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HISTORY OF OFFALY - KILKENNY CLAN O'NOLAN: CONNAUGHT.

Nolen Family: People and Places.

Ashokan Farewell (Flute & Harp).
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Name Variations: O’Nolan, Nolan, Nowlan, Nowlin, Nowling, Nolin, Nolun, Nolen, Nowland, Noland, Knowlan, Knowland.


FAMILY TREE DNA - NOLAN SURNAME PROJECT.

KERCHNER'S R1b1c10 (U152+) PROJECT.

Add your NOLAN family (all variants) to the NOLAN Family Pedigree Forum at WFNForum.net: Registration and Login required to post.


For a list of documents in order by year, state, and country: O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) (NOLEN) Census, Deed, & Land Records, 195-1990.


Text Only File with Endnotes: 1,000 Years of O'NOLAN History.


Download: Microsoft Office Word Viewer 2003.


National Geographic - Genographic Project - Haplogroup R1b Population Route Map.

Migration:


Scythia - Near East - Ancient Libya (Northwest Africa) - Central Italy - Central Europe - Spain - Ireland - Scotland.

Map of Eastern Mediterranean (from Black Sea to Lybia and Egypt).

Map of Ancient Greek World (Southern Italy, Greece and Asia Minor).



R1b1c10 Ancestral History of N-4 (NOLAN DNA Surname Project) provided by the National Geographic - Genographic Project.


R-U152 (R1b1b2a1b7) (R1b1b2h*) (R1b1c10): M173+ M207+ M269+ M343+ P25+ P-312+ (rs34276300+) (S116+) U152+ (S28+) L2- L3- L4- M126- M153- M160- M18- M222- M37- M65- M73- P107- P66- SRY2627- U106- U198- S21- S26- S29-


R-U152+ or S28+ = U152 (R1b1b2a1b7) (R1b1b2a2g) (R1b1b2h*) or R1b1c10 confirmed at FTDNA and EthnoAncestry

DYS 385a/b (Kittler) 17-11

Y-DNA Advanced Markers - FTDNA Panels 5-9: Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan: Connaught


News: The Nolan DNA Project has linked Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan: Connaught to the Milesian Legends of Ireland. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan: Connaught has a generational mutational link to Eber Glunflind son of Lamfhind recorded in the Leabhar Gabhála (Lebor Gabala Erren) and the Book of Leinster 1150 A. D. (with some variant readings from the Book of (Formoy).


This is extraordinarily great news in the growing field of genetic genealogy. The Lebor Gabala Erren is the recorded oral history of the Celtic Irish. The Ireland Literature Guide has further information. Though, sometimes represented as fictional and mythological in origin the Lebor Gabala Erren is deeply rooted in Celtic ancestry. Please read Of the Nolans (Nola): Origins of the Irish and Scottish - Corca Luighe (Corca Laoidhe) and Dál Riada (Dál Riata) - R1b1b2a2g (R1b1b2h*) (R1b1c10) - DYS #385a and 385b at 11 and 17: A Corca Luighe (Corca Laoidhe) Ossory (Osraighe) and Dál Riada (Dál Riata) Uladh Haplotype in Co. Donegal, Ulster, Ireland, 1600s for details.


INTRODUCTION.

According to the available Irish genealogies or pedigrees, Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught descended from a sept of the ruling Ui Neill: O’Neill's of Ulster, but Carlow Clan O'NOLAN at R1b1c7 and Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught at R1b1c10 do not present the same Y-DNA haplogroup. R-M222 and R-U152 descend from a common R1b1c ancestor except that link occurred in the past making Niall Nóigiallach - Niall of the Nine Hostages and King Colla Uais distant relations.

The Irish, Scottish, Welsh, and English have a close affinity to the people of Galicia, the Basque region, and Spain. Historians place the Celtic invasions of the British Isles in the Iron Age. Modern geneticists, however, argue that DNA testing of the people from Celtic areas of Europe indicates that the migratory movement possibly began some 6,000 years in the past. The commonalities of the people of these areas appear more ancient than historians have predicted.

Evidence presented at Of the Nolans: Origins of the Irish and Scottish - Corca Luighe (Corca Laoidhe) and Dál Riada (Dál Riata) - R-U152 (R1b1b2a1b4) (R1b1b2a1b7) (R1b1b2a2g) (R1b1b2h*) (R1b1c10) - DYS #385a and 385b at 11 and 17: A Corca Luighe (Corca Laoidhe) Ossory (Osraighe) and Dál Riada (Dál Riata) Uladh Haplotype in Co. Donegal, Ulster, Ireland, 1600s is suggestive of an origin from the Central Italian Refugium, depending on its relative age, however, the Balkans Refugium cannot be discounted. The age estimate for R1b1b2h (R1b1c10) is from R1b1c10 aka S28 by John McEwan. Other age estimates for R1b1b2h are 3,080-4,500 years or 103-150 generations to the most recent common ancestor, which is not necessarily the age of the mutation for U152+ (R1b1b2a2g) only the estimated age to the most recent common ancestor. Ken Nordtvedt, has calculated a time to most recent common ancestor for U152 (R1b1b2a2g) (R1b1b2h*) (R1b1c10) that falls within the range for the volcanic destruction of the city and territory of Nola in ancient Italy circa 1800 and 1750 B. C. with a 3,780 year most recent common ancestor estimate for R-U152 and R-U106 stating that the MRCA for R-U152 is within range of that estimate and the MRCA for R-U106 occurs at the 3,270 year marker making the MRCA for it 500 years younger than R-U152.

In Ireland, "of the Nolans" is usually representative of the Co. Carlow Nolans. By the 17th century, these two Irish Clan names are interchangeable, but a new hypothesis is possible due to the ever-expanding knowledge of genetics. "Of the Nolans" could represent the people from the territory of Nola of ancient Italy. Two interesting facts regarding the Cippus Abellanus by M. Horatius Piscinus are that the border sanctuary between the towns of the territory of Nola was unusual and that it corresponds to southern Gaul and its Celtic tribes, and that the people of the territory of Nola were “Nolans” more than two thousand years ago.

The Scythian Milesian ancestry myths of the Heremonian lineage of Ireland, and the Milesian Legends: The Book of the Taking of Ireland recounts an origin of descent from the Scythian King Feinius Farsaid. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan: Connaught, R1b1c10, according to Old Irish Kingdoms and Clans is a pre-Milesian Corca Luighe (Corca Laoidhe or Corca Loigde) sept; however, any speculation as to Irish arrival prior to the Iron Age is unproven.

Nolan Y-DNA cannot yet place R1b1c7 or R1b1c10 (R1b1b2h) into a specific wave of Celtic migration as shown by the myriad of Irish migration myths. Hence, we have two mythological origins for the Corca Loigde: Érainn or Goídel. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’Nolan: Connaught is of the Corca Laoidhe and that places it within the Érainn or Goidel, but pinpointing an arrival date prior to 2,500 years ago is not possible at this point. The Érainn (Fir Bolg) invaded Ireland long before the Goídel (Gaedil) or Milesians, however, it has become obvious that the differing redactions of the Milesian Legends and its use of double episodes based upon the Lebor Gabala Erren refer to the same migration of the Celtic people into Ireland: Érainn (Fir Bolg) and Goídel (Gaedil) or Milesians. O’Nolan: The History of a People by Fr. John O’Nolan and Art Kavanagh also puts Carlow Clan O’Nolan in descent of the Scythian Milesian ancestry myths of the Heremonian lineage of Ireland. It is possible to conclude that Carlow Clan O'Nolan, R1b1c7, and Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan: Connaught, R1b1c10, are both of Milesian ancestry based on rs34276300+ (S116+) results.

Edward MacLysaght, first Chief Herald of Ireland, writing several books on Irish family history and heraldry, in his book, Irish Families, would take exception to the use of the term “clan” to describe these “septs” or groups of O’NOLAN’S. He notes that Ireland did not have a true clan system like that which developed in Scotland; however, modern DNA evidence is separating the various septs or groups of O'NOLAN’S living in the same vicinity into distinguishable family groups, lineages or clans. An explanatory note concerning Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN is warranted at this point, there may or may not be at least three distinct genealogical branches or lineages of Offaly -Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught, Ossory, and Tipperary; 1. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN that moved into the Connacht counties of Galway and Mayo with the Barrett family in the 12th or early 13th century; 2. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN which stayed in Co. Kilkenny (Ossory) after the 12th century; and 3. Tipperary Clan O’NOLAN which may or may not have developed in conjunction with Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN with a split disseminating into Co. Tipperary Clan O’NOLAN somewhere between the 5th and 12th century in (Ossory) Osraighe. At present, the Connacht branch of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN is the only one that has attained the status of a distinct lineage due to a limited number of NOLAN surnamed DNA participants, and it is possibly the result of an illegitimate hereditary relationship, an adoption, or a branch of a family using a different surname.

R1b1b2a1b5 (R1b1c7) (R1b1b2e) or the Northwest Irish Haplogroup represents twenty percent of R1b in Ireland and has been calculated at 1740 years by Dr. Ken Nordtvedt, which corresponds roughly to the reign of Niall Noigiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages) beginning in the year 379. Or, of further note, the calculation by Dr. Ken Nordtvedt of 1740 years for a TMRCA for R-M222 matches the reign of Carby Lifeachain (“the Liffey”) Cairbre Liffeachair from 268-284, great-great grandfather to Niall of the Nine Hostages. Others, however, have estimated the age of R-M222 as “about 46% of the age of R1b and is most likely at least 3400 years old." Previously, R-U152 (S28+) acquired an estimate of approximately eighty-nine percent the age of R1b developing as a hunter-gatherer group in Europe representing a Celtic Central European Northern Alpine cluster with the age of its development ranging from an estimated 6,541 years to the end of the last ice age or 10,000-12,000 years.

Clan (Colgain) Colgan, from which O’HUALLACHAIN (NOLAN) descends, is recorded in Septs of the Ui Neill descending from Fearghal, High King of Ireland, dying 718 (Common Era) C. E. This research also points to the Ulster Ireland counties of Donegal and Tyrone, which the Vennicnii and the Rhobogdii tribes anciently occupied. Obviously, R1b1c10 might also be an Ancient Uladh, Kingdom of Ulster haplotype.

An early tribe of the Uladh (Province of Ulster) was the Dál Riada or Dál Riata, once referred to by Romans as “Scoti” or "Scotia" from which the name Scotland may have derived. One Irish genealogy of the ancient Dál Riata refers to the Clan of Úgaine Mor and Glass mac Nuadait Argatlám as the common ancestor between the Dál Riata and the people of Laigin (Leinster), Ulaid (Ulster), Ossairgi (Osraighe or Ossory), and the Síl Cuind. This mythical figure also known as Nuadu Argatlám, Nuadu of the Silver Hand or Nudd Airgetlam, King of the Tuatha De Danann, lost a hand in battle with the Fir Bolg or Belgae and every subsequent family in Ireland is reportedly descended from the race of Nuadu.

The Dál Riata of Ireland never was descended from the Ui Neill, but the Ui Neill and the Dál Riata did descend from an ancient common ancestor. The Irish pedigree of the Dál Riata was of the Érainn or Belgae: Érainn-Cianacht. Modern DNA analysis confirms the existence of the King Colla Uais (Dalriadic) modal haplotype, and relatedness exists to the clan or tribe of the Ui Neill through R1b1c.

Colla Uais seized Ulster, but in 327 C. E. (the fourth year of his reign) Muireadhach Tireach expelled King Colla Uais and three hundred of his followers to Scotland becoming the founding lineages for the Scottish Dalriadic kingdom. The major clans of Scotland descend from the Dál Riata of Ireland based on available DNA analysis, and the Niall or Northwest Irish R1b1c7 haplotype exists in Western Scotland. Thus, it is clear from modern genealogy and DNA testing that Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught at R1b1c10 is a distinct ancient Irish clan or tribe.


DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
ID #
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 13 13 29 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 R1b1c10 385a-385b 11, 17 Modal Reference


Unique Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught R1b1c10 Y-DNA Haplotype:


Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught has the classification of Haplogroup R1b1c10 meaning that it falls within ten percent of the Western European male population. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught appears to be in the King Colla Uais and R1bSTR43 cluster. The R1bSTR43 cluster identified as having originated in the British Isles some 2,000-3,000 years before the Common Era arrived in the British Isles probably from the Iberian Peninsula or Spain 7,000-10,000 years in the past. Stephen Colson suggests that one R1bSTR43 cluster may have spent a considerable amount of time in Ireland tracing some sub-clusters into Scotland and eventually England. A close match with the King Colla Uais (Dalriadic) modal haplotype is also suggestive of a close ancestral relationship for Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught and Khaki Group 01 of the Windham Family DNA Project to the inhabitants of Ireland and Scotland.

A Ui Neill connection reportedly exists through Carby Lifeachain (“the Liffey”) father of Eochaidh Dubhlinn, grandfather of “the Three Collas,” and great-great grandfather to Niall of the Nine Hostages. The genealogy of the Sil Anmchadha of the Uí Maine records Colla Da Chrioch, brother to Colla Uais, as an ancestor of (O’HUALLACHAIN) UALLACHAN. The Úa Maine are also recorded as descending from Conn of the Hundred Battles, Óengus Dub, a grandson of Cathaír Mór, of the Ua Failge, and from Maine, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. The territory of the Ui Maine included parts of Kings Co. (Offaly). MUGRON of Clan (Colgain) Colgan, the ancestor of O'H-UALLACHAIN or HOOLAHAN, was reportedly born at Ballycowen, Kings, Co. (Offaly).

In Kingdom of Airghialla, Ulster Series, Background on the Three Collas, Contemporary historians record King Colla Uais as one of the three sons of the early Ulster ruler Niall Noigiallach who had three sons: Eogan, Conall, and Enda. The Irish Annals indicate he was the son of Eochaidh Doimhlen (Eochaid Duibhlein) and Aileach, the daughter of the King of Alba, Scotland. Yet, others prefer the alternate theory of Romanized Britons ascending the Irish throne. Though, there is no account of Romans in Ireland. Intertwined in this mystical era of Irish history are reality and myth, therefore, a true origin for the Three Collas is unclear.

Modern DNA analysis can determine that the (MRCA) most recent common ancestor for the paternal line of the O’Neil’s (13, 25, 14, and 11) and the “Three Collas” (13, 24, 14, and 10) probably occurred beyond 500 B. C. E. (Before Common Era). These Irish royal lineages may have been heavily intermarried but did not have a genetic paternal link for more than 2,500 years. The Irish genealogies, therefore, which relate to this aspect of the descent of Conn are not correct and probably have a degree of fabrication. King Colla Uais was not the son of the Ulster ruler Niall Noigiallach, but they do have an ancient common ancestor. The R1b1c signature does connect these people genealogically.

Aengus (the Prolific) Tuirmheach, 81st Monarch of Ireland, son of Eochaidh Foiltleathan, defeated and killed Fearghus, the powerful or brave, at Tara assuming the monarchy of Ireland having two sons: Fiacha Fermara, and Enna Aighneach. Fiacha Fermara is the progenitor for the Dalriadic and Alba Scottish Kings, and many of the succeeding Kings descend from Enna Aighneach.

There is ample evidence that the O HAONGHUSA [meaning descendant of Aonghus or Angus] (O'HENNESSY) [shared the lordship of Clann Cholgan with their kinsmen the O’HOLOHAN'S (O HUALLACHAIN)] in Co. Offaly, but there is also evidence of a sept of the Ui AENGHUSA in Munster. These two separate septs probably developed independently after the descendants of Aonghus, Aengus, or Angus split with some descendants moving into Munster and some into Co. Offaly. In any event, these two separate Irish septs are inextricably linked genealogically.

The Érainn, a group of Munster clans, occupied the Kingdom of (Ossory) Osraighe. In essence, Ossory was a buffer zone during the sixth through ninth centuries between the men of Munster (Munstermen) and the men of Leinster (Leinstermen). The Kingdom of (Ossory) Osraighe encompasses most of present day Co. Kilkenny in which Inse Ui hUallachan (the river meadow of O HOLAHAN) or O'HOLOHAN’S holm is located in the Barony of Shillelogher. After 1653, Inse Ui hUallachan, anglicized Inchyolaghan became Castleinch or Caislean-na-h-Ínse. Thus, the basis for naming this particular NOLAN clan Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN lies within these two septs of the descendants of Aonghus or Angus.

The 33 of 37 Y-DNA marker match between N-4 (Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught) R1b1c10 of the NOLAN DNA Surname Project and Kit #56134 from the WINDHAM Family DNA Project probably occurred between these two 1574 Galway castle owning families who were also Herenagh Families of Ulster Co. Donegal Ireland. An exact match of the first 20 markers (13, 24, 14, 10, 11, 17, 12, 12, 12, 14, 13, 30, 17, 9, 10, 11, 11, 25, 15, and 19) in the Y-DNA test of N-4 with RICHARD (O') HAGAN also gives credence to an Ulster relationship. Ó hOgáin is also a Corca Laoidhe surname. A WINDHAM - NOLAN DNA comparison provided by JOHN B. WINDHAM details a 25 Y-DNA marker match between N-3 (Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught) and Kit # 18393 and a 61-62 of 67 Y-DNA marker match between Kit # 18393 and N-4. Incidentally, Kit # 18393 mismatches RICHARD O’HAGAN by one in a 20-marker comparison. Herenagh meaning land typically converted into donated church property.

In most circumstances when individuals of different surnames closely match at a limited number of 12 markers that match will disappear with increased marker testing. Mutation rate explains the disappearance of a close match in a limited 12-marker test. As an increased number of markers are tested and compared the possibility of more mutations exist, which increases the time span of the most recent common ancestor usually beyond the period for relatedness of the earliest known use of surnames: 40 generations or 1,000 years.

When exceptions to this disappearance of relatedness persist between different surnamed individuals at the higher level of a 37 or 67-marker match then an extramarital event, non-paternity event or adoption has typically occurred. Adoption of a different surname by a branch of one family and convergence are also a possibility. Convergence meaning the mutation of each families result into a DNA match. Yellow denotes haplotype differences.


Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught R1b1c10 Unique 20-marker Haplotype Matches:

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
ID #
13 24 14 10 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 30 18 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 King Colla Uais
13 24 14 10 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 R1bSTR43

N-3 mismatches the King Colla Uais 20-marker haplotype at DYS #385b, 389-1, 389-2, and 458. N-4 mismatches the King Colla Uais 20-marker haplotype at DYS #385b, 389-1, and 458. N-30 (brother to N-4) mismatches the King Colla Uais 20-marker haplotype at DYS #385b, 389-1, 389-2, and 458. N-3, N-4, and N-30 mismatch the 20-marker haplotype of R1bSTR43 at DYS #385b, 389-1, and 389-2.

N-4 and N-30 are brothers of the same mother and father, but mutations at DYS #389-2 and 464c for N-4 with a genetic distance of two at the 25-marker level compared to N-30 leaves N-30 with a more precise genetic match with N-3 and 9ZZVM - Windham at the 25-marker level than with N-4.

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
DYS
449
DYS
464a
DYS
464b
DYS
464c
DYS
464d
ID #
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 17 17 N-3 - Nolen
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 15 17 N-4 - Nolen R1b1c10
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 17 17 N-30 - Nolen (brother to N-4)

The three below HAGAN DNA results from Y-Search have an exact 20-marker match with N-4 resulting in an ancient relationship prior to the introduction of surnames through parallel subclades of R-P312. N-3 and N-30 mismatch by one mutation at DYS 389-2. User ID # 5GGTH lists Carrickmore, Ulster, Ireland as country of origin.

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
ID #
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 5GGTH - Hagan
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 N2F3B - Hagan
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 YNXPB - Hagan

Three of the following WINDHAM/WYNDHAM Y-Search participants claim descent from England: JCBWN, P6D2Y, and QT7HT, however, mutations at DYS 389-2 for N-4 and the HAGAN surname at 30, N-3, N-30 and WINDHAM at 31 results in an ancient Irish relationship prior to the introduction of surnames through parallel subclades of R-P312.

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
DYS
449
DYS
464a
DYS
464b
DYS
464c
DYS
464d
ID #
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 JCBWN - Windham
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 17 17 9ZZVM - Windham
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 P6D2Y - Windham
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 QT7HT - Windham
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 V43N7 - Windham

Genetic Distance
IDm
o
d
a
l
C
o
l
l
a

U
a
i
s

R
1
b
R
1
b
S
T
R
4
3
N
-
3

N
o
l
e
n
N
-
4

N
o
l
e
n
N
-
3
0

N
o
l
e
n
5
G
G
T
H

H
a
g
a
n
N
2
F
3
B

H
a
g
a
n
Y
N
X
P
B

H
a
g
a
n
J
C
B
W
N

W
i
n
d
h
a
m
9
Z
Z
V
M

W
i
n
d
h
a
m
P
6
D
2
Y

W
i
n
d
h
a
m
Q
T
7
H
T

W
i
n
d
h
a
m
V
4
3
N
7

W
i
n
d
h
a
m
1 modal 203301011100000
2 Colla_Uais_R1b 320234344433333
3 R1bSTR43 322032322233333
4 N-3_Nolen 033201011100000
5 N-4_Nolen 142120100011111
6 N-30_Nolen 033012011100000
7 5GGTH_Hagan 142101200011111
8 N2F3B_Hagan 142101020011111
9 YNXPB_Hagan 142101002011111
10 JCBWN_Windham 033010111200000
11 9ZZVM_Windham 033010111020000
12 P6D2Y_Windham 033010111002000
13 QT7HT_Windham 033010111000200
14 V43N7_Windham 033010111000020
Related Probably Related Possibly Related
FTDNA's Interpreting Genetic Distance for 12 Markers
FTDNA's Interpreting Genetic Distance for 25 Markers
FTDNA's Interpreting Genetic Distance for 37 Markers
- Infinite allele mutation model is used
- Values on the diagonal indicate number of markers tested
Genetic Distance Modal ID #
13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 Modal Reference


NOLAN - WINDHAM
PROBABILITY & TIME TO MOST RECENT COMMON ANCESTOR.

98.55% Probability of a Shared Common Ancestor within 24 Generations:

94.97% Probability of a Shared Common Ancestor within 20 Generations:

2006 minus 1597* = 409 Years.

2006 minus 1643* = 363 Years.


* 1597 - THOMAS NOLAN purchased Enniscrone Castle Co. Sligo.

* 1643 - JOHN NOWLIN living in Isle of Wight Co. VA.


The O’HAGAN (O hAgain in Irish, which was originally O hOgain) family also descends from the ruling Ui Neill, O’Neill's, of Ulster, and were hereditary stewards, sheriffs, and judges considered part of that sept. O'HAGAN’S stood with Hugh O'Neill, the last of the native Irish kings, in his rebellion against England. Hugh O'Neill, in the tradition of the times, took the remnants of his fortune and sailed to Spain. The O'HAGAN’S were not as fortunate, being totally dispossessed of lands and possessions in the plantations that followed Hugh O'Neill’s defeat.


The O’HAGAN'S (O hAgain), a sept of the Cineal Eoghain, are recorded as descendants of Fergus, son of Eoghan with the following families in Roger O'Ferrall's "Linea Antiqua": O'COLGAN, O'Branagan, O'HAGIN, O'Cahalan, O'Uarisg, O'Brelar, O'Hanin, O'Dovan, O'Losgny, O'Mellan, O'CONOLAN, O'Spellan, and O'Breonan. Fergus was also ancestor to the O'QUIN'S, as described in Background on the Northern Uí Neill. O'QUIN later spawned the family of WYNDHAM-QUINN. Included in the background of the Northern Ui Neill is evidence pertaining to the O'BOYLE, MAC SUIBHNE, and MACSWEENEY septs that became WYNDHAM of Co. Donegal. A History of the HOGAN, O'HOGAN, Ó HOGAIN Surname reflects a separate origin in Co. Cork as a sept of the Corca Laoidhe.


It is evident that not all Irish NOLAN’S descend from County Carlow. More than one NOLAN lineage developed in ancient Ireland prior to the introduction of surnames. The first name of the ancestor's father formed the basis of familial relationships. Hereditary surnames have a relatively recent origin. By 1400, for example, most every person in England had a surname. With the origination of surnames within the last millennia, therefore, it is not uncommon to find many different variants of the same clan using the same surname. Usually, genealogists are not interested in relatedness prior to the adoption of surnames, but depending on whether that clan separated and moved to different regions prior to the adoption of surnames researchers should expect to find more than one variant of the same clan using the same surname. The descendants of UALLACHAN of Clan (Colgain) Colgan, for example, became HUALLACHAN. In Ireland “H” often appears in front of a name beginning with a vowel which became O'HUALLACHAN meaning of UALLACHAN or in Gaelic of NOLAN. DNA evidence posted at NOLAN DNA Project: Results conclusively supports the existence of more than one NOLAN lineage.


The most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of N-3 and N-4 is HARDIN NOLEN of Lauderdale Co. Alabama who married CYNTHIA VICKERS on 15 May 1845 proving the existence of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN through DNA and genealogical documentation. In fact, more NOLAN lineages developed after the Norman invasion due to the introduction of the English language. In Co. Fermanagh, O'HULTACHAIN, an obvious derivation of O‘HUALLACHAN, became anglicized as NOLAN. CORMAC O'HULTACHAIN, Erenach (Herenagh) of Achadh-Beithe, Aghavea, died 1532.


Similarly, the O‘HUALLACHAIN (NOLAN) landholding sept of the Connaught branch of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN is believed to have had herenagh property in Ulster Co. Donegal moving their influence further north from Co. Sligo. Perhaps a familial relationship existed between these two NOLAN herenagh property owning lineages, septs or clans of the Ui Colgain. With O'HULTACHAIN an obvious derivation of O‘HUALLACHAIN, it is possible that the JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight Co. Virginia, 1643 represents one or both of these northern Ireland NOLAN lineages, septs or clans. A 17 January 2009 e-mail from WAYNE NOLAN of New Zealand lists the children of THOMAS NOLAN (O'HUALLACHAIN) and AGNES MARTIN from Ballinrobe Co. Mayo Ireland as having seven children: GREGORY, JOHN, CEACILLA, ANNIE, JAMES, THOMAS, and JOSEPH.


