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HISTORY OF CARLOW CLAN O'NOLAN AND TIPPERARY CLAN O'NOLAN.

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Name Variations: O’Nolan, Nolan, Nowlan, Nowlin, Nowling, Nolin, Nolun, Nolen, Nowland, Noland, Knowlan, Knowland.


FAMILY TREE DNA - NOLAN SURNAME PROJECT.

Add your NOLAN family (all variants) to the NOLAN Family Pedigree Forum at WFNForum.net: Registration and Login required to post.


For a list of documents in order by year, state, and country: O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) (NOLEN) Census, Deed, & Land Records, 195-1990.


Text Only File with Endnotes: 1,000 Years of O'NOLAN History.


Download: Microsoft Office Word Viewer 2003.


National Geographic - Genographic Project - Haplogroup R1b Population Route Map.

INTRODUCTION.

Based on Y-DNA analysis of the NOLAN DNA results Lineage III - Barony of Forth, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN appears to be the original lineage of descent from NUALAN or NUALLAIN of EOCHA FIONN FOHART, the brother of Conn Cead-Catha or Conn of the Hundred Battles centered in Forth Barony Co. Carlow. EOCHA FIONN FOHART was ancestor of Carlow Clan (O'NOWLAN) O'NOLAN. Unless, of course, another Carlow NOLAN lineage emerges through future Y-DNA testing and the results prove a closer genetic match to the Northwest Irish (Niall of the Nine Hostages) R1b1c7 haplotype.

The calculation by Dr. Ken Nordtvedt to the Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) for R-M222 (R1b1b2a1b5) (R1b1c7) (R1b1b2e) of 1740 years falls within a window of 112 years when considering the recorded death date of the year 157 for Conn Céad Cathach (Conn Cead-Catha) or Conn of the Hundred Battles, brother to EOCHA FIONN FOHART the ancestor of Carlow Clan (O'NOWLAN) O'NOLAN. The father of Conn of the Hundred Battles, Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar (Feidhlimedh Rechtmhar) (the Lawgiver) ruled Ireland in the years 111-119. Considering the accession date given by P. W. Joyce, in his Social History of Ancient Ireland (1913, reissued in 1968 by Benjamin Blom, Inc.), Volume I, pages 69–71, of the year 177 places the TMRCA calculation of 1740 years well within a one hundred year time span since Conn Céad Cathach (Conn Cead-Catha) ruled Ireland for thirty-four years leaving a fifty-eight year interval, which is well within the span of a lifetime. Thus, this intervening period of 58-112 years undoubtedly represents descendants of Eocha Fionn Fohart demonstrating the relatedness to Barony of Forth and Shangarry, Carlow Clan O’Nolan. Or, of further note, the calculation by Dr. Ken Nordtvedt of 1740 years for a TMRCA for R-M222 matches the reign of Carby Lifeachain (“the Liffey”) Cairbre Liffeachair from 268-284, great-great grandfather to Niall of the Nine Hostages.

NOLAN Lineage III matches the Northwest Irish (Niall of the Nine Hostages) 25-marker haplotype exactly to the 22nd marker mismatching at DYS #464b and 464c making the mismatch two points among the 25-markers compared. A key difference in Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN and Lineage III O'NOLAN - Barony of Forth lies at DYS #447, and all Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN has DYS #447 = 26 while Lineage III O'NOLAN - Barony of Forth has DYS #447 = 25.

The Northwest Irish (Niall of the Nine Hostages) DYS #447 at 25 suggests that the Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN DYS #447 at 26 value is a mutation from the DYS #447 at 25. Based on the 20-marker comparison between R1b1c7, Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN, and Lineage III O'NOLAN - Barony of Forth the DYS #447 = 25 result for Lineage III Carlow Clan O‘NOLAN - Barony of Forth stands out as the key difference in Carlow Clan O‘NOLAN.

Unique Carlow Clan O'Nolan 20-marker R1b1c7 (Northwest Irish) Haplotype:

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
ID #
13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 12 13 14 29 17 9 10 11 11 26 15 18 Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'Nolan
13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 12 13 14 29 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 18 Barony of Forth, Carlow Clan O'Nolan

A key difference in Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN and Barony of Forth O'NOLAN lies at DYS #447, all Shangarry, Carlow Clan O'NOLAN has DYS #447 = 26 while Barony of Forth Carlow Clan O'NOLAN has DYS #447 = 25.

Northwest Irish (Niall of the Nine Hostages) 25-marker Haplotype:

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
DYS
449
DYS
464a
DYS
464b
DYS
464c
DYS
464d
ID #
13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 12 13 14 29 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 18 30 15 16 16 17 R1b1c7

Lineage I - Shangarry Carlow Clan O'NOLAN mismatches the Northwest Irish 25-marker haplotype at DYS 447 and rapidly mutating 449 and 464c.

