorough canvass before the people of his State, he was elected by the Legislature on the first ballot to fill the unexpired term. In the fall election of 1896 he was a candidate before the people of California for reelection, and received the endorsement of the Republican county conventions that comprised a majority of the senatorial and assembly districts in the State. When the Legislature convened in joint convention (January, 1897) for the purpose of electing a United States Senator, he was reelected on the first ballot. In January, 1903, he was again reelected on the first ballot for the term of six years, receiving every vote of the Republican members of the Legislature. His election was made unanimous on motion of a Democratic member of the Legislature. Again, in 1909, he was reelected on the first ballot for another term of six years, receiving every Republican vote except two, and at the same time receiving Democratic support. At the time of his election in 1897, 1903, and 1909 he was absent from the State attending to his Congressional duties in Washington. His term of service will expire March 3, 1915.

 

JOHN DOWNEY WORKS (Republican) was born in Ohio County, Indiana, March 20, 1847; was reared on a farm until sixteen and a half years of age; when he enlisted in the army of the Civil War, serving eighteen months and until the close of the war; was educated in the common schools on Indiana; was married to Alice Banta, November 8, 1868, and has six children; is a lawyer and practiced his profession for fifteen years at Vevay, Indiana; in 1883 removed to California; served one term as a member of the Legislature of Indiana in 1879; was Judge of the Superior Court of San Diego County, California, and a Justice of the Supreme Court of this State; was for a short time in 1910 a member of the City Council of the City of Los Angeles, California, and its president; has been a member of the American Bar Association...

 

Page 452

 

...for more than twenty years; in 1911 was elected United States Senator for California by the Legislature of this State, on the first ballot, receiving ninety-two votes out of one hundred and twenty. His term expires March 4, 1917.

 

REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS

 

First District

 

Counties: Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, Del Norte, El Dorado, Humboldt, Lassen, Mariposa, Modoc, Mono, Placer, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra, Nevada, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity, and Tuolumne (19 counties). Population (1910) 184,274

 

JOHN E. BAKER (Democrat) of Alturas, Modoc County, was born on a farm near Knoxville, Knox County, Illinois, February 22, 1863. Soon after his parents moved to Sedalia, Missouri, and remaining there but a short time, removed to Knoxville. In 1873 moved with his parents to Lassen County, California; worked on the ranch and farm and attended the public school, working his own way; attended the grammar school at Susanville, and the State Normal School at San Jose, California, 1882-1884. In the spring of 1885 entered the law office of Judge E. V. Spencer of Susanville, where he studied law and was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1885; was his party's candidate for District Attorney of Lassen County in 1886. December 6, 1886, moved to Alturas, where he has resided every since, engaging in the practice of the law. In 1894 was elected District Attorney of Modoc County, which office he held four years, 1895-1898; at the general election in 1898 was the Democratic nominee for State Senator. Elected Judge of the Superior Court of California in and for the county of Modoc in 1902 and reelected in 1908, which position he resigned December 19, 1910. Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon, the United States Circuit and District Courts of California, United States Court of Appeals, and the Supreme Court of the United States; was elected to the Sixty-second Congress against W. F. Englebright (Republican), W. H. Morgan (Socialist), and C. H. Essex (Prohibitionist).

 

Second District

 

Counties: Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Sacramento, Sonoma, Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba (12 counties). Population (1910) 263,070

 

WILLIAM KENT (Republican) was born in Chicago, Illinois, March 29, 1864. He came to California with his parents in October, 1871, and had his residence in Marin County from that date until 1887. He was a resident of Chicago from 1887 to 1907. He graduated from Yale in 1887 with a degree B.A., and received an honorary degree, M.A., from Yale in 1908. While in Chicago he served as Alderman from 1895 to 1897 and was president of the Municipal Voters' League from 1900 to 1901. He returned to California to reside permanently in 1907. In 1910 he sought the Republican nomination for Congress from the Second District at the Republican primaries and was successful, and at the general election in November he was elected over his Democratic opponent.

 

Third District

 

Counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, and Solano (3 counties). Population (1910) 305,364

 

JOHN RUSSELL KNOWLAND (Republican), of Alameda, was born in the city of Alameda, California, August 5, 1873; was educated in public and private school and in the University of the Pacific; is associated with his father, Joseph Knowland, in the wholesale lumber and shipping business; in 1898, at the age of 25, was elected to the Assembly of the California State Legislature; was reelected in 1900; in 1902 was elected to the State Senate, resigning in 1904, after serving one session, having in the mean time received the Republican nomination for Congress; was elected to...

 

Page 453

 

...the Fifty-eighth, Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, and Sixty-first Congresses, and reelected to the Sixty-second by a plurality of 27,238 over a Socialist opponent. No Democratic candidate filed a petition for a place on the Democratic ticket at the direct primary on the part ballot, and as he received a majority vote was declared to be, under the California direct primary law, the nominee of the Democratic as well as the Republican party.