HISTORY OF OFFALY - KILKENNY CLAN O'NOLAN: CONNAUGHT.


O'H-UALLACHAIN.

“With the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in the 12th century, NOLAN'S began to wander farther afield. Some are believed to have distanced themselves ending up, for example, in County Galway..." (1) Another scenario is that more than one Irish Clan used the name NUALLAIN or NOLAN. The above quote is from the NOLAN Clan Association.



“About 749 the Osraighe attacked a territory to their east known as Fotharta Fea, in the eastern portion of modern Co. Carlow.” (2) From this researchers can deduce that the Carlow NOLAN and the Offaly - Kilkenny NOLAN clans had some degree of interaction. The possibility exists of several different NUALLAIN or NOLAN clan affiliations. The above quote is from The History of Osraighe: The Roots of County Kilkenny.


TRIBES OF THE ÉRAINN.

THE ÉRAINN, CORCA LAOIGHDHE (CORCA LAIDHE), AND O’HAONGHUSA: O'HENNESSY, O’HUALLACHAIN - O’HOLOHAN, NOLAN MIGRATION TIMELINE.



* The above quote is from Old Irish Kingdoms: A Supplement to Ireland History in Maps.




* The above quote is from Long Ago in Ireland.




* The above two entries were extracted from Annála Connacht.



* The above quote is from Long Ago in Ireland.





* The above three entries were extracted from Annála Connacht.


Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XXXX. (1985-86), Some 13th Century Castle Sites in the West of Ireland: Note on a Preliminary Reconnaissance, C. J. Lynn, 90-115.


Illustrations from the above pages 96, 99, 106, 113, 114, and 115 of Some 13th Century Castle Sites in the West of Ireland: Note on a Preliminary Reconnaissance:Banada Co. Sligo, Castlemore Co. Roscommon, Plan of Temple House Castle, Castle Sites in the West of Ireland, Banada Abbey, Hen's Castle, and Temple House Co. Sligo.


** 1315 - “When Felim (O'Conor) heard that William Burke had arrived in Connacht from Alba (Scotland) he commanded a muster of his people to one place, to expel him (Burke). And this was the muster that came there, namely all from Es-Ruaidh,* to Echtghe:* And Donogh O'Brien, King of Thomond came in his following and muster: And O'Melaghlin, King of Meath: And O'Rourke, King af Breifne: And O'Ferrall, King of Conmaicne (Angally, now Co. Longford): And Tadgh O'Kelly, King of Hy-Many; and many more of the Kings and Chieftains of ERIN, came in his muster. And they all went to Ath-na-righ (Athenry) against William Burke, MacFeorais and the other Foreigners of Connacht: And a battle was fought between them, at the door of the town; and the Gaels were defeated there, and Felim O'Conor, King of Connaught was slain there; and Tadhg O'Kelly, King of Hy-Many, and twenty persons entitled to the sovereignty of Hy-Many fell there along with him: And Art O'Heghra (O'Hara) King of Leyney: And Melaghlin O'Dowde: And Dermot MacDermot, who was fit to be King of Moylurg: And John son of Murragh O'Madden and Murragh O'Madden: And Donnell, son of Aedh O'Concannon, King of Hy-Dermoda: And Donnell O'Boyle: And Nial Sinnach (The Fox), King of Feara-Taffia (Foxes Country, now part of Kings County): And Farrell, son of John galda O'Ferrall, William, son of Aedh oge O'Ferrall, and Thomas, son of Awley O'Ferrall: And five of the clan Donnagh were slain there: And John MacEgan, O'Conor's brehon, and Gillananaev son of O'Dolan, the standard bearer, and Thomas O'Connellan, were slain there, around their Lord. And it is not easy to tell all that were then slain of the men of Munster and the men of Meath and of the men of ERIN likewise; as the poet says



As the Anglo-Norman force sustained but little loss in this battle, it is likely that their archers at the onset showered a hail of arrows upon the Irish host who were not protected with mail armour, and shot them down in hundreds before they could get to close quarters; and that then the charge of the heavy Anglo-Norman cavalry of mail-clad knights, completed the havoc and rout of the undisciplined Gaelic hosts. This battle of Athenry must be reckoned in its effects and results as one of the most decisive battles in Ireland during the Anglo-Norman period. It fully established the De Burgh supremacy in Connaught over the native Irish there.” (6)


* Assaroe on the river Erne, near Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal: Echtghe now Slieve Aughty, the name of the mountain range between the Counties of Galway and Clare.


** Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. VII. No. I., Notes on the Persons Named in the Obituary Book of the Franciscan Abbey at Galway by Martin J. Blake, 1-28.


** Illustrations from pages 2, 8, 21, and 26 of the Notes on the Persons Named in the Obituary Book of the Franciscan Abbey at Galway: Sir William De Burgh; tombstone; Richard O'Cuairsci Bourke; Edmond Albanagh.



* The above quote is from Long Ago in Ireland.



* The above entry extracted from Annála Connacht.


History of the Irish Hierarchy: With the Monasteries of Each County, Biographical Notices of the Irish Saints, Prelates and Religious by Rev. Thomas Walsh, 1854.

Chapter XLIX.

County of Kilkenny.

P. 493




* The above two entries were extracted from Annála Connacht.



* Fr. M. Holland writes on 8 June 2005 from The Abbey Galway, galwayabbey@eircom.net, "I regret to say that the tomb you refer to is no longer in existence." (8) The Francisan Friary referred to is actually located in the heart of Galway City and is now situated on Francis Street. St. Stephen's Island where the courthouse is now was the location of the medieval friary. There are no substantial remains of the buildings, but an interesting collection of medieval tombstones can be seen in the present friary garden. Name: Abbey (The) Old Franciscan Friary; Address: 8 St. Francis Street, Galway, Ireland.


Obituary Book of the Franciscan Monastery at Galway.


SITE OF THE OLD FRANCISCAN ABBEY.
Galway Courthouse.








* The above seven entries were extracted from Annála Connacht.





* There is a Loughboy parish in Co. Galway that probably did not exist during the period of 1394. The Loughboy, Co. Kilkenny site was a residence of this O'HUALLACHAIN (NOLAN) Clan that does exhibit an ancient 800-1,000 year history prior to the year 1394. This quote is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 277.



* DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) was married to JULIAN FALLON, daughter of ANDREW FALLON. This is the first reference to a goldsmith in Galway. No evidence exists suggestive of DONNELL O'NOLAN marking or stamping his finished product. The above entry represents an owner holding under feudal tenure. It was extracted from The Annals of Connacht: "The Annals" Tell the Story of Galway, and Galway Corporation Book A.


* “[1500.]-To all men to whom this writtinge comith, the Mayor, Baillevies and Comens of this hir Majesties town of Galway sendith grettinge in our Lord God everlastinge: Lettinge you to witte that for dyvers considerations and for erniste respecte that we, the said Mayor, Bailievs and Comens had to the request made by one ANDRAUE FFALLON, on the behalf of his doughter, JULIAN FALLON, who is married to DONILL OGE OVOLLOGHAN of this same town, goldsmith, and for the better relieffe of the said ANDROWE FFALLON, who is old and impotente, it is condescendid and agreid by us, the said Mayor and Bailyvvis and combrethern of Galwy, aforsaid, that the said DONILL OVOLLOGHAN shalbe acceptid, taken and receivd in to our ffredoms, and lik as and acordingly oure previledges and chartors, had and obtaynid of suffraynis Kinges of ancient (times). And by vertu therof we, the said Mayor and Bayleffes, with oure combrethern, have gyvin and grauntid unto the said DONYLL ffredome and ffre liberties in as ampull and lardg manner as we grauntid to anny other ffreman made by us and by thes presents we do gyve and graunt to the said DONYLL his ffredome and ffredom and ffre liberties as well within this town, as also within and without the fraunchies and ffre liberties of the same. And by these presents the said DONIALL shall and may ocupie the trade of merchandice and all manner warres in lading and discharding of his goodes, warres, and merchandice into forayn realmis and from thence into this town of Galwey, and after the transporting of the same to sell the said warres and merchandice and make sellis thereof as well by grosse as retaylle, and thus to use the ffredoms and liberties of the same town as all other ffremen doth without leat or truble of any person or persons, the said DONILL answering the Comons acordingly ther costoms acording his vocation from tyme to tyme. In wittnes whereof we the said Stevn Arture Lynch, Mayor, and ouer Bayllys, Jamis Linch and Nicholas Frenc[h], with the rest of our Counsaill, have set hereunto our signes.-[Undated.]” (10)


* This quote was extracted from a Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 390-91.


** Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLVI. (1994), Mulveen, Jack: Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Wares, 43-64.


** Illustrations from pages 44, 45, 46, and 52 of Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Ware: Figure 1; Figure 2; Figure 3; Figure 4 with photographs of a Silver Chalice by MARK FALLON, 1714, and a collection of Galway Silverware circa 1725 by MARK FALLON and Richard Joyce.



* The above entry was extracted from Annála Connacht.



* This information was extracted from a Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 391. MS 866: Trinity College, Dublin lists CORNELL as COLLONEL FALLON and is in the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLIV, (1992), Walsh, Paul: An Account of the Town of Galway, 61.



* This information was extracted from a Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 399.



* This information is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 82.



* The above entry was extracted from Annála Connacht.











* The above seven entries are from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. II, Nolan, J. P.: Galway Castles and Owners in 1574, 109-123. The list for the Barony of Moycullen includes the Barony of Galway. Col. J. P. NOLAN cautions readers of this article that any surname beginning with Mac such as MCSWYNE could possibly denote the Burke surname.



* The above entry is from Notes on Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo and the Families of Burke, NOLAN, Cuff, and Knox written by Martin J. Blake, 1909.



ANNATES FOR THE DIOCESE OF EMLY.


* The origin of the word HOOLIGAN may have derived from the family of HOULIHAN or O'H-UALLACHAIN.




* Historical texts that place the Creevagh in Co. Galway have failed to account for the Creevagh, Kilmolara, Co. Mayo or Walter MacTibbot's Castle of Crigh. The above quote is from the Indenture of Composition, 1585.





* "One of the Galway Nolan’s-THADY-was in the pay of the government and was a ‘pursuivant’ or state messenger who in 1596 was ordered to bring certain persons to Dublin. Bingham, the Governor of Munster, ordered the Mayor and Sheriff of Galway to assist THADY in his duties. The NOLAN’S survived the Nine Years War, the Rebellion of 1641, Cromwell and the Williamites, which in itself was testimony of their sagacity and tenacity…" (15) The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 291.



ANNATES FOR THE DIOCESE OF EMLY.


* There is a Kilcowle in Co. Mayo as listed in the Indenture of Composition, 1585. “The Ecclesiastical Province of Cashel comprises the Archdiocese of Cashel with the Diocese of Emly and eight suffragan sees: Cloyne, Cork, Kerry, Killaloe, Limerick, Ross, Waterford & Lismore, and Kilfenora. The Bishop of Galway is Apostolic Administrator of Kilfenora.” (16) The above quote is from The Ecclesiastical Province of Cashel.




* This information was extracted from a Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 462.



THE STRAFFORD INQUISITION OF CO. MAYO (R. I. A. MS 24 E 15).

BARONY OF BURRISHOOLE.

P. 13.


“Alexander mc Donnell, of Ballenamarogh-the qr of Knock Inedane until the year 1623, at which time he did mortgage the same unto JENNETT MARTIN and her three sisters, daughters of ALLIN MARTIN, of Galway, merchant.”



* William Betham’s will abstract for THOMAS NOLAN indicates the following: THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, 17 April 1628, Daughter ANNIE, and Wife ENESE [AGNES?] sister of GEOFFREY of NICHOLAS MARTIN. Ballinrobe is situated on the River Robe at the heart of the lake district of South Mayo. Ballinrobe Castle was located where the ruins of Cavalry Barracks stand. The above three entries are from Notes on Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo and the Families of Burke, NOLAN, Cuff, and Knox written by Martin J. Blake, 1909.



THE STRAFFORD INQUISITION OF CO. MAYO (R. I. A. MS 24 E 15).

BARONY OF KILMAINE.

P. 48.


“NICHOLAS MARTIN, of Galway-the town and 4 qrs of Moynyfallaghteris, viz. the qr of Nollbriene; the qr of Cahirchristeene; the qr of Atywalter; and the qr of Garryduffe.


Said NICHOLAS did in January 1632[3] purchase of Moyler Bourck the said castle and 3 qrs of land of Moycharra, viz. the qr of Knockanefreighane; the qr of Carrowen Legane; [62V] and the qr of Balloghboy; and also the qr of Carrowmoreinninterbruine for the consideration of £400.


Margaret ny Rory, mother of the said Moyler enjoyeth the 3 parts of the issues of the said 4 qrs of land during her life.”


P. 52.


“Said Walter-3 qrs of Ultanagh, viz. the qr of Rathhape; the qr of Rathnembranagh; and the qr of Lissinargidd, until about 11 years since he did mortgage the same unto NICHOLAS MARTIN, of Galway, merchant, and his heirs for £180 st.-.”


BARONY OF CLANMORRIS.

P. 98.


“GILES MARTIN, (1) daughter of FRANCIS MARTIN, deceased-the moiety of the 4 qrs of Ballyglasse; the moiety of the qr of Killeruagh; and the moiety of ½ gnive of Fallneree.”


(1) “GILES MARTIN, spinster (Harleian MS 2048, f. 465V).”


CROWN SERVANTS: SERIES ONE: THE PAPERS OF THOMAS WENTWORTH, 1st EARL OF STRAFFORD, 1593-1641.




* This information was extracted from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 254.



DOMINICAN ARCHIVES: DOMINICAN SISTERS OF EASTERN AUSTRALIA AND THE SOLOMON ISLANDS.

IRISH CONNECTIONS.

10 September 1647 - “We trace our foundation in Australia to one established in Galway, Ireland on September 10th, 1647. These Sisters were exiled to Spain in 1651 and two elderly Sisters, JULIAN NOLAN and Mary Lynch, returned to Galway 35 years later to begin again, only to be dispersed 11 years later.” (18)



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. V, (1907-1908). Blake, Martin J.: Galway Corporation Book B., 140.


* 1652 - Articles of surrender to Cromwell’s forces.


A note of the town’s-men of Galway that refuse to sign. October 26th 1652.



A note of what town’s-men are absent.


* This information is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, Appendix, xviii-xxix.


THE CAREER OF FR. GREGORY FRENCH, OP.

Part 1.


December 1652 - “After the surrender of Galway in 1652, we find Fr. French, who had been appointed Vicar of the Galway Dominican Nuns by the papal nuncio, John Baptist Runicinni, Archbishop of Fermo in 1647, negotiating the reception of fourteen Irish nuns, including Sr. Mary French, possibly a relation, in Spanish monasteries. Sr. Mary Lynch and Sr. JULIAN NOLAN were eventually settled in the Convent of the Incarnation in Bilbao in December, 1652; for three months before their assimilation into the Spanish community, Fr. French paid four reales a day for their upkeep.” (20)



* The above entry is from Notes on Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo and the Families of Burke, NOLAN, Cuff, and Knox written by Martin J. Blake, 1909.


* 15 February 1657 - "A Schedule containing a Survey and Valuation of soe Many of the Houses in the Towne of Galway, with the Gardens, Orchards and Edifices, and their Appurtenances, as are set out pursuant to said Additional Act." (21)


Houses, etc./Proprietors in 1640, Irish Papists./Proprietors in 1657, Eng. Protestants./Yearly value, if to be let for years.






“Memorandum, that all the above mentioned premises are scituate, lying, and being, in Flud-street, Key-street, Midle-street, Little Gate-street, south side of High-street, and the lanes and parts thereunto adjoining, in the towne of Gallway aforesaid,” (22)


* This information is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, Appendix, xviii-xxix.



* "Galway Corporation Mace and Sword: In the Autumn of 1930 the 'civic' section of Galway was like a hive of bees just robbed of its honey. It was soon made plain that there was no robbery and that the honey did not really belong to the angry ones. For all that the citizens of Galway must feel the deepest sorrow and regret that those ancient symbols of their past glory should be sold away for money. Ninety years ago the defunct Corporation of Galway owed the last Mayor, Edmond Blake of Furbough, £8000 in salary: the citizens could not or would not raise this money but handed over their regalia instead to their creditor. He died in 1905 and left these treasures as heirlooms to his daughter. Both Sword and Mace were objects of great beauty and in excellent condition. The former was made in Galway in 1660 by EDWARD FALLON to the Order of the Corporation, all except the blade being of silver. The Mace was made in Dublin by John Clifton, a famous Galway silversmith, in 1709, to the order of the Galway Corporation, and weighs about 300 oz. of solid silver. Each item stands 4 ft. 6 inches high. It appears that the National Museum of Ireland had the option to purchase but declined. No such option was given to any representative body in Galway. When shall we have a museum fit to house such treasures?" (23) The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XV, (1931-33), Anonymous: Galway Corporation Mace and Sword [note], 83-84.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. V, (1907-1908), No. IV. Kelly, Richard J.: The Forfeitures and Settlements of 1661: Lands in Galway, 212 and Ballybanagher (Ballabanagher) Castle is discussed in the below quote from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 42.


"BALLABEANCHERE (Ballabanagher). is not even on the Ordnance map-its former existence was unknown to all but one old lady of the Parish. It was situated half a mile north of Corofin close to Ballibanagher House and just above the old flood line of the Grange and Clare rivers which meet near the ancient site of the Castle." (25)


CARTE CALENDAR VOLUME 38, NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1663.




* The above entry is from Roderick O'Flaherty's "1684 History of Connaught," 40.



* The above information is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. V, (1907-1908). Blake, Martin J.: Galway Corporation Book B., 92.


* The above information is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XII, No. III and IV. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 61.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XII, No. III and IV. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 80.



* GREGORY NOLAN gave the chalice to the Franciscan Friary or Abbey of Clare (Clar) Galway, founded around 1260 but now a ruin, six miles from Galway city. The Franciscans abandoned it finally (through shortage of numbers) in 1860. Previously they lived in a small house erected on the grounds, and used as a church a part of the old building, which had been re-roofed. The Abbey or friary had been sacked and pillaged many times by the English, even as late as 1798. In the latter years, before 1860, the Franciscans commuted quite a lot between the Abbey in Galway city and Claregalway. ‘This chalice belongs to the Chaple of Clar’ that is the little church or penal chapel amid the ruins of the abbey. ‘Chaple’ was the only word that Catholics were allowed to use under the Penal Laws. Only Protestants could use the word ‘church’. (28) This information is from Fr. M. Holland of The Abbey Galway.


The Tuam News: Chalice Returns to Abbey 150 Years After it was Lost!

Claregalway and the NOLAN Silver Chalice Photo.


Silver Chalice.
Click Images to Enlarge.


* This quote is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 157.



* This information is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 158.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII, No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 19-20.



* This information was extracted from a Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 509.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII, (1925) No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 79.


7 June 1688 - “And impower our said Atturny in pursuance of an Act or Order made by the Comon Councell of this towne dated the 6th of June instant to constitute and appoint GREGORY NOLAN Gent. [ ] for us in his Ma[jes]ties Court of Exchequer and execute ye ejectm[en]ts now brougt in the said Court for ye poor howse, Gortnalower, Gortnagopoge, the Spitle or Leaper howse and severall other lands and tenements and likewise to constitute and appoint the said GREGORY NOLAN to be Atturny for the said Corporacion on any other suit or suits hearafter to be commenced or p[ro]secuted in the said Court, ratifying, confirming and allowing, holding firm and stable all and whatsoever our said Atturny shall doe or cause to be done in and about recovering the premises and every part and parcell thereof to be as firm and effectual in law, to all intents and purposes, as if we ourselves might or could doe if [we] were personally present and did the same. In wittness whereof we have herunto set the Comon [Seale] of the said Corporacion of Gallway, the seventh day of June Anno D[omi]ni, one thousand six hundred and eighty eight.” (33) The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS, Vol. XIII. (1925), Nos. I and II. Galway Corporation MS C. Rev. J. Rabbitte, 82-83.


28 June 1688 - "Mr. GREGORY NOLAN shall be imployed as Atturny for this Corporacion by Aldr. Stephen Deane Trustee for ye said Corporacion in his Ma[jes]ties Court of Exceheq[ue]r on ye severall ejectments already brought and hereafter to be brought in the said Court for ye recovery of the severall howses, lands and tenements belonging to this Corporacion, he the said GREGORY NOLAN being formerly concerned as Agent for passing the late Charter of this Corporacion and faithfully [dis]charged ye trust and being also a member of this Comon Councell, Now Know all men by these presents that wee the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs, free Burgesses, and Comonalty of this Corporacion of Galway doe hereby constitut, nominat, and appoint ye said GREGORY NOLAN for ye consideracions aforesaid our true and lawful Atturny in ye said Court of Exchequer for us and in our names and behallf to prosecute the said severall eject[men]ts already brought and hereafter to be brought in the said Court for ye recovery of such howses, lands and tenements as this Corporacion is out of possession of, and wee do hereby ratify and confirm all act and acts, thing and things, which our said Atturny shall lawfully doe in prosecution of the said ejectments or any other ejectments hereafter to be brought in our name. In testimony whereof wee have hereunto sett ye Comon Seale of the s[ai]d Corporacion at Gallway, the 28th day of June, Anno Domini 1688." (34) The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII, (1925) No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 80-81.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIV, (1928-1929) No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 2.



* The above quote and information is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIV, (1928-1929) No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 3-5.



THE HISTORY OF GALWAY - PART III.

THE ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY OF THE TOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME.

Chapter XIV. 256.


* “On the accession of James II. the Catholic clergy again assembled in the town, 29 and on the 29th March, 1688, the then corporation informed archbishop Vesey that his majesty had been pleased to grant them a charter containing, amongst other privileges, a power to elect a warden and eight vicars, and granting the rights and revenues belonging to the wardenship and college, and others in his grace's possession, which they requested he would forthwith order to be delivered to them, except the church and cemetery, during the pleasure of government. 30 On the 1st of August following, they proceeded, under the charter, to the election of the clergy, when father Henry Browne was chosen warden for the year; and fathers Henry Joyce, Michael Lynch, JAMES FALLON, John Bodkin, Jerome Martyn, NICHOLAS NOLAN and Thomas Lynch were elected vicars.” (37) The above quote is from Hardiman’s History of Galway.




* This information was extracted from a Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 509.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XVI, No. I and II. (1934-35), Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 69-70.



* The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XVI, No. I and II. (1934-35), Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 74.


Three Seventeenth Century Connacht Documents.



* This information was extracted from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIX (1940–1941), No. III & IV, Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS C., 164.



DOMINICAN NUNNERY.

* “When the town was taken by Cromwell’s forces in 1652, the nuns, with their then vicar, father Gregory O’Ferrall, went to Spain. Two only of the number survived, namely, JULIA[N] NOLAN and Maria Lynch, who returned to Galway in 1686, by direction of John Browne, provincial of the order in Ireland. On their arrival, the former was instituted prioress, and the latter sub-prioress; a house having been provided for them in the town, the community soon increased, and, before the end of two years, was effectually re-established.


In 1698 they were again dispersed. It was most deplorable, says the historian of those melancholy scenes, to witness the cries and tears of these distressed females, by which even their very persecutors were moved to compassion. The convent was converted into a barrack, but the nuns remained secretly in town, amongst their friends, under the direction of their venerable prioress, JULIA[N] NOLAN, who was released by death from all her sufferings, in 1701, at the age of ninety years, and was succeeded by the sub-prioress, Maria Lynch.” (42)


* This quote is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 286.


Early 18th century Galway smuggling.


* ”Account of the holes and passages in the town wall of Galway through which brandy and other goods are conveyed into the town by night time.” (43)


“A hole likewise broke through the wall where James Browne Fitz-Barth lives; formerly one NOLAN much frequented it.” (44)


* The above two quotes are from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 179.



Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. VII. Part IV. Fortification of Ballinrobe by H. T. Knox, 204.


Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. VII. Part III. (1911-12), A Petition for the Fortification of Ballinrobe, 168-170.


GALWAY GOLDSMITHS.

APPENDIX II.


* Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLVI. (1994), Mulveen, Jack: Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Wares, 61.



* The above entry is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XVIII. (1938), No. II, Some Documents Relating to Galway, edited by M. D. O'Sullivan, 170-182.


GALWAY GOLDSMITHS.

APPENDIX I.

LIST OF GALWAY GOLDSMITHS, INCLUDING JEWELLERS AND WATCHMAKERS, REGISTERED IN THE BOOK OF THE DUBLIN GOLDSMITH'S COMPANY FROM 1784 TO 1817.


* Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLVI. (1994), Mulveen, Jack: Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Wares, 59.



* The above entry was extracted from Law and Order in Galway.


LANDOWNERS IN CO. GALWAY, 1870's.


FRAGMENTARY ANNALS OF IRELAND.

Annal FA 4.


583 Kl. The slaying of Feradach Finn son of Dui, king of Osraige. Now he was one of the three kings who went to heaven during the lifetime of Colum Cille, and this is the reason, as Colum Cille told Áed son of Ainmere: A great illness seized Feradach. Clann Connla came to storm his house, because Feradach son of Dui was of the Corcu Laígde (for seven kings of the Corcu Laígde ruled Osraige, and seven kings of the Osraige took the kingship of Corcu Laígde). Now, he had waged war against Clann Connla. And he was in his sleeping-place then, and his riches were all there with him, as it was customary for the kings to have cubicles of yew about them, that is, a partitioned place, for their bars and cases of silver and their cups and goblets to give service at night, and their brandub and fidchell games and their bronze hurley-sticks to use by day. Feradach had many treasures, and he loved them greatly; but he had acquired them by evil means, for he would not hear of much or little gold or silver, in the possession of either powerful or wretched in Osraige, without confiscating it to take away that wealth, to ornament those treasures. Feradach's sons came to his bed then to take the treasures away with them. ‘What do you want, sons?’ asked Feradach. ‘To take the treasures away with us,’ answered the youths. ‘You shall not take them,’ said Feradach, ‘for they were ill-gotten; I tormented many in gathering them, and I consent to being tormented myself by my enemies on their account.’