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
DYS
449
DYS
464a
DYS
464b
DYS
464c
DYS
464d
ID #
13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 12 13 14 29 17 9 10 11 11 26 15 18 29 15 16 17 17 Lineage I

Lineage III - Barony of Forth Carlow Clan O'NOLAN mismatches the Northwest Irish 25-marker haplotype at DYS 464b and 464c, which are prone to rapid mutation. This 25-marker haplotype may represent the original NUALAN or NUALLAIN lineage of EOCHA FIONN FOHART, the brother of Conn Cead-Catha or Conn of the Hundred Battles. EOCHA FIONN FOHART was ancestor of Carlow Clan (O'NOWLAN) O'NOLAN.

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
DYS
458
DYS
459a
DYS
459b
DYS
455
DYS
454
DYS
447
DYS
437
DYS
448
DYS
449
DYS
464a
DYS
464b
DYS
464c
DYS
464d
ID #
13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 12 13 14 29 17 9 10 11 11 25 15 18 30 15 17 17 17 Lineage  III

Twenty-first century DNA analysis is separating Carlow Clan O’NOLAN, R1b1c7, into distinct lineages: Barony of Forth, Shangarry, Ballon-Rathoe, Ballykealey, and Kilbride. Barony of Forth is the original patrimony of Carlow Clan O'NOLAN. Shangarry is in the southern part of Co. Carlow and has been DNA defined. Ballon-Rathoe from the middle part of Co. Carlow, Ballykealey, and Kilbride have as yet not attained the status of a distinct lineage due to a limited number of NOLAN surnamed DNA participants. Certainly, in the future, with participation of more, NOLAN surnamed DNA participants, Ballon-Rathoe, Ballykealey, and Kilbride will attain separate and distinct Carlow NOLAN lineage status.


R1b1b2a1b5 (R1b1c7) (R1b1b2e) or the Northwest Irish Haplogroup represents twenty percent of R1b in Ireland and has been calculated at 1740 years by Ken Nordtvedt, which corresponds roughly to the reign of Niall Noigiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages) beginning in the year 379. Others, however, have estimated the age of R-M222 as “about 46% of the age of R1b and is most likely at least 3400 years old." These separate and distinct Carlow NOLAN lineages will fail to meet a standard of recent relatedness within a time span for the modern use of surnames. Emerging DNA evidence suggests that relatedness for these Carlow NOLAN lineages goes beyond the time span for surname use to perhaps the 2nd century C. E. (Common Era). Carlow Clan O'NOLAN matches exactly the Northwest Irish, R1b1c7, Niall of the Nine Hostages 12-marker haplotype (13, 25, 14, 11, 11, 13, 12, 12, 12, 13, 14, and 29) as shown on Unique NOLAN Y-DNA Haplotypes.


Unique Carlow Clan O'NOLAN R1b1c7 12-marker Haplotype:

DYS
393
DYS
390
DYS
19
DYS
391
DYS
385a
DYS
385b
DYS
426
DYS
388
DYS
439
DYS
389-1
DYS
392
DYS
389-2
ID #
13 25 14 11 11 13 12 12 12 13 14 29 R1b1c7

Circa 115 C. E., Cu Corb, King of Leinster, granted seven Fotharts in Leinster to EOCHAIDH FINN FUATHAIRT, the Carlow NOLAN progenitor. Five were eventually absorbed back into the adjacent territories, but two withstood the test of time and survived as Fotharta Ui NUALLAIN (barony of Forth in Co. Carlow) and Fotharta an Chairn (barony of Forth in Co. Wexford). Niall Noigiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages) ruled in fourth century Ireland dying circa 405 of the Common Era, therefore, a prior common ancestor fostered the resultant genetic string or haplotype of the Ui Neill and that of Carlow Clan O’NOLAN. NOLAN Y-DNA test results indicating a match with Niall of the Nine Hostages and the Ui Neill are indicative of these septs having an ancient (MRCA) most recent common ancestor: Cobhtach, Caol mBreagh, 69th Milesian Monarch of Ireland, eldest son of Ugaine Mor, 66th Milesian Monarch of Ireland.


O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 24.

HISTORY OF CARLOW CLAN O'NOLAN.

O'NOLAN: THE HISTORY OF A PEOPLE.

O'NOLAN COAT OF ARMS AND MOTTO.