 

Fourth District

 

City of San Francisco; Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-second, Forth-third, Forty Fourth, and Forty-fifth Assembly Districts. Population (1910), 153,404

 

JULIUS KAHN (Republican) was born at Kuppenheim, Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany, February 28, 1861; in 1866 he was brought to California by his parents, and received his education in the public schools of San Francisco; after leaving school he followed the theatrical profession for ten years, playing with many well-known stars; in 1890 he returned to San Francisco and took up the study of the law; in 1892 he was elected Member of the Assembly from San Francisco; in January, 1894, he was admitted to practice as a lawyer; in 1898 he was elected Representative in Congress for the Fourth District, and reelected in 1900; in 1904 he was again elected to Congress, and reelected November 6, 1906, as the nominee of the Republican and Union Labor parties; again reelected November 3, 1908, and November 8, 1910, was again elected.

 

Fifth District

 

Counties: San Mateo, Santa Clara, and the Thirty-second, Thirty-third, Thirty-fourth, Thirty-fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Assembly Districts of San Francisco. Population (1910), 372,632

 

EVERIS ANSON HAYES (Republican) was born at Waterloo, Wisconsin, March 10, 1855, and educated in the public schools; upon graduating from the Waterloo High Schools he entered the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1873, and graduated from both the literary and law departments of that institution, receiving the degree of B.L. and LL.B.; he engaged in the practice of law at Madison for four years, and at Ashland for three years; about that time he became interested in iron mines at Ironwood, Michigan, and at Hurley, Wisconsin, and since then has not been actively engaged in his profession, but has devoted his time to the management of his various properties; while residing in Madison he was City Alderman for two years, and for one year he was a member of the Board of Supervisors of Gogebic County, Michigan; in 1887 he removed to Santa Clara County, California, where he engaged in fruit raising, and together with his brother is publisher and proprietor of the San Jose Daily Morning Mercury and the Evening Herald; elected Representative in Congress for the Fifth District, November 8, 1904, reelected November 6, 1906, as the nominee of the Republican and Union Labor parties; again reelected November 3, 1908, and also November 8, 1910; at the last election, he received 33,265 votes to 15,345 votes for Thomas E. Hayden (Democrat), 7,052 for E. L. Reguin (Socialist), and 357 for T. E. Caton (Prohibitionist).

 

Sixth District

 

Counties: Fresno, Kings, Madera, Merced, Monterey, San Benito, San Joaquin, Santa Cruz, and Stanislaus (9 counties). Population (1910) 246,983

 

JAMES CARSON NEEDHAM (Republican), of Modesto, was born September 17, 1864, in Carson City, Nevada, in an emigrant wagon, his parents being at the time en route across the plains to California; educated in the public schools of California, the San Jose High School, the University of the Pacific at San Jose, and the law department of the University of Michigan; began the practice of law in November, 1889, at Modesto, where he has ever since resided; in 1890 was nominated by the Republican...

 

Page 454

 

... party for State Senator, but, the district being overwhelmingly Democratic, was defeated; was elected to the Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth, Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, and Sixty-first Congresses, and reelected to the Sixty-second Congress.

 

Seventh District

 

County of Los Angeles. Population (1910) 504,131

 

WILLIAM DENNISON STEPHENS (Republican) of Los Angeles, son of Martin F. and Alvira (Leibee) Stephens, was born at Eaton, Preble County, Ohio, December 26, 1859; was educated in the public schools; graduated from the Eaton High School; taught country school three years, beginning at the age of 16; studied law during vacations, but never applied for admission to practice, being obliged to earn immediate money. In 1880 joined engineering corps, and for eight years was engaged in construction and operation of railroads in Ohio, Indiana, Iowa, and Louisiana. On account of his mother's health moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1887, and in 1888 became manager for large retail grocery. From 1891 to 1902 was traveling salesman for wholesale grocery house in Los Angeles; from 1902 to 1909 was partner in wholesale and retail grocery business of Carr & Stephens. He was director of Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, 1902 to 1911; president in 1907; and chairman or member of advisory committee for the building of the Los Angeles aqueduct, costing $25,000,000, in 1910. Since 1903 has been major and commissary First Brigade, California National Guard, and saw active service at San Francisco after its destruction; was in San Francisco at the beginning of and during the earthquake and fire which destroyed it in 1906; was elected to the Sixty-second Congress, receiving 36,435 votes to 13,340 for Lorin A. Handley (Democrat), 10,305 for T. W. Williams (Socialist), and 1,990 for C. V. La Fontaine (Prohibitionist).