His sons left him, and he began fervent penance. Then Clann Connla came, and they killed Feradach, and took the treasures; and Feradach went to heaven.


Annal FA 432.



THE ANNALS OF ULSTER, THE ANNALS OF THE FOUR MASTERS & THE ANNALS OF CONNACHT.

ANNALS OF THE FOUR MASTERS.

M1175.7.



M1178.9.



M1185.11.



M1192.7.



M1373.12.


  • Brian Oge, son of Brian O'Dowda, was slain by the Barretts.

    M1404.1.



    ANNALS OF CONNACHT.

    1237.5.



    1281.4.



    1313.4.



    1398.10.



    1406.2.



    ANNALS OF ULSTER.

    U1182.2.



    M1182.2.



    1182.



    M905.3.



    The above information is from The Annals of Ulster & The Annals of the Masters: 1182 & 905.


    PROGENITOR LINE OF THOMAS NOLAN (TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN), BALLINROBE CASTLE, MAYO CO. IRELAND - PRIOR TO 1585 RESIDED AT "THE CREVAGHE" (CREAGH CASTLE) PURCHASING ENNISCRONE CASTLE IN CO. SLIGO AFTER 1597 DYING 18 JUNE 1628.


    Tribes of the Érainn - Based on Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland: An Ethnography of the Gael A. D. 500 - 1750, by C. Thomas Cairney, Ph.D.


    CHAPTER VII: THE ÉRAINN.

    "The Érainn were the second of the Celtic groups to come to Ireland, as discussed in Chapter II. They arrived from the Continent between 500 and 100 B. C., and established their La Tène culture throughout the island as a military aristocracy possessing superior iron weapons technology. They were akin to the Belgae of Southwest Britain, and were generally known as the Ulaid in the North, and as the Erainn or Desi in the South, although all the tribes of this ethnic group were known ultimately to be Erainn. The great Erainnian population groups of around A. D. 600, such as the Muscraige of Munster, gave rise in the Middle Ages to the independently branched tribal groups that follow:" (45)


    CORCA LAOIGHDHE [CORCA LAIDHE: Descendants of Lugaid son of Ith].



    The above information is from Tribes of the Érainn - Based on Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland: An Ethnography of the Gael A. D. 500 - 1750, by C. Thomas Cairney, Ph.D.


    ANCESTRAL QUEST: CELTIC INVASIONS OF IRELAND, BY PATRICK LAVIN.

    The "Erainn (also known as Menapii, Bolgi, Belgae and Firbolgs) by annalists and historians, arrived after 500 B. C. They called their new home Eueriio, which would later evolve through the old Irish Eriu to Eire, and from Eire to Ireland. Claudius Ptolemy's map of ancient Ireland shows branches of the Erainn widely dispersed throughout the island, but with strongest connection in the areas around Cork and Kerry where they first settled. These tribes, more frequently called the Firbolgs, were, according to historian J. Rhys (1890), a seafaring people who wore breeches, wielded improved weapons and traced their origins to the goddess Bolg. Norman Mongan, in his well-researched book, Menapia Quest (1995), traces their origin to the Menappi, a confederation of Belgae Celts from north Gaul and the area now known as Belgium. Among the several tribes he identifies, were the Dal Riada of west Antrim and the Dal Fiatach of east Ulster. Both of these tribes, he believes, were granted Gaelic ancestry and thereafter identified only as Gaodhail (the last of the ancient Celtic invaders). Mongon suggests that many Firbolgs survived into early historic times as "tributary" tribes." (46) The above quote is from Ancestral Quest: Celtic Invasions of Ireland, by Patrick Lavin.


    CULLEN SURNAME ORIGINS PART III: O'CULLEN OF MUNSTER COMPILED BY JIM CULLEN.

    "The Corca Laoighdhe (Loigde, Loighdhe, Luighe) ... was an important early clan that ruled in Munster before the rise of the Eoghanact dynasty. They were of the Lugadian race from Lugaidh, son of Ith, an uncle of Milesius, and held their territory in Carbery in the west of County Cork. They are said to be the descendants of Lughaidh Laidhe (or Loigde), 22nd in descent from Ithe, uncle of Milesius. Lugaidhe MacCon, the grandson of Lughaidh Laidhe, was the 113th Monarch of Ireland from 195 A. D. to 225 A. D. The territory of the Corca Laoighdhe was approximately the diocese of Ross in southwest County Cork but they were later pushed further south [and east into present day Co. Kilkenny] with the rise of the Eoghanachta. The Corca Laoighdhe were likely from the stock of the Erainn people who arrived in Ireland about the 5th century B. C. Also known as the Menapii or Bolgi (Belgae, Firbolgs), the name of the Erainn people survived as the Old Irish Eriu, which then became Eire, the modern Irish form of the name of Ireland. The ruling sept of the Corca Laoighdhe was O'Driscoll while some other related septs were O'Coffey, O'Dinneen, O'Driscoll, O'Flynn, O'Fihelly, O'Hea, O'Hennessy, [O’HOLOHAN, (O'HUALLACHAIN)], and O'Leary.


    An early genealogy of the Corca Laoighdhe is cited as: Luigdech Loigde (for whom the Corca Laoighdhe is named), the son of Dairi [Doimtig] no Sirchrechtaig, the son of Sidebuilg, the son of Fir Suilne, the son of Tecmanrach, the son of Loga, the son of Eithlenn, the son of Luigdech, the son of Bregaind. Some of the early mentions of the Corca Laoighdhe in the Annals are: Flann Foirtrea, Lord of Corco Laigde, who died in 746; Maelbracha, son of Breslen, lord of Corca Loighdhe in the year 800; Bruadar, son of Dunlang, lord of Corca Loighdhe in the year 860; in 893 there is a note on the mortal wounding of the three sons of Duibhghilla, son of Bruadar (above), in the territory of the Deisi; and in 944 Finn, the son of Mutain, Lord of Corco Laighdhi was slain.” (47) The above quote is from Cullen Surname Origins Part III: O'Cullen of Munster Compiled by Jim Cullen.



    O'H-UALLACHAIN.

    "An early Clan Colgcan (Ua hUallachain) genealogy (Rawlinson): Mac Tíre Úa h-Uallacháin m. Cuiléoin m. Conchobuir m. Meic Thíre m. h-Uallacháin m. Fogartaich m. Cumascaig m. Colgcan m. Mugróin m. Flaind Dá Chongal m. Díumasaich m. Forannáin m. Congaile m. Máel h-Umai m. Cathail [m. Éogain] m. Bruidge m. Nath Í m. Rosa Failgi m. Cathaír Máir." (48) The above quote is from The Tribes of Laigen: Leinster Series - Clan Colgan.


    HY-MAINE

    Clan Cholgaín and the sept of Ua-hUallachain were noted as being in the Barony of Lower Philipstown, Daingean area, once known as Philipstown, Co. Offaly. O'h-Uallachain (Clan Cholgain) members were dispossessed of their land in Hy-Maine (Connaught) moving into other areas of Ireland: Dublin, Galway, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's Co. (Offaly), Mayo, Meath, and Westmeath. The historical evidence suggests that the sept of Ua-hUallachain and the ancestor of THOMAS NOLAN (Tomhas O'h-Uallachain) could have come from the Barony of Shillelogher in Co. Kilkenny. MICHAEL O'NOLAN of Co. Galway rebuilt and dedicated a burial tomb to his O'NOLAN ancestors of Loughboy after June 1473 that was first erected in the center of a Franciscan Friary Churchyard in Galway, 1394. The Loughboy referred to may have been in Co. Galway, Mayo, Offaly, or Kilkenny. It is my contention that this family of NOLAN'S descended from the O'H-UALLACHAIN sept living at Castleinch or Inchyolaghan in Co. Kilkenny prior to Strongbow (Richard de Clare) and the Anglo-Norman invasion. The close proximity of Castleinch or Inse Ui Uallachán, O' Holohan's holm, in the Barony of Shillelogher, Co. Kilkenny to the ancestral home of the UA NUALLAIN or NOWLAN'S in Forth Barony, Co. Carlow leads this researcher to believe that this family of O'H-UALLACHAIN (NOLAN) could be genealogically related to the UA NUALLAIN or NOWLAN'S of that county through the marriage of LANDABARIA, daughter of CATHAIR MAR, 109th Monarch of Ireland, who married CONN-CEADCATHE or Conn of the Hundred Battles, 110th Monarch of Ireland, who's brother EOCHA FIONN FOHART was ancestor of O'NOWLAN, the lord or prince of the "Foharta" in the Baronies of Forth in the counties of Wexford and Carlow.


    The discovery at Ballon Hill, Co. Carlow of “a huge boulder which appears to have been the capstone of a dolmen is said by archaeologists to mark the burial place of CATHAIR MOR, High King of Ireland in 177 A. D. and of many generations of Kings before him.” (49) The close proximity of this Co. Kilkenny family of O'H-UALLACHAIN (NOLAN) to the ancient burial site is significant when considering the genealogical relationship between the Co. Kilkenny and Carlow NOLAN’S. “Historians and archaeologists have described the collection of urns, and artifacts discovered there as being representative of nearly a thousand years of pre history (1300 - 500 B. C.)” (50) The above two quotes are from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, iii.


    It is a distinct possibility that this family of O'H-UALLACHAIN (NOLAN) migrated from the Castleinch, Athnowen, Co. Cork area to Kilkenny and then into Galway, or they moved to Hy-Maine, Offaly, and west into Galway and Mayo County. Table 1 of the Catalogue of Artifacts from the National Museum of Ireland Topographical Files of Appendix D: Archaeology and Cultural Heritage County Kilkenny lists a destroyed burial mound and unburnt human bones found at the Loughboy, Co. Kilkenny site.


    Correspondence in 2004-05 from Isabella Mulhall, Irish Antiquities Division, National Museum of Ireland regarding Loughboy burial mound and the Castleinch Medieval Jug are below with the donation of a plain bronze finger-ring found near Loughboy. Isabella Mulhall, IAD, NMI also discusses excavation of the Loughboy Ringfort and subsequent discovery of nineteen remains in 1998.


    2004.


    "Loughboy burial mound: At least ten individuals were uncovered here when the mound was bulldozed by a Mr. Nolan in 1957. The burials lay E - W, 9 or 10 inches below the surface, close to one another. The remains were presented to the National Museum of Ireland on 19 August 1957 by a Mrs. M. Phelan, County Hospital. Unfortunately, no work has been done on the individuals and therefore, no date has been established. There were no known associated artifacts with the burials, which would assist with dating either. Nothing is known of the mound as it was bulldozed so rapidly (before an assessment could be done). Castleinch Jug: The Castleinch Jug is housed in Rothe House, Kilkenny City and for this reason does not have a National Museum of Ireland registration number. The jug was published in the Old Kilkenny Review Journal in 1977." (51)



    2004.


    "Unfortunately, the skeletons from Loughboy have not been examined and it is not possible to determine sex/age etc. It is hoped that some time in the future, when necessary resources and funding are available, that these individuals will be examined. Because of the find circumstances of the individuals (found during bulldozing of the mound) much, if not all, of the scientific data associated with them has been lost i.e. the mound was not scientifically or systematically excavated. We currently have a team of researchers working on "The Unpublished Burials Project" here in the National Museum of Ireland and the Loughboy Mound has received a mention in their text. Owing to the absence of excavation information/contextual information for the skeletons, it was decided not to choose the Loughboy skeletons (or skeletons from similar circumstances) for analysis. The researchers/osteoarchaeologists instead chose to examine the human remains from over 100 other sites from where scientific data had been gleaned." (52)



    23 May 2005.


    "The [Loughboy Ringfort] burials that were excavated in 1998 are currently housed in our Museum Stores in our sister site at Collins Barracks. They will not form part of our Unpublished Burials Project and this project essentially deals with excavations carried out by National Museum of Ireland staff over the years. Mr. Eamonn Cotter, who excavated the remains in 1998, is not an NMI staff member. Should you wish to consult his report on his excavation at Loughboy, you should contact the Archive Section of the National Monuments Division of the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government (DOEHLG). (All their contact details are on their Website). This section is responsible for the licensing of archaeological excavations in the Republic of Ireland and house all the reports relating to such excavations." (53)



    APPENDIX D: ARCHAEOLOGY AND CULTURAL HERITAGE - TABLE 1: CATALOGUE OF ARTIFACTS FROM NATIONAL MUSEUM OF IRELAND TOPOGRAPHICAL FILES COUNTY KILKENNY.

    No., Townland, OS 6" Sheet, Co-ordinates, Reg. No., Acquisition, Monument, Artifact.



    DATABASE OF IRISH EXCAVATIONS REPORTS.

    The Database of Irish Excavations Reports also lists the remains of nineteen individuals uncovered at the ringforts of Loughboy, Co. Kilkenny in 1998.



    "Testing and subsequent full excavation were carried out on foot of archaeological conditions imposed on a grant of planning permission by Kilkenny County Council to IDA Ireland for the construction of an industrial and business park at Loughboy, Co. Kilkenny. The conditions were necessary because of two circular enclosures shown in the area on the 1st edition 6-inch OS map but not now visible above ground. A report in the files of the National Museum of Ireland refers to the destruction of the two ringforts in the area in 1937, as well as the discovery of human remains. Test excavations were carried out under this licence in May 1998 by Sarah McCutcheon, during which archaeological features were uncovered. Full excavation followed in November 1998.


    The enclosures lay on two low knolls on undulating ground with a general northwards slope towards Kilkenny City, which lies c. 1.5 km to the north and is clearly visible from the site. Despite extensive exploratory trenching no definite trace was found of the more easterly of the two sites (SMR 19:41). The depiction of this area in the 1945 edition of the 6-inch OS map suggests that the landscape had been modified, possibly by gravel quarrying. This is borne out by the evidence of landfill in the area in the form of extensive deposits of loose stone in a dark brown, loamy matrix containing fragments of brick and modern earthenware pottery.


    The surviving remains of the most westerly site (SMR 19:40) comprise the base of a circular fosse enclosing an area c. 30m in diameter, with an entrance facing north. The fosse varied from 1m to 1.2m wide and from 0.53m to 0.65m deep, with a steep-sided V-shaped profile. The fill of the fosse contained a considerable quantity of animal bone. A secondary 'loop' ditch was also present, forming a subrectangular extension to the main site on the south, south-east and east sides.


    The only original features that survived within the ringfort were three charcoal spreads in the southern half of the enclosure. These contained some slag and molten metal, and close to one a fragment of a decorated bone comb was recovered. The latter compares well with Dunlevy's class C1, which she dates to the 4th-7th centuries AD.


    In addition a number of human skeletons were found, concentrated in the south-east quadrant of the site. These were uncovered immediately below the topsoil. Many were in a fragmentary condition, probably because of the destruction of the site in 1937, but it appears that at least nineteen individuals were represented. Several of the skeletons were interred in the fill of the fosse, indicating that they post-dated the ringfort. The exact date of the skeletons is not yet known.


    Eamonn Cotter, Ballynanelagh, Rathcormac, Co. Cork." (54)


    DATABASE OF IRISH EXCAVATIONS REPORTS.


    "The site lies in the townland of Loughboy in St Patrick's Parish, Co. Kilkenny. Two enclosure sites (SMR 19:40 and 19:41) are marked on the area of the proposed development. Test excavation by Sarah McCutcheon and later full excavation by Eamonn Cotter (see No. 362 above) established the presence of these features in the subsoil. This monitoring licence was for the stripping of topsoil in the south-east and north-east of the site, away from the enclosures. Initially work was carried out by Joanna Wren and John Purcell, and then Martin Reid took over the work and the licence.


    No archaeological features were uncovered during the soil clearance work. Incidental finds included a clay pipe bowl, one sherd of post-medieval pottery and one sherd of late 13th/14th-century Leinster ware, like that found at nearby Kilferagh (Hurley 1987). Reference Hurley, M. F. 1987 A corn-drying kiln at Kiferagh, Co. Kilkenny. In R. M. Cleary, M. F. Hurley and E. Twohig (eds), The archaeology of the Cork-Dublin gas pipeline. University College Cork.


    Joanna Wren and Martin Reid, c/o The Mile Post, Waterford." (55)


    Journal of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society, Vol. I., No. 4 - Castleinch Medieval Jug.


    Click Image to Enlarge.

    Castleinch Medieval Jug Photo 2.

    Castleinch Medieval Jug Elevation Photo.


    "There was one stray find recorded from the townland of Castleinch or Inchyolaghan in the adjacent townland to the north-east [Castleinch Castle]. This comprised an almost complete medieval ceramic jug described below:



    Acquisition Record: Description - Almost complete wheel-thrown jug in buff pink ware. The core is darker in colour and contains small mica flecks. A few dark grey pebble grits (up to 3 mm) appear on the outer surface near the base. Globular body with cylindrical neck. The latter is rilled externally. Rounded rim with raised ridge underneath. The rim is provided with a pinched out pouring lip. The strap handle, rectangular in cross section, bears marked finger tip impressions at the junction with the rim. Two lighter impressions occur at the lower junction. The handle is ornamental with three deeply incised grooves along its length. Base convex externally and the junction of wall and base is pinched downward by a series of spaced oval thumb impressions. The body bears an uneven sprinkled on copper green glaze which is yellow where the glaze runs thin, especially near the base. Height 24.50 cm; Diameter at rim 10 cm; Maximum Diameter 21 cm; Diameter of base 15 cm; Average body thickness 5 mm. The object was found on the site of Castleinch Castle at a depth of 12 feet." (56) The above quote is from The People's Millennium Forests.


    JRSAI VIII (1864-1866).

    THE JOURNAL OF THE KILKENNY AND SOUTH-EAST OF IRELAND ARCHÆOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Vol. V NEW SERIES 1864-66.

    Part I 1864.


    Proceedings: Donation of a plain bronze finger-ring found near Loughboy, near Kilkenny, 7.


    It is always a possibility, however, that Loughboy may have been in the "Lough Boora Parklands centrally located in County Offaly and 5 km north of Kilcormac." (57) It encompasses some 5,500 acres of cutaway bogland opening into vast parkland. "The area itself is the site of the former Lough Boora - now established as an early Mesolithic site of some 8,500 years ago." (58) The above two quotes are from Irish Midlands Ancestry: Offaly Landscape.


    OFFALY HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY: FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE 13TH CENTURY.

    ANCIENT TIMES.

    "About 120 A. D. Cathair Mor, King of Leinster, became powerful enough to be designated 'Ard-Rí Éireann' by the Four Masters in the Annals. He had ten sons, and the eldest, Ros Fáilghe ("of the rings"), was given the territory of North Offaly which today is known as Uí Fáilghe. From this Ros the O'Conor Sept is descended. They ruled the area until late in the 16th century." (59) O'H-UALLACHAIN, the Irish form of the name Holohan, is common to the Counties of Kilkenny, Laois and Offaly. The above quote is from Offaly History & Archaeology: From the Earliest Times to the 13th Century.


    CLANS AND FAMILIES OF IRELAND AND SCOTLAND: VIII. THE LAIGIN, 82-83.

    "The Clann Cholgan included the families of MacColgan, O’Hennessy and O’HOLOHAN. The MacColgan's (Mac Colgan) were chiefs of the territory around Kilcolgan in the extreme northeast of County Offaly. The O’Hennessy's (O hAonghusa) [meaning descendant of Aonghus or Angus] shared the lordship of Clann Cholgan (i.e., their clan-name was applied to the territory they possessed) with their kinsmen the O’HOLOHAN'S (O hUallachain). Their territory comprised the present barony of Lower Philipstown, a district adjoining the hill of Croghan, near Kilbeggan, and lying just east of the O’Connor's in northeast Offaly." (60) The above quote is from Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland: VIII. The Laigin, 82-83.


    OLD CROGHAN MAN - JUNE 2003 - DISCOVERED IN BOG - CROGHAN HILL - NORTH OF DAINGEAN - CO. OFFALY.

    IRISH DYNASTIES OF THE MIDE AND BREGA AREA IN THE 12TH CENTURY.


    DAINGEAN.

    "Daingean, once known as Philipstown, is on the Grand Canal 14 km east of Tullamore, and was the administrative centre for Offaly (King's County) until Tullamore took over in 1834. Five km due north of Daingean near the village of Croghan is Croghan Hill, an extinct volcano, which offers fine views of the surrounding countryside, with some burial cairns and Bronze Age earthworks." (61) The above quote is from Irish Midlands Ancestry: Offaly Towns, Villages & Places of Interest.


    KILBEGGAN, DAINGEAN, CROGHAN, KILCORMAC, CO. OFFALY.

    Croghan Hill, Co. Offaly Photo.

    Croghan Hill, Co. Offaly Photo 2.


    O'HOLOHAN AREAS OF IRELAND.

    COUNTY KILKENNY, IRELAND: HISTORY & TIMELINE OF EVENTS.


    * The above quote is from Old Irish Kingdoms: A Supplement to Ireland History in Maps.



    The above timeline of events for Co. Kilkenny supports my contention that this family of NOLAN'S descended from the O'H-UALLACHAIN sept living at Castleinch or Inchyolaghan in County Kilkenny prior to Strongbow (RICHARD DE CLARE) and the Anglo-Norman invasion. THOMAS NOLAN (TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN) of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, Ireland appears to have descended from this small sept of O'NUALLAIN belonging to the Corca Laidhe group that originally settled in County Cork and Kerry. These events also fit with the marriage of LANDABARIA, daughter of CATHAIR MAR, 109th Monarch of Ireland, who married CONN-CEADCATHE or Conn of the Hundred Battles, 110th Monarch of Ireland, who's brother EOCHA FIONN FOHART was ancestor of O'NOWLAN, the lord or prince of the "Foharta" in the Baronies of Forth in the counties of Wexford and Carlow.



    An interesting archaeological find "in the townland of Castleinch, or Inchyolaghan, in the parish of Castleinch, 4 km south-west of Kilkenny City" (63) was the discovery of "a partially truncated fulacht fiadh with stratified burnt mound continuing east of the area of excavation. The site contained two troughs, a possible working surface, a mound of unused boiling stones, a buried sod and a smaller boiling pit. The underlying limestone bedrock was covered by yellow/brown boulder clay, with areas of iron-panning.


    Trough A was to the north-west of the site and was an irregular ovoid or pear-shaped pit with vertical north and east sides, a straight, steep southern side and a flat base. It was 1.1m long, 0.75m wide and 0.5m deep, orientated north-east/south-west, but was possibly recut and may have originally been circular or square. It contained a primary silting of fine, grey sand with charcoal, sealed by large, sub-rounded stones (sandstone cobbles: 20% fire-cracked) and fragmented cattle bone in grey/black, silty sand, possibly representing the last firing of this trough. This in turn was sealed by an upper backfill of burnt mound material.


    Trough B was 3m south-east of, and post-dated, Trough A. It was a shallow, subrectangular pit with square profile and flat base, measuring 1.8m+ in excavated length, 1.5m in width and 0.25m in depth. Four post-holes and two stake-holes were cut into the base of this trough around the western edge in an irregular pattern, and two were cut across the centre, possibly representing the staves or sails of a decayed or removed wooden lining. Each post-hole was filled by a grey/black, silty clay with fire-cracked stone and charcoal. All these cuts had tapering profiles, suggesting that the uprights they contained were sharpened. The trough was filled by a single, uniform backfill of burnt mound material, the basal part of which was substantially wetter than the upper part, suggesting that the trough successfully cut below the water-table.


    An oval pit with concave profile was found north of Trough B, within the area of the burnt mound. It was over 0.6m long, 0.5m wide and 0.2m deep, orientated east-west. It contained a dark grey/brown, sandy silt clay with occasional fire-cracked stone, charcoal and gravel and produced a possible bronze swan-necked pin.


    A scattered area of similar-sized, partially heat-affected sandstone (with very occasional limestone measuring less than 0.2m) represented a collection of unused boiling stones (C18). The stone, selected for geology and size, was heated but not cracked through contact with cold water and therefore either not used in the boiling process or used only once in the latter stages of the simmering process and not reused.


    An intermittent layer of mid-brown, silty clay (C19) lay north-east of the stone scatter and represented a soil dump, possibly associated with a residual buried sod, measuring 2m in exposed length, 1.5m in width and 0.1m in depth.


    A possible platform or working surface was found to the east of Trough B, covering C18 and C19. The surface consisted of a compacted area of redeposited, natural boulder clay with occasional charcoal flecks, measuring 4m in exposed length, 3m in exposed width and 0.2m in depth.


    The partly truncated oblong and concave mound sealed these features and continued under the baulk to the west. The mound (which was not visible before excavation) covered an area of over 10m north-south, 7m+ east-west, with a truncated depth of 0.45m, and was made up of fire-cracked sandstone (0.1-0.25m in individual diameter), charcoal and silt. Within the top of the mound were isolated lenses of dark grey clay, 0.1m thick. These and the mound were sealed by a layer of compacted, grey/brown, friable, silty sand with charcoal, gravel and fire-cracked stone, 3m in diameter, 0.1m deep, possibly representing a buried sod line or soil dump." (64) The above two quotes are from Excavations: Database of Irish Excavation Reports.


    "Fulachta fiadh were an integral part of the prehistoric landscape in Ireland, they provide significant evidence of activity in areas with little artifact deposition. They also form the biggest number of a single prehistoric monument in Ireland and over the years have generated much interest in the archaeological world. Yet the purpose of fulachta fiadh is still unclear even though many major studies have been undertaken on them.


