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THE PIONEER STEAMER

CALIFORNIA

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX

 

 

 

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B

 

 

PASSENGER LIST OF THE STEAMER FALCON ON LEAVING NEW YORK,

DECEMBER 1, 1848¹

 

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1. Rueben Witherz

2. Maj. Fitzgerald

3. E. Woodruff

4-5. Capt. F. G. Elliott and land (sic)

6. Persifer Frazier      

7-8. Rev. O. C. Wheeler and lady

9. Rev. Mr. Woodbrigh

10. Rev. J.W. Douglass

11. Chief Justice Bryant

12. K. Pritchett, Coll. Of San Francisco

13. Major Loyd Brooks

14. R.W. Heath

15. George E. Tyler

16. W. H. Peise

17. Levi Stowell

18. H.F. Williams

19. Wm. S. Burch

20. John Joyce

21. John Morse

22. J. A. Voorhees, Special P.O. Ag. for Savannah

23. John R. Suydam

24. W. J. Fulton

25. Job Chandler

26. J. B. Fish

27. Rev. S. H. Willey

28. Rev. W. F. Tilgham

29. Lieut. Gibbs, aide to Gen. Smith

 

 

¹New York Herald, December 2, 1848.

 

 

 

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C

 

PASSENGER LIST OF THE STEAMER FALCON ON LEAVING

NEW ORLEANS.¹

 

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Left New Orleans, December 18, 1848

Arrived at Chagres, December 26, 1848.

 

 

CHAGRES- Steamship FALCON, New Orleans.

 

Persifer F. Smith, Governor of California, lady and two servants.

Gen Adair, Collector of the port of Astoria, wife and six children.

Judge W. P. Bryant, Chief Justice of Oregon

R. Pritchett, Secretary of State of Oregon.

W. Van Voorhees, US Mail Agent in California.

Major Fitzgerald, USA

Major Ogden, USA and lady.

Major Canby, USA and lady

Capt. E G Elliott, USA and lady

Isaac Bronson, Mail Agent in Oregon

Capt. J. McDougall, lady and child

Lieut. Gibbs

Persifer Frazer

Capt. R. W. Waterman

N. H. Wyse

Rev. Mr. Woodbridge

Rev. Mr. Douglass

Rev. O. C. Wheeler and lady

Forest Field

E Woodruff

R A Maupin

S.C. Willey

W F Tilghman

B. F. Whittier

R. Rust

Andrew Garr

T. B. Winsten

Jacob Furrer

James Wharton

Henry J Clark

R. B. Withers

Charles Baum

F E Kerstein

John Blockley

Jas J Rawls

Benj Aspinwall

John O Agnew

John Keys

Thomas Brease

Lloyd Brooks

_ Heath

P Ord

W Norris

D T Bagley

W Valentine

T Phillips

H E Robinson

B Mahony

Luther Hathaway

Henry Toll

W S McKnight

Jesus Curna

Dr Wilson Jones

M L Goodman

Geo W Fenno

Henry Perritt

John McWilliams

W Sewell

John Morse

John Berry

Isaac Anderson

J D Gilmore

J Metcalf

J A Phillips

W Zerka

D S Allen

Peter Carter

John Peterson

John Berkel

Peter Smith

W G Davis

Wm Johnson

Saml Gilmore

Wm Robbi

H Z Wheeler

Thos Sherlock

D Robertson

J. Henry Coghill

John B Crawford

John Hughes

Patrick Vance

Thomas Freeland

Alex McLaughlin

Auguste Dusprat

Lewis Lask

Jos Lask

J F Noble

Benjamin Tunis

Richard Tunis

O W Heurlin

Lewis H Pollock

James McCullech

W P Pottorff

C Lilly

E Smith

J Brown

George E Tyler

Wm E Price

Levi Stonell

H F Williams

Wm L Burch

John Joyce

W S Smart

Wm F. Smart

W J Whitney and lady

Eli Banchor

R B Ord

 

James R McAdam

Thomas F White

John H White

Elnathan Elliott

Edwin R Thompson

Albert Pawling

Robert R Winders

H L Tudor

John Bigley

Louis Pappi

M Shafer

F Rosenbaum

Benj Wheeler

Wm Worthing

John E Townes

Arthur Toledana

Dr. J Baron Clement

John H Craycroft

C Robinson

E W Emerick

Thomas H. Reed

Charles Gulliver

Lorenzo B Hayden

Willard W Hayden

Michael Tankred

John Brien

John B Miller

Wm. L Kelten

Henry Lewis

A Toutant

D H Whepley

Capt. Lawrence Denison

P Barry

A W VonSmuth

A A Ducros

P H Luckett

A B Wood

Robert Baldwin

James Frazer

Thomas Murphy

Richard Victor

William Waters

Edward Cain

Jas K Ogier

Daniel Locke

Jas Jenkins

Andrew Miller

E B Ragsdale

Philip Williams

Jarvis B Hendrickson

John Gairo

Jesse P Jones

Maj Arnold Harris

Edward Freedman.