 

Eighth District

 

Counties: Imperial, Inyo, Kern, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Tulare, and Ventura (11 counties). Population (1910) 346,691

 

SYLVESTER CLARK SMITH (Republican), of Bakersfield, was born on a farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, August 26, 1858; was educated in the district school and at Howe's Academy, Mount Pleasant; moved to California in the fall of 1879; farmed and taught school in Colusa County, and in 1883 went to Kern County to teach; while teaching he was studying law, and in 1885 was admitted to practice and located at Bakersfield, California, where he still resides. In 1886 a number of farmers bought a newspaper plant with which to establish a paper to represent their views on a question of water right, which was then engrossing their attention, and Mr. Smith was employed to edit the paper--the Kern County Echo; three years later he bought the paper and continued to edit it till 1897, when he returned to his law practice; is still the principal owner of the paper, now a morning daily, and does occasional editorial writing for it. He was elected to the State Senate in 1894 and again in 1898, serving eight years; was elected to the Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, and Sixty-first Congresses, and reelected to the Sixty-second Congress, receiving 28,202 votes, to 18,958 for W. E. Irving (Democrat).

 

RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS

 

JOHN MORTON ESHLEMAN (Republican) was born at Villa Ridge, Illinois, June 14, 1876, and came to California March 2, 1896. He worked in a railroad camp of the Southern Pacific Company, during which time he studied to prepare himself for admission to the University, entering the University of California in 1898. In 1902 he took his A.B. with highest honors and in 1903 the degree of Master of Arts. He was admitted to the bar and appointed Deputy State Labor Commissioner under...

 

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... Governor Pardee and Commissioner W. V. Stafford. He represented the Fifty-second District (Berkeley) in the thirty-seventh session of the Legislature. He was appointed, under District Attorney (now Superior Judge) Everett J. Brown, Deputy District Attorney of Alameda County, but was compelled by his health to remove to the Imperial Valley. On the formation of Imperial County, August, 1907, Mr. Eshleman was elected its first District Attorney, serving out his term. In November, 1910, he was elected Railroad Commissioner from the Third District and chosen as president of the Commission in January, 1911.

 

ALEXANDER GORDON (Republican) was born in Hants County, Nova Scotia, October 16, 1846. He received a common school education and was brought up on a farm. In 1869 he moved to California, settling in San Joaquin County, where he engaged in the sheep raising industry. In 1875 he moved to Fresno and began the growing of raisins on a large scale. Since 1901 he has made his residence in Sacramento, where he became a director and the vice-president of the Sacramento Bank. From 1903 to 1907 he served as member of auditing board to Commission of Public Works. From 1907 to 1911 he served as member of Consulting River Board, Department of Engineering. Elected member of Railroad Commission November 8, 1910, from the First District.

 

HARVEY D. LOVELAND (Republican) was born in new York in 1853 and received his education in the schools of that State. For nine years he taught school in New York and Kansas, to which latter State he moved in 1876, where he read law and was admitted to the bar in 1881, but after practicing for a few years engaged in mercantile affairs, to which he has since given his attention. He became a resident of San Francisco in 1887. For several years he was connected with two of the largest mercantile institutions on the coast. He has always taken a lively interest in public affairs; was for six years President of the Pacific Coast Jobbers and Manufacturers' Association; has also recently retired from the presidency of the Transmississippi Commercial Congress. As traffic director and later as president of the Pacific Coast Jobbers and Manufacturers' Association, he assisted in accumulating the evidence and prosecuting the suits before the Interstate Commerce Commission in defense of the jobbing interests of the coast in what are known as the St. Louis Case, the State Toll Case, the Spokane Case, and others. He is vice-president of the International Mercantile and Bond Company, and president of the Merchants and Manufacturers' Securities Company. Mr. Loveland is also prominent in Masonic circles and is Past Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of California. He was a member of Governor Pardee's staff and Paymaster General of Governor Gillett's staff, with the rank of Colonel. He was appointed Railroad Commissioner for the Second District by Governor J. N. Gillett November 23, 1907, to succeed Andrew M. Wilson, resigned.

 

EDWIN O. EDGERTON (Republican) was born in Yreka, California, January 8, 1876; educated in the common schools and University of Southern California; admitted to the bar in 1898; practiced law eleven years in Los Angeles, California; became secretary of Municipal League March, 1909; appointed member of the State Railroad Commission March 13, 1912.

 

MAX THELEN (Republican) was born in Nebraska, 1880; came to San Diego County, California, in 1888. Graduated from National City, San Diego County, public schools and high school; worked five years on ranch, entered University of California August, 1900; graduated May, 1904; Harvard Law School, 1904 to 1906; in office of Olney & Olney, attorneys-at-law, San Francisco, November, 1906, to May 1907; assistant attorney and then attorney for Western Pacific Railway Company from May 1907, to April, 1911; attorney for California State Railroad Commission April, 1911, to date; appointed member of Railroad Commission March 13, 1912; first secretary and organizer of Berkeley Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican Club; vice-president of City Club of Berkeley; member of Commonwealth Club of San Francisco, University of California Club, and American Society of International Law; lecturer on International Law, University of California; joint author with John M. Eshleman of public utilities act.

 

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STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION

 

RICHARD E. COLLINS (Republican) was born in the town of Weaverville, Trinity County, California, March 28, 1873, and educated in the public schools of that section; he is a miner by occupation, with residence at Redding, Shasta County; in 1902 he was elected Assessor of Shasta County, and elected Member of the State Board of Equalization for the Third District, November 6, 1906, as the nominee of the Republican and Union Labor parties; was reelected to the same office in 1910 as the nominee of the Republican and Democratic parties.