"The NOLAND heraldic coat of arms is an ancient family crest that was bestowed on members of the NOLAND clan centuries ago for military services and steadfast loyalty, which had been rendered by the NOLAND'S to kings and chiefs of ancient Ireland. One of the first recordings of the NOLAND family crest was for the Chiefs of Fotharta-Tea. This area is now the Barony of Forth (Carlow).


The crest or coat of arms plaque is dissected by a red cross that symbolized the powerful under girding of faith and strength, which the NOLAND'S held in their belief and trust in God. Each quarter of the cross contains an unsheathed sword upraised and ready to do battle to protect the things they held dear. The red color on the swords denotes the blood lost in battles fought in defense of their honor and beliefs. Each leg of the red cross shows a legendary bird called a Mariet, which is always drawn without feet. The Mariet symbolized great courage and is usually the distinctive mark of a fourth son. At the center of the cross is a lion, further symbolizing courage. The motto written in Latin below the crest, reads "Cor Unum Via Una" which translates to "One Heart, One Way". (1)



FAMILY HISTORY.

"The earliest record of the NOLAND'S has been found in Ireland. Traditionally, the O'NIALLON clan was found in several of the counties in the eastern area of Ireland, including County Carlow. The ancient Gaelic spelling for the NOLAND clan name was O'NIALLON (NIALL means "Great Chieftain)".


"The first written mention of our name spelled O'NOLAN was when King Henry II confirmed to JOHN O'NOLAN his rights and possessions of land in Carlow around the year 1160 A. D. One of the reasons for the change in the NOLAND name is that the English language was slowly being introduced into Ireland and the revised pronunciation and spelling lost it's Gaelic flavor . . ., which meant that O'NIALLON became O'NOLAN. Upon immigration into America, the "O" was dropped and even later, the English "d" was added to some of the families. There are various spellings of the NOLAND name including NOLAN, NOLEN, NOLIN, NOWLIN and NOWLAND." (2) The above quotes furnished by Sharon NOLAND of NOLAND'S of America.


* Discrepancies exist as to the origin of the name NOLAN from NIALL, originally meaning noble or famous in Gaelic, (O’NEIL’S) or NUALL to NUALLAIN. The issue is the spelling of the name of the 100th generation individual. Irish Pedigrees by John O’Hart and Keating and McKeoghan’s History of County Carlow use NUALL whereas Father JOHN NOLAN'S account lists both O'NIALLAIN and NUALLAIN, ain (son of) being the Irish equivalent of either the Anglican an or ian. It is more probable that our lineage is associated with nobility than a shout or cry. The fact, however, remains unsettled.


* Information provided from an e-mail of Jerry NOWLIN.

















"The NOLAN name has always been associated with the barony of Forth on Co. Carlow. In pre-Norman days their chiefs, who held high heredity office under the Kings of Leinster, were known as Princes of Fothairt (modern Forth).... The NOLAN Clan is one of the oldest families in Ireland, so old in fact that our origins are lost in the mists of time. But the old Druid genealogists preserved our lineages back to Eochaidh Fionn of Fothairt, son of Feidhlimidh Reachmhar, King of Ireland in 164 –174 AD, and even further back to Cobhthach Caol mBreach, a King of Ireland who ruled from 591 to 541 BC. The ancient Irish annalists referred to our family as O’NUALLAIN Fotharta Laighean, or the “ancient ones of Leinster”. It is believed that the O’NOLAN'S were settled in Leinster long before the Milesian Celts ever arrived and are probably descended from the mythical Da Danaans.













Keating, the historian, in tracing the royal genealogies of Ireland, comes to Conn Ceadh Chathach, “the hero of the hundred battles”, whom he states to have had two brothers. From Eochaidh Fionn, one of them, descended O’NUALLAIN. Conn’s posterity was kings of Ireland, and governed in Tara; Eochaidh Fionn’s went into Leinster, at a time when Chucorb, son of Modhacorb, was king of that province.



















The forces of Munster had conquered a large portion of Leinster. Chucorb entreated assistance from Eochaidh Fionn and a friend of his called Laoighseach Cean More, with their followers, to drive them back into their own territories. The battle was fought at a place called Arthrodain, known now by the name of Athy. The Lagenians, or the men of Leinster, had a narrow victory there and pursued the chase through Laois to a place called Ballaghmore near Borris-in–Ossory where they finally expelled the Munstermen from Leinster.













Chucorb, being reinstated in his dominions, by the assistance of Eochaidh Fionn, out of gratitude, thought himself obliged to make a recompense for his services, and therefore he generously bestowed upon him The Seven Fothartuaths, and confirmed this donation by perpetuating the rights to his posterity forever.