 

 

 

¹New York Herald, December 28, 1848.

 

 

 

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D

 

PASSENGER LIST OF THE CRESCENT CITY¹

 

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Left New York, December 23, 1848

 

PASSENGER SAILED

 

In steamship Crescent City, for Chagres

 

Jas Hunson

T N Stan

A A Porter

F C Gray

Joseph B Read

Geo E Webster

Alex H Barbim

Erastus Spencer

A Clom

E H Sullivan

W H Grattan

Mr Roberts and friends

Henry Baker

Henry D Baker

Morris Bailey

D C Hardin

John Wehrman

P Brunner

R S Williamson

F Rempton

C Fritz

S Britton

A Landon

M Branch

Wm E Wheaton

E C Guisse

De Grasse

Foster

G M Fox, Jr.

Jas F Rogers

Griffith

Hone

Alex Wiley

A Arnold

J Buntin

Geo Augustus

C Dunbar

Wm Leonard

D Bronning

C Dye

Chas C Townsend

F S Amith

G G Wood

H H Spencer

A K Meyers

C Fox

O Backus

W D Sewell

C Livingston

Amos House

J W Thompson

W Ridley

B Johnson

J Lunau

W R Halsey

M Read

J Johnson

Edward Batters

Morgan L R Mills

C N B Crosby

Rudolph Gureke

A Blook

T R Menton

G G Gallagher

F Chunsy

C A Hayford

L L Blood

E Tickenor

Edmund A Woodbridge

Geo H Pitkin

Wm Brooks

C H Hughes

W N Wilson

W K Cindleton

John Barker

Wm H Baldwin

Jas Birch

J Manning

J Wilson

H A Warren

H Miller

J H Giles

J Gray

J Davenport

A M Dorrance

M H Barrett

D H Shipps

C A Hotchkiss

Lomis Litter

T A Goin

Nesbit

J Quick

G Quimby

C S Penfield

T Martin

A Martin

H Wyman

D Sidney Shownell

F E James

C Praig

Geo M Yates

A A M Yates

A McLean

Thomas Bowen

D Rogers

D Rogers

Fr. F G Rogers

J Neal

D Browning

J M Buntin

M Johnson

A C Can

Leander Rogers

W E Contey

 

 

 

¹New York Daily Tribune, December 25, 1848; also New York Herald, December 25, 1848.

 

 

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E

 

PROGRESS OF THE PASSENGERS OF THE CRESCENT CITY

OVER THE ISTHMUS AT CHAGRES, JANUARY 2, 1849¹

 

 

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ADDITIONAL INTELLIGENCE

 

BY THE

 

STEAMSHIP CRESCENT CITY

­­__________________

 

THE PROGRESS OF THE EMIGRANTS OVER THE ISTHMUS, &c. &c. &c.

 

 

 

 

We have received some additional intelligence of interest from Panama and Chagres, by the steamship Crescent City.

 

The latest accounts from Panama are of the morning of the 8th, and from Chagres of the afternoon of the 9th inst.

 

There were three schooners at Panama announced for San Francisco. They would leave between the 8th and 20th inst., with passengers. The Humboldt, coalship, was also there; but would not go to California. The bark Philadelphia was not there, as previously reported, but was daily expected. She will probably be chartered to take passengers to the gold region, and one or two vessels from the South were to touch at Panama, on their way North.

There had been five deaths in all, viz._

 

Mr. Luckett, of New Orleans

Capt. Elliott, of the Quartermaster's Department;

Mr. Birch, of New Orleans

Mr. Geo. W. Taylor, of Providence, R. I.;

Mr. Thorne, of New York.

 

The latter gentelman died in Panama, on the morning of the 8th inst. He is a son of Mr. Thomas W. Thorne, President of the National Fire Insurance Company, of this city.

 

We learn that a party of engineers, New Granadians, were met on the road, between Chagres and Panama, preparing to clear the road and improve it for travel.

 

¹New York Herald, January 29, 1849.

 

The Orus was expected at Chagres in a few days. She, it will be recollected, is to ply on the Chagres, and will run up fifteen or twenty miles. This will dispense with the use of canoes.

 

New York, January 27, 1849.

J. G. BENNETT, Esq: ---

 

Dear Sir – Enclosed, I beg leave to hand you a report, up to the 8th inst., of the whereabouts of the passengers of the steamer Crescent City, on her late trip to Chagres.

 

The publication of the list will doubtless afford a very desirable item of information to many of your subscribers, in all parts of the country, and will by no means detract from the high reputation of your paper for the early furnishing of valuable news.