 

JEFF McELVAINE (Republican) was born in San Bernardino, California, July 27, 1862, and educated in the public schools of his native city; his business is that of real estate broker; for four years he held the appointment of Deputy County Tax Collector, and was Chief Deputy County Assessor for twelve years, in 1900 he was elected City Assessor, and was elected County Assessor in 1902; elected Member of the State Board of Equalization for the Fourth District, November 6, 1906, and reelected to the same office November 8, 1910.

 

JOHN MITCHELL (Republican) was born at St. Andrews, Canada, January 1, 1863, and was elected in the public schools of New Hampshire, and in Chester Academy, in the same State; he came to California and located in San Francisco, but later removed to Oakland, Alameda County, where he has since resided; in November, 1896, he was elected member of the Board of Supervisors of Alameda County, reelected to the same office in 1900, and again elected in 1904, serving eight years as chairman of that board; in November, 1910, he was elected member of the State Board of Equalization for the Second District.

 

EDWARD MAXIMILIAN ROLKIN (Republican) was born in Russia, October 12, 1850, and educated in a private school; came to the United States in 1868; sought fortune as a miner in Utah, Montana, Nevada, and California, and finally located in San Francisco in 1884, since which time he has been engaged in the hotel business. Elected member of the State Board of Equalization for the First District, November 8, 1910, as the nominee of the Republican party.

 

A. B. NYE (Republican), State Controller and ex officio member of State Board of Equalization. (See page 446 for bio)

 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL

 

EDWIN ALEXANDER FORBES (Republican) was born in Sierra County, California, July 20, 1860. In 1867 moved to the Oregon House Valley, Yuba County, where he was reared on a farm. Attended the common schools until eighteen years of age, when he received a certificate to teach. Taught school until 1881. Entered the Law Department, University of California, in August, 1881. Graduated in May, 1884. Was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of the State of California in June, 1884. Elected District Attorney of Yuba County in 1884, which office he held for four terms, until 1892. Admitted to practice in the Federal courts of the United States. Became interested in dredge mining, electric railroading and land enterprises to such an extent that he retired from the practice of law in 1905 and thereafter devoted his time to private business. General Forbes always had a strong inclination for military matters. He enlisted as a private of the National Guard of California on May 20, 1881, and has served on and off until the present time, having passed up through the various grades of official rank in different military organizations of the State until he attained the rank of brigadier general. At the commencement of the Spanish-American war General Forbes was Lieutenant Colonel of the Second Regiment of Infantry, National Guard of California, and volunteered his services to the Governor of California for that war. He was commissioned as Major in the Eighth California Infantry, U. S. Volunteers, and served until the muster out of his regiment in 1899. In the year 1910, accompanied ...

 

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... by his family, he made a tour of the world and studied the military systems of the old world. Upon his return from this tour, General Forbes was appointed The Adjutant General of the State of California by Governor Hiram W. Johnson.

 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BANKS

 

WILLIAM R. WILLIAMS (Republican) was born at Gold Hill, Nevada, November 6, 1870; he came to Fresno County, California, in 1879, where he attended the public schools; was in the drug business for a time, and then became an accountant; served as Deputy County Clerk of Fresno County for the four years 1895-1898; from 1898 to 1907 was associated with "The California Raisin Growers' Association." Elected State Treasurer November 6, 1906; reelected November 8, 1910. Resigned office February 20, 1911, and on same day appointed Superintendent of Banks.

 

COMMISSIONER OF BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS

 

GEORGE S. WALKER (Republican) was born in Santa Rosa, California, September 21, 1874, and educated in the public schools of this State; he made his home in Los Gatos, Santa Clara County, engaged for a time in the newspaper printing business, and then became assistant postmaster at San Jose. He is a journalist by profession; in November of 1900 he was elected Member of the Assembly from Santa Clara County, and reelected in 1902; elected State Senator from the Twenty-seventh District, November 6, 1906, to fill out the unexpired term of Eli Wright, expelled from the Senate; on November 3, 1908, he was reelected for the full term. Appointed Commissioner of Building and Loan Associations April 10, 1911.

 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CAPITOL BUILDING AND GROUNDS

 

GEORGE G. RADCLIFF (Republican) was born in Grass Valley, Nevada County, February 6, 1868, where he received a common school education; moved to Watsonville, California, in June, 1882, and became an apprentice in his brother's printing office; since 1902 has been one of the two proprietors of the Watsonville Evening Pajaronian, and most of that period editor of said newspaper; was Clerk and Assessor of the city of Watsonville 1890-92; was Assemblyman from Santa Cruz County in the California legislative sessions of 1899, 1900, and 1901; was postmaster of Watsonville from May 1, 1902, to September 1, 1906; was appointed on April 6, 1911, Superintendent of Capitol Building and Grounds.