Hanmer informs us, that, “Hugh De Lacy built a castle, in Fotheret O’NOLAN, for Raymond and another for Griffin, his brother, the sons of William Fitz-gerald.” Here then, is a clear and distinct proof that, at the earliest period of English acquaintance with the locality, it was found to be possessed by the O’NOLAN'S, and this in an uninterrupted succession (1,000 years approx.) from Eochaidh Fionn Fotheret, for none but a genuine O’NOLAN, or descendant of Fionn, could have held property in the district prior to the invasion. Thus commenced the first spoliation’s of Fotheret O’NOLAN in Co. Carlow, the O’NOLAN'S had already been driven in from the other side, viz., the "Barony of Forth" in the county of Wexford, which doubtless, formed originally part of the “Seven Fothartuaths”. The history of the locality for the next couple of centuries is scarcely anything but details of conflicts and collisions between the O’NOLAN'S defending themselves from the encroachments of the Anglo – Norman adventurers.


Camden’s 3rd vol. of the “Britannia” gives the following: “Philip Staunton was slain, and Henry Traherne was treacherously taken in his house at Kilbeg, by RICHARD, son of PHILIP O’NOLAN. James Lord Butler, Earl of Ormond, burnt Foghird for three days in revenge to O’NOLAN, for his brothers sake.” This happened in 1329. In 1394 Richard II King of England came over and got all the Irish of Leinster to submit to him.


Cox tells us “Gerald O’Byrne, DONALD O’NOLAN*, Malachias O’Morrough, Rore OG O’Moore, Arthur O’Connor, and others, made their humble submissions through an interpreter, in an open field at Balingory, near Carlow, on the 16th of February.” He says: “They laid aside their girdles, skeins, and caps, and falling on bended knee, did homage; which being performed, the Marshal gave each of them the Osculum Pacis.” They were bound in large penalties: O’Byrne for instance, in 20,000 marks, and O’NOLAN in £10,000 sterling. When he went back to England, things returned to normal." (3) The above quote is from Tom NOLAN of the O'NOLAN Clan Association.


"1394 - On the 16th of February, Thomas, Earl of Nottingham, Marshal of England, accompanied by his retinue, proceeded to a place called Ballygory (?Kilgorey) near Carlow, on the side of the mountain of Slieve Margy, and caused Edmund Wall (or de Valle)[15] to translate into the Irish tongue certain Letters Patent of King Richard II, to an assemblage of the native chiefs, empowering the said Earl to receive the Irish chiefs to the king’s fealty and obedience; then Art MacMurrough, Garrett O’Byrne, DONNELL O’NOLAN*, Murrough O’Connor Faly, Tiege O’More, Rory oge and Shane, sons of Maurice Boy O’More of Slieve Margy, chiefs of their septs, removing their girdles, swords, and caps, on bended knees, with uplifted hands, took an oath, in their native tongue, of allegiance to the king, or in default to pay 20,000 marks to the Papal chamber. The submission of Gillapatrick “reogh” O’More is also recorded in this year. [Brewer’s “Cal. of Miscellaneous Carew MSS.,” pp. 378-381.]" (4) The above quote is from Clan O'More.


O'NOLAN: The History of a People by Fr. John NOLAN & Art Kavanagh state that the above event occurred in 1395. “The McMurrough, O’NOLAN, O’Connor Faly and their allies had decided that it would be imprudent to risk a pitch battle with such a formidable force and that their best policy was to adopt guerrilla warfare, in the tactics of which the Irish in those days had no equals. The result was the total defeat of Richard’s mighty force and his return to England without accomplishing anything worthy of note.” (5) The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 132.


* It is not known whether the above DONNELL (DONALD) O’NOLAN who submitted to Richard II in 1394-95 was the same DOMNALL O NUALLAIN killed by the Galls in 1398 as reported in the Annals of Connacht or even if this individual was of the Carlow Clan O’NOLAN or Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O‘NOLAN. DONAL was reportedly the son of JOHN O’NOLAN, the “dynast of Forth O’NOLAN in 1394” as stated in O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 133, but the authors were unaware of the existence of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN. (6) Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN may still have resided in Co. Kilkenny at that time moving to Connacht and Galway after submitting to Richard II. That scenario agrees with the assertion of MICHAEL O'NOLAN that his ancient family of Loughboy, Co. Kilkenny was in Galway, 1394.


“Besides the baronies of Forth, one in Carlow the other in Wexford, there were two other territories of the name in Leinster, as Fothart Airbreach, around the hill of Cruachan Bri Eile (Croghan), in the north-east of the King’s County [Offaly]; and Fothart Oirthir Life, in the now county of Wicklow.” (7) Other tribes dominated the latter two in the early period of Irish history. One of these other tribes was undoubtedly Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN. The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 45.