 

The report, I believe, embraces the names of all the passengers out by the Crescent City, from those who had arrived in Panama previous to my leaving that place, to those who yet remained at Cruces and Gorgona, at the head of Chagres River, awaiting conveyance to Panama.

 

I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. W. CARRINGTON,

Purser of the Crescent City.

 

REPORT of PROGRESS OF PASSENGERS BY THE STEAMER CRESCENT CITY, CAPT. STODDARD, MASTER, FROM NEW YORK TO CHAGRES, DEC. 23, 1848, ARRIVED AT CHAGRES JANUARY 2, 1849 – 9 ½ days:

 

 

At Panama, Jan. 9.

 

Capt. W. K. Smith, of Va.

Louis R. Sowers, Philad.

Harry L. Shotwell, do.

N. S. Shotwell, do.

Edwin L. Morgan, do.

James M. Reed, do.

Hardin Bigelow, Michigan

David Rogers, sr. Hudson

James R. Malony, N. York.

A. A. Porter, do.

Steph'n H. Branch, do.

Charles Hughes, do.

W. H. Nelson, do.

Thomas A. Goin, do.

W. K. Pendleton, do

 

 

 

 

 

Met on the Road from Cruces to Panama, Jan. 8.

 

John Davenport

George Chase

Charles Radcliffe

Lt. R. J. Williamson, Top. Engin'r.

De Grasse Fowler, N. York

Samuel N. Fox, do.

John Roberts

John Maynard

Capt. Jas. Kearney, N.Y.

John Wilson, do.

James Patten, do.

James Birch, do.

Griffith Rowe, do.

T. N. Starr

R. Geeseke

James Kane, New Haven

A. C. Carr

C.Prague

D.G. Phipps, New Haven

C. Hotchkiss, do.

H. Hotchkiss, do.

David Rogers, jr., Hudson

Leander Rogers, do.

N. G. Rogers, do.

C. Fritze

T. Rimpan

L. Goodwin, New York

Capt. W. W. Brooks, Brigpt.

J. Olmsted

J. H. Giles

E. C. Geisse, Philadelphia

H. A. Warren

Ed. Batters, Philad.

John Johnson

A. J. Tiffany, Buffalo.

A. B. Cooke, Virginia

C.J. Fox

Oscar Backus

H. W. Wyman

P. Brunner

A. Boyden, Buffalo

John Barker

H. H. Spencer

S. Quimby

J. Quick

J. G. Maxwell

H. Miller

J. Gray

T. B. Newton

E. Kirschaw

G. M. Yates.

 

 

 

At Cruces, (head of Chagres River), Jan. 8:

 

Clarkson Dye, New York.

E. S. Penfield, do.

A. McLean, do.

A. R. Myers, do.

E. E. Dunbar, do.

J. W. Bowen, do.

H. T. Booraem, do.

John Lienen, do.

James L. Fowler, Boston.

John M. Buntin, do.

A. L. Dale, do.

C.H. Hayford, Provid. R. I.

W. R. Halsey, Brooklyn

Charles H. Hoyt, Brooklyn

Louis Gibson, New York.

Louis Lillie, do.

E. Sparrow, Buffalo.

A. Klemm

W. H. Baldwin

W. W. Ridley, New York

T. M. Maslin, Philadelphia.

Alexr. Maslin, do.

A. H. Barbour, New York.

E. L. Sullivan

W. H. Grattan

David Sidle

O. W. Rawson

S. S. Gallagher, N. Jersey

J. B. Pine

J. B. Wehrman

B. M'Nally

Saml. B. Mills, New York

F. C. Gray, Chicago

J. F. Rogers

A. W. Noney, New York

M. Bailey

J. Manning

S. W. Britton

A. Landon

 

 

 

At Gorgona, to leave next morning, Jan. 9th, for Panama.

 

W. L. Thayer

G. A. Thayer

Daniel Browning

Timothy Page

Cortlandt Livingston

E. R. Hall

Edward Tichenor

Anson House

John W. Thompson

L.L. Blood

W. D. Sewell, jun.

Augustus Arnold.

 

 

 

 

 

----All in good health and spirits; no casualty of any kind having occurred, up to the date of our leaving, to any of the Crescent City's passengers.

 

 

 

 

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F

 

PASSENGER LIST OF THE STEAMER ISTHMUS.¹

 

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Left New York, Decmber 26, 1848

Arrived at New Orleans, January 3, 1849.