 

STATE BOARD OF CONTROL

 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN (Republican) was born in New York City; engaged in the newspaper profession in San Francisco for several years. Was appointed to the Board of Control June 2, 1911.

 

CLYDE LEROY SEAVEY (Republican) was born in Lee County, Illinois. Came to California in 1890. Assistant Secretary State Board of Examiners from 1903 to 1911.

 

W. P. HUMPHREY (Republican) was born in Charles City, Iowa, in 1862. He was educated in the public schools of Iowa and at the University of Iowa. Is an attorney at law. Appointed member of Boar of Control by Governor Johnson August 28, 1912.

 

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STATE FORESTER

 

G. MORRIS HOMANS (Republican) was born in North Vassalboro, Maine, December 23, 1881. He received his early education in the public schools in Boston, Mass., and later attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Yale Summer School of Forestry, special courses at Arnold Arboretum, and the Biltmore Forest School, Biltmore, North Carolina, from which school he graduated in 1904, receiving the degree of B.F. He then entered the United States Forest Service and held various administrative positions, among which was Assistant Forest Inspector of Oregon, Washington and Alaska, finally attaining the rank of Assistant District Forester in 1908 in charge of the office of Silviculture, with headquarters at San Francisco. He resigned from the Forest Service in March, 1910, to accept the appointment of State Forester of California.

 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION COMMISSION

 

MATT I. SULLIVAN was born in Grass Valley, in Nevada County, California, November 3, 1857. His parents were Michael M. and Margaret Sullivan, California pioneers who came to this State in the spring of 1852. With them he moved to San Francisco at the age of about four years. He attended St. Ignatius College and graduated from that institution in 1876, receiving the degrees of A.B. and LL.D., and was admitted to the bar at San Francisco in November, 1879. He was one of the supervisors appointed by Mayor Taylor in July, 1897, to succeed indicted members of the Schmitz administration. In February, 1911, he was appointed by Governor Hiram W. Johnson a member of the Panama Pacific International Exposition Commission of the State of California and was elected its president. In September, 1912, he was chosen dean of the law college of St. Ignatius University.

 

MARSHALL STIMSON (Republican) was born in Cambridge, Mass., May 21, 1876, and has resided in Los Angeles, Cal., since 1887. He was educated at Los Angeles High School, Harvard University, and Harvard Law School. Director Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, 1908-1910; Executive Committee Municipal League, 1906-1911; President Good Government Organization, 1910; Chairman Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League, 1910; Chairman Seventh District Republican Congressional Committee; delegate National Republican Convention, 1912; member State Republican Executive Committee; member California Club, Union League Club, University Club, City Club, and Los Angeles Country Club.

 

CHESTER H. ROWELL (Republican) was born in Bloomington, Ill., November 1, 1867, son of Jonathan H. and Maria S. (Woods) Rowell; educated in Bloomington public schools, Illinois State Normal University, University of Michigan and Universities of Halle and Berlin, Germany. Clerk to Committee on Elections, U. S. House of Representatives, in 51st Congress; taught in high school and academies and in the University of Illinois; since 1898 has been editor and manager of the Fresno Republican; is a member of the National Advisory Board of the Associated Press and a Director of the California Leased Wire Circuit, Associated Press; was President of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League and is a member of the Republican State Committee.

 

ARTHUR ARLETT was born in Oakland, California, May 13, 1875. Went to public school there until ten years old. Entered the university of labor and hard knocks at that age. Learned the trade of bricklayer and has been continuously engaged in building construction. Was married in Anaconda, Mont., in 1898. Has two daughters and a son. Resides at Berkeley. Has been a director of the Berkeley Y.M.C.A. for ten years and is a member of the State Executive Committee of the Y.M.C.A. Is extensively engaged in general contracting and building around San Francisco Bay and in Oregon. Was appointed by Governor Hiram W. Johnson as a member of the Panama-Pacific Internation Exposition Commission of the State of California August 21, 1912, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of R. Cameron Rogers of Santa Barbara.

 

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CONSERVATION COMMISSION

 

GEORGE C. PARDEE (Republican) was born at San Francisco, July 25, 1857. Attended public schools, City College, San Francisco; McClure's California Military Academy, College School, High School, Oakland; graduated from University of California, Ph.B., 1879, M.A., 1883; studied medicine Medical College of the Pacific, San Francisco, 1881-82; graduated University of Leipzig, Germany, M.D., 1885. Member of Oakland Board of Health, 1889-91; member of Oakland City Council, 1891-93; Mayor of Oakland, 1893-95; Regent of University of California, 1889-1903; Governor of California, 1903-07; member National Conservation Commission, 1907-08. President, two terms, National Irrigation Congress. Director for California of the National Conservation Congress and Trans-Mississippi Congress. Chairman Conservation Commission, State of California, since 1911.