“Numerous authorities are of the opinion that the progenitor of the NOLAN [NOWLAND, NOWLAN, NOLAND, NOWLING, NOLIN, NOLEN] family was one EOCHAIDH FIONN FOHART, whose elder brother CONN CEADCATHACH (Conn of the Hundred Battles) was King of Ireland in the early part of the second century of the Christian era". (8) This excerpt is from The NOLEN Story, by Jewel NOLEN.



IRISH PEDIGREES.

THE O' NOWLAN FAMILY - IRELAND.

Conn Cead-Catha or Conn of the Hundred Battles had two brothers, named Eochy Fionn Fohart and Fiacha Suidhe. This Eocha Fionn Fohart was ancestor of O'NOWLAN, the lord or prince of the "Foharta"—the name by which the descendants of this Eocha were called; and the two principal districts inhabited by them still retain the name, viz.: the baronies of Forth in the counties of Wexford and Carlow. From "Foharta" is derived the surname Faharty.



According to Jewel NOLEN: The NOLEN Story, "TEIGE was the father of JOHN, who was the father of DONAL or DANIEL, who had a son named JOHN O’ NOWLAN or O’ NOLAN, was the ancestor of the NOLAN family of the County of Wexford, Ireland, as well as others." (9)


NOLAN CLAN IN CANADA.

"Given that Gaelic was common to many of the early founding peoples of the British Isles, it is quite conceivable that the family name O'NUALLAIN or something very close to it may have been introduced elsewhere in the British Isles around the year 1000. This may be the explanation for the KNOWLAN/KNOLLIN families which trace their ancestors back to Exeter and Devon in southwest England. This line of thinking is particularly credible when one considers that southeast Ireland and southwest England share a common ancestry going back some 2000 years, when the Laigain tribes from Armorica in northwestern France (known as the "Veneti") fled there to escape Roman domination. Leinster, the southeastern province of Ireland within which both counties Carlow and Wexford are found, takes its name from the Laigain tribes." (10) The above quote is from the NOLAN Clan in Canada - Family Name.



LEINSTER.

COUNTY CARLOW: CENSUS OF IRELAND, 1659 & RENT ROLL OF THE MANOR OF CATHARLOGH, 1681.

The following link provides evidence that numerous families of O'NOLAN'S were in the County Carlow: Census of Ireland, 1659. In the township of Aghelare, EDMOND NOLAND, gent, was listed as the recorder of record for 22 Irish Head of Households. In the township of Ballinoge, JOHN NOLAN, gent, was listed as the recorder of record for 12 Irish Head of Households. And the Rent Roll of the Manor of Catharlogh, taken 1681, Carlow Co. Ireland lists a JAMES NOWLAND in the alphabet of the tenant's names for the Manor of Catharlogh. The abstract is of such rents and revenues as do belong to the Right Hon. Hery, Earl of Thomond.


LONGFORD COUNTY: CENSUS OF IRELAND, 1659.

Principal Families.



PROGENITOR LINE OF JOHN NOWLAN (NOWLIN), WILLIAM NOWLAN (NOWLIN), & JAMES NOWLAN (NOWLIN) OF COUNTY CARLOW, IRELAND & THE NEW WORLD.

THE O'NOLAN'S OF SHANGARRY.

(Knockendrane & Ballinrush)

"The Shangarry O'NOLAN'S descended from HUGH. HUGH may in fact be the HUGH ROO who was pardoned for aiding and abetting a robbery (see Fiant details - [1552 - Accessory to Robbery of hides, goats]). HUGH had a brother MORGAN of Rosslee (pardoned in 1549) and DONALD McDONHE pardoned at the same time may have been their father. The 'MORGAN NOLANS' of Ballaghmore and Rosslee are descended from MORGAN. [HUGH and his son DONAL appear to have both died in 1647.] HUGH had four sons CAHIR, DONAL, WILLIAM and HUGH. DONAL appears to have been married twice. By his first wife he had a son EDMUND who was the father of Captain JAMES NOLAN, who fought against the Cromwellians in Colonel Daniel Kavanagh's Clonmullen regiment. By his second wife, Anastace Byrne he had another son PATRICK* who seems to have inherited the Shangarry lands. PATRICK was dispossessed and forced to take lands in Connaught. The LAWRENCE NOLAN, gentleman, who was the owner of the Shangarry lands in the early part of the next century, must have been a son or grandson of PATRICK. PATRICK was born around the year 1600 and his grandson, LAWRENCE, seems to have been still in possession of substantial lands in the latter decades of the 1600s (he was born c. 1670).” (11) The above information is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 233-234.