    Nearly 50 years ago some experimental archaeology was conducted to support a theory that fulachta fiadh were cooking sites (O’Kelly, 1954). This particular experiment proved very successful but, many people still refused to accept that the sole purpose of a fulacht fian was to cook. In 1987 it was argued that fulachta fiadh were used as bathing sites similar in a sense to a Roman or Turkish bath (Barfield and Hodder, 1987).


    In 1991 some observations were published highlighting the fact that fulachta fiadh are exceedingly suitable for textile production (Jeffery, 1991). More recently in East Anglian Fens, Jo Roberts has found evidence that in England at least fulachta fiadh have been used as burial sites and may have had some ritual purpose. She uncovered a “burnt mound with a crouched inhumation?"(Roberts, 1998)." (65) The above quote is from Fulachta Fiadh – An Irish Mystery.


    KILKENNY CITY.
    Loughboy: Dark Green Shaded Area (Lower Right).

    TOWNLANDS OF COUNTY KILKENNY, IRELAND.

    Townland, Acres, Barony, Parish, PLU in 1857.



    Map of the Baronies and Civil Parishes of County Kilkenny.


    The ancestor of THOMAS NOLAN (Tomhas O'h-Uallachain) must certainly be UALLACHAN or NUALLAIN of Clan Colgan. His descendants undoubtedly migrated to County Galway after being ousted from their residence of "Castleinch or Inchyolaghan or in Irish "Caisleán na hInse" meaning "the castle of the holm" or "Inse Ui Uallachán" meaning "O' Holohan's holm" (Kilkenny Archaeological Society p.178) [with] "Inch" or "Inis" [meaning], an island; a low meadow along a river (Joyce 1856, 52). Castleinch was an important fief in the barony (Nolan and Whelan 1990, 77). The parish [of Castleinch] contains 448 acres. The ancient church surrounded by the churchyard is in ruins. A modern Protestant churchyard, now long closed to divine service, is by the site and encloses the tombs of the Earls of Desart in a sad state of neglect. The ruined castle is in the opposite side of the road from the church." (66) The above quote is from The People's Millennium Forests.


    Map of Ireland c. 1200: Norman Invasion -Territories - Surnames.


    "Following the death of Dermot MacMurrough in 1171, the Irish King of Leinster, the Anglo-Norman leader Strongbow (Richard de Clare) became the Lord of Leinster (which now included Ossory) through his marriage to Dermot's daughter. Strongbow initiated grants of land to some of his followers, including Miles Fitz David (the cantred of Iverk), Adam de Hereford (the cantred of Aghaboe), and Griffin fitz William (likely the cantred of Knocktopher). In 1192 William Marshall succeeded Strongbow as Lord of Leinster and continued the process of land grants within the province. Most of central Ossory was shared among William's knights. Geoffrey FitzRobert was given the cantred of Kells; Thomas FitzAnthony, the cantred of Ogenti; John de Erlee in succession to Baldwin de Hamptonsford, the cantred of Erley; and William Marshall retained the cantreds of Callan and Kilkenny for his own. The other cantreds were divided among a number of lesser knights as well as to the bishop of Ossory. The cantred of Shillelogher was divided among the families of Grace (le Gros) of Tullaroan, St Leger of Tullaghanbrogue, de Valle of Ballybur and Castleinch, fitz Gerald of Burnchurch, and Avenal of Kilferagh." (67) The above quote is from Ossory to the County of Kilkenny Ireland.


    The ancestor file of UALLACHAN or NUALLAIN of Clan Colgan up to and including MUGRON of Clan Colgan, ancestor of O'H-UALLACHAIN or HOOLAHAN, can be found at Human Family Project: O'H-UALLACHAIN. A more detailed ancestor tree of UALLACHAN or NUALLAIN of Clan Colgan can be found at: Human Family Project - 1339. The Barony of Shillelogher in County Kilkenny is located on the below map of the Baronies of Leinster close to the ancestral home of the O'NOLAN'S: Carlow and Forth.


    Map of the Baronies of Leinster.


    CATHAIR MAIR & HIS DESCENDANTS.
    O'CONNOR, O'DEMPSEY, O'H-UALLACHAIN, O'HENNESSY, OULAHAN, O'MADDEN, HOOLAHAN, NOLAN, & OTHERS.

    CATHAIR MAR, CATHAIR MOR, or CATHIRE MOR 109th Monarch of Ireland, King of Leinster had a daughter LANDABARIA who married CONN-CEADCATHE or Conn of the Hundred Battles, 110th Monarch of Ireland, who's brother EOCHA FIONN FOHART was ancestor of O'NOWLAN, the lord or prince of the "Foharta" in the Baronies of Forth in the counties of Wexford and Carlow.


    O'CONNOR.


    O'DEMPSEY.


    Medical and genetic research into Idiopathic Torsion Dystonia (ITD) suggests its primary manifestation is through paternal inheritance. GENATLAS: Gene Database does have TOR1A (DYT1) early-onset Dystonia listed as Y-linked. DYT7 is also Y-linked. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught has a genetic history of Dystonia. The video of a handcuffed disabled man with Dystonia, JOHN DEMPSEY, tasered by Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Kamloops, B. C., RCMP Watch, 10 March 2008, supports the genealogical and genetic relatedness of these two Irish septs: O'Diomasaighe (O'DEMPSEY) and O'Huallachain (O'NOLAN). DUNNE (O’Doinn) (O’Doyne) is also an Irish surname. The Dunn Sept of County Laois & Kildare is a prominent branch of the Ui Failghe, (Ophaley or Offaly), which branched into the O’Diomasach (O’DEMPSEY) and O’DUNNE. An article in the 16 June 2008 edition of the Detroit News focused on JASON DUNN and his battle with early-onset childhood dystonia, which links these three Irish septs genealogically and genetically: Clann Colgcan (Cholgaín) (Ua HUALLACHAIN), Clann Máellugra (O'DEMPSEY), and the Uí Riacáin (O'DUNNE).


    O'H-UALLACHAIN, HOOLAHAN, O'NOLAN, (NOLAN).


    O'HENNESSY.


    IRISH PEDIGESS, 487-88.

    HOOLAHAN (No. 2) OF CLAN COLGAN, KING'S COUNTY.

    Arms: Gu. a lion ramp, ar. armed and langued as between two sword points upwards of the second, pommels and hills or, one in bend dexter, the other in bend sinister.


    MUGRON, a brother of Cineth who is No. 99 on the "Dempsey" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'h-Uallachain, of Clan Colgan; anglicised Holahan, and Hoolahan.



    HOOLAHAN. (No. 3) CHIEFS OF SIO(A)L ANMCHADA IN HY-MAINE.


    Arms: Az. a tower or, supported by two lions ramp, ar, in base two crescents of the last, on a chief of the third three annulets gu.


    Of OULAHAN (a Branch of this family) the Arms are: Az. two lions argent, supporting a Castle of four turrets of the second, or in the centre chief point a cross gu. in base two crescents* argent, and in chief three annulets gules. Crest:* A domi-savage, handcuffed.


    FLANCHADH [FLANCHA], brother of COBTHACH who is No. 100 on the "O'MADDEN" (of Connaught) pedigree, was the ancestor of O'h-Uallachain: anglicised O'Hoolahan, Hoolahan, Oulahan, etc.


    * Crescent: The "crescent" is the distinctive mark of the second branch of a family, In this case "O'Madden" (a branch of "O'Kelly" of Hy-Maine, Ireland) is the head family.


    * Crest: See "Fairbairn's crests," Plate 10. O'Dugan in his Topography, says; "A rough fettering lord of distinguished valour is O'h-Uallachain." "O'Kelly" of Hy-Maine has this crest; and so have "O'Kelly," "Hollyland," and "Holyland" in England: a fact which would go to prove that "Hollyland" and "Holyland" are Houlahan disguised; and that "O'Kelly," of England, is a branch of "O'Kelly" of Hy-Maine. For another crest of "O'Kelly" of Hy-Maine, see Burke's "General Armory."


    *O'h-Uallachain: After this family was disposed of their territory in Hy-Maine, in Connaught, branches of them settled in Dublin, Galway, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's County, Mayo, Meath, and Westmeath; and assumed one or other of the following surnames: Colaghan, Coolscan, Coolaghan, Halahan, Halegan, Halligan, Holsban, Holhans, Holligane, Holighan, Holland, Holligan, Hoolaghan, Hoolaghane, Hoolahan, Houlaghan, Houlaghane, Houlahan, Howlegan, Howlan, Hulegan, Huolaghane, Olehan, Oulahan, Oullaghan, Oullahan, Woolahan, and Merrie, Merry, FitzMerry, Mac-Merry, NOLAN (of Mayo), NOLAND (in England), Proud, Proude, Soople, Suple, Supple, Vain, Vane, Whelton, and Wilton.



    The above information is from Irish Pedigrees, 487-88. The quote below is from Irish Pedigrees, 858.


    "O'H-UALLACHAIN - MACUALLACHAIN, MACCUOLAHAN, CUOLAHAN, NOLAN*


    * This is not the NOLAN or NOWLAN family, which, at the time of the Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland, was transplanted from the county of Waterford to the county of Galway." (69)


    "... A branch of the NOLAN'S migrated to Connaught [Province] and became extensive landowners in Counties Mayo and Galway, in which counties the name is not uncommon to-day." (70) THOMAS NOLAN (Tomhas O'h-Uallachain) of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, Ireland appears to have descended from "a small sept of O'Nuallain belonging to the Corca Laidhe group. (Possibly the NOLAN'S of west Munster to-day stem from them). These, however, for some reason not apparent, were often called O'h Ullachain - thus in Lynche's De Praesulibus (1672) the two names are treated as interchangeable. In this connexion it may be mentioned that, according to Woulfe, O'h Uallachain is anglicized NOLAN in north Connaught. As KNOWLAN and KNOWLAND this name is noted in the "census" of 1659 as numerous in Longford and in the adjacent baronies of Co. Westmeath." (71) The above two quotes are from the Dunn Sept Association.


    GALWAY.

    City of Galway.

    DESCRIPTION OF THE OLD MAP OF GALWAY.

    “And in the fifth, the armorial bearings of the families of FALLONE, Labarth, NOLAN, Quinne, Tully and Porte, with the following inscription underwritten: Conscripti cives hi gaudent legibus urbis, Quos falcit et fratres connubialis amor." Translation: Our common rights, these, late enfranchised, prove, And claim a kindred thro' connubial love. (72) The above quote and translation is from James Hardiman’s History of Galway, 1820 Chapter One at Description of the Old Map of Galway.


    The above words refer to the fourteen tribes or families of Galway. Late enfranchised most definitely relates to this NOLAN family, which did not become enfranchised under English law until the year 1500 with the change of status for DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN). Presumably, MICHAEL O’NOLAN could also be characterized a freeman since he has been described as a merchant of Galway, 1473. Connubial love meaning marriage relates to this NOLAN family through the union of DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) and JULIAN FALLON, daughter of ANDREW FALLON. ANDREW FALLON was obviously a freeman through marriage or birth into the fourteen tribes of Galway and petitioned the Corporation of Galway for freeman status for his son-in-law as described below. The son or grandson of this DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN), THOMAS NOLAN (TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN), of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo also married into the fourteen tribes of Galway. AGNES MARTIN, the wife of THOMAS NOLAN (TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN), descends from NICHOLAS MARTIN. The MARTIN family was one of the original fourteen tribes of Galway and claim descent from the Norman Crusader, OLYVER MARTIN. Incidentally, this MARTYN family was established in Devon and Exeter in England as early as the Norman Conquest as noted in the Visitation of the County of Devon, 1620 authored by Vivian, John Lambrick and published by Henry S. Eland, Exeter, 1895. The intermarriage of the MARTYN and NOLAN families in Galway may have occurred very early in the thirteenth century, which in turn may have given rise to the KNOWLAN (KNOLLIN) lineage from Exeter and Devon in southwest England.



    Ancient Wall of Galway City.

    MICHAEL O'NOLAN OF GALWAY - 1473; ESTIMATED BIRTH: 1410-1440.


    * This quote is from Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 277.


    DESCENDANTS OF DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) & WIFE, JULIAN FALLON, OF GALWAY, 1500.

    * "3. The DeBurgo-O'Malley chalice dated 1494, now in the National Museum is believed to have been made in Galway. There are no makers' marks on this chalice, but it is possible that it was made by DONILL O'NOLAN, a local goldsmith. The inscription on the chalice reads "Thomas De Burgo et Granunia ni Malle me fieri fecerunt Anno Domini MCCCCLXXXXIV". (74)


    * Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLVI. (1994), Mulveen, Jack: Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Wares, 62.



    * "Donell Óge" means Young Donell and has been represented as DONELL O'NOLAN, Junior. Thus DONNELL O'NOLAN, Senior may have been a nephew or brother to MICHAEL O'NOLAN, Galway, 1473. DONNELL O'NOLAN, Senior may have even been the father of both men. The above entry represents an owner holding under feudal tenure. It was extracted from The Annals of Connacht: "The Annals" Tell the Story of Galway, and Galway Corporation Book A as shown below.


    GALWAY ADVERTISER.

    Did the Tribes of Galway speak Irish? The Old English colony and the 'mere Irish.'

    "James Hardiman, the historian of Galway, gave this account of the Tribes of Galway in about the year 1820:


    "From the earliest period, they were celebrated for commerce, and for many centuries were classed amongst the most considerable merchants of Europe. Their wealth was consequently great, and the ample landed properties, which they gradually acquired by purchase, from the native Irish, throughout the Province of Connaught, are now enjoyed by their numerous and opulent posterity. During the earlier periods of their career, they carefully avoided all connexion with their surrounding neighbours; in consequence of which, added to the circumstance of the town being so remotely situated from the more civilized parts of the kingdom, the inhabitants were necessarily obliged to intermarry amongst themselves, and in progress of time, their degrees of kindred so increased that they became, as it were, one family, and in many instances, it was a difficult matter to effect a marriage amongst them, without an ecclesiastical dispensation".


    Hardiman's narrative, however, requires both comment and qualification. It is true that intermarriage was very frequent, but the reasons behind it had as much to do with retaining property within the confines of the main families as it did with distance from 'civilization'.


    Furthermore, marriages were made, from an early date, with the native Irish. For example, in “Corporation Book A , a note appears in the minutes of the council in 1500 that at "the request made by ANDRAUE FFALLON, on the behalf of his doughter, JULIAN FALLON, who is married to DONILL OGE OVOLLOGHAN of this same town, goldsmith, and for the better relieffe of the said ANDROWE FFALLON, who is old and impotente, it is condescendid and agreid by us, the said Mayor and Bailyvvis and combrethern of Galwy, aforsaid, that the said DONILL OVOLLOGHAN shalbe acceptid, taken and receivd in to our ffredoms, and lik as and acordingly oure previledges and chartors, had and obtaynid of suffraynis Kinges of ancient (times). And by vertu therof we, the said Mayor and Bayleffes, with oure combrethern, have gyvin and grauntid unto the said DONYLL ffredome and ffre liberties in as ampull and lardg manner as we grauntid to anny other ffreman made by us and by thes presents we do gyve and graunt to the said DONYLL his ffredome and ffredom and ffre liberties as well within this town, as also within and without the fraunchies and ffre liberties of the same".


    [“And by these presents the said DONIALL shall and may ocupie the trade of merchandice and all manner warres in lading and discharding of his goodes, warres, and merchandice into forayn realmis and from thence into this town of Galwey, and after the transporting of the same to sell the said warres and merchandice and make sellis thereof as well by grosse as retaylle, and thus to use the ffredoms and liberties of the same town as all other ffremen doth without leat or truble of any person or persons, the said DONILL answering the Comons acordingly ther costoms acording his vocation from tyme to tyme. In wittnes whereof we the said Stevn Arture Lynch, Mayor, and ouer Bayllys, Jamis Linch and Nicholas Frenc[h], with the rest of our Counsaill, have set hereunto our signes.-[Undated.]”* (75)

    The distance Hardiman states the Tribes maintained from the native Irish was never as complete as his statement would imply. Although the creation of the Wardenship was a deliberate move to separate the ecclesiastical control of Galway from the Irish-staffed archdiocese of Tuam, in many other areas of life, the ruling families of the town mingled closely with their Irish neighbours and fellow townsfolk. In fact, as Seamus O Cathain pointed out in his excellent article Galway - 'An ancient colony of English' (Studies, 1940), "In spite of all the laws (discriminating against the non-English residents), the life of the town was too closely linked with the countryside, too dependent on it, to escape its influence. Not only did the town depend for its essential foods on traffic with the country, its trade was mainly a matter of exporting country produce - wool, hides, corn, and wood formed the bulk of the export trade - or of collecting that produce and preparing in the Galway workshops for export. As trade relations of this kind developed, we may be sure that the merchants saw to it that a good deal of this produce was paid for, not with money but with the commodities they were importing in ever increasing quantities - wine mainly, but iron also and salt, and...there was a very lively if underground trade in guns and other munitions".


    O Cathain points to an even more significant body of evidence strongly suggesting that the Tribes and their native Irish neighbours mixed more regularly than Hardiman implies - the use of the Irish language in the town.


    Although he observes that "Irish was never officially recognised" and "that the proceedings of the Corporation were conducted in English", from the general necessity of communicating with the tradesmen and 'unfree' townsmen, the Tribe families "probably knew at least enough Irish to carry on trade negotiations in that language." However, he argues that a strong case can be made for claiming that Irish was used more commonly and more naturally by the Tribe families than simply for business purposes. For example, there is the famous Ordinance of Henry VIII "enjoining the people of Galway to learn to speak English", which, taken together with the statement of historian John Lynch, in his Alithinologia (c. mid-17th century), "that the settlers differed in no way from the 'meer antient Irish' ", and "that they were as Irish as the old inhabitants, whose customs and language they adopted", certainly supports the contention that the Tribes used Irish in the course of daily life. O Cathain also draws attention to the fact - curious if Irish was not commonly spoken - "that many members of the great town families adopted Irish soubriquets such as Duff, Oge and Roe.. Many of them, too, used an Irish form of their names", and he concludes that this "is a very different matter from the use of occasional Irish words in the Corporation records". To the objection that these Irish soubriquets were "bestowed on them by the lower, Irish-speaking classes", he replies, "even if such were the case, why did they adopt them and use them in official business?" On the same lines, he notes the frequent Irish place-names found on the famous mid-17th century map, allegedly drawn for the Duke of Lorraine c.1650, such as "The lyon's tower, called Tor an Leoin"; one of the city gates "called in Sparra hier"; "Earl Street, or Sraid an Iarlagh"; "St. Mary's hill, called Cnucka in Tampeill Mirca"; "The whirlpool river, with the whirlpool, called Poultuofil", and "The salt lake, called Lough-an-Stale".


    "Admittedly", O Cathain notes," all these might have been simply the names given by the Irish-speaking classes, but why did the Corporation adopt them? Not for the Prince surely? What interest would a foreign prince have in such outlandish names. Could it not be argued that the members of the Corporation felt that the Irish names were the real names, the names in daily use, and that as such they should be included in the map?"


    Finally, in a note, O Cathain raises the perhaps obvious but generally neglected question, when did the Tribes learn to speak and write English?


    When they arrived in Connacht, they would have spoken Norman - French, and during the chaos of the 14th and early 15th centuries, Galway was virtually cut off from English influence. It is in this connection that Henry VIII's insistence that the people of Galway learn English finds its proper context.


    "For the furtherance of your weal, profit, and commodity, and the extirpation of all abuses, we command you to observe the devices ensuing perpetually....


    "That the inhabitants endeavour to speak English and use themselves after the English fashion, and specially that you do put forth your children to school to learn to speak English."


    The clear implication of this command is that the Old English inhabitants of Galway were not endeavouring to speak English, nor were they much troubled to "use themselves after the English fashion". Furthermore, that the citizens were not over concerned with their children learning "to speak English". Even if the king was not altogether accurately informed about the condition of the English language in the town, it does not make sense to command something to be done unless it is, in fact, not being done.


    Thus, so far from the English language being the lingua franca of the town of Galway in 1536, the evidence suggests that it was primarily used for official purposes, such as the records of the corporation and council meetings. We may imagine the Tribe families speaking a polyglot form of Norman-French - a kind of 'franglais' - with a certain proportion of 14th and 15th century English. Latin, we know, was also used for many official and ecclesiastical matters. Finally, there can be no doubt that the merchants of Galway spoke and probably wrote enough Irish to conduct their daily affairs and business dealings with the 'mere' Irish among whom they lived, traded, worshipped and, increasingly as time went on, married.



    The above quote is from the Galway Advertiser: Did the Tribes of Galway speak Irish? The Old English colony and the 'mere Irish'. * The inserted paragraph is the remaining portion of this Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 390-91.


    ** Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLVI. (1994), Mulveen, Jack: Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Wares, 43-64.


    ** Illustrations from pages 44, 45, 46, and 52 of Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Ware: Figure 1; Figure 2; Figure 3; Figure 4 with photographs of a Silver Chalice by MARK FALLON, 1714, and a collection of Galway Silverware circa 1725 by MARK FALLON and Richard Joyce.


    The below paragraph is from an incomplete accounting of Galway by Geoffrey Lynch. Thus the date for DONELL O'HOLAGHANE [O HUALLACHAIN] O'NOLAN change in status to freeman is suspect in MS 866: Trinity College, Dublin from which the information was gathered. Fourteen years may not have been enough time for DONNELL OGE O'NOLAN to acquire the necessary wealth needed to be the owner of Qwarown Browne (Carrowbrowne) Castle in 1574.


    "This year [1552] Richard Beg was made freeman of this town upon condition to keep an inn victualling and lodging strangers. This year [1560] DANIEL [fol. 15v] O'HOLAGHANE [O HUALLACHAIN] NOLAN goldsmith was made freeman, as it seemed, during his natural life, for to sustain one ANDREW FALLON decrepit and poor, whose son-in-law he was by marrying his daughter." (77) The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLIV, (1992), Walsh, Paul: An Account of the Town of Galway, 64-65.


    Clanricarde was granted, with some exceptions, the whole of Connaught, but he never really owned this territory, even from the English point of view. The rights of the Irish chieftains were largely acknowledged, and also those of the various owners who held by feudal services from Clanricarde.” (78) The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 13.


    DONELL OGE O'HOLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) OWNER OF QWAROWN BROWN (CARROWBROWNE) CASTLE, 1574.



    Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. II, Nolan, J. P.: Galway Castles and Owners in 1574, 109-123. The list for the Barony of Moycullen includes the Barony of Galway.


    www.castles-of-ireland.com.
    Carrowbrowne.

    "Carrowbrowne was an early 14th century hall-house on the northern outskirts of the town of Galway." (79) In the eighteenth century, the castle stone became building material for a countryseat. The above photograph is of that building now in ruins. The above quote and photograph are from www.castles-of-ireland.com @ http://homepage.eircom.net/~rookery/castle16.html.


    * Given the pronunciation of Qwarown Browne Castle and the location of Carrowbrowne, it is a reasonable presumption that they are the same structure. Roderick O’Flaherty cites the two names as synonymous in the 1684 History of Connaught. Carrowbrowne (Qwarown Browne) may have been the property of Walter Browne, son of Philippus de Browne who came to Ireland in 1170. In 1172, Philippus de Browne was appointed Governor of Wexford. Walter Browne settled in Co. Galway. Sir Dominick Browne, of Galway, Knight, is listed as a Galway landowner in 1585. “Anastas [Darcy] married Sir Dominick Browne of Carrowbrowne, Co. Galway, and became the ancestor of the Browne’s of Castlemagarrett, Co. Mayo.” (80) The above quote is from http://www.14tribes.net/darcy.htm or for more information: Brown (e), de Brún, and Broun.


    Another account states, that "Sir David Browne, who was cotemporary with Richard de Burgo, the Red Earl of Ulster, that he died in 1303, and had a son, named Stephen, who settled at Killpatricke, near Dublin, from whence, after a time a branch of that house settled at Brownstown, near Loughrea, and thence branched forth to Athenry and Galway." (81) The above quote is from Hardiman's History of Galway, Chapter 1 - An Alphabetical List and Concise Account of the Ancient Families of Galway.


    Qwarown Browne Castle was in the barony of Moycullen Co. Galway adjacent to the barony of Kilmain Co. Mayo where THOMAS NOLAN (TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN) resided in 1583. DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN), of Galway in the year 1500, and DONELL OGE O'HOLOGHAN, owner of Qwarown Browne Castle in 1574, may indeed be the same individual, or DONELL OGE O'HOLOGHAN may have been a son and heir to DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN). In any event, THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe was most definitely related to this family.


    “Up to 1600, [once wealth had been acquired] it was impossible for a man of means to exist outside a fortified place. It was a choice between a walled town or a castle. There was nothing very unusual in this, except that small castles were necessary in the west of Ireland to a later period than in the greater portion of Europe.” (82) The above quote is from the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 14.



    * Historical texts that place The Creevagh in Co. Galway have failed to account for the Creevagh, Kilmolara, Co. Mayo or Walter MacTibbot's Castle of Crigh. The above quote is from the Indenture of Composition, 1585.


    ANNATES FOR THE DIOCESE OF EMLY.


    * There is a Kilcowle in Co. Mayo as listed in the Indenture of Composition, 1585. “The Ecclesiastical Province of Cashel comprises the Archdiocese of Cashel with the Diocese of Emly and eight suffragan sees: Cloyne, Cork, Kerry, Killaloe, Limerick, Ross, Waterford & Lismore, and Kilfenora. The Bishop of Galway is Apostolic Administrator of Kilfenora.” (84) The above quote is from The Ecclesiastical Province of Cashel.


    THOMAS NOLAN, BALLINROBE CASTLE, MAYO CO. IRELAND - PRIOR TO 1585 RESIDED AT "THE CREVAGHE" (CREAGH CASTLE) PURCHASING ENNISCRONE CASTLE IN COUNTY SLIGO AFTER 1597 DYING 18 JUNE 1628.