 

FRANCIS CUTTLE (Republican) was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1864. Came to California in 1881. Was first engaged in the care of orange orchards; in 1888 became superintendent of the Riverside Water Company and has acted as its superintendent and president until the present time. Was one of the organizers of the Tri-Counties Reforestation Committee and has been its chairman since its organization, six years ago. Is also president of the Water Conservation Association. This organization as been instrumental in conserving storm waters of the Santa Ana River for the benefit of the irrigators of San Bernardino, Riverside, and Orange counties. Was appointed a member of the State Conservation Commission by Governor Johnson in May, 1911.

 

J. P. BAUMGARTNER (Republican)is a native of Missouri, born at Columbia, in that State. He is self educated. Came to California in 1887 and has ever since been engaged in the newspaper business in southern California, as part proprietor of the Riverside Press, and sole owner of the Pasadena Star, Long Beach Press, and Santa Ana Register, the latter of which he now owns and edits. He was appointed a member of the Conservation Commission of the State of California by Governor Johnson in August, 1911.

 

HIGHWAY COMMISSION ADVISORY BOARD

 

NEWELL DYKE DARLINGTON (Republican) was born January 4, 1874, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Attended school at West Chester, Pennsylvania, and afterward studied civil engineering at Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania. Moved to Los Angeles in 1894, where he has practiced his profession up to the present time. Was appointed a member of the Board of Public Utilities of the city of Los Angeles in 1911 by Mayor Alexander, which position he resigned in June of the same year. Appointed member of the Advisory Board of the Department of Engineering, August 1, 1911.

 

CHARLES DUCHESNE BLANEY (Progressive Republican) was born in Chicago. Attended Princeton University, then in business in Chicago until 1882, when he came to California. Invested in California real estate. Retired from active business in 1901. Appointed member of California Highway Commission in 1911. Never held office before. Resides near Saratoga, Santa Clara County, California.

 

BURTON A. TOWNE (Republican) was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, September 24, 1874, and attended the public schools and university of that State. After leaving the university he was in the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company at Sacramento in the machinery, drafting and testing departments. Since then, he has been engaged in viticulture near Lodi, and during the year 1909, 1910 and 1911 he was a member of the San Joaquin County Highway Commission, which position he resigned to take a membership in the Department of Engineering of the State of California, as one of the three appointed members of that board.

 

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HIGHWAY ENGINEER

 

AUSTIN B. FLETCHER (Republican) was born at Cambridge, Massachusetts, and educated in the public schools of that city and at Harvard University, where he received the degree of B.S. in 1893; during the years 1893 to 1910 he was the executive officer of the Massachusetts Highway Commission, and after 1902 was its Chief Engineering Officer. During this period, the Commission built nearly 800 miles of state highways. In January, 1910, assumed the position of secretary-engineer of the San Diego County (California) Highway Commission and had full charge, under the direction of the Commission, of the main public highway work in that county until August, 1911. In 1907 he was appointed to be a special agent of the Office of Public Roads of the United States Department of Agriculture. In 1908 he served as a delegate from Massachusetts at the First International Road Congress at Paris. He has been a member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers since 1894 and of the American Society of Civil Engineers since June, 1909. For fourteen years he was the secretary of the Massachusetts Highway Association, and is now an honorary member of that organization; he has recently been chosen as a director of the American Road Builders' Association.

 

COMMISSIONER OF HORTICULTURE

 

A. J. COOK (Republican) was born at Owosso, Michigan, in 1842; educated in public schools until 1858, working vacations on his father's farm. Entered Michigan Agricultural College in 1858, from which he received the degree of B.S. in 1862, M.S. in 1865, and D.Sc. in 1905. Studied at Harvard 1867 and 1868. At Cornell in 1878 and 1879. Instructor in mathematics in Michigan Agricultural College two years. Professor of Zoology and Entomology from 1868 to 1893. Entomologist in Michigan Experiment Station 1888-91. Agricultural extension work, Michigan Agricultural College, 1875 to 1893. Curator General Museum 1875 to 1893. Professor of Biology, Pomona College, Claremont, and Curator Museum, 1894-1911. Conductor Agricultural extension work, University of California, 1894 to 1905. First to make kerosene emulsion (1877), and to demonstrate and advocate the use of the arsenites as a specific against the codling moth in 1880. Author: Beekeeper's Guide, Injurious Insects of Michigan, The Silo and Silage, Maple Sugar and the Sugar Bush, Birds of Michigan; sponsor for Pomona College Journals of Entomology and Botany, and of Laguna Laboratory Report; appointed State Commissioner of Horticulture of California in 1911.

 

INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT BOARD

 

ARTHUR JUDSON PILLSBURY (Republican) was born in New Hampshire, January 31, 1854; emigrated with his parents in October of the same year to the then territory of Kansas, to which the father removed with the purpose of aiding in making Kansas a free state. Mr. Pillsbury grew to manhood in Kansas, was educated in the common schools, studied law and was admitted to the bar, but practiced newspaper work instead; married and came to California in 1881; since then has been identified with several newspapers; was secretary of the State Board of Examiners under the administration of Governor Pardee; appointed a member of the Industrial Accident Board, and, upon the organization of said board, was elected its chairman.