 

PASSENGERS SAILED

 

CHAGRES – Steamship Isthmus -

 

S. R. Smith

Geo. P Way

G Lilliendahl

A. W. Kruger

Truscott

Potter

Geo Webster

J G Haines

Dorrance

Huntzleman

S C Mott

O H Webster

H D Allen

P H Kelly

P A Pedriaux

H Doran

H F Bird

E Carpenter

W Agate

W Poillon

J D Poillon

E V Joice

T P Van Buren

J C Hardy

E H Stephenson

E C Patterson

L C Webster

S O Brigham

D P Webster

B F Williams

M Fallon

James Dunn

James Wolfe

G W Carnes

Litzendorff and lady

G Sampson

E C Andrews

F Carpenter

F Mount

J W Brown

W R Andrews

B W Harwood

Geo L Smith

D McCarty

Jacob Hohl

Rosenchwier

J G Kolbig

E Crosby

P McCabe

A Fulton

F E Pinto

John Lambieer

R F Fowler

T B Wade

W J Connor

L C Stein

E P Howell

S B French

R E Garder

Thom Riley

Geo Leland

S P Woolworth

John Titus

John Galloway

John Kelly

R Austin

Alex Austin

John Read

Alfred Redforn

 

 

 

¹New York Herald, December 28, 1848.

 

 

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G

 

COLONEL MASON'S REPORT ON THE CALIFORNIA GOLD DISCOVERIES¹

 

 

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CALIFORNIA GOLD

IMPORTANT OFFICIAL REPORT

 

 

We publish the following description of the Gold Region from the pen of Col. MASON, the Military Commandant of California, being one of the Documents accompanying the President's Message. Our readers will also see rich reports from the gold regions of Virginia:

 

HEADQUARTERS 10th MILITARY DEPT., MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, AUG. 17, 1848.

 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that accompanied by Lieut. W. T Sherman, 3d artillery, A.A.A. General, I started on the 12th of June last to make a tour through the northern part of California. My principal purpose, however, was to visit the newly-discovered gold 'placer' in the Valley of the Sacramento. I had proceeded about forty miles, when I was overtaken by an express, bringing me intelligence of the arrival at Monterey of the U.S. Ship Southampton, with important letters from Com. Shubrick and Lieut. Col. Burton. I returned at once to Monterey, and dispatched what business was most important, and on the 17th resumed my journey. We reached San Francisco on the 20th, and found that all, or nearly all, its male inhabitants had gone to the mines. The town, which a few months before was so busy and thriving, was then almost deserted.

 

On the evening of the 25th, the horses of the escort were crossed to Sousoleto(sic) in a launch, and on the following day we resumed the journey by way of Bodega and Sonoma to Sutter's fort, where we arrived on the morning of the 2d of July. Along the whole route mills were lying idle, fields of wheat were open to cattle and horses, houses vacant, and farms going to waste. At Sutter's there was more life and business. Launches were discharging their cargos at the river, and carts were hauling goods to the fort, where already were established several stores, a hotel, &c. Captain Sutter had only two mechanics in his employ, (a wagon-maker and blacksmith), whom he was then paying ten dollars a day. Merchants pay him a monthly rent of $100 per room; and while I was there a two-story house in the fort was rented as a hotel for $500 a month.

 

At the urgent solicitation of many gentlemen, I delayed there to participate in the first public celebration of our national anniversary at that fort, but on the 5th resumed the journey and proceeded twenty-five miles up the American fork to a point on it now known as the Lower Mines, or Mormon Diggings.

 

¹New York Daily Tribune, December 8, 1848.

 

The hillsides were thickly strewn with canvass tents and bush arbors; a store was erected, and several boarding shanties in operation. The day was intensely hot, yet about two hundred men were at work in the full glare of the sun, washing for gold – some with tin pans, some with close-woven Indian baskets, but the greater part had a rude machine, known as a cradle. This is on rockers, six or eight feet long, open at the foot, and at is head has a coarse grate, or sieve; the bottom is rounded, with small cleets nailed across. Four men are required to work this machine; one digs the ground in the bank close by the stream; another carries it to the cradle and empties it on the grate; a third gives a violent rocking motion to the machine; while a fourth dashes on water from the stream itself.

 

The sieve keeps the course stones from entering the cradle, the current of water washes off the earthy matter, and the gravel is gradually carried out at the foot of the machine, leaving the gold mixed with heavy fine black sand above the first cleets. The sand and gold mixed together are then drawn off through augur holes into a pan below, are dried in the sun, and afterward separated by blowing off the sand. A party of four men thus employed at the lower mines averaged $100 a day. The Indians, and those who have nothing but pans or willow baskets, gradually wash out the earth and separate the gravel by hand, leaving nothing but the gold mixed with sand, which is separated in the manner before described. The gold in the lower mines is in fine bright scales, of which I send several specimens.

 

As we ascended the north branch of the American fork, the country became more broken and mountainous, and at the saw-mill, 25 miles above the lower washings, or 50 miles from Sutter's, the hills rise to about a thousand feet above the level of the Sacramento plain. Here a species of pine occurs which led to the discovery of gold. Capt. Sutter, feeling the great want of lumber, contracted in September last with a Mr. Marshall to build a saw mill at that place. It was erected in the course of the past Winter and Spring – a dam and race constructed; but when the water was let on the wheel, the tail-race was found to be too narrow to permit the water to escape with sufficient rapidity. Mr. Marshall, to save labor, let the water directly into the race with a strong current, so as to wash it wider and deeper. He effected his purpose, and a large bed of mud and gravel was carried to the foot of the race.