    MICHAEL O’NOLAN, merchant of 1473 Galway, presumably can be characterized a freeman, therefore, his children would have been free at birth, however, his extended family could still have been mired in the feudal system: father, brothers, uncles, nephews, and cousins until the year 1500.


    Relatives of MICHAEL O'NOLAN and the children of DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) (O'HOLOGHAN)?



    * William Betham’s will abstract for THOMAS NOLAN indicates the following: THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, 17 April 1628, Daughter ANNIE, and Wife ENESE [AGNES?] sister of GEOFFREY of NICHOLAS MARTIN.


    Children of THOMAS NOLAN and AGNES MARTIN:




    The Tuam News: Chalice Returns to Abbey 150 Years After it was Lost!

    Claregalway and the NOLAN Silver Chalice Photo.




    * The Ballimobe above is possibly Ballinrobe. This reference comes from a Hawkins pedigree dating from the mid 1700's listed at The Butler and Bodkin family of Galway. THOMAS NOLAN purchased Enniscrone Castle in Co. Sligo after 1597 for his son JOHN and there is a Ballymote in Co. Sligo. CEACILIA NOLAN could also have been the daughter of THOMAS who had three sons - JOHN, ANTHONY and BRABAZON.




    * The above information is from the Strafford Inquisition of Co. Mayo (R. I. A. MS 24 E 15), 65-67.




    t The information of JAMES and JOSEPH NOLAN are from a 17 January 2009 e-mail from WAYNE NOLAN of New Zealand.



    Child of RICHARD NOLAN:



    INDENTURE OF COMPOSITION, 1585.

    "Richard Barrett of Kyherrenan, in consideration of his service done at the said meeting [battle] of Shrule, shall have 3 quarters in the said Toae of Kyherrenan free. THOMAS NOLAN of the Creevagh, in respect of his sufficiency to serve as a clerk in the said country, shall have the said castle and 3 quarters free." (85)


    NOTES ON BALLINROBE, CO. MAYO AND THE FAMILIES OF BURKE, NOLAN, CUFF, AND KNOX.

    “At that period, in addition to the old castle at Ballinrobe attached to the McWilliamship, there also existed at Ballinrobe another castle of more recent date - hence called the "Newcastle" - which seems to have been the patrimonial property of another branch of the Mayo Bourkes - the descendants of "Shane na Termuin" (John Bourke of the Termon). In the list of 1574, "Richard McShane an Termon" is given as the owner of this Newcastle. I am inclined to think that both these castles at Ballinrobe were allotted or confirmed under the terms of the Composition of Mayo in 1585 to Sir Richard fitz Oliver Bourke, the then McWilliam Eighter. He died in December 1585, and the election of any new McWilliam was prohibited by the Queen's government. Sir Richard Bourke's son and heir William Bourke, on the 16th April 1586 obtained a grant by patent from Queen Elizabeth of the castle and manor of Ballyloughmask, and 13 quarters of land in Kilmaine Barony, but the castle and manor of Ballinrobe were not specifically comprised or included in this patent grant, and they seem to have been appropriated and retained as Crown property until the reign of King James I.


    On 2 July 1607 THOMAS NOLAN, described as "of Ballinrobe" got a grant by patent from King James I "of the 4 quarters of Ballinrobe" and on the 20th August 1617 the same THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe got a re-grant by patent of the castle and manor of Ballinrobe, with 4 quarters. This THOMAS NOLAN had acted as sub-sheriff of the County of Mayo in 1583, and about that date probably had acquired by purchase or mortgage land at Creevagh from Walter McTibbot (Bourke) of Crioch. After obtaining the patent grants of Ballinrobe above referred to, (if not earlier), THOMAS NOLAN went into occupation of the Newcastle at Ballinrobe, for the old castle attached to the MacWilliamship had probably even then become ruinous: every vestige of it has long since disappeared. Mr. Hubert Knox considers that its site was on the east bank of the river Robe, about where the iron bridge now is, but on the high ground.


    GREGORY NOLAN, presumed eldest son, succeeded his father, THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe who died in 1628, at Ballinrobe Castle. GREGORY NOLAN'S estate was confiscated by the Cromwellian Government in 1653, and was granted in 1655 by the Cromwellian Commissioners to James Cuff, who was one of those Commissioners. This James Cuff was Knighted on 12th March 1661 and was confirmed in the possession of the Manor and Castle of Ballinrobe as well as extensive estates in the Barony of Tyrawley, by a patent under the Acts of Settlement, enrolled on the 2nd March 1666.” (86) The above quote is from Notes on Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo and the Families of Burke, NOLAN, Cuff, and Knox written by Martin J. Blake, 1909.


    In the Irish Rebellion of 1641-42, "the Catholic party had obtained possession of County Mayo; [and] Galway Town was doubtful" according to the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 26. (87)


    After the Norman invasion the power of the O’NOLAN'S declined, though they did retain considerable influence. "About the end of the sixteenth century, a THOMAS NOLAN resided in the County of May, [Mayo] Ireland. He had at least one son JOHN, and a brother named RICHARD, who was the father of, probably, among other children, a son named PETER NOLAN.” (88) The above quoted information from The NOLEN Story, by Jewel NOLEN.


    "In 1585 THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe in Mayo was given large grants of land as payment for acting as Clerk of the country. He also obtained lucrative licenses to sell wine and spirits throughout the West." (89) This information is quoted from Gary NOLAN'S Family Tree Maker Site.


    IRISH LANDED GENTRY, PEDIGREES, 159.

    "According to the Patent Rolls, 15* Jac, I., p. 1, THOMAS NOLAN (in Irish, Tomhas O'h-Uallachain), of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, gent., obtained a grant by patent, of the four quarters of land in Ballinrobe, for ever, which, belonged to the "Fryers' House, of Ballinrobe." Before the date of that Grant the said THOMAS NOLAN resided at "The Crevaghe" (now called Creagh), in the barony of Kilmain and county of Mayo. In the Indenture of Composition for that county, A. D. 1585, it was provided that he should have the Castle of the Crevaghe and three quarters of land thereto adjoining, free from the Composition rent, "in respecte of his sufficiencie to act as a Clerke in the said countrey." It may be here added, as a matter merely, coincident, that the next grantee of those very lands in the succeeding century, under the Act of Settlement, was Mr. James Cuffe, ancestor of the late Baron Tyrawley, and of the late (if not the present) proprietor of the Crevaghe, whose first appearance here was in the capacity of clerk or secretary to Cromwell's Commissioners of Transplantation to Connaught (see Hardiman's "West Connaught," p. 251). (90)


    RODERICK O'FLAHERTY'S "1684 HISTORY OF CONNAUGHT."

    Page 40.


    “St. Dominick’s Order*. Fa. DANIEL NOLAN, Pryor of this convent, Anno 1672, deceased; Anno 1669, built there a large chappell, and covered it with brick.” (91)


    Page 251-52.


    “On 2nd July, 1608, THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe, gent. obtained a grant by patent, of the four quarters of land in Ballinrobe, for ever.-Rot. Pat. 15*, Jac. I. p. 1.


    This THOMAS NOLAN, before the date of the above grant, resided at “the Crevaghe,” now called Creagh, in the barony of Kilmain and Co. Mayo. In the Indenture of Composition for that county, A. D. 1585, which see, Appendix I, it was provided that he should have the castle of the Crevaghe, and three quarters of land thereto adjoining, free from the Composition rent, “in respecte of his sufficiency to act as Clerke in the said Countrey.” This provision may be taken as a proof of the low state even of elementary education in the West of Ireland, at that period. To this may be added, as a matter merely coincident, that the next grantee of those very lands in the succeeding century, under the Act of Settlement, was Mr. James Cuffe, ancestor of the late Baron Tyrawley, and of the present proprietor of the Crevaghe, whose first appearance here was in the capacity of clerk or secretary to Cromwell's Commissioners of Transplantation to Connaught, as appears by the following order: “By the lo. Deputy and Councill. It is ordered that Mr. James Cuff be and is hereby appointed secretary to Sir Charles Coote, and the rest of the Commissioners appointed and nominated in a commission bearing date this day, for the setting out of lands to the transplanted Irish and inhabitants of Connaught and Clare. Dated at Athlone, the 16th June 1655. T. H. C. C.”-Orig. Council Book, Dublin Castle. On 12th April following, Mr. Cuff was himself appointed a Commissioner of assessment for Mayo, (Id.) where he afterwards acquired considerable grants of forfeited lands, and among others, of the town and manor of Ballinrobe, forfeited by the descendants of THOMAS NOLAN.


    The above THOMAS NOLAN was one of the first "English Tavern" keepers in Connaught. When the old Irish Biatachs (see Stat. Kilkenny, p. 4) and "Houses of Hospitality" ceased, they were succeeded by "English Inns" or Taverns. On 21st December, A. D. 1616, a license was granted to John Coman of Athlone, merchant, and THOMAS NOLAN, of Ballinrobe, Esq., to keep taverns, and sell wines and spirituous liquors. The former in Loughrea and all Galway co. except the town and parish of Athenrie, the town of Galway, and the barony of Killconnell; also, in the town of Burrysowle, and in the baronies of Moriske, Burrysowle, Irrus, Costellagh, and Gallen in Mayo co., in Athlone, in Roscommon and Westmeath co., in Ballymote and all Sligo co. except the town of Sligo, in Ballintobber and all Roscommon co. except the baronies of Athlone and Boyle, and the towns of Ardcarne and Elffin. To the latter in the town of Callow, and in the whole barony of Kilconnell, and in the town and barony of Kilmaine, in Mayo co. during their own lives and those of Barnaby Coman, brother of John; of JOHN NOLAN, son of THOMAS; of PETER NOLAN, son of RICHARD NOLAN, late of Athlone, merchant, deceased; and of Jane or Jennet Coman, daughter of the said John.” Rol. Pat. 15* Jac. I., p. 2 d. No. 58. This was one of the extensive Monopolies granted at that period, for more of which see ante, p. 240.


    Note 8. See page 52, note: Moycullin barony-Gnomore, Gnobeg.”


    In the document before referred to, p. 44, note *, preserved in the British Museum and entitled the “Division of Connaught, A. D. 1586,” Titus B. xiii fo. 399, this barony is described as follows: “The barony of Muckullen, containing Cosarg …, Gnovore, Gnobeg, Loghcurb, and Keildromedirge, 20 myles long, 20 broad; and is, after this rate, plowlands 5. Murrogh ne doe chief in the same.-Parishes 6. viz. Vicarages of Rahune, Killaen, Galway, Muckullin, Kyleumayne, Killinkelogh.-Gentlemen and castles (20) viz. Rory O’Flahairte of Moykullen, Murrogh ne doe of Nowghe and of Achneuir (Aghneure) Thomas Colman, Mynlagh (Menlo); Jonick O’Halorane, O’hery; Owen O’Halorane, Bearne; (Barna) Domynick Lynche, Tyrellan; Rolland Skeret, Short Castle; (Castlegar) DONELL OGE O’HOLOGHAN, QWAROWN BROWN (CARROWBROWN); Wm & Redmond Mc Wm, Ffiegh, Kellyn; Redmond McThomas, Ballymuritty; Redmond Reogh, Ballindully; Richard Beg, Cloynecanyn; Darby Augny, Lysacowly; John Blake fitz-Richard, Kiltullagh; John Blake fitz-Richard, Kiltorog; Thomas Blake, Ballemicro; Thomas and John Blake, Turlagh ne sheamon; Murietagh O’Conor, Tullekyhan; Martin Lynch, New Castle.” (92)


    Page 337.


    "That THOMAS NOLLANE of the Crevaghe in the barony of Kilmeane, in respecte of his sufficiencie to serve as clerke in the said countrey, shall have the castle of Crevaghe and 3 qr free." (93)


    Map of the Baronies of Connaught.


    "The above THOMAS NOLAN was one of the first "English Tavern" keepers in Connaught. When the old Irish Biatachs (see Stat. Kilkenny, p. 4) and "Houses of Hospitality" ceased, they were succeeded by "English Inns" or Taverns. On 21st December, A. D. 1616, a license was granted to John Coman of Athlone, merchant, and THOMAS NOLAN, of Ballinrobe, Esq., to keep taverns, and sell wines and spirituous liquors: to the former in almost every town in the county Galway, and in some of the towns of the counties of Mayo, Roscommon, Sligo, and Westmeath; and "to THOMAS NOLAN, in the town of Callow, and in the whole barony of Kilconnell, and in the town and barony of Kilmaine, in Mayo county, during their own lives and those of Barnaby Coman, brother of John; of JOHN NOLAN, son of THOMAS; of PETER NOLAN, son of RICHARD NOLAN, late of Athlone, merchant, deceased; and of Jane or Jennet Coman, daughter of the said John Coman." Rol. Pat. 15* Jac. I., p. 2 d. No. 58." (94-5) The above two paragraphs are from Irish Landed Gentry, Pedigree, 159.


    THE MELLETT SEPT OF SOUTH MAYO

    "In 1589 Richard Bourke and Sir Murrough 0'Flaherty and their followers, including some shipwrecked survivors of the Spanish Armada, traveled through South Mayo raising disturbances as part of a campaign to intimidate "loyalist" settlers in the area. Their progress was recorded in a letter dated the 19th of March 1589, written by THOMAS NOLAN to Sir Richard Bingham, President of Connaught. NOLAN describes how the group left the Lehinch area and "... came up as far as the river of Clongowla or Ballenrobe, cessed themselves upon the Rochfords, Malods and Clannevallies (MacEnallys), and going thus in troops to the terror of the subjects." (6) Cloongowla is immediately north of Ballinrobe town." (96)


    "(6) Knox, Hubert T., The History of the County of Mayo to the close of the Sixteenth Century, Dublin 1908, facsimile reprint, Castlebar 1982, pp. 222, 3." (97) The above two quotes are from The Mellett Sept of South Mayo by P. Waldron.


    THOMAS NOLAN: OWNER CASTLE OF CRIGH (CREAGH) (THE CREVAGHE), 1582.

    Patent Rolls suggest that THOMAS NOLAN resided at "The Crevaghe" (now called Creagh), in the barony of Kilmain and county of Mayo prior to 1585. "THOMAS NOLAN of the Creevagh, in respect of his sufficiency to serve as a clerk in the said country, shall have the said castle and 3 quarters free." (98) Historical texts that place The Creevagh in Co. Galway have failed to account for the Creevagh, Kilmolara, Co. Mayo or Walter MacTibbot's Castle of Crigh. The above quote is from the Indenture of Composition, 1585.


    "MacTibbot of the Crich, Barony of Kilmaine, Co. Mayo, was the head of the family called the Sliocht Mhic Teboid na Criche. His castle of the Crich was in the townland of the Creevagh in the parish of Kilmolara. The sept owned lands thereabouts, and Rahard, and Cuslough, and near Annies on the shore of Loch Carra." (99) The White family web site contends that the Creevagh Castle was in Ballinrobe. The below Kilmaine barony map does show the location of the New Castle at Ballinrobe and the Castle of the Crich in the parish of Kilmolara. The above quote is from Barony of Kilmaine, Co. Mayo.


    RANDOM NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF CO. MAYO.

    G. V. Martyn writes in Random Notes on the History of County Mayo “the MacTibbots were opposed to the Annexation of Connacht and purposely omitted making a return of Coslough Castle and Manor, fearing its confiscation or for some other reason.


    Before proceeding further it is necessary to explain the apparent absence of Creagh from the List of Castles of 1574. It and Coslough were divided from one another by the river Robe and both, it is believed, were MacTibbot Bourke manors as we will now endeavour to show.


    The Norman ruler who set up in Ballinrobe about 1236-7 would not have been content, in peaceful times, without a country residence. Creagh was an ideal position, in that a castle in the demesne would be only a mile from Ballinrobe and yet within a short distance from Lough Mask. The triangle of which the mouth of the Robe to Keel bridge is the base, and Ballinrobe the apex, was occupied by the O'Gormly tribe in pre-Norman times and they appear to have been transplanted about 1236. We may reasonably contend therefore that the Creagh site was available and selected for what we might call a suburban residence of the ruler of Kilmaine in the Norman period.” (100)


    G. V. Martyn continues with “the next entry in the 1574 List of Castles to which we must draw attention is that Walter MacTibbot had Crigh. Knox argues that Crigh is Creevagh in the parish of Kilmolara. To show that this is in error we must quote the following evidence:



    It would thus appear that in 1574 Walter MacTibbot's Castle of Crigh* was that of Creagh. He sold it to THOMAS NOLAN in 1582 and apparently moved to Coslough. His family name of MacTibbot of the Crigh or Crich continued to be attached to him at Coslough.” (101)


    “* Since this was written a Sketch Map of Connacht, temp. Henry VIII. has been found in the R. I. Academy, drawn probably between 1540 and 1547. It is on a very small scale but the compiler found room to enter the only place he heard of as existing on the East shore of Lough Mask. He calls it Crigh and he places it at the point where the river Robe discharges itself into the Lake.


    tThe future of Coslough from 1592 up to Cromwell is in some doubt but according to family papers NICHOLAS MARTYN of Galway acquired in 1627-1632 certain lands in Kilmaine which cannot now be identified. In Strafford's Survey their extent is given as seven quarters of arable and pasture. This would be equivalent to 1,600 statute acres or say 2,000 acres gross. The area of the Coslough property (including Curraghmore, etc.) is 1380 acres and of Moneycrower and Boleemeelah lands 337 acres.


    In Cromwell's time both Creegh and Coslough were confiscated and about 1685 Edmond Skerrett bought back Curraghmore as a dower for his daughter on her marriage with GEOFFREY MARTYN. The latter in his Will of 1697 refers to his recoverable lands.” (102) The above three quotes are from Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII. (1925), Nos. I and II. Random Notes on the History of County Mayo by G. V. Martyn, 83-100. G. V. Martyn continued the discussion in the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIV. (1929), Nos. III and IV, Random Notes on the History of County Mayo, 133-137 which began in the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII. (1924), Nos. I and II, Random Notes on the History of County Mayo with Special Reference to the Barony of Kilmaine, G. V. Martyn, 23-49.


    Kilmaine Barony, Mayo Co. Map.



    The above photo is the Creagh Estate in the barony of Kilmain, Co. Mayo. “The second Colonel Knox, Charles Howe Cuff Knox, not satisfied with the existing house in town or the house already standing at Creagh *Demesne, built a mansion called Creagh House on the Creagh Demesne in 1875.” (103) The above quote is from Mayo Pages: Ballinrobe, The Knox Family.


    * Demesnes were estates.


    BALLINROBE PHOTOS.*

    * Ballinrobe photographs are available through the efforts of Maggie Blanck and her Ballinrobe research.


    TOWN OF BALLINROBE FROM THE 1900 ORDNANCE SURVEY MAP.

    Ballinrobe map notes:


    * RUINS OF CAVALRY BARRACKS WITH BARRACK BRIDGE ON LEFT.

    * Site of Ballinrobe Castle: Built by the De Burgos and situated where the ruins of Cavalry Barracks stand today down by Bowers’ Walk.


    Snow covered Cavalry Barracks (Ballinrobe Castle).

    Ballinrobe Castle - Front.

    Ballinrobe Castle - Back.

    MAYO AND THE JACOBITE WAR OF 1689-91 by Sheila Mulloy.

    “The majority of the Old Irish families meanwhile had lost their property to the new owners and joined the ranks of smallholders. The O’Malley’s of Murrisk and Burrishooje, however, clung tenaciously to their ancestral territory, and many of these were to thrive through judicious matrimonial alliances and the adoption of the Protestant faith in the following century. It is noticeable, however, that during the period under discussion, the older inhabitants played a very minor role.


    The representatives for Co. Mayo in the Patriot Parliament of 1689 were Garrett Moore and Walter Bourke, and for the Borough of Castlebar John Bermingham and Thomas Bourke. These names are to appear again in another connection, for a commission was issued 20 April 1690 by King James to raise £20,000 per month, and persons of local influence were appointed in each county in connection with the tax. Those appointed in Mayo were Colonel Garrett Moore, Colonel John Browne, Lieutenant Colonel Walter Bourke, George Browne, Esq., Captain Thomas Bourke, Captain John Bermingham and John Fitzgerald Esq. At a later stage orders regulating winter quarters were given to Lord Athenry, Col. Garrett Moore, Col. John Browne, Capt. Terence Mac Donough, Capt. GREGORY NOLAN and Capt. Geoffrey French, all Commissioners for the peace in Mayo.


    To begin with those of lesser military rank, Lord Athenry was Francis Bermingham and sat as a peer in the Parliament of 1689. John Bermingham, described as a Portrieve of Castlebar, i.e. chief officer of the town or borough, was a Captain in the Earl of Clanricarde’s infantry regiment. John Fitzgerald was of Turlough, and does not appear to have taken an active part in the war. George Browne was of the Neale family and not personally involved in the fighting, although his brother John Browne of Westport was a Colonel, and a son John was a Captain and taken prisoner at the siege of Derry. Captain Terence Mac Donough was in Col. Henry Dillon’s infantry regiment. He represented Sligo in the 1689 Parliament. He was a Counsellor and commonly known by the name ’blind Mac Donough‘. Captain GREGORY NOLAN belonged to a family that had lost their land in the barony of Carra after the 1641 Rebellion.” (104) The above quote is from http://www.clancleary.com.


    BRITISH HISTORY ONLINE: HOUSE OF LORDS JOURNAL, VOL. 20, 21 July 1715.

    Pages 124-25.


    NOLAN versus BOURKE.


    "Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of GREGORY NOLAN Gentleman, from all Orders and Proceedings had upon the Decrees obtained in the Court of Chancery in Ireland by the Lady Grandison by the Name of Katherine Fitzgerald Villiers, and by Thomas Butler and Lady Iveagh, in the Year 1697, against Rickard late Earl of Clanricarde, any Way affecting the Petitioner; and also from the several and respective Orders of the 25th of August 1704, and 1st of February 1705, and the Master's Report in 1706, and likewise from the several and respective Orders of the 23d of May and 19th of June 1707, 21st of May and 25th of February 1708, 2d of December and 28th of February 1709, and 11th of May 1715; and from all other Orders and Proceedings had in the said Court, which in any Wise do affect the Petitioner; praying, "That the same may be set aside and discharged in relation to him, or that he may be otherwise relieved, as to the Wisdom of this House shall seem meet; and, in order thereunto, that Colonel Thomas Bourke may answer the said Appeal; and that the Service of the Order of this House on the said Colonel Bourk's Clerk in the said Court may be deemed good Service, so as to stop any Proceedings against the Petitioner there:" It is Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Colonel Bourke may have a Copy of the said Appeal; and shall and he is hereby required to put in his Answer thereunto, in Writing, on or before Thursday the Eighteenth Day of August next; and that the Service of this Order on the Respondent's Clerk in Court shall be good Service." (105) The above quote is from House of Lords Journal Volume 20: 21 July 1715, Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 20: 1714-1717, pp. 124-25 at British History Online: House of Lords Journal, Vol. 20, 21 July 1715.


    “Another NOLAN to loom large in land dealings that occurred during the early part of the [eighteenth] century was GREGORY NOLAN. This man, who was domiciled in Dublin, had contacts with Galway, Carlow and Tipperary. On the balance of evidence he may well have been a Galway NOLAN. (634) His first transactions were done in Tipperary with the Butlers. Prior to 1710 he loaned money to Colonel Thomas Butler of Kilcash (635) and got a lease on lands for a period of 21 yrs. at an annual rent of £40. 7s.(636) and in that year, 1710, he sold his leasehold interest to a man named Carroll for £116 sterling with the proviso that he could redeem his interest after 5 yrs. after repaying his debt.


    Two years later, in 1712, GREGORY was named as the only surviving executor of a will of a man called Walter Blake. Other parties named in the document were JULIANA* BLAKE the widow, James Blake of Galway and Richard England of Ennis, Co. Clare who paid the two Blake’s £90 each on foot of a land transaction in Co. Clare where 240 acres of the Burren changed hands. In the following year GREGORY (as the executor of Walter Blake) and James Blake sold 58 acres in Co. Clare to Brigadier General Francis Gore of Clonrone. In the same year GREGORY and LAWRENCE NOLAN of Shangarry, gentlemen sold 200 acres in Shangarry to Jeremiah Quill as detailed above.


    GREGORY seems to have redeemed his Tipperary lands from Carroll as in 1716 he sold his interest in Kilcash to John Osbourne for £550 and in the same document it was noted that he received arrears from Colonel Thomas Butler of £428. GREGORY may well have been a banker. In the next year, 1717, he released and sold lands in Galway to Edmund Fitzpatrick for £200. In 1721 a GREGORY NOLAN, a parson, of Middlesex, made his will. It is possible he was the same man involved in all the above transactions, as being a parson he would have been socially mobile.” (106) The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 289-290.


    * This may be JULIANA NOLAN (BLAKE).


    THE O'NOLAN'S OF GALWAY.

    Indenture between PATRICK NOLAN and John Brown.

    Indenture between PATRICK NOLAN and John Brown, 2.

    Indenture between PATRICK NOLAN and John Brown, 3.

    Source: Linda (Noland) Layman


    "When THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe Castle died in 1628 he left his widow and a son and heir GREGORY. Hardiman who wrote a history of Galway in 1820 had this to say about the NOLAN'S. 'This family was formerly of the first rank and opulence and is still wealthy and respectable. THOMAS NOLAN Esq., of the town and Castle of Ballinrobe died June 18th. 1628, was possessed of most extensive landed possessions, to which his son GREGORY succeeded and out of which his widow AGNES MARTIN had dower. This property was confiscated in the civil war of 1641, but a considerable part still remains in the families of Loughboy, Ballinderry and Ballybanagher. The tomb of the ancient family of O'NOLAN of Loughboy is situated in the centre of the Franciscan Friary Churchyard in Galway and bears the following inscription - "This tomb was first erected in the year of our Lord 1394, by the O'NOLAN'S of Loughboy and is now rebuilt and ornamented by MICHAEL O'NOLAN, Galway, one of the representatives of the said family." A terrible conflagration took place in Galway in June 1473, by which the town was nearly destroyed. This misfortune was soon overcome by the exertions of an industrious and already opuient community, the chief amongst whom were the fourteen tribes also NOLAN, Port, Coine, Cuin and Tully are particularly noticed.'