 

WILLIS I. MORRISON (Republican) was born at New Orleans, Louisiana, February 16, 1881. Father was an officer in the United State Army and early life was spent in military posts in various parts of the United States; graduated from Princeton university in 1902 with degree of A.B. and from Harvard Law School in 1905 with the degree of LL.B. Moved to California from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1904. Admitted to the bar August 28, 1905, and since that time has been practicing law in Los Angeles, California, while residing in Pasadena. Appointed...

 

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... as a member of the Industrial Accident Board for a term of two years from September 1, 1911.

 

WILL J. FRENCH (Republican) was born at Auckland, New Zealand, August 13, 1871; he received a public school education, and is a printer and journalist, with residence at Oakland, Alameda County; is a former editor of the San Francisco Labor Clarion, and a past president of the San Francisco Labor Council and the Typographical Union, No. 21, of San Francisco.

 

STATE MINERALOGIST

 

WILLIAM H. STORMS, who was appointed State Mineralogist by Governor Johnson on November 25, 1911, was born in New Jersey, April 17, 1859. In June, 1878, at the age of 19, he went to the Black Hills of South Dakota, and lived in that region for nearly nine years. It was there he gained his early mining experience. He came to California in January, 1887, and has been a resident of this State ever since. On October 1, 1892, he was appointed field assistant to William Irelan, Jr., then State Mineralogist, and continued through the term of J. J. Crawford, who succeeded Mr. Irelan as State Mineralogist. In 1900 he received a special appointment from Governor Henry T. Gage to make a study of the mines of the Mother Lode in California. The result of that work was issued by the State Mining Bureau as Bulletin No. 18. Mr. Storms has had the management of several large mines in California at various times, and has a wide knowledge of the mineral resources of the State. He was also editor of the mining and Scientific Press for over five years, has contributed largely to the technical mining papers of the United States, and is well known throughout the mining regions of the west.

 

PANAMA-CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION COMMISSION

 

GEORGE W. MARSTON, of San Diego, was born in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, on October 22, 1850. In 1870 he went to San Diego, California, and there, in 1873, he started a drygoods business, which has grown with the city until now it is the oldest and one of the largest in southern California. Mr. Marston is president of the board of trustees of Pomona College, and has been a member of the board for twenty-five years. He holds the vice-presidency of the American Civic Association and is president of the San Diego Civic Association; has been twice president of the San Diego Chamber of Commerce and was chairman for five years of the railroad committee that promoted the San Diego and Arizona railroad, which was later sold to John D. Spreckels. Mr. Marston was first chairman of the Park Board and is now a member of the buildings and grounds committee of the San Diego 1915 Exposition.

 

THOMAS O'HALLARAN, of San Diego, was born at La Grange, Missouri, in 1857. He moved to St. Louis in 1880, entering the mural decorative business. He continued in this business in various parts of the country, moving about in search of health, and living in Columbus, Ohio, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and Denver, Colorado. In 1901 he moved to San Diego, California, where he has since been in the real estate business. He is state inheritance tax appraiser in San Diego County, and member of the buildings and grounds committee of the San Diego Exposition.

 

RUSSELL C. ALLEN, of San Diego, was born in Boston on January 27, 1859. He lived in Cambridge for some time, graduating from Harvard in 1880, then attended Columbia Law School, and was in a law office in Wall Street, New York, until 1882, when he decided that he wanted to live an outdoor life. He went to San Diego, California, and bought a fruit ranch in Sweetwater Valley, several miles from the city. He is now chairman of the Buildings and Grounds Committee of the San Diego Exposition.

 

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STATE ENGINEER

 

WILBUR F. McCLURE was born in Ohio in December, 1856, and lived there until the fall of 1860, when he went to Pennsylvania, where he resided until the spring of 1879. He was in Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Indian Territory, Texas, and New Mexico from 1879 to 1883, and then came to California, where he has since resided. The period of his life in Pennsylvania was spent in school, at work and in teaching in the public schools. One year in Missouri was spent in teaching. The following three years were spent in railroad surveys and construction. The time in California has been spent in railroad, marine, municipal and general engineering practice. He was appointed to his present position by Governor Johnson January 236, 1912.

 

STATE WATER COMMISSION

 

S. C. GRAHAM (Republican) was born in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, in 1862. Common school education. Worked in the eastern oil fields (Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, and Kentucky). Came to California in 1888. Lived in Ventura County, California from 1888 to 1898, and has lived in Los Angeles from 1898 to the present time. Engaged in the production of oil, or in work connected with the production of oil, in California for twenty-three years. Actively identified with the non-partisan movement and the good government organization in the city and county of Los Angeles for several years. Served one short term as member of the Board of Police Commissioners in Los Angeles City. Appointed member of the State Board of Control (Water Power) by Governor Johnson, April 24, 1911.