* The Shangarry, Carlow Co. PATRICK NOLAN who was dispossessed and forced to take lands in Connaught in the seventeenth century can be ruled out as the owner of Ballybanagher (Ballabanagher) Castle, 1661. It is extremely doubtful that any one other than a descendant of THOMAS NOLAN (O'H-UALLACHAIN) was the owner of Ballybanagher (Ballabanagher) Castle, 1661 since a MICHAEL NOLAN, Esq., was reportedly of Ballybanagher on 28 February 1865. In 1574, Ballybanagher (Ballabanagher) Castle was the property of Thomas Ballagh as listed in the Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. II, Nolan, J. P.: Galway Castles and Owners in 1574, 117.


“Three NOWLAN’S are mentioned as owners or occupiers of land in the closing decade of the [seventeenth] century. They were JOHN NOLAN [the father of  JAMES, JOHN, & WILLIAM who came to the New World around 1700] who claimed he had a lease of three lives on part of the lands of Shangarry and Ballinrush. By a lease dated 1669 Richard the Earl of Arran leased the lands to Thomas Bagenal to hold in trust for the claimant - JOHN NOWLAN. I think this JOHN NOWLAN was the son of PATRICK O’NOLAN who had been dispossessed by the Ormondes earlier in the century [and thus moved to Connaught].” (12) PATRICK NOLAN must have then been the grandfather of the three NOWLAN (NOWLIN) brothers who came to the New World around 1700. The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 284.


“Captain JAMES NOLAN held command of a detachment of the Catholic forces stationed at Clonmullen Castle, then still in the possession of Sir Morgan Kavanagh, the son of Donal Spainneach. In the course of an excursion from the garrison (during the 1641 wars) his company was said to have killed PATRICK O’NOLAN and to have hanged James Curwen, servant to Thomas Bagenal. Captain NOLAN went to Spain in 1652 where he served in the army of the King for about ten years. Upon his return he found that his little patrimony had been appropriated by the Duke of Ormonde. He brought suit before the Privy Council for its restitution but the Ormonde influence was much to strong in that court for any ‘mere’ Irishman to have a chance of success. Charges of murder, based on the excursions of his command from Clonmullen and illegitimacy were made against him and needless to add the Council did not require much evidence to decide against his claim. Though accused of having killed PATRICK O’NOLAN in the earlier stages of the case. In the later stages it was alleged that PATRICK O’NOLAN was living and would be called as a witness to prove the invalidity of James’s claim… In addition to those killings Captain James was alleged to have killed a THADY NOLAN in 1669 after his return and had fled to England to escape prosecution.” (13) The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 219.


After his Cromwellian adventures, Captain JAMES NOLAN “became embroiled in serious litigation with the Duke of Ormonde in trying to establish his rights to lands in Shangarry." (14) In dispute were the lands of PATRICK NOWLAN in Shangarry and Ballinrush. After all attempts at litigation failed to regain lands lost in the rebelllion some of his relatives came to the New World. The above quote is from O'NOLAN: The History of a People, 268.


References for NOLAN at the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford: The Electronic Calendar of the Carte Papers, 1660-87.


NOLAN Names in Patent Roll of Co. Carlow, 1603.


NOLAN, NOWLAN, NOWLAND Owners of Land Co. Carlow, 1641.


DONOUGH/HUGH NOWLIN (NOWLAN), Born: 1500-1530 in Ireland.



Child of DONOUGH/HUGH NOWLIN (NOWLAN):




The file Other Descendants of JOHN NOWLAN was saved from the web site of Bob Brown Jr.: My NOWLIN Genealogy. It includes a detailed list of other descendants of JOHN NOWLAN.


SHANGARRY, MOWNEY PARISH: 1654.

There is a Shangarry of 678 acres listed in Carlow County, Forth Barony, and Myshall Province. Ballingarry (below map) is in Tipperary County: Tipperary, Kilkenny, and Carlow.


"The Survey of the Barony of Slieveardagh and Comsy 1654 describes the boundary of the parish and the acreage of each town land, Shangarry (360 acres), Garrynoe (500 acres), “Dundrenan” (200 acres), “Knockankit” (200 acres), and “Kilmoculloge” (200 acres), (the latter three are now part of the town land of Shangarry)." (15) The above quote is from The Parish of Mowney.


Town Survey: 1654, Superimposed on 1840 Map.

TRANSPLANTED IRISH FROM CARLOW CO. 1653-54.


PATRICK NOWLANE of Kilballyhugh and DANIEL NOLANE of Kellstown fit into the estimated birth and death dates of the descendants of JOHN NOWLIN (NOWLAN) and must definitely be ancestors of JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) who died Goochland Co. VA, St. James Parish, March, 1750-51. The above information can be found at Transplanted Irish from Carlow Co. 1653-54.