    [If] MICHAEL O'NOLAN is correct in stating that the ancient tomb of the O'NOLAN'S dates from 1394 then the original group of O'NOLAN'S who went to Galway must have gone west from Carlow before then, possibly as early as 1170 after the Norman invasion when they opposed the Norman/McMurrough alliance. What is certain is that there was a very powerful family of O'NOLAN'S in Co. Galway and they were situated in the Ballinrobe region. Another branch of the family set up in the Loughboy area of Mayo. In 1628 THOMAS NOLAN, who died, was the owner of Ballinrobe Castle and he had at least one son GREGORY, by his wife AGNES MARTIN. GREGORY'S son was JOHN NOLAN of Ballinderry and JOHN'S son was PATRICK, who married a BROWNE of the Neale (Brownes were the ancestors of Lord Kilmaine). He had several children but his heir was JOHN NOLAN of Ballinderry who was born c. 1680. This JOHN married ELLIS BRABAZON of Co. Mayo in 1709 and their son was THOMAS. It is probable that GREGORY NOLAN who was party to many land transactions in the early 1700s was JOHN'S brother. THOMAS had three sons - JOHN, ANTHONY and BRABAZON. Nothing much is known about them except that they were all involved in land dealings. JOHN [*] succeeded to the Ballinderry estates. He married an heiress, MARGARET FRENCH of Port a Carron. His grandson JOHN, married MARY NOLAN of Loughboy, Mayo, in 1836 and they had six sons and one daughter ELIZABETH. The sons were:­



    JOHN PHILIP was an Army Officer and later an M. P. for Galway North and a J. P.


    There are about 200 NOLAN families in the Galway/Mayo area today and they are descended from the NOLAN'S who went to Galway in the 12th. century. Many may be descended from the NOLAN'S I have written about above. As we know many of the NOLAN'S spread from Co. Carlow into the neighbouring counties of Wexford, Kilkenny, Kildare and Wicklow in the 17th., 18th., and 19th. centuries. Fr. Meehan, the P. P. of Ballindaggin, in Co. Wexford, writing to Fr. O'NOLAN in 1919 stated that there were 25 families of NOLAN/NOWLAN in his parish and that their ancestors had been very active in 1798 when they were noted as 'great fighting men'." (107) The above quoted information is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 249-250.


    * JOHN NOLAN was born about the year 1760 in Ballinderry, Co. Galway marrying on 11 May 1785 at St Nicholas in Galway to MARGARET FRENCH who was born about the year 1764. I have found record of a _______ NOLAND born about the year 1600 in Mayo Co. And JOHN NOLAN born about the year 1630 of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo who married BRIDGET DARCY, born between 1635-37, about the year 1660 in Galway may have been the son of GREGORY NOLAN, heir of THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe.


    HISTORY OF LODGE 14: NOTES ON THE FREEMASONRY IN COUNTY GALWAY.

    “Lodge (No. 329) held in 1759 at Summerville on the west side of Claregalway: The Blakes of Menlo had a large house there about half a mile from the main road and the Lodge probably was held in the house or one of the outbuildings. The first Master was Andrew Blake and the Wardens were BRABAZON NOLAN and ANTHONY NOLAN. After eleven years the Warrant was moved to Donmacreena on the Mayo border, where another branch of the Blakes had an estate. There is no record to show when the Warrant was cancelled. Summerville long since has disappeared; part of the yard wall remains and the rest has been incorporated in several modern farmhouses.” (108)


    PIGOT AND CO'S DIRECTORY 1824 TUAM.

    Nobility, Gentry and Clergy.



    THE CORK EXAMINER, 2 March 1865.

    Marriages.


    “February 28, [1865] at the Church of St. Andrew, Westland-row, by the Rev. Patrick Duggin, P. P., of Corofin, MICHAEL NOLAN, Esq., of Ballybanagher, county of Galway, to MARGARET JOSEPHINE, eldest daughter of the late James Lynch, Esq., of Windfield, in the same county.” (109)


    IRELAND OLD NEWS.

    The Times London, Middlesex, England - Tuesday, July 5, 1892.
    The General Election - Biographies of Candidates - Galway.

    "NOLAN, JOHN PHILIP Lieutenant Colonel (Galway, North) (P) of Balinderry, Tuam, Galway, eldest son of the late Mr. JOHN NOLAN, J. P., of Ballinderry, by MARY ANNE, daughter of Mr. WALTER NOLAN, of Loughboy, born 1838, educated at Clongowes-wood College, Stonyhurst, Trinity College, Dublin, the Staff College and Woolwich, entered the Royal Artillery in 1857. Served throughout the Abyssinian campaign as adjutant to Colonel Milward, present at the capture of Magdala, was mentioned in dispatches (Abyssinian medal), retired from the Army with the rank Lieutenant Colonel in 1881. In one of the Parnellite Whips, a J. P. for Co. Galway, M. P., Co. Galway Feb-June, 1872, unseated on petition, and from 1874 to 1885, and for the North division from 1885." (110)


    Trench v. NOLAN - The Galway Election Petition by Samuel J. Maguire.


    THE HISTORY OF GOLF IN GALWAY.

    The first President - SEBASTIAN M. NOLAN (17 March 1843 - 14 September 1907).

    "He was the son of JOHN NOLAN of Ballinderry and brother of Col. NOLAN M. P. The family owned large estates in Ballinderry, Portacarron, Kilmaine and Roundstone. Apart from the wealth he inherited he was also a keen business man and was the largest employer of labour in Galway. He imported fertilisers, chiefly guano from Chile and built the large stores close to the docks.


    Too late in life to learn golf, he made up in enthusiasm what he lacked in style and play. He was passionately fond of the exercise and he knew everything about it theoretically. At Gentian Hill he constructed and maintained a course which was the scene of many competitions, for which he presented valuable prizes, executed remarkable feats of handicapping and constructed rules which recognised not the authority of the R. A. committee. On the links he was by no means an ideal partner and he could never play a losing game gracefully. But when you reached the clubhouse and the bunkers and bad lies and execrable luck and other shocking things were all behind, the host shone. There was once an unfortunate Scot who had played a round with him in a foursomes and being both off their game they got badly beaten and straightaway villified each other. But when they reached the snug clubhouse and sat down to their tea and muffins Mr. NOLAN slipped upstairs and turned on the gramophone to "Annie Laurie" and it is an open question whether the solace of that Scot or the beaming geniality of the host in paying the curious compliment was the prettier picture. Such were his complex ways.


    Another story is one about a duel that nearly took place between him and a gallant Colonel, which fortunately did not come off, though one gentleman recommended a dozen golf balls each and a driver at ten yards distance as a good method of settling their differences. He was a thorough sportsman and for years kept a string of racehorses, amongst others, "The Arrowed" which won several races. He was also Commodore of the Royal Galway Yacht Club.


    On a wild and stormy day he left his home in Seamount to play golf. He died on Gentian Hill while playing a game with his good friend Rev. Fr. Lally P. P. In his will he left his house at Seamount and the Magdalen Asylum to the sisters of Mercy. The following inscription is written on the huge granite Celtic cross which stands over his grave in the New Cemetery. "He was during his life a kind and generous benefactor and by his last will he bequeathed the residence of his estates as an endowment for the great charitable work of the Magdalen Asylum"." (111) The above quote is from Renmore at www.galwaygolf.com/historyFiles/ chapter1/Chapter%201.pdf.


    In the History of Carlow County Ireland, by John Ryan is the following passage: “After the rebellion of 1641-1662 had been suppressed (in which the NOWLAN'S took sides with the Catholic party), the NOWLAN'S lost a great deal of their property which was included in the grant made to James Butler, Earl of Ormonde, Lt. General of the Protestant Forces. Due to the Irish Rebellion of 1641, most of the land belonging to the NOWLAN family in Northern Ireland was seized by James Butler, the lieutenant general of the Protestant Forces. The family took this complaint to court but was rejected because one of the sons had participated in the revolution. Around 1700, at least 3 (possibly 5) of the NOWLAN brothers came from Ireland to America. The Castle of Ballinrobe, in Northern Ireland, belonged to the NOWLAN family. Perhaps the Barony of Forth.“ (112) This NOLAN family history found in the History and Antiquities of County Carlow by John Ryan published in 1833 and the NOWLIN-Stone Genealogy by James Edmund NOWLIN erroneously placed the owner of Ballinrobe Castle, THOMAS (NOLAN) O’HUALLACHAIN, within Carlow Clan O‘NOLAN and quite possibly recounts the eviction of his son JOHN NOLAN and family from Enniscrone Castle, 1642 and the events which led to the arrival of JOHN NOWLIN in Isle of Wight Co. Virginia, 1643.


    JOHN NOLAN & FAMILY ATTACKED AND FORCEFULLY EVICTED FROM ENNISCRONE CASTLE, 1641-42.

    "In October 1641, rebellion against English rule broke out in Ulster and soon spread to the rest of the country. For the next eight years, England was the scene of a fiercely fought civil war between King Charles I and the extreme Protestants or Puritans led by Oliver Cromwell. The fighting soon spread to Ireland where armies supporting both sides fought each other. The Catholic rebels, who included Old Irish and Anglo-Irish, formed the Federation of Kilkenny. The Earl of Clanrickard, who was the King’s Governor of Connacht, eventually became involved but was a reluctant rebel." (113)




    ENNISCRONE CASTLE.

    Enniscrone Castle is in Kilglass Parish, Co. Sligo in the North of Ireland. THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo, purchased the castle after 1597. THOMAS NOLAN or his son JOHN lived in the castle at least until 1641 or 1642. The castle was remodeled in the late 16th or early 17th century, however, it was first mentioned in 1417 as the residence of Tadgh Riabhach, King of Tireragh and was probably built in the 13th century.


    "Enniscrone Castle is an early 17th century semi-fortified house, built mainly for a degree of comfort in living accommodation rather than for defence. In 1597 the brothers Fearadach and Cormac MacDonnel sold the house to John Crofton, who then sold it to THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe. His son JOHN was living in the house in 1642. During the 1641 rebellion the Irish commandeered it and placed a garrison in the castle. It was the scene of a small skirmish in 1642 but in 1645 it was captured by Cromwellian forces and they used it until the end of the war. It was then granted to Sir Francis Gore." (114) The above quote is from the following web site: http://sligo.local.ie/content/20479.shtml/arts_and_culture/famous_buildings/castles.

    “Based upon documented genealogy since the early 1600s it is quite evident that the De Burgo (De Bergh, Burgho, Bourke, Burke, etc.) and Nolan families were closely allied, intermarrying with one another. The marriage, in the 1600s, of Catherine Nolan, granddaughter of Thomas of Ballinrobe and daughter of John of Inniscrone, to Walter Bourke (????-1715), Major General of the Athlone Regiment of Foot and later a Count in France, is a clear testament to this fact. This special relationship between the two families may however have already started as early as 1394. This is suggested by the fact that when the Nolans of Galway City first erected a tomb to their Loughboy ancestors, they erected it in a Franciscan Friary founded by the De Burgo family.” (115)


    DOWDE, DOWD, O'DOWDE, O'DOWDA, AND DOWDY ABSTRACTS IN IRELAND.




    WEST SLIGO HISTORY: ENNISCRONE CASTLE.

    “In the castle field in the centre of Enniscrone, stands the remains of Enniscrone Castle or sometimes known as O’Dowd’s Castle.


    In the fifteenth century, the O’Dowd’s (O'Dubhda) ruled Tireragh. And various branches of the O’Dowd’s took over different parts of Tireragh as landlords. Around this period, several castles were built in Tireragh, including Enniscrone.


    Tadhg Riabhnach O'Dubhda was chieftain over the O’Dowd’s. He and his family settled in Enniscrone. When he died in 1432, one of his sons Tadgh Bui was fostered by a man called Albanach Mor (the big Scotsman) who, it is thought may have been a Mac Donnell gallowglass mercenary hired by the O’Dowd’s. Albanach Mor built the original castle in Enniscrone.


    In 1512, during a war between The Mac William Burkes of Mayo and the O’Donnell’s of Donegal, Enniscrone Castle was captured by Burke. O’Donnell’s besieged the castle with his army for four days until it was surrendered. He took the garrison as prisoner and demolished the castle. The O’Dowd’s supported the O’Connor’s of Sligo against O’Donnell and soon rebuilt Enniscrone Castle in order to protect the local area.


    In 1597, Enniscrone Castle had been sold to John Croft by Fearadach and Cormac O'Dowd, and it is then thought to have been sold to THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe and it stayed in this family until the rebellion of 1641/1642. At ten o'clock on a winters night in January 1642 a party of armed men attacked the castle.” (116)


    ENNISCRONE CASTLE AND CHURCH.

    Enniscrone Castle and Valentine's Church drawn for Colonel Cooper by William Frederick Wakeman on 1 August 1879: Copyright Sligo County Library.

    "The castle consists of a rectangular gabled house with three quarter round towers at the angles, with only the two western towers surviving. The house has two stories with attics. On the ground floor there is a centrally placed doorway in the south wall that has evidence of drawbar sockets. Also on the ground floor on the west wall is a large fireplace with a small oven built onto its south side, with a smaller fireplace on the upper storey and the chimneys are still intact. The floor levels of the towers correspond to those of the main building. A number of gun loops and small windows occur through the building.


    The ruined simple rectangular church is called Valentine's church. It has windows, a door in the south wall and a bellcote on the west gable, visible in the painting and photograph. It is possibly on the site of Cill Insi, an older ecclesiastical site which was still standing in 1666. A bell was found in the old Ballina Workhouse in 1934 and an inscription on the bell dated it to 1679. This bell came from this church, which suggests the church was rebuilt sometime around this date. In 1712 Thomas Valentine from Lancashire was appointed to this area as Protestant vicar and died in 1765. About eighteen years later a plaque to his memory was erected in the church, which can be still seen. The church was damaged during the 1798 rebellion and does not seem to have been used again. Valentine was credited with rebuilding the church and hence, it became associated with his name.


    In the area west of the castle and church there are some remains of boulder circles and monuments similar to those at Carrowmore passage tomb complex." (117)


    The following five photographs of Enniscrone Castle have a copyright © Frank L. Ludwig. Ordering information is at http://franklludwig.com/order2.html


    Enniscrone Castle 1 © Frank L. Ludwig.

    Enniscrone Castle 2 © Frank L. Ludwig.

    Enniscrone Castle 3 © Frank L. Ludwig.

    Enniscrone Castle 4 © Frank L. Ludwig.

    Enniscrone Castle 5 © Frank L. Ludwig.


    It is conceivable that JOHN NOLAN married into the MAC SUIBHNE, O’MULGEEHY, MCSWYNE, WYNNE or WYNDHAM, family of Co. Galway and Donegal since both families match 25 of 25, 33 of 37, and 62 of 67 Y-DNA markers. Both were also Herenagh Families of Donegal Co. Ireland. The MCSWYNE’S and the Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught families are represented on the list of Galway Castle Owners, 1574. Undoubtedly, some members of this landholding lineage, sept or family of the Connaught branch of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN intermingled with the O’MULGEEHY, MCSWYNE, WYNNE or WYNDHAM, family of Co. Galway and Donegal either in Co. Galway or by migrating out the Connaught counties of Galway, Mayo, and Sligo into the Ulster counties of Donegal and Fermanagh. DNA evidence of N-4 from the NOLAN DNA Surname Project and Kit #56134 from the WINDHAM Family DNA Project suggest a possible common ancestor through an extramarital event, an adoption, or a branch of one family using the others surname. Herenagh meaning land typically converted into donated church property.


    Once paid with beef, these galloglaich (foreign mercenary) families gained steady employment when Irish Kings began payment for services in land, which was usually an attempt to have them, live in their territory. Irish Bards and Historians were normally the only other group offered land incentives. MAC SUIBHNE were one of the most famous gallowglass families in Ireland. Attacking a member of the MAC SUIBHNE family would have been an attack on the King himself. Thus, Irish society bestowed great esteem on the gallowglass. A NOLAN marriage or DNA exchange in those intervening years would have been an honor or the commonality in these two families could be the result of the power and prestige related to having offspring in Irish society with various unrelated females, which introduced unrelated males into the structure of a clan resulting in DNA diversity: more than one DNA result per clan or surname.


    For instance, O'HUALLACHAIN (O'NOLAN), O'COBHTHAIGH (O'COFFEY), and O'HAODHA (O'HEA) or EGAN descend from the Corca Laoighdhe as do O'DRISCOLL. R1b1b2h (R1b1c10): DYS #385a and 385b at 11 and 17 - A Corca Luighe (Corca Laoidhe) and Ossory (Osraighe) Haplotype in Co. Donegal, Ulster, Ireland, 1600s details these Y-DNA haplotype matches, which do not support an illegitimate hereditary relationship of any kind. The high level genetic match of the O'MULGEEGH, O'BOILE’S, O'BOYLE, MCSWYNE'S, MACSWEENEY, O'MULGEEHY, O MAOLGHAOITHE, MACSUIBHNE family of Clandaholka Parish Co. Donegal who became WYNNE or WYNDHAM denotes a hereditary link to the Corca Laoighdhe and adoption of this surname by (O'HUALLACHAIN) O'NOLAN.


    NOLAN - WINDHAM
    PROBABILITY & TIME TO MOST RECENT COMMON ANCESTOR.

    98.55% Probability of a Shared Common Ancestor within 24 Generations:

    94.97% Probability of a Shared Common Ancestor within 20 Generations:

    2006 minus 1597* = 409 Years.

    2006 minus 1643* = 363 Years.


    * 1597 - THOMAS NOLAN purchased Enniscrone Castle Co. Sligo.

    * 1643 - JOHN NOWLIN living in Isle of Wight Co. VA.


    MCLAUGHLIN’S OF DONEGAL.

    “A sept could receive its herenagh lands in one of two ways. The position was an inherited one, but if the appointed herenagh sept died out, a new sept was chosen to take its place. Or a landholding sept could donate its lands to the church, receiving them back as "herenagh" lands, exempt from despoliation in times of war, in return acting as the lay official of the church, responsible for the repair and maintenance of the church. The herenagh families also paid an annual rent to the church, of livestock and produce. Because herenagh land was traditionally spared by marauding armies, many septs in the Inishowen peninsula, including the McLaughlin’s, donated their lands to the church to protect their livestock and possessions from the armies of the O'Donnell’s and the O'Neill’s.” (118)


    THE HERENAGH FAMILIES OF DONEGAL.

    “Clandaholka Parish.


    O'MULGEEGH; the O'Boile’s; the McSwyne’s; O'MULGEEHY - O MAOLGHAOITHE - according to McLysaght, now WYNNE or WYNDHAM; O'Boyle - O Baoilaigh; MacSweeney - Mac Suibhne.


    Mevaugh Parish.


    The sept of the O'NOLAN’S; O'NOLAN - O NUALLAIN.” (119)


    PATENT ROLLS OF JAMES I: INQUISITION AT LIFFORD, 1609.

    “Clandaholka Parish.


    Herenagh O'MULGEEGH; the O'Boile’s; the McSwyne’s; or freeholds: Clandaholka parish, containing 9 ballibetaghs whereof the herenagh O'MULGEEGH has 1 qr., who pays to the bishop of Raphoe 13s 4d Ir. rent, and 1l 13s 4d Ir. pension out of the bishop's thirds of the tithes, the bishop hass 1/3 qr. called Marfaugh, anciently inhabited by the sept of the O'Boile’s, for which 4s rent is paid, the McSwyne’s paid them a cosherie of 4 madders of butter and 8 madders of meal, whereof nothing has been paid in the time of the present bishop, about 3 miles from the church is a ruined chapel with 7 gorts of free land called Clonveg, the tenants of which paid 2s 4d yearly to the parson of Clondaholka in this parish, the parson, vicar, tithes and repairs are as in Faughan parish, the parson and vicar pay 8s Ir. proxies to the bishop and have 4 gorts of glebe between them, there are also 2 qrs. belonging to the late abbey of BallymcSwyne Odie besides Doe castle, the tithes and spirituallities of which are divided between the parishes of Clondaholka and Kilmacrenan;


    Mevaugh Parish.


    Herenagh the sept of the O'NOLAN’S; or freeholds: Mevaugh parish, containing 5 baalibetaghs, of which 1 qr. are church land enjoyed by the sept of the O'NOLAN’S, as herenaghs, who pay to the bishop of Raphoe 13s 4d Ir. and 1l Ir. pension out of the bishop's third of the tithes, the parson, vicar, tithes and repairs are as in Faughan parish, the parson and vicar pay 3s proxies each to the bishop, and have 2 gorts of glebe land between them, in this parish are 6 gorts of free land called Kinelargie, the proprietors of which paid 2s yearly to the official of Raphoe, there is also a chapel with 1/2 qr. of land called Druin which belonged to the Franciscan friars of Kilmacrenan who received 13s yearly out of it, the McSwyne’s challenged a cosherie of 4 meathers of butter and 8 meathers of meal from it;” (120)


    * Map of Co. Donegal.


    * Middle of county and at the top of the Co. Donegal map under the name Duneanaghy lies Clondehofkey and directly east of that is Mevugh Parish (Clandaholka and Mevaugh Parish).


    The MCSWYNE (O’MULGEEHY) WYNNE or WYNDHAM family of Clare Barony Co. Galway, 1574 and Clandaholka Parish Co. Donegal were a landholding sept within Connaught and Ulster. Kyliskiegh Castle and Cahirnefieke Castle in the barony of Clare Co. Galway and Doe Castle in Co. Donegal were three of several castles of this sept or family. The NOLAN’S were a landholding sept within the Connaught counties of Galway, Mayo, and Sligo. It is not surprising that this NOLAN sept would have expanded their landholdings into Ulster. An arranged marriage would have preserved and enhanced the (landholding) status within each sept. This is quite probably, where and how the two families connect through DNA.


    THE MANUSCRIPTS OF THE MARQUIS OF ORMONDE, PRESERVED AT THE CASTLE, KILKENNY, Vol. II.

    LIST OF TRANSPLANTED IRISH, 1655-1659.

    An Account of Lands Set Out To The Transplanted Irish In Connaught, 114-176.


    P. 154.



    * Son of THOMAS NOLAN, In England "Fitz" often indicates illegitimacy.


    P. 155.



    P. 156.



    P. 172.



    * Son of GREGORY NOLAN, In England "Fitz" often indicates illegitimacy.



    * Son of GREGORY NOLAN, In England "Fitz" often indicates illegitimacy.



    BOOKS OF SURVEY AND DISTRIBUTION: MOORGAGAGH, CO. MAYO

    "After the wars of the mid-seventeenth century, the English government needed solid information on land ownership throughout Ireland to carry out its policy of land redistribution. The Books of Survey and Distribution record ownership before the Cromwellian and Williamite confiscations, c.1641, and after, c.1666." (121) The above quote is from: Books of Survey and Distribution: Moorgagagh, Co. Mayo, Ireland.



    Books of Survey and Distribution, 483

    Books of Survey and Distribution, 484

    Books of Survey and Distribution, 485

    Books of Survey and Distribution, 488

    Books of Survey and Distribution, 489


    BOOKS OF SURVEY AND DISTRIBUTION.

    Names of Proprietors In 1641/Denomination of Lands/Forfeited Lands Conveyed.


    Parish of Magawnagh:



    Kilfyan Parish:



    Parish of Killala:



    Parish of Templemurry:



    CLANS AND CHIEFTAINS (IN IRELAND)

    "Forty years after the destruction of the old order in Ulster came the Cromwellian Transplantation to Connacht and Clare which resulted in the confiscation of the estates of great numbers of Catholic landowners and their settlement in smaller holdings in the West or in many cases their exile." (122) This supports the conclusion that the JOHN NOLAN and family evicted from Enniscrone Castle, 1641-42 may indeed have been exiled to the New World. The above quote is from: Clans and Chieftains (in Ireland).


    It is clear from the above Irish abstracts that JOHN NOLAN and his family were evicted from Enniscrone Castle in either 1641 or 1642. The castle was commandeered and JOHN NOLAN and his family may have been exiled to the New World or he fled to the New World voluntarily after the O'Dowd's and other Irish troops were garrisoned in his home. The above information from the Books of Survey and Distribution indicates that all of JOHN NOLAN'S land and holdings were confiscated and redistributed during the period 1641-1666. This evidence also supports the theory that JOHN NOWLIN living in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 may indeed be the JOHN NOLAN evicted from Enniscrone Castle, 1641-42 or an offspring. JOHN NOLAN and family lived in Co. Sligo forty-four years prior to the troubles of 1641 and, thus, the possibility of estrangement from extended family living in Mayo and Galway apply.


    The list of Cromwellian evictions for Co. Sligo, Ireland includes JOHN NOLAN, EDMOND and MILMORY MCSWINE, GILCOLLUM O’HIGIN, and TEIG O’HIGIN. The list and accompanied information suggest that JOHN NOLAN received other land in Connaught as compensation after a legal battle. The threat of violence toward family members, exile, deportation, and execution forced many to the New World. Other estranged members of the extended JOHN NOLAN family may indeed have sought legal restitution twenty years later as described below; however, it is a reasonably understandable deduction that the JOHN NOWLIN living in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 was a member of this exiled family evicted from Enniscrone Castle.


    Jewel NOLEN in The NOLEN Story continues: "In County Galway, Ireland is found one PATRICK NOLAN who married in 1667, Anne Brown. To this union was born at least one son, named JOHN, who was married in 1709 to Ellis Brabazon, and had issue, by her of among other children, a son named PATRICK. This PATRICK had at least one son, JOHN NOLAN, of Galway.