 

One day Mr. Marshall, as he was walking down the race to this deposit of mud, observed some glittering particles at its upper edge; he gathered a few, examined them, and became satisfied of their value. He then went to the fort, told Capt. Sutter of his discovery, and they agreed to keep it secret until a certain grist-mill of Sutter's was finished. It however got out and spread like magic. Remarkable success attended the labors of the first explorer's, and in a few weeks hundreds of men were drawn thither. At the time of my visit, but little over three months after its first discovery, it was estimated that upward of 4,000 people were employed. At the mill there is a fine deposit or bank of gravel, which the people respect as the property of Capt. Sutter, although he pretends to no right to it, and would be perfectly satisfied with the simple promise of preemption, on account of the mill which he has built there at considerable cost. Mr. Marshall was living near the mill, and informed me that many persons were employed above and below him; that they used the same machines at the lower washings, and that their success was about the same – ranging from one to three ounces of gold per man daily. This gold, too, is in scales a little coarser than those of the lower mines.

 

From the mill Mr. Marshall guided me up the mountain on the opposite or north bank of the south fork, where, in the bed of small streams or ravines, now dry, a great deal of coarse gold has been found. I there saw several parties at work, all of whom were doing very well; a great many specimens were shown me, some as heavy as four or five ounces in weight, and I send three pieces labeled No. 5, presented by a Mr. Spence. You will perceive that some of the specimens accompanying this, hold mechanically pieces of quartz; that the surface is rough, and evidently molded in the crevice of a rock. This gold cannot have been carried far by water, but must have remained near where it was first deposited from the rock that once bound it. I inquired of many people if they had encountered the metal in its matrix, but in every instance they said they had not; but that the gold was invariably mixed with washed gravel, or lodged in the crevices of other rocks. All bore testimony that they had found gold in greater or less quantities in the numerous small gullies or ravines that occur in that mountainous region.

 

On the 7th of July I left the mill, and crossed to a stream emptying into the American fork, three or four miles below the saw-mill. I struck this stream (now known as Weber's Creek) at the washings of Sunol & Co. They had about thirty Indians employed, whom they pay in merchandise. They were getting gold of a character similar to that found in the main fork, and doubtless in sufficient quantities to satisfy them. I send you a small specimen, presented by this company, of their gold. From this point, we proceed up the stream about eight miles, where we found a great many people and Indians – some engaged in the bed of the stream, and others in the small side valleys that put into it. These latter are exceedingly rich, and two ounces were considered an ordinary yield for a day's work. A small gutter not more than a hundred yards long by 4 feet wide and 2 or 3 feet deep, was pointed out to me as the one where two men – William Daly and Parry McCoon – had, a short time before, obtained $17,000 worth of gold. Capt. Weber informed me that he knew that these two men had employed four white men and about a hundred Indians, and that, at the end of one week's work, they paid off their party, and had left $10,000 worth of this gold. Another small ravine was shown me, from which had been taken upward of $12,000 worth of gold. Hundred of similar ravines, to all appearances, are as yet untouched. I could not have credited these reports had I not seen, in the abundance of the precious metal, evidence of their truth.

 

Mr. Neligh, an agent of Commodore Stockton, had been at work about three weeks in the neighborhood, and showed me in bags and bottle over $2,000 worth of gold; and Mr. Lyman, a gentleman of education and worthy of every credit, said he had been engaged with four others, with a machine, on the American fork, just below Sutter's mill; that they worked eight days, and that his share was at the rate of $50 a day; but hearing that others were doing better at Weber's place, they had removed there, and were then on the point of resuming operations. I might tell of hundreds of similar instances; but, to illustrate how plentiful the gold was in the pockets of common laborers, I will mention a simple occurrence which took place in my presence when I was at Weber's store. This store was nothing but an arbor of bushes, under which he had exposed for sale goods and groceries suited to his customers. A man came in, picked up a box of Seidlitz powders, and asked its price. Capt. Weber told him it was not for sale. The man offered an ounce of gold, but Capt. Weber told him it only cost 50 cents, and he did not wish to sell it. The man then offered an ounce and a half, when Capt Weber had to take it. The prices of all things are high, and yet Indians, who before hardly knew what a breech-cloth was, can now afford to buy the most gaudy dresses.

 

The country on either side of Weber's creek is much broken up by hills, and is intersected in every direction by small streams or ravines, which contain more or less gold. Those that have been worked are barely scratched; and although thousands of ounces have been carried away, I do not consider that a serious impression has been made upon the whole. Every day was developing new and richer deposits; and the only impression seemed to be, that the metal would be found in such abundance as seriously to depreciate in value.