Children of JOHN NOWLIN (NOWLAN) are:



Children of DANIEL NOWLIN (NOWLAN) and ANASTASE O'BRIEN are:



Children of PATRICK NOWLIN (NOWLAN) are:



Children of JOHN NOWLIN (NOWLAN) are:



  • JOHN NOWLIN, Born: About 1682 in Carlow County Ireland; He
  • reportedly went to the Northern states or to Pennsylvania.
  • WILLIAM NOWLIN, Born: About 1684 in Carlow County Ireland. He
  • reportedly went to the New England states.
  • JAMES NOWLIN Born: Jan 1685, County Carlow, Ireland,
  • Died: March, 1750/51, St. James Parish, Goochland County, Virginia.

    A JOHN NOWLIN (NOWLAN) of Carlow County, Ireland born around 1640 or before is reportedly the father of JAMES NOWLIN (NOWLAN) and 3-5 brothers who arrived in the New World around 1700. JOHN, WILLIAM, & JAMES of County Carlow, Ireland, reportedly sailed to Jamestown, Virginia around 1700. WILLIAM is reported to have gone to the New England states. JOHN reportedly ended up in Pennsylvania.


    A THOMAS NOLIN was born in Boston, Massachusetts about the year 1735. And a HANNAH NOLLIN married Wright Brown between the years 1768-1774 perhaps in Swanzey, Cheshire Co. New Hampshire. Around the year 1783, they moved to Stillwater, then Albany Co. (Saratoga Co.) New York. In 1784, their son Isaac was born in Stillwater.


    A VOLUME OF RECORDS RELATING TO THE EARLY HISTORY OF BOSTON.

    Municipal Print Office, 1900-1909.


    MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS.

    P. 231.


    Vessels Entered, May 1716.



    BOSTON - LIST OF CATTLE OWNERSHIP.

    P. 320.


    13 April 1774.



    BOSTON MARRIAGES.


    SHIPPEN FAMILY.

    MARY GRAY (NOWLAND) (SHIPPEN) was born on 13 January 1705-06 in London, England. She married first husband JOHN NOWLAND marrying second husband Edward Shippen in Pennsylvania August 1747. She died on 3 May 1778 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, at the age of 72.


    PENNSYLVANIA APPLICATIONS FOR LAND WARRANTS, 1746-1767.

    York Co., 1767.


    MOOR__, William for to get a location for 100 acres of land adjoining WILLIAM NOWLAND and Jonathan HUGH in Manallen Township.


    JOHN NOWLANE of Bethlehem Township, Northampton Co. Pennsylvania died about the year 1777 according to Will Abstracts of Northampton Co., 1752-1802. He had married GERTRUDE. JOHN NOWLANE and GERTRUDE had the following children:



    “The O' NUALLAINS were princes of the Foharta, now the Barony of Forth in the County Carlow, Ireland. In pre-Norman days their chiefs held high office under the Kings of Leinster. In Irish, the name O' NUALLAIN means descendant of NUALLAN, the word NUALLAN means a shout or cry. The name was anglicized O' NOWLAN, NOWLIN, and NOLAN. To this day, NOLAN is among the forty most numerous names in Ireland." (16) This quote is from the History of Carlow County Ireland, by John Ryan.


    HISTORY OF TIPPERARY CLAN O'NOLAN.

    FAMILY TREE DNA - NOLAN SURNAME PROJECT.

    The R-L226 Project - Irish Type III.


    HOULAHAN originally appeared in Gaelic as O‘HUALLACHAIN. Other spelling variations include HOLOHAN, HOOLOHAN, HOULIHAN, and WHOOLAHAN.


    In his book, Irish Families, Edward MacLysaght mentions that the O’Hennessy’s of Offaly moved into Co. Tipperary. It is a reasonable assumption, therefore, that their kinsman O’HUALLACHAIN also moved into Tipperary. Undoubtedly, MacLysaght would take exception to the use of the term “clan” to describe this “sept” or group of O’NOLAN’S. He notes that Ireland did not have a true clan system like that which developed in Scotland; however, modern DNA evidence is separating the various septs or groups of O'NOLAN’S living in the same vicinity into distinguishable family groups, lineages or clans: Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O‘NOLAN: Connaught and Tipperary Clan O‘NOLAN. The above assumption can also be substantiated with the following:


    The Deise “were also given the country comprised in the present baronies of Clonmel, Upper-Third, and Middle-Third, in the Co. Tipperary, which they held till the Anglo-Norman Invasion.” (17) The Corca Dhuibhne and Corca Laoighdhe were brethren tribes of the Érainn (Belgae from Belgium). The Corca Dhuibhne, according to the below paragraph from The History of Ireland, ruled over the descendants of FIACHAIDH SUIGHDHE, brother to CONN CEADCHATHACH of the Hundred Battles and EOCHAIDH FIONN, when they were in Munster. AONGHUS son of EOCHAIDH FIONN (Carlow NOLAN ancestor) son of FEIDHLIMIDH REACHTMHAR was reportedly the leader of the Offaly - Kilkenny NOLAN and Tipperary NOLAN ancestors at that time.