    Not without distinction in Ireland, where many bearers of the name appear to have been landed gentry and ancient nobility, the family was represented among the early British colonists in the New World.” (123)


    The following paragraphs explain the reasoning behind the assumption that JOHN NOLAN and family forcefully evicted from Enniscrone Castle Co. Sligo on a January night in 1642 is the JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight Co. VA, 1643:


    1. JOHN (NOLAN) NOWLIN of Isle of Wight Co. VA, 1643 forcefully evicted from Enniscrone Castle Co. Sligo on a January night in 1642, 2. THOMAS (TOMAS O'HUALLACHAIN) NOLAN purchased Enniscrone Castle for his son JOHN after 1597, 3. THOMAS (TOMAS O'HUALLACHAIN) NOLAN lived in Ballinrobe Castle Co. Mayo until his death on 18 June 1628, 4. Sligo Co. is a border county to Ulster Province Ireland, and 5. The threat of violence, torture, and execution caused many Irish families to flee to the New World.


    Therefore, when the troubles of 1641 (Civil War in Ireland between English Protestants and Irish Catholics) began JOHN NOLAN and his immediate family probably would have been separated and estranged from the main body of his family in Co. Mayo and Galway for more than forty years. Consequently, when trouble strikes a family that has been estranged or removed from the main body of a family for that long of a duration it behooves that part of the family to rely on its own initiative and ingenuity to solve that particular family problem.


    Thus, this isolated part of the NOLAN family would have had nowhere else to turn for help when the O'Dowd’s managed to recruit Irish Catholics to storm the NOLAN Castle of Enniscrone. Colonial Virginia was an English Colony, however, THOMAS NOLAN had received a grant or license to sell spirits or liquor by the English, and that is how this family gained wealth by cooperating with the English rulers of Ireland. They were Irish Catholics who cooperated and gained considerable wealth under English rule until the troubles of 1641 forced them out of Ireland.


    Enniscrone Castle is on the extreme West Coast of Ireland. After the forceful eviction by an Irish mob that no doubt was after blood. JOHN NOLAN and family would have had no choice but to flee the short distance to the coast and wait for transportation. The troubles of 1641 in Ireland went on for years resulting in the torture, killing, and execution of many people. At least 150,000 Ulster Irish fled to the New World by the American Revolution and Charles A. Hanna estimated that figure as more than 333,000 in a two-volume work on the subject of The Scotch-Irish or the Scot in North Britain, North Ireland, and North America published in 1902.


    JOHN NOWLIN LIVING IN ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1643.

    JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 was most likely from the same family, a son, of the JOHN NOLAN who was living in Enniscrone Castle Co. Sligo during the years 1641-42, if not the same individual. Perhaps, some family members of this landholding lineage of the Connaught branch of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN migrated out of the Connaught counties of Galway, Mayo, and Sligo into the Ulster counties of Donegal and Fermanagh. It is widely accepted that 150,000 or more Ulster Irish were residing in North America prior to the American Revolution. Charles A. Hanna estimated that figure as more than 333,000 in a two-volume work on the subject of The Scotch-Irish or the Scot in North Britain, North Ireland, and North America published in 1902. Upon dispossession some members of the JOHN NOLAN family of Enniscrone Castle may have moved to Dublin petitioning for the return of Connaught property twenty years later.


    CARTE CALENDAR VOLUME 37, AUGUST - OCTOBER 1663; BODLEIAN LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.

    Petition of JOHN NOLAN to the Duke of Ormond, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

    Recites the recovery in the Court of Claims by Lord Viscount Dillon, of certain lands formerly allotted to, and possessed by, Petitioner. ...

    Prays for reprisals by the grant of a custodiam of the lands of Brodallagh & Ballivanan ... now in the hands of Ulick Burke, esquire. ...


    Subjoined 1:


    A Certificate of the Consent of Ulick Burke, esquire, to the grant of a custodiam of the lands of Brodallagh & Ballyvanan, to JOHN NOLAN, aforesaid.

    Subjoined 2:


    An Order, by the Duke of Ormond, upon the Petition of JOHN NOLAN, calendared above.

    Petition of JOHN NOLAN to the Duke of Ormond.

    Recites particulars of petitioner's dispossession, under a late Decree of the Court of Claims, made on behalf of the Lord Viscount Dillon, of 800 acres of land [in the province of Connaught] formerly set forth to petitioner. Prays to be, in part, reprized out of the lands of "Brodillagh and Clonbanon, lately in the possession of Sir John Bellew, ... which were, by way of custodiam, granted to Ulick Bourke, esquire", ... who, it is added, consents thereto.


    Annexed:


    An Order upon this Petition, directing a grant, in custodiam, of the lands prayed for; the consent recited being declared in the Court of Exchequer, and the petitioner giving recognizance therein for due payment of the rent, reserved.


    It is conceivable that JOHN NOLAN of Enniscrone Castle married into the O'MULGEEHY, (O MAOLGHAOITHE) MCSWYNE, WYNNE or WYNDHAM, family of Co. Galway and Donegal, but it is also possible that JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 was from the province of Ulster. The 33 of 37 Y-DNA marker match between N-4 of the NOLAN DNA Surname Project and Kit #56134 from the WINDHAM Family DNA Project may have occurred in Isle of Wight Co. VA in the early 1640's since both families were represented in the early history of Isle of Wight Co. VA, or as described above the NOLAN - WINDHAM DNA match could have occurred between these two 1574 Galway castle owning families who were also Herenagh Families of Donegal Co. Ireland. An exact match of the first 20 markers (13, 24, 14, 10, 11, 17, 12, 12, 12, 14, 13, 30, 17, 9, 10, 11, 11, 25, 15, and 19) in the Y-DNA test of N-4 with RICHARD (O') HAGAN also gives credence to a possible Ulster relationship. A WINDHAM - NOLAN DNA comparison provided by JOHN B. WINDHAM details a 25 Y-DNA marker match between N-3 and Kit # 18393 and a 61-62 of 67 Y-DNA marker match between Kit # 18393 and N-4. Incidentally, Kit # 18393 mismatches RICHARD O’HAGAN by one in a 20-marker comparison. Yellow denotes haplotype differences.


    Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught R1b1c10 Unique 20-marker Haplotype Matches:

    DYS
    393
    DYS
    390
    DYS
    19
    DYS
    391
    DYS
    385a
    DYS
    385b
    DYS
    426
    DYS
    388
    DYS
    439
    DYS
    389-1
    DYS
    392
    DYS
    389-2
    DYS
    458
    DYS
    459a
    DYS
    459b
    DYS
    455
    DYS
    454
    DYS
    447
    DYS
    437
    DYS
    448
    ID #
    13 24 14 10 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 30 18 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 King Colla Uais
    13 24 14 10 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 R1bSTR43

    N-3 mismatches the King Colla Uais 20-marker haplotype at DYS #385b, 389-1, 389-2, and 458. N-4 mismatches the King Colla Uais 20-marker haplotype at DYS #385b, 389-1, and 458. N-30 (brother to N-4) mismatches the King Colla Uais 20-marker haplotype at DYS #385b, 389-1, 389-2, and 458. N-3, N-4, and N-30 mismatch the 20-marker haplotype of R1bSTR43 at DYS #385b, 389-1, and 389-2.

    N-4 and N-30 are brothers of the same mother and father, but mutations at DYS #389-2 and 464c for N-4 with a genetic distance of two at the 25-marker level compared to N-30 leaves N-30 with a more precise genetic match with N-3 and 9ZZVM - Windham at the 25-marker level than with N-4.

    DYS
    393
    DYS
    390
    DYS
    19
    DYS
    391
    DYS
    385a
    DYS
    385b
    DYS
    426
    DYS
    388
    DYS
    439
    DYS
    389-1
    DYS
    392
    DYS
    389-2
    DYS
    458
    DYS
    459a
    DYS
    459b
    DYS
    455
    DYS
    454
    DYS
    447
    DYS
    437
    DYS
    448
    DYS
    449
    DYS
    464a
    DYS
    464b
    DYS
    464c
    DYS
    464d
    ID #
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 17 17 N-3 - Nolen
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 15 17 N-4 - Nolen R1b1c10
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 17 17 N-30 - Nolen (brother to N-4)

    The three below HAGAN DNA results from Y-Search have an exact 20-marker match with N-4 resulting in an ancient relationship prior to the introduction of surnames through parallel subclades of R-P312. N-3 and N-30 mismatch by one mutation at DYS 389-2. User ID # 5GGTH lists Carrickmore, Ulster, Ireland as country of origin.

    DYS
    393
    DYS
    390
    DYS
    19
    DYS
    391
    DYS
    385a
    DYS
    385b
    DYS
    426
    DYS
    388
    DYS
    439
    DYS
    389-1
    DYS
    392
    DYS
    389-2
    DYS
    458
    DYS
    459a
    DYS
    459b
    DYS
    455
    DYS
    454
    DYS
    447
    DYS
    437
    DYS
    448
    ID #
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 5GGTH - Hagan
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 N2F3B - Hagan
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 30 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 YNXPB - Hagan

    Three of the following WINDHAM/WYNDHAM Y-Search participants claim descent from England: JCBWN, P6D2Y, and QT7HT, however, mutations at DYS 389-2 for N-4 and the HAGAN surname at 30, N-3, N-30 and WINDHAM at 31 results in an ancient Irish relationship prior to the introduction of surnames through parallel subclades of R-P312.

    DYS
    393
    DYS
    390
    DYS
    19
    DYS
    391
    DYS
    385a
    DYS
    385b
    DYS
    426
    DYS
    388
    DYS
    439
    DYS
    389-1
    DYS
    392
    DYS
    389-2
    DYS
    458
    DYS
    459a
    DYS
    459b
    DYS
    455
    DYS
    454
    DYS
    447
    DYS
    437
    DYS
    448
    DYS
    449
    DYS
    464a
    DYS
    464b
    DYS
    464c
    DYS
    464d
    ID #
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 JCBWN - Windham
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 28 15 15 17 17 9ZZVM - Windham
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 P6D2Y - Windham
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 QT7HT - Windham
    13 24 14 10 11 17 12 12 12 14 13 31 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 19 29 15 15 17 17 V43N7 - Windham

    The O’HAGAN (O hAgain in Irish, which was originally O hOgain) family also descends from the ruling Ui Neill, O’Neill's, of Ulster, and were hereditary stewards, sheriffs, and judges considered part of that sept. O'HAGAN’S stood with Hugh O'Neill, the last of the native Irish kings, in his rebellion against England. Hugh O'Neill, in the tradition of the times, took the remnants of his fortune and sailed to Spain. The O'HAGAN’S were not as fortunate, being totally dispossessed of lands and possessions in the plantations that followed Hugh O'Neill’s defeat. Clan Colgan, from which O’HUALLACHAIN (NOLAN) descended, is in Septs of the Ui Neill descending from Fearghal, High King of Ireland, dying 718 (Common Era) C. E.


    The O’HAGAN'S (O hAgain), a sept of the Cineal Eoghain, are recorded as descendants of Fergus, son of Eoghan with the following families in Roger O'Ferrall's "Linea Antiqua": O'COLGAN, O'Branagan, O'HAGIN, O'Cahalan, O'Uarisg, O'Brelar, O'Hanin, O'Dovan, O'Losgny, O'Mellan, O'CONOLAN, O'Spellan, and O'Breonan. Fergus was also ancestor to the O'QUIN'S, as described in Background on the Northern Uí Neill. O'QUIN later spawned the family of WYNDHAM-QUINN. Included in the background of the Northern Ui Neill is evidence pertaining to the O'BOYLE'S, MAC SUIBHNE, and MACSWEENEY septs that became WYNDHAM of Co. Donegal. A History of the HOGAN, O'HOGAN, Ó HOGAIN Surname reflects a separate origin in Co. Cork as a sept of the Corca Laoidhe.


    *Hy-Many Map.
    Click Image to Enlarge.

    * It is interesting to note on the above map that the septs of the Ui Colgain are settled in western Connacht in the territory of the Ui Briuin Seola. JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 could have also descended from a sept of this clan which migrated into Ulster "following the coming of the Normans beginning in the 13th century, a portion of ancient Ui Maine later became known as the district of Clanricarde, named for a branch of the Burke family. This included much of the baronies of Loughrea, Kiltartan, Clare, Dunkellin, Athenry and Leitrim, in Co. Galway, according to O'Donovan." (124) This quote is from (Ui-Maine or Hy-Maine).


    Other scenarios for the DNA relationship between these families are consistent with a Connaught or Ulster Ireland connection. MAC SUIBHNE were gallowglass (gallóglaigh) Scottish hired mercenaries to the Kings of Ireland beginning in the fourteenth century. An extramarital event or impregnation is, therefore, a possible answer to the question of relatedness, which may have occurred in either Ulster or Connaught.


    “Dubhghall, the founder of the branch according to Leabhar Chlainne Suibhne, was slain in 1356, although in the Book of Ballymote (ca. 1400) six of his grandsons are said to belong to Mac Suibhne of Connacht. The eldest of these, Toirdhealbhach, who is described in A. F. M. as Ard Chonsapal Connacht, or High Constable of Connacht, was slain in battle with two of his brothers, Donnchadh and Donn SIéibhe in 1397.” (125)


    With the existing evidence, it is an accurate assessment that JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 was a member of the landholding lineage of the Connaught branch of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN which migrated out of the Connaught counties of Galway, Mayo, and Sligo into the Ulster counties of Donegal and Fermanagh becoming one of the Herenagh Families of Donegal Co. Ireland. Upon dispossession, deportation to the New World became common practice in the following years. JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 was also most likely the grandfather of WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) of Goochland County, Virginia, 1740 and of Albemarle County, Virginia, 1744. “There was a NOWLIN family in Goochland Co. VA from the 1600's,” according to a genealogy forum posting by Susan Peters Zmrzel. (126) She evidently is relying on The Nicolaus Heinrich Crist Account Book - Nicolaus Heinrich Crist (1716-1783) & Ana Catherin NOWLIN (1720-1783). Parts of Henrico County, one of the original shires, were used to form Goochland Co. in 1728.


    ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY DEEDS, WILLS & GUARDIAN ACCOUNT BOOK A, 1636-1767.

    1 Dec 1643 Thomas HESSON to William BRUNT for 1000 pounds tobacco...? acres on south side of JOHN NOWLIN adjoining James WATSON. Mention is made of John SEWARD and Mr. Robert PITT. Wit: JOHN NOWLIN; Rec: 19 Oct 1644; Signed: Thomas HESSON.


    NORTH CAROLINA: THE OLD NORTH STATE.

    OLD ALBEMARLE AS VIRGINIA’S FIRST FRONTIER.

    P. 41.


    “If there were in Virginia by 1650, as was estimated at that time, 15,000 white people, it is probable that some of them had pushed their settlements across the watershed dividing the streams of southeastern Virginia from those flowing into Albemarle Sound.” (127)


    THE NICOLAUS HEINRICH CRIST ACCOUNT BOOK - NICOLAUS HEINRICH CRIST (1716-1783) & ANA CATHERIN NOWLIN (1720-1783).

    25 December 1738 - Page 44. Sir JOHN HENRY NOWLIN, Esquire and his wife ANA ELIZABETH TILLMAN NOWLIN extended an invite to me and my brothers to share a feast with them. We took him up on it. I asked Sir JOHN for his daughter CATHERIN'S hand in marriage. He approved with a hearty handshake. Everybody was happy during this festive time.


    25 January 1739 - Page 46. ANNA CATHERINE became my wife today. Rev. Henrie Dreher performed the ceremony. We are so happy. So many friends neighbors and relatives came to our wedding. We got married in the little Lutheran Church here in the Colony on the Monongahela River. Catherine teaches school in the little church during the week.


    25 January 1739 - Page 60. Nicholaus Heinrich Crist borne in the year of our Lord 29 October 1716 married CATHERIN NOWLIN.


    2 August 1739 - Page 52. This account Book gave to me by my parents when I left the old Country is a fine gift. They gave one to all five of us. I will pass it on to my son. CATHERIN is with child.


    29 October 1739 - Page 52. John Jacob Crist was borne in the year of our Lord 29 October 1739. CATHERIN was nineteen today and I was twenty three.


    14 April 1749 - Page 70. Sir JOHN HENRY NOWLIN, Esquire and his wife ANA ELIZABETH, along with two sons JOHN HENRY and WILLIAM GEORGE and a daughter MARY ELIZABETH drowned. They left seven days ago to call on a brother of Sir JOHN’S that was very ill. The river was high and it was rough but Sir JOHN thought that they would be safe on the raft that we had built. The bodies was found yesterday down the river about halfway between Sir JOHN’S place and his brothers. We will bury them on the land that Sir JOHN loved so much.


    15 June 1749 - Page 71. ANA CATHERINE was with child when her parents, brothers and sister drowned. We named her Mary Elizabeth Crist after Catherin's Mother and Sister. She was borne in the year of our Lord 14 June 1749 and died the next day. We buried her next to Sir JOHN and his family on his land.


    20 August 1749 - Page 74. I am so worried about ANA CATHERIN. It has been a while since we lost our loved ones and she is still not well. I do not know how me and our sons can face life without her. I have got to do something to bring her back to her old self, but what? The people in the Colony are so good to us. The other women are so helpful.


    22 December 1749 - Page 76. We moved into Sir JOHN’S place today it is bigger. ANA CATHERIN seems a lot better. My prayers has been answered. She is talking about teaching school again. She has been teaching our sons since they was borne but now she wants to teach others that want to learn to read and write like she did before we married.


    24 December 1776 - Page 120. I guess that I am more scared now than I was coming across the ocean to America. We have six sons in Washington's Continental Army. CATHERIN and me are doing the best we can to take care of our daughters and grandchildren. Everyone is working hard from day break until dark trying to keep things going. We have seen bad times but it is worse now. Our food that we have stored is low. It seems that every one around us is in bad shape. The only thing that we can do is pray that it will get better and soon be over. Me and CATHERIN are so tired and scared, not for ourselves but for our loved ones. (128)


    Evidence is presented below that THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN), Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught, and JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) are both living in the Beaver Dam Creek area of Henrico County, Virginia in the early 1700's. As early as the 1630’s Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN possessed a JAMES NOWLAN, of Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo. It is, therefore, likely that THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) and JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) of Henrico and Goochland Co. Virginia are related through the three Offaly - Kilkenny Clans: Connaught, Kilkenny (Ossory), or Tipperary Clan O'Nolan. The children of JOHN NOWLIN of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1643 who was previously living in Enniscrone Castle during the year 1641-42 are related to THOMAS NOLAN of Ballinrobe Castle and Offaly - Kilkenny: Connaught.


    Evidence is also presented below that THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) who died Goochland County, Virginia, 1729 may be the father of said WILLIAM. THOMAS NOLIN is in James City County Virginia, 1717. James City County is one county north and west of Isle of Wight County.





    THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) OF JAMES CITY COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1717; DIED: GOOCHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1729.

    THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN), who died in 1729 Goochland County, Virginia, was one of the first New World born NOLAN'S (NOWLIN'S) of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught. The possibility that he could be a brother to JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) of Carlow Clan O'NOLAN who came to the New World around 1700 has been discounted. John Ryan in The History of Carlow County, Ireland, states the possibility of there being two more brothers beyond that of JAMES, JOHN, and WILLIAM. The fact that JOHN NOLAN (NOWLIN), Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught, was in Isle of Wight, Co. VA, 1643 presents the opportunity of children. Thus, through research not available to John Ryan, THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN), who died in 1729 Goochland Co. Virginia, and JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) of Henrico and Goochland Co. Virginia have been firmly placed in the genealogical tree of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught and with regard to JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) placed in either Kilkenny (Ossory), or Tipperary Clan O'Nolan.


    John Ryan obviously did not consider the existence of JAMES NOWLAN, of Ballinrobe, or of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’Nolan: Connaught. The most exciting avenue of research to date is that both these men THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) and JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) are related through the three clans of Offaly - Kilkenny O'NOLAN. THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) and JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) and their families were residing in the same location of Beaver Dam Creek in the early 1700's.


    THE STRAFFORD INQUISITION OF CO. MAYO (R. I. A. MS 24 E 15).

    BARONY OF BURRISHOOLE.

    P. 25.


    "Said lord viscount did also, on 6 August 1632, purchase of JAMES NOWLAN, of Ballinrobe, gent. 1/2 cartron in the half qr of Rosstwogh; and 1/2 cartron in the half qr Irrishane, in the town of Ballytarsny for the consideration of £5 st." (129)


    Therefore, THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN), who died in 1729 Goochland County, Virginia, has been designated a descendant of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught. And JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) of Beaver Dam Creek in Goochland Co. has also been designated an Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN member of either Kilkenny (Ossory), or Tipperary Clan O'NOLAN. According to Goochland County VA, Wills and Deeds, 1736-1742 and Henrico County, VA Wills and Deeds, 1707-1737, JAMES NOWLAND (NOWLIN) (NOWLING) resided on the North side of James River on Beaver Dam Creek.


    GOOCHLAND CO. VA WILLS & DEEDS, 1736-1742.

    Deed 20 March 1737, Amos Lead of Goochland Co., to John Pleasants of Henrico Co., for 50 [pounds] 250 acres on North side of James River next to Constant Lead, JAMES NOWLAND, and Buffalo Branch of Beaver Dam Creek. Wit: Stephen Woodson, William Hatcher, Thomas Childrey, Henry Sharp. Signed: Amos Lead. Recorded: 22 March 1737.



    HENRICO CO. VA DEEDS, 1707-1737.

    P. 138 Amos Ladd of St. James Parish, Henrico Co., for love and affection to my son Constantine Ladd, land on lower Beaver Dam Creek, next to JAMES NOWLING and Amos Ladd, Jr., 130 acres. 29 Sept 1727. Wit: Amos (A) Ladd, Jr., John (IL) Ladd, Joseph Ashlin. Signed: Amos (A) Ladd. Recorded: 2 Oct 1727.


    Below is listed an Henrico Co. VA Deed placing THOMAS NOLUN (NOLIN) on the North side of James River on Beaver Dam Creek in 1717. According to Colonial Wills of Henrico Co. VA, JAMES NOWLIN is in Henrico Co., 1720.


    COLONIAL WILLS OF HENRICO CO. VA.

    Court, 1 August 1720. P. 40, Sarah Hughes is granted administration of estate of John Hughes; Nicholas Cox and Benjamin Woodson, Security; Amos Lead, JAMES NOWLIN, John Pledge, and John Johnson to appraise his estate.



    HENRICO COUNTY VA DEEDS, 1706-1737.

    P. 211, 1 Nov. 1717 Charles Evans of Charles City Co., to THOMAS NOLIN of James City Co., for 8/6/8, 100 acres on north side of James River on Beaver Dam Creek, being part of a grant to Evans. 16 June 1714, 577 acres. Wit: Michael Cantepie, Jean Ponvielle. Signed: C. Evans. Recorded 4 Nov. 1717.


    Goochland Co. VA Wills and Deeds, 1728-1736 has John Bolling living next to JAMES NOWLAND (NOWLIN) (NOWLING)


    GOOCHLAND CO. VA WILLS AND DEEDS, 1728-1736.

    P. 449, Deed: 16 July 1733, Amos Lead and Constant Lead, son of said Amos, of Goochland Co., to John Bolling of Henrico Co., for 50 [pounds] 216 acres bounded by the mill belonging to the said Bolling on Horse Pen Creek, a branch of Beaver Dam Creek, and next to JAMES NOWLING. Wit: John Fleming, Leon'd Ballowe, Jos. (+) Price, James (I) Westbrook Signed: Amos (AL) Lead, Constantine (L) Lead. Recorded: 15 Jan 1733.


    Below are listed: A Goochland Co. VA Deed that has THOMAS NOLUN (NOLIN) buying property bounded by Bolling and the inventory of THOMAS NOLUN (NOLIN'S) estate, and a Goochland Co. VA Deed of Nicholas Davies witnessed by WILLIAM NOWLAND in 1740. Robert Hughes is listed in the below document as living next to Nicholas Davies. Robert Hughes is also listed in the inventory of THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN'S) estate. And here is a Nicholas Davies deed witnessed by JAMES NOWLIN in Goochland Co., 1734.


    GOOCHLAND CO. VA WILLS AND DEEDS, 1728-1736.

    Deed: 26 July 1734, William Bradley of St. James Parish, Goochland Co., to Nich's Davies, Gent, of county and parish of Henrico, for 12/10 [pounds/shillings] land on Muddy Creek on South side of James River, 400 acres, bounded by Robt. Hughes, Muddy Creek, Math. Cox, Robt. Carter. Wit: JAMES NOWLIN, John Henson, Tho. Moseley. Signed: William (W) Bradley. Recorded: 20 Aug 1734.


    P. 190, Inventory of THOMAS NOLUN of St. James Parish, Goochland Co. dec'd, taken by court order of May 1730 by Thomas Walker, Frederick Cox, Robert Hughes. Recorded 19 May 1730.


    GOOCHLAND COUNTY VA: DEED RECORDS, 1740.

    P. 409, Deed: 23 Jan 1740, Nicholas Davies from Robert Hughes of St. James Parish, Goochland Co. for 4 [pounds or shillings], 2 acres on east side of Muddy Creek opposite mouth of School House branch. Wit: Sam'l Scott, Isac Hughes, John (I) Creasee, WILL. (M) NOWLAND. Signed: Robert Hughes Recorded 16 June 1741.


    Ten years earlier, Goochland County December Court, 1730 has an Action of Trespass between WILLIAM NO___? and STEPHEN HUGHES. It is listed below.


    GOOCHLAND COUNTY ORDER BOOK 2, 1730-1731.

    P. 63, In the Action of Trespass in the case between WILLIAM NO___?, Plaintiff, and STEPHEN HUGHES, Defendant, the Defendant appears at biling [filing] to plead on the Plaintiffs motion. Judgment by which ___? is granted ___? against the Defendant. For what damages hath __? _______? in this suit to be discharged ____? _____?. The Defendant shall plead at the next court.