 

On the 8th of July I returned to the lower mines, and on the following day to Sutter's, where, on the 10th, I was making preparations for a visit to the Feather, Yubah(sic) and Bear rivers, when I received a letter from Commander A. R. Long, United States Navy, who had just arrived at San Francisco from Mazatlan with a crew for the sloop-of-war Warren, with orders to take that vessel to the squadron at La Paz. Capt. Long wrote to me that the Mexican Congress had adjourned without ratifying the treaty of peace, that he had letters for me from Commodore Jones, and that his orders were to sail with the Warren on or before the 20th of July. In consequence of these I determined to return to Monterey, and accordingly arrived here on the 17th of July. Before leaving Sutter's I satisfied myself that gold existed in the bed of the Feather River, in the Yubah and Bear, and in many smaller streams that lie between the latter and the American fork; also, that it had been found in the Cosummes(sic) to the south of the American fork. In each of these streams the gold is found in small scales, whereas in the intervening mountains it occurs in coarser lumps.

 

Mr. Sinclair, whose rancho is three miles above Sutter's on the north side of the American, employs about 50 Indians on the north fork, not far from its junction with the main stream. He had been engaged about five weeks when I saw him, and up to that time his Indians had used simply closely woven willow baskets. His net proceeds (which I saw) were about $16,000 worth of gold. He showed me the proceeds of his last week's work – fourteen pounds avoirdupois of clean-washed gold.

 

The principal store at Sutter's Fort, that of Brannan & Co., had received in payment for goods $36,000 (worth of this gold) from the 1st of May to the 10th of July. Other merchants had also made extensive sales. Large quantities of goods were daily sent forward to the mines, as the Indians, heretofore so poor and degraded, have suddenly become consumers of the luxuries of life. I before mentioned that the greater part of the farmers and rancheros had abandoned their fields to go to the mines. This is not the case with Captain Sutter, who was carefully gathering his wheat, estimated at 40,000 bushels. Flour is already worth at Sutter's $36 a barrel, and soon will be fifty. Unless large quantities of breadstuffs reach the country, much suffering will occur; but as each man is now able to pay a large price, it is believed the merchants will bring from Chili and Oregon a plentiful supply for the coming Winter.

 

The most moderate estimate I could obtain from men acquainted with the subject, was, that upward of four thousand men were working in the gold district, of whom more than one-half were Indians; and that from $30,000 to $50,000 worth of gold, if not more, was daily obtained. The entire gold district, with very few exceptions of grants made some years ago by the Mexican authorities, is on land belonging to the United States. It was a matter of serious reflection with me, how I could secure to the Government certain rents or fees for the privilege of procuring this gold; but upon considering the large extent of country, the character of the people engaged, and the small scattered force at my command, I resolved not to interfere, but to permit all to work freely, unless broils and crime should call for interference. I was surprised to learn that crime of any kind was very unfrequent, and that no thefts or robberies had been committed in the gold district.

 

Some of the specimens of gold accompanying this were presented for transmission to the Department by the gentlemen named below. The numbers on the topographical sketch corresponding to the labels of the respective specimens, show from what part of the gold region they were obtained.

 

1.       Captain J. A. Sutter

2.       John Sinclair

3.       Wm .Glover, R. C. Kirby, Ira Blanchard, Levi Fifield, Franklin H. Arynes Mormon diggings.

4.       Charles Weber

5.       Robert Spence

6.       Sunol & Co.

7.    Robert D. Neligh

8.    C. E. Picket, American Fork Columa

9.    E. C. Kemble

10. T. H. Green, from San Fernando, near Los Angeles.

A. 2 oz purchased from Mr. Neligh

B. Sand found in washing gold, which contains small particles.

        11. Captain Frisbie, Dry Diggings, Weber's Creek

        12. Consumnes

        13. Consumnes, Hartwell's Ranch.

 

I have the honor to be your most ob't. Ser't.

R. B. Mason, Col. 1st Dragoons, Commanding.

Brig. Gen. R. Jones, Adjt.-Gen. U.S. A., Washington, D. C.

 

Note. - The original letter, of which this is a copy, was sent to its address, in charge of Lieut. L. Loeser, 3rd artillery, bearer of dispatches, who sailed in the schooner Lambayecana, from Monterey, August 30, 1848, bound for Payta, Peru. Lieut. Loeser bears, in addition to the specimens mentioned in the foregoing letter, a tea-caddy containing two hundred and thirty ounces fifteen pennyweights and nine grains of gold. This was purchased at San Francisco by my order, and is sent to you as a fair sample of the gold obtained from the mines of the Sacramento. It is a mixture, coming from the various parts of the gold district.

 

R. B. Mason, Col. 1st Drag. Comd'g.

Headquarters 10th Mil. Department

Monterey, (Cal.) Sept. 10, 1848.