 

CHARLES DAVID MARX (Republican) was born at Toledo, Ohio, October 10, 1857; educated in the public schools of Toledo, Cornell University, and Karlsruhe (Germany) Polytechnic. Practicing civil engineer since 1881 and professor of civil engineering since 1884; Cornell University 1884-1890; University of Wisconsin 1890-1891; Stanford University 1891 to date. School trustee and town trustee of Palo Alto for a number of terms. At present member of Board of Public Works of Palo Alto.

 

HAROLD THOMAS POWER (Republican) was born at Damascus, Placer County, California, February 7, 1857; he was educated in the public schools of his native State, taking a commercial course in the Pacific Business College, San Francisco, afterward (1875-1880) associated with the Union Iron Works. From 1887 to 1910 was superintendent of Hidden Treasure and May Flower Gravel Mining companies, and Morning Star Mining Company, all of Placer County. Representative in the California Legislature, thirty-second session. Presidential Elector 1900. Trustee of California State Mining Bureau 1903-10. President Board of Trustees 1908-10.

 

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER

 

E. C. COOPER (Republican) was born in Eureka, California, on October 6, 1868. In 1891 he graduated from the Hastings College of Law and commenced the practice of his profession in his home city. He was District Attorney of Humboldt County from 1889 to 1903, and was City Attorney of Eureka from 1903 to 1907. He was private secretary to Governor Gillett from 1907 until 1910, receiving his appointment as Insurance Commissioner on June 15th of that year.

 

LABOR COMMISSIONER

 

JOHN P. McLAUGHLIN (Republican and Union Labor) was born in San Francisco, June 19, 1873, and educated in the public schools of that city. He served as a member of the Board of Health in 1908-09; was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors, 1910-11, and resigned March 1, 1911, to accept the position of Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, under Governor Hiram W. Johnson.

 

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STATE LIBRARIAN

 

JAMES LOUIS GILLIS (Republican) was born at Richmond, Washington County, Iowa, October 3, 1857, the son of Charles and Emily Eliza (Gelatt) Gillis. He received his education in the public schools of Sacramento, California, and began as messenger with the Sacramento Valley Railroad Company in 1872; on December 25, 1881, he married Kate Petree, of Sacramento. He retired from the railway service as assistant superintendent in 1894; was keeper of archives, Secretary of State's office, from 1895 to 1899; clerk Assembly Committee on Ways and Means, sessions of 1895, 1897 and 1899; State Librarian of California since April 1, 1899; president Sacramento Oil Company; vice-president Acme Development Company; president California Library Association from 1906 to 1909, and from 1910 to date; member American Library Association, National Association State Libraries, American Association of Law Libraries; member Sutter Club, Sacramento.

 

FISH AND GAME COMMISSION

 

CARL WESTERFIELD was born at San Francisco on December 11, 1869, and attended the public schools of that city. He entered Yale College and was graduated in 1893; entered Hastings College of Law, and graduated in 1896; admitted to practice law in 1896. Appointed Fish and Game Commissioner November 28, 1911.

 

MICHAEL J. CONNELL, was born in Ireland, where he received his early education. Arrived in Boston in 1875, where he remained for two years. He came west to Utah, remaining there but a short time before going to Montana, where he resided in Deer Lodge. He soon became engaged in several enterprises in different parts of Montana, establishing large industrial plants. He came to California in 1901, and resides in Los Angeles. Appointed Fish and Game Commissioner June 17, 1908.

 

FRANK MILLARD NEWBERT was born in Sacramento County on March 4, 1872. He is a graduate of the Sacramento Grammar School and Professor Atkinson's Business College. He has been associated with the Kimball Upson Company since 1895. He gained his knowledge of the wishes of the huntsman and angler through his connection with one of the largest sporting goods houses in the West. Mr. Newbert comes of a family of sportsmen. He is one of the best combination field and trap shots in America today, and is authority on all outdoor sports.

 

BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS

 

JOHN JOSEPH DWYER was born in San Francisco, California, November 2, 1861, and has resided in that city every since. He was educated in the public schools, was graduated from the University of California in 1882 with a degree of A.B., and from Hastings College of Law in 1885 with a degree of LL.B.; has practiced law in San Francisco since 1885; appointed member of the Board of State Harbor Commissioners on March 17, 1911, and elected President of the Board July 25, 1911. He is a retired lieutenant-colonel of the National Guard of California.

 

THOMAS S. WILLIAMS, appointed Harbor Commissioner on July 26, 1911, was born in London, England, in 1856. His parents arrived in New York City in 1859, and he attended the public school there. Since 1877 he has been in California, and after a business career of twenty-five years as a merchant tailor, he retired in 1902, and has taken an active interest in politics ever since.

 

JOHN H. McCALLUM, appointed a member of the Board of State Harbor Commissioners on July 30, 1912, was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1870. He has resided in San Francisco during the last twenty-two years, and has been engaged in the lumber business as vice-president of J. W. Schouten & Co. for the last twenty years.

 




2004 Natalie Huntley.




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