    GOOCHLAND COUNTY VA: DEED RECORDS, 1728.

    P. 32, Deed 19 Aug. 1728 John Quin and Susanna his wife of Goochland Co. to THOMAS NOLUN of Hanover Co., for 100 [pounds], 350 acres on south side of James River at Mahook Creek, bounded by Bolling, Mahook Creek, line of [Jacob] Michaux, dec'd, with all houses, etc. Wit: James Skelton, Fra. Hamilton; Recorded: 20 Aug. 1728 Susanna Quin, wife of John, acknowledged her deed.


    The above deed of THOMAS NOLUN for 19 Aug 1728 and the below deed of AGNES NOLAND for 16 May 1732 mention the line of Jacob Michaux, deceased, and that of Bolling. This land was listed as the escheated property of THOMAS NOLAND. AGNES NOLAND has proven to be the widow of THOMAS NOLUN. Escheated meaning reverting back to the state or crown due to lack of heirs. Thomas and Agnes may have had children not yet of age.


    GOOCHLAND COUNTY VA: DEED RECORDS, 1732.

    P. 321, Deed: 16 May 1732, AGNES NOLAND of Goochland Co., to William Wilkison of same, carpenter, for 25 [pounds], 350 acres on South side of James River on Mahook Creek, bounded by Bolling, [Jacob] Michaux, dec'd, and granted to AGNES NOLAND: 6 May 1732. Wit: Allen Howard, Nowell Burton, Henry Hampton (H), Signed: William Wilkison, AGNES (A) NOLAND. Recorded: 16 May 1732.



    GOOCHLAND COUNTY VA WILLS, 1742-1749.


    For a list of documents in order by year, state, and country: O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) (NOLEN) Census, Deed, & Land Records, 195-1990.


           




    WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1740 & ALBEMARLE COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1744.

    The evidence presented shows a family migration from Albemarle (formed in 1744) to Amherst (formed in 1761) to Buckingham (formed in 1761) south to Bedford, Henry & Franklin Co. VA and further south into Washington Co. North Carolina now Tennessee. New county formations throughout Virginia and burned county records complicate the journey of family discovery. It seems clear that WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) and his family were in Buckingham Co. VA after it formed in 1761. Below is a survey record of NOLAND, WILLIAM 6 Apr 1744 400 acres on Arthur's Creek of Slate River. That land was patented in 1747. It is in present day Buckingham County, Virginia according to Genealogical Records of Buckingham County, Virginia.


    GENEALOGICAL RECORDS OF BUCKINGHAM COUNTY VIRGINIA.

    Pg. 118. "The next group of abstracts taken from Albemarle surveys, are thought to refer to land in Buckingham County." (130)


    WILLIAM NOLAND of Albemarle conveyed 200 acres on Arthur's Creek of Slate River to THOMAS BLAKEY of Goochland County on 8 Sept 1748.


    Circumstantial evidence also provides evidence that the family was in Buckingham County. A Residents Petition to the VA House of Delegates, 1785 - Buckingham Co. VA signed by JOHN STOVALL & THOMAS BLAKY offer proof that the family was in Buckingham County.



    WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) is in Albemarle County, VA formed in 1744. This NOLEN line has extensive roots in the South. Albemarle Co. VA was formed from Goochland Co. VA in 1744. There is a THOMAS NOLUN in Goochland Co. VA from 1728-1729. Deed records for Goochland Co. VA show WILLIAM NOWLAND in Goochland Co. prior to the formation of Albemarle. In 1730, Goochland Co. VA has listed the record of inventory for THOMAS NOLUN'S estate.


    ALBEMARLE CO. VA ROAD ORDERS, 1744-1748.

    Albemarle Co. VA Road Orders, 1744-1748.


    13 February 1746 O. S. P. 219.


    Ordered ARTHUR McDANIEL be Overseer in the Room of WILLIAM CABELL Gent. from the head of Sycamore Island Creek to Glovers Road and that the hands of WILLIAM NOWLAND, Mrs. PATTESON, JOHN RIPLEY, JAMES GATES, THOMAS TURPIN, ABRAHAM SMITH, ANTHONY BINNIS, JOHN GORDON, SACHEVEREL WHITEBREAD, SAMUEL BAILY and ROBERTSON BAILY’S hands do Clear the same.


    14 August 1746 O. S. P. 143.


    Ordered a Road from NICHOLAS DAVIS Plantation at the Blue Ridge falls to Beaver Creek be Opened and that the Male Tithes of NICHOLAS DAVIS, WILLIAM STITH, JOHN BOLLING, and GEORGE STOBALL do clear the same. JOHN STONE, Overseer. It is likewise Ordered the said Road be Carried from thence to the South End of Slate River Mountains and that the Hands on the South Side the main river between Beaver Creek and Slate River Mountain do Clear the same JAMES CHRISTIAN, Overseer, and that the said Road be carried from thence a Cross Slate River near the Mouth of the Great Creek and that ALLEN HOWARD do mark off the said Road.


    9 April 1747 O. S. P. 268.


    Ordered the Male Tithables of TYE CHAMBERLAIN, WILLIAM MOOR, JOHN ANTHONY’S, HENRY MARTIN, THOMAS CRAWLEY, SAMUEL CRAWLEY, THOMAS GOOLSBY and JOHN GOOLSBY do Clear the Road from the Court House to MARTIN KINGS Road, JOHN ANTHONY, Overseer.


    A survey record from 1 Jan 1744 to 10 June 1745 for Albemarle Co. VA lists William NOLAND or NOWLAND as residing on 400 acres.


    ALBEMARLE COUNTY COURT ORDER BOOK, 1744/45-1745/46.

    Joshua Fry Gent: Surveyor of this County presented a List of the Surveys made by him from the first of Jan: 1744 to June xxlO. 1745. Ordered to be Recorded.


    A true and perfect List of All the Surveys made by me in the County of Albemarle and Parish of Saint Anns &c. Acres.



    ALBEMARLE COUNTY SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK 1.

    Note: Old Albemarle County before 1761 included the present day counties of Amherst, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Nelson and a part of Appomattox. It did not include the northern part of present day Albemarle Co. until 1761, which was Fredericksville Parish, a part of Louisa Co. In the 1740's and 1750's, the part of the James River above the Rivanna River was generally called the Fluvanna River, although occasionally you will find the use of James.


    Page, Grantee, Survey Date, Acres, Notes, Neighbors, etc.



    ALBEMARLE COUNTY WILLS & DEEDS NO. 1748-1752.

    8 Sept 1748.


    THIS INDENTURE made the Eight day of September in year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and Forty eight Between WILLIAM NOLAND of County of Albemarle of one part and THOMAS BLAKEY of County of GOOCHLAND of other part Witnesseth that WILLIAM NOLAND for Fifty pounds of lawfull money of Virginia doth sell unto THOMAS BLAKEY his heirs one certain parcell of land containing Two hundred acres being in Albemarle County of ARTHURS CREEK of SLATE RIVER which said Two hundred acres of land is part of Four hundred acres which was granted unto WILLIAM NOLAND by Patent bearing date the Twentieth day of August One thousand seven hundred and Forty seven in the Twenty first year of his Majesties Reign it being the part of said tract of land whereon WILLIAM NOLAND now dwelleth situate together with the Improvements thereon made To have and to hold said Plantation and tract of land with the appurtenances unto THOMAS BLAKY his heirs and assigns forever. In Witness whereof WILLIAM NOLAND to these presents hath set his hand and Seal in the presence of us Witness: ISAAC BATES, WILLIAM NOLAND.


    JOHN WATKINS, PATK. NAPIER Albemarle Set, March Court MDCCXLVIII


    This Deed vith Livery of Seizin & the Receipt was presented in Court by said NOLAND & by him acknowledged to be his act and deed & on motion of THOMAS BLAKY was ordered to be recorded, JANE; the Wife of said WILLIAM NOLAND having been first privately examined relinquished her right of Dover to the within granted lands & premises.


    DEED ABSTRACTS OF ALBEMARLE CO. VA 1758-1761.

    9 November 1758.


    26, ALBEMARLE COUNTY, DEED BOOK 2.


    THIS INDENTURE made this ninth day of November one thousand seven hundred and fifty eight between WILLIAM NOWLIN of one party & JOHN NOWLIN of the other party Witnesseth that WILLIAM NOWLIN doth give unto the said JOHN NOWLIN Two hundred acres of land lying on the lower side of my plantation being part of the tract of land lying on both sides of Arthur's Creek .. in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal the day & date above written. ....Presence WM. CHAMBERS, THOMAS BLAKEY. WILLIAM\X/NOWLIN.


    Another possible relative of WILLIAM NOWLIN is an ELENDER NOWLIN who married Robert Willis and had son William Willis born 20 September 1760 in Goochland Co. VA. William Willis “enlisted for service in the Revolutionary War at Williamsburg, VA in the winter of 1775. He must have been on speaking terms with Gen. George Washington because he was discharged in February of 1778 "at a camp called Valley Forge." William Willis married Elizabeth at a date unknown. William is buried in Post Oak Graveyard.” (131) The above quote is from Wigton-Walkers: Captain Joseph R. Walker A Family Tree.


    1,000 YEARS OF O'NOLAN HISTORY IN IRELAND & THE NEW WORLD: MICHAEL O'NOLAN, COUNTY GALWAY - 1473, (ESTIMATED BIRTH: 1410-1440) AND THE DESCENDANTS OF DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) & JULIAN FALLON OF GALWAY - 1500, DONELL OGE O’HOLOGHAN (O’NOLAN) OWNER OF QWAROWN BROWN (CARROWBROWNE) CASTLE - 1574, TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN (THOMAS NOLAN) & AGNES MARTIN, BALLINROBE CASTLE, MAYO COUNTY IRELAND - PRIOR TO 1585 THOMAS NOLAN RESIDED AT "THE CREVAGHE" (CREAGH CASTLE) PURCHASING ENNISCRONE CASTLE IN COUNTY SLIGO AFTER 1597 DYING 18 JUNE 1628; JOHN NOLAN & FAMILY ATTACKED AND FORCEFULLY EVICTED FROM ENNISCRONE CASTLE, 1641-42; JOHN NOWLIN LIVING IN ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1643; THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) OF JAMES CITY COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1717; WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1740.


    Part I. HISTORY OF CARLOW CLAN O'NOLAN AND TIPPERARY CLAN O'NOLAN.


    Part III. DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1740 & ALBEMARLE COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1744.


    Part IV. O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLEN) (NOWLIN) (NOLUN) (NOLIN) (NOWLING) (NOLEN) CENSUS, DEED, LAND, MARRIAGE, & OBITUARY RECORDS, 195-1990: IRELAND, VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE.


    Part V. O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLEN) (NOWLIN) (NOLUN) (NOLIN) (NOWLING) (NOLEN) CENSUS, DEED, LAND, MARRIAGE, & OBITUARY RECORDS, 195-1990: ALABAMA, ARKANSAS, FLORIDA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, OKLAHOMA, & TEXAS.


    Part VI. OF THE NOLANS (NOLA): ORIGINS OF THE IRISH AND SCOTTISH - CORCA LUIGHE (CORCA LAOIDHE) AND DAL RIADA (DAL RIATA) - R-U152 (R1b1b2a1b4) (R1b1b2a1b7) (R1b1b2a2g) (R1b1b2h*) (R1b1c10) - DYS #385a AND 385b AT 11 AND 17 - A CORCA LUIGHE (CORCA LAOIDHE) OSSORY (OSRAIGHE) AND DAL RIADA (DAL RIATA) ULADH HAPLOTYPE IN CO. DONEGAL, ULSTER, IRELAND, 1600s.


    Part VII. NOLAN Y-DNA HAPLOGROUP I2a DYS #385a and 385b at 11 and 17 and the FOMORIANS of IRISH MYTHOLOGY.


    NOTES.

    1. Nolan Clan Association, Global Migration @ http://onolanclan.org/migration.html.

    2. History Series #1 - The History of Osraighe: The Roots of County Kilkenny @ http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/history/ossory.htm.

    3. Old Irish Kingdoms and Clans @ http://members.aol.com/hgurski3/ireclans.htm.

    4. Long Ago in Ireland @ http://www.lawrencetown.com/longago.htm.

    5. Ibid.

    6. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS, Vol. VII. No. I., Notes on the Persons Named in the Obituary Book of the Franciscan Abbey at Galway by Martin J. Blake, 5-6.

    7. Long Ago in Ireland.

    8. Fr. M. Holland of the Abbey Galway e-mail dated 8 June 2005.

    9. Hardiman’s History of Galway, James Hardiman, The History of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, (Galway: Connacht Tribune) Reprint, 1926, 277.

    10. Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 390-91.

    11. Ibid, 391.

    12. Ibid, 399.

    13. The Indenture of Composition of 1585, Knox, Hubert T., The History of the County of Mayo to the close of the Sixteenth Century, Dublin 1908, 366.

    14. The Mellett Sept of South Mayo by P. Waldron @ http://members.aol.com/Seanchi3/Mayo.HTM.

    15. O’Nolan: The History of a People, 291.

    16. Catholic Encyclopedia - Cashel @ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03401a.htm.

    17. Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, 462.

    18. Dominican Archives @ http://www.opeast.org.au/archives/arch_History.htm.

    19. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. V, (1907-1908). Blake, Martin J.: Galway Corporation Book B., 140.

    20. Galway Advertiser, 1 October 1998, The Career of Fr. Gregory French, OP. @ http://www.galwayadvertiser.ie/ent/981001/page19.htm.

    21. Hardiman’s History of Galway, Appendix, xxii.

    22. Ibid, xxix.

    23. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XV, (1931-33), Anonymous: Galway Corporation Mace and Sword [note], 83-84.

    24. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. V, (1907-1908), No. IV. Kelly, Richard J.: The Forfeitures and Settlements of 1661: Lands in Galway, 212.

    25. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS, Vol. I (1900-901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 42.

    26. Roderick O’Flaherty’s, 1684 History of Connaught, 40.

    27. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XII, No. III and IV. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 80.

    28. Fr. M. Holland of The Abbey Galway.

    29. Hardiman’s History of Galway, 157.

    30. Ibid, 158.

    31. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII, No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 19-20.

    32. Ibid, 79.

    33. Ibid, 82-3.

    34. Ibid, 80-1.

    35. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIV, (1928-1929) No. I and II. Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 2.

    36. Ibid, 3-5.

    37. Hardiman’s History of Galway @ http://www.galway.net/galwayguide/history/hardiman/part3.html.

    38. Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, 509.

    39. Ibid.

    40. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XVI, No. I and II. (1934-35), Rabbitte, J.: Galway Corporation MS. C., 69-70.

    41. Ibid, 74.

    42. Hardiman’s History of Galway, 286.

    43. Ibid, 179.

    44. Ibid.

    45. Tribes of the Erainn - Based on Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland: an Ethnography of the Gael A. D. 500 - 1750, C. Thomas Cairney, Ph.D. @ http://www2.smumn.edu/uasal/sheaclan/erainn.html.

    46. Ancestral Quest, Patrick Levin, @ http://www.leitrim-roscommon.com/plavin/lavin.html.

    47. Cullen Surname Origins Part III: O’Cullen of Munster compiled by Jim Cullen @ http://members.bex.net/jtcullen515/CullHis3.htm, moved from old site @ http://www.lrbcg.com/jtcullen/CullHis3.htm.

    48. The Tribes of Laigen - Leinster Series @ http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/leinst2.htm.

    49. O'Nolan: The History of a People, iii.

    50. Ibid.

    51. Isabella Mulhall, Irish Antiquities Division, National Museum of Ireland 2004 e-mail.

    52. Ibid.

    53. Ibid, 23 May 2005.

    54. Database of Irish Excavations Reports @ http://www.excavations.ie/Pages/Details.php?Year=1998&County=Kilkenny&id=1290.

    55. Database of Irish Excavations Reports @ http://www.excavations.ie/Pages/Details.php?Year=1998&County=Kilkenny&id=1291.

    56. The People's Millennium Forests @ http://www.millenniumforests.com/16forests/surveys/archwood.htm.

    57. Irish Midlands Ancestry: Offaly Landscape @ http://www.tullamoreoffaly.com/offaly_landscape.htm.

    58. Ibid.

    59. Offaly History & Archaeology: From the Earliest Times to the 13th Century @ http://www.tullamoreoffaly.com/edenderry_ages.htm#one.

    60. Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland: VIII. The Laigin, 82-83 @ http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/cairney/82.htm and http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/cairney/83.htm.

    61. Irish Midlands Ancestry: Offaly Towns, Villages & Places of Interest @ http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/index3.htm.

    62. Old Irish Kingdoms and Clans.

    63. Excavations: Database of Irish Excavation Reports @ http://excavations.ie/Pages/Details.php?Year=1999&County=Kilkenny&id=430.

    64. Ibid.

    65. Fulachta Fiadh – An Irish Mystery @ http://www.angelfire.com/fl/burntmounds/.

    66. The People's Millennium Forests.

    67. History Series #2.

    68. Irish Pedigrees, 487-88.

    69. Ibid, 858.

    70. Dunn Sept Association @ http://www.henneberry.org/dunn/nolan.htm.

    71. Ibid.

    72. Hardiman’s History of Galway, Description of the Old Map of Galway @ http://www.galway.net/galwayguide/history/hardiman/chapter1/old_map.html.

    73. Hardiman’s History of Galway, 277.

    74. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLVI. (1994), Mulveen, Jack: Galway Goldsmiths, Their Marks and Wares, 62.

    75. Galway Corporation Book A note listed in the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, 390-91.

    76. Galway Advertiser, 13 August 1998, Did the Tribes of Galway Speak Irish? The Old English Colony and the 'mere Irish' @ http://www.galwayadvertiser.ie/ent/980813/page5.htm.

    77. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XLIV, (1992), Walsh, Paul: An Account of the Town of Galway, 64-65.

    78. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 13.

    79. Castles of Galway, The heart of Gaelic Ireland, Ruins Series, Page Two @ http://homepage.eircom.net/~rookery/castle16.html.

    80. 14 Tribes @ http://www.14tribes.net/darcy.htm.

    81. Hardiman's History of Galway, Chapter 1 - An Alphabetical List and Concise Account of the Ancient Families of Galway @ http://www.galway.net/galwayguide/history/hardiman/chapter1/ancient_families.html.

    82. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 14.

    83. Indenture of Composition, 1585, 366.

    84. Catholic Encyclopedia - Cashel @ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03401a.htm.

    85. Indenture of Composition, 1585, 366.

    86. Notes on Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo and the Families of Burke, NOLAN, Cuff, and Knox written by Martin J. Blake, 1909, 541-42.

    87. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. I., Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 26.

    88. The Nolen Story, Jewel Nolen, 13.

    89. Gary Nolan's Family Tree Maker Site @ http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/n/o/l/Gary-R-Nolan/PHOTO/0001photo.html.

    90. Irish Landed Gentry, 159 or Hardiman's "West Connaught," 251.

    91. Roderick O’Flaherty’s, 1684 History of Connaught, 40.

    92. Ibid, 251-52.

    93. Ibid, 337.

    94. Irish Landed Gentry, 159.

    95. Ibid.

    96. The Mellett Sept of South Mayo by P. Waldron @ http://members.aol.com/Seanchi3/Mayo.HTM.

    97. Ibid.

    98. Indenture of Composition, 1585, 366.

    99. Barony of Kilmaine @ http://www.shrule.com/_shrule/_display.php?pid=611&fid=21.

    100. Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. XIII. (1925), Nos. I and II. Random Notes on the History of County Mayo by G. V. Martyn, 94-6.

    101. Ibid.

    102. Ibid.

    103. Mayo Pages: Ballinrobe, The Knox Family @ http://www.maggieblanck.com/Mayopages/Ballinrobe.html.

    104. Clan Cleary @ http://www.clancleary.com.

    105. House of Lords Journal Volume 20: 21 July 1715, Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 20: 1714-1717, pp. 124-25 at British History Online: House of Lords Journal, Vol. 20, 21 July 1715 @ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=38445.

    106. O'Nolan: The History of a People, 289-290.

    107. Ibid, 249-50.

    108. History of Lodge 14: Notes on the Freemasonry in County Galway @ http://indigo.ie/~bchapple/Hist.htm.

    109. The Cork Examiner, 2 March 1865, @ http://www.irelandoldnews.com/Cork/1865/MAR.html.

    110. Ireland Old News - The Times London, Middlesex, England, Tuesday, July 5, 1892, The General Election, Biographies of Candidates @ http://www.irelandoldnews.com/Other/1892/JUL.html.

    111. The History of Golf in Galway @ Renmore www.galwaygolf.com/historyFiles/ chapter1/Chapter%201.pdf.

    112. The History and Antiquities of the County Carlow, John Ryan, 1833; History of Carlow County Ireland, John Ryan, and The Nowlin-Stone Genealogy, James Edmund Nowlin, 357.

    113. Claregalway Parish History @ http://www.claregalway.net/castles.htm.

    114. Sligo Arts and Culture: Famous Buildings - Castles @ http://sligo.local.ie/content/20479.shtml/arts_and_culture/famous_buildings/castles.

    115. Galway’s First Nolan Family - An Overview, The Nolan, Newsletter of the O’Nolan Clan Family Association, March 2009, Issue 19, 4.

    116. Enniscrone Castle History @ http://www.westsligo.com/enniscrone/history.htm.

    117. Enniscrone Castle and Church @ http://www.askaboutireland.ie/show_narrative_page.do?page_id=3728.

    118. McLaughlin’s of Donegal @ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mallorybrody/Eire/Ulster/clanhist.htm.

    119. The Herenagh Families of Donegal @ http://members.aol.com/Lochlan6/herenagh.htm.

    120. Patent Rolls of James I: Inquisition at Lifford, 1609 @ http://www.ulsterancestry.com/ua-free-Inquistion_at_Lifford.html.

    121. Books of Survey and Distribution: Moorgagagh, Co. Mayo, Ireland @ http://www.shrule.com/_shrule/_display.php?pid=202&fid=21.

    122. Clans and Chieftains (in Ireland) @ http://homepage.tinet.ie/~donnaweb/info/article06.html.

    123. The Nolen Story, 13.

    124. Ui-Maine or Hy-Maine @ http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/uimaine.htm.

    125. Mac Sweeney Banagh: Mac Suibhne Boghaineach @ http://www.sweeneyclanchief.com/id7.htm.

    126. Genealogy forum posting by Susan Peters Zmrzel.

    127. North Carolina: The Old North State, 41.

    128. The Nicolaus Heinrich Crist Account Book - Nicolaus Heinrich Crist (1716-1783) & Ana Catherin Nowlin (1720-1783) @ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ptsonline/stories/cristaccountbook.html.

    129. Strafford Inquisition, 25.

    130. Genealogical Records of Buckingham County Virginia, 118.

    131. Wigton-Walkers: Captain Joseph R. Walker A Family Tree.









    Here are my websites:


           




    DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1740 & ALBEMARLE COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1744.

    O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLEN) (NOWLIN) (NOLUN) (NOLIN) (NOWLING) (NOLEN) CENSUS, DEED, LAND, MARRIAGE, & OBITUARY RECORDS, 195-1990: IRELAND, VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE, ALABAMA, ARKANSAS & TEXAS.

    TOWNSHIPS OF CARLOW COUNTY, IRELAND.

    BENNER, GOTTHARDT, HAGELGANS, & LORENZ GENEALOGY.

    POETRY OF GLENN ALLEN NOLEN.

    FAMILY PHOTOS OF GLENN ALLEN NOLEN.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN MOBLEY OF SOUTH RIVER PARISH, ANN ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND, 1687.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN M. (MAC) HORTON: GEORGIA, 1827.

    BLUE MOUNTAIN DAM, AR: CEMETERY RELOCATION RECORDS.

    DESCENDANTS OF CHRISTIAN ADAM BARTH AND CATHERINE WUNDERLICK.

    WEB PAGES OF GLENN ALLEN NOLEN.

    BISHOP GENEALOGY.


    Here are some of my favorite websites:


    ONLINE SHORT STORY BY EDWARD EVERETT HALE (1822–1909): THE MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY. THE HARVARD CLASSICS SHELF OF FICTION, 1917.

    CENSUS OF CARLOW COUNTY IRELAND, 1659.

    NOLANDS OF AMERICA.

    EARLY HISTORY OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE.

    1860 CENSUS WILLIAMSON CO. TN.

    1880 CENSUS YELL CO. AR.

    MOBLEY CEMETERY, YELL CO. AR.

    CEMETERY RECORDS OF YELL CO. AR.

    DESCENDANTS OF PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND)- VERY LARGE DOCUMENT: BE PATIENT.

    THE NICOLAUS HEINRICH CRIST ACCOUNT BOOK - NICOLAUS HEINRICH CRIST (1716-1783) & ANA CATHERIN NOWLIN (1720-1783).

    NOWLIN GENEALOGY.

    UNITED STATES MIGRATION PATTERNS FROM 1660.

    HAVANA ARKANSAS CITY CEMETERY.

    HISTORY OF THE FIRST REGIMENT ALABAMA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY C. S. A.

    11TH ALABAMA CAVALRY REGIMENT, CSA, ALABAMA.

    NOLENSVILLE, TN

    SUGAR GROVE CEMETERY, LOGAN COUNTY ARKANSAS.

    ISBELL GENEALOGY.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN ISBELL.

    IRELAND'S HISTORY IN MAPS.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN NOWLAN (NOWLIN).

    ASHOKAN FAREWELL (HARPSONG), SONG DURATION: 3:08.

    MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF THE CELTIC RACE.

    IRISH MAGIC AND TUATH DE DANAANS.

    IRISH SEPT AND CLAN PAGES.

    WHO WAS WHO IN ROMAN TIMES: NOLANS, NOLA, NOLAN.



    E-MAIL GLENN ALLEN NOLEN @ ganolen@gmail.com.