 

 

_______________________________________________________

 

 

 

H

 

COMPLETE LIST OF VESSELS TO CHAGRES FROM

DECEMBER 7, 1848, TO FEBRUARY 8, 1849¹

 

 

_______________________________________________________

 

 

COMPLETE LIST OF VESSELS

 

Which have sailed from various Ports of the United States to Chagres, and other Ports,

for California, since Dec. 7, 1848.

 

Vessels

 

Passengers

Where from

Sailed.

Strmr.

Orus

50

New York

Dec. 12

Strmr.

Crescent City

130

New York

Dec. 13

Strmr.

Isthmus

60

New York

Dec. 25

Strmr.

Falcon

227

New York

Feb. 1

Strmr.

Crescent City

305

New York

Feb. 5

Ship

Florence

10

New York

Dec. 14

Ship

Sutton

50

New York

Dec. 29

Ship

Chris. Colon

30

New York

Jan. 6

Ship

B.T. Bartlett

65

New York

Jan. 6

Ship

Albany

66

New York

Jan. 9

Ship

Brooklyn

167

New York

Jan. 12

Ship

Tarolinta

130

New York

Jan. 14

Ship

Apollo

66

New York

Jan. 16

Ship

Pacific

100

New York

Jan. 23

Ship

South Carolina

163

New York

Jan. 24

Ship

Montreal

8

New York

Jan. 25

Ship

Tahmaroo

160

New York

Jan. 25

Ship

Rose

38

New York

Jan. 25

Ship

Orpheus

174

New York

Jan. 30

Ship

Panama

160

New York

Feb. 4

Ship

Daniel Webster

58

New York

Feb. 5

Ship

Robert Bowne

175

New York

Feb. 5

Ship

Clarissa Perkins

127

New York

Feb. 7

Ship

Geo. Washington

99

New York

Feb. 8

Bark

John Benson

60

New York

Dec. 11

Bark

Neumpha

81

New York

Dec. 24

Bark

Express

25

New York

Jan. 2

Bark

Ocean Bird

10

New York

Jan. 2

Bark

Harriet Newell

20

New York

Jan. 10

Bark

Croton

50

New York

Jan. 14

Bark

Peytona

18

New York

Jan. 16

Bark

Rolla

23

New York

Jan. 16

Bark

Madonna

6

New York

Jan. 16

Bark

Eugenia

134

New York

Jan. 16

Bark

Hersilia

59

New York

Jan. 20

Bark

Mazeppa

28

New York

Jan. 23

Bark

Templeton

50

New York

Jan. 24

Bark

Mary Stuart

12

New York

Jan. 27

Bark

Victory

19

New York

Jan. 27

Bark

Philip Hone

60

New York

Jan. 27

Bark

Azim

48

New York

Jan. 27

Bark

Mara

155

New York

Jan. 31

Bark

Bonne Adele

68

New York

Feb. 2

Bark

Ann Welch

67

New York

Feb. 2

Bark

Strafford

101

New York

Feb. 3

Bark

Isabel

47

New York

Feb. 7

Brig

Mary Rennel

10

New York

Jan. 2

Brig

Newcastle

10

New York

Jan. 4

Brig

D. Henshaw

15

New York

Jan. 7

Brig

George Henry

10

New York

Jan. 10

Brig

Henrico

20

New York

Jan. 10

Brig

Orbit, Company of

35

New York

Jan. 13

Brig

Isabel

20

New York

Jan. 14

Brig

John Enders

40

New York

Jan. 18

Brig

Georgiana

13

New York

Jan. 18

Brig

A. Emory

47

New York

Jan. 25

Brig

Sarah McFarland

41

New York

Jan. 28

Brig

Cordelia

57

New York

Jan. 30

Brig

Eudora

48

New York

Jan. 30

Schr.

Anthem

22

New York

Feb. 3

Schr.

Olivia

20

New York

Jan. 16

Schr.

Samuel Roberts

7

New York

Jan. 16

Schr.

Rawson

8

New York

Jan. 20

Schr.

Decatur

29

New York

Jan. 27

Schr.

Laura Virginia

26

New York

Jan. 29

Schr.

John W. Castnor

88

New York

Jan. 29

Schr.

Empire

15

New York

Feb. 1

Schr.

Sea Witch

9

New York

Feb. 1

Ship

Edward Everett

150

Boston

Jan. 12

Ship

Capitol

195

Boston

Jan. 24

Ship

Pharsalia

150

Boston

Jan. 25

Ship

Corsair

112

Boston

Jan. 31

Ship

Drummond

47

Boston

Feb. 1

Ship

Leonore

100

Boston

Feb. 3

Bark

J. W. Coffin

4

Boston

Dec. 7

Bark

Carib

11

Boston

Dec. 31

Bark

Elvira

12

Boston

Jan. 6

Bark

Maria

22

Boston

Jan. 10

Bark

Josephine, Company

30

Boston

Jan. 10

Bark

Oxford

63

Boston

Jan. 12

Bark

Rochelle

46

Boston

Feb. 3

Brig

Josephine

32

Boston

Dec. 24

Brig

Mary Wilder

49

Boston

Dec. 26

Brig

Almena

29

Boston

Dec. 26

Brig

Saltillo

12

Boston

Dec. 26

Brig

Forest

45

Boston

Jan. 11

Brig

Attlila

42

Boston

Jan. 12

Brig

North Bend

31

Boston

Jan. 15

Brig

Acadia

16

Boston

Feb. 3

 

Naumkeag Mut. Trad. Co.

20

Boston

Jan. 15

Schr.

Anonyma

3

Boston

Jan. 17

Schr.

Boston

30

Boston

Jan. 25

Ship

Louisana

40

Philadelphia

Dec. 20

Ship

Gray Eagle

36

Philadelphia

Jan. 18

Brig

Oniotal

17

Philadelphia

Jan. 11

Brig

Osceola

65

Philadelphia

Jan. 16

Brig

Marion

8

Philadelphia

Jan. 21

Ship

Gray Hound

6

Baltimore

Jan. 10

Ship

Jane Parker

80

Baltimore

Jan. 25

Ship

Xylon

140

Baltimore

Feb. 3

Bark

Paoli

5

Baltimore

Jan. 11

Bark

Hebe

7

Baltimore

Feb. 3

Bark

John Potter

13

Baltimore

Feb. 6

Brig

Bathurst

12

Baltimore

Feb. 6

Schr.

Eclipse

8

Baltimore

Jan. 11

Schr.

Sovereign

40

Baltimore

Jan. 17

Stmr.

Falcon

200

New Orleans

Dec.__

Stmr.

Telegraph

5

New Orleans

Jan. 12

Stmr.

Fanny

214

New Orleans

Jan. 14

Ship

Architect

63

New Orleans

Jan. 18

Bark

Florida

7

New Orleans

Jan. 14

Schr.

Macon

60

New Orleans

Dec. 10

Schr.

Othello

67

Charleston

 

Ship

Mary and Adeline

212

Norfolk

Dec. 27

Brig

John Petty

14

Norfolk

Jan. 10

Ship

Aurora

31

Nantucket

Jan. 11

 

Plymouth & Cal. Min. Co.

50

Plymouth

Jan. 16

Ship

Magnolia

87

New Bedford

Feb. 1

Bark

Dimon

55

New Bedford

 

Schr.

Favorite

8

New Bedford

Dec. 13

Schr.

Pomona

17

New Bedford

 

 

Suliote

50

Belfast, Me.

Jan. 28

Brig

Charlotte

43

Newburyport

Jan. 23

Brig

Pauline

30

Charlestown

Jan. 13

Schr.

Montague

47

New Haven

Jan. 24

Brig

Sterling

10

Salem

Dec. 30

Brig

Eliza

37

Salem

Jan. 27

Brig

Mentor

57

New London

Jan. 31

Schr.

Mary Taylor

10

New London

Jan. 13

Schr.

Velasco

38

New London

Jan. 25

Schr.

Odd Fellow

22

New London

Feb. 2

Ship

Trescott

50

Mystic

Jan. 24

Brig

J. Goodhue

5

Eastport

Jan. 17

Ship

Hopewell

105

Warren, R.I.

Jan. 29

 

California Over'nd Ass.

300

Buffalo

Jan. 20

Ship

Sabina

67

Sag Harbor

Feb. 8

 

¹New York Daily Tribune, February10, 1849.

 

___________________________

 

 

From N. York

In stm'rs

772

From N. York

In ships

1,846

From N. York

In barks

1,141

From N. York

In brigs

388

From N. York

In schrs.

212

 

Total

4,359

 

From Boston

 

In ships

 

754

From Boston

In barks

188

From Boston

In brigs

256

From Boston

In schrs

53

 

Total

1,251

 

From Philadel

 

In ships

 

76

From Philadel

In brigs

90

 

Total

166

From Balt're

In ships

276

From Balt're

In barks

25

From Balt're

In brigs

12

From Balt're

In schrs

43

 

Total

361

 

From N. Orl's

 

In stm'rs

 

419

From N. Orl's

In ships

63

From N. Orl's

In barks

7

From N. Orl's

In schrs

60

 

Total

549

 

 

From other ports

 

 

 

 

 

1,412

 

Grand total number of passengers

 

 

8,098

 

 

 

 

 

Transcribed by: Jeanne Sturgis Taylor.

Source: Berthold, Victor M., Ph.D., The Pioneer Steamer California 1848-1849, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1932. Boston & New York.


© 2010 Jeanne Sturgis Taylor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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