    "These three sons of Fiachaidh Suighdhe divided that territory between them into three parts; and they are called the descendants of Oilill Earann, and the Earna. However, they are not the Earna, but the descendants of Conaire son of Mogh Lamha it is these that were styled the Earna. It is Corc Duibhne son of Cairbre Musc who was chief over the descendants of Fiachaidh Suighdhe who came to Munster; and it was these descendants that were called the Deise; and Aonghus son of Eochaidh Fionn son of Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar was their leader when coming to Munster, and with him were the three sons of Fiachaidh Suighdhe, namely, Rossa, Eoghan, and Aonghus.” (18)


    HISTORY SERIES #1: THE HISTORY OF OSRAIGHE: ROOTS OF COUNTY KILKENNY.

    "In the fifth century the neighbouring tribe of the Deisi (from modern Co. Waterford/Tipperary), aided by the Corca Laighde (from modern Co. Cork), conquered south Ossory, and for over a century, the Corca Laighde chiefs ruled in place of the dispossessed Ossory chiefs." (19)


    THE OSRAIGHE REGION.

    "In ancient times the Kingdom of Ossory was divided under Brehon Laws into Magha, a term signifying "plains", of which seven are recorded in early documents, though not all of these are coterminous with the present county boundaries. The names of these, now doubtful of interpretation and no longer in popular usage, included Magh Airgead Rois, northwards from Kilkenny city; Magh Airbh, continuing further north-westwards to the Laois border; Magh Chearbaill, on a broad front from the Nore to the Barrow rivers, now comprising much of the barony of Gowran; Magh Ghabhar Laighean, northwards from the Johnswell Hills into modern Co. Laois (Leix); Magh Lacha (west of Kilkenny city to Callan?); Magh Feimhin, west of Callan to Slievenaman (in modern Co. Tipperary); and Magh Roighne, comprising most of Shillelogher Barony." (20)


    The PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND) (O’HEWELANE) (O’WOLOGHAN) line of O'NOLAN'S has long been assumed to have descended from Carlow Clan O'NOLAN. New DNA evidence and genealogical information is altering that assumption. The families of N-8, N-10, and N-38 of the NOLAN DNA Surname Project prove a descendancy from Co. Tipperary, Ireland and connect to the PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND) line that began traveling to the New World around the mid 17th century. These separate and distinct NOLAN lineages may or may not have developed in conjunction with Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught with a split disseminating into Co. Tipperary Clan O’NOLAN somewhere between the 5th and 12th century in (Osraighe) Ossory connecting to the ancestors of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN, the Corca Laighde.


    Nolan Y-DNA Family Discussion and Unique Haplotypes

    Lineage VII - Tipperary Clan O'Nolan


    Conclusions:


    "Primary: The families of N-8, N-10, and N-38 prove a descendancy from Co. Tipperary, Ireland and connect to the Pierce Nowland (Noland) line of O'Nolan's that began traveling to the New World around the mid 17th century. N-8 matches N-10 and N-38 exactly at the 25-marker level. N-10 is also a genetic distance of 3 at the 37-marker level with N-38. This separate and distinct O'Nolan clan from Co. Tipperary could have an ancient Osraighe (Ossory) connection to the ancestors of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan, the Corca Laighde, as described below.


    History Series #1: The History of Osraighe: Roots of County Kilkenny.


    "In the fifth century the neighbouring tribe of the Deisi (from modern Co. Waterford/Tipperary), aided by the Corca Laighde (from modern Co. Cork), conquered south Ossory, and for over a century, the Corca Laighde chiefs ruled in place of the dispossessed Ossory chiefs." (21)


    Some genealogical researchers have this family living in Co. Mayo in the early seventeenth century, which suggests transplantation or dispossession from Co. Tipperary. The earliest known ancestor of N-13 is James J. Nolan born in Co. Mayo in the year 1810. The Maryland estate of Pierce Noland, "Fethard," was most likely named after the ancient walled city of Co. Tipperary where this family or clan of O'Nolan's may have originated. N-38 matches exactly the 25-marker haplotype of the Irish Type III Web Page. N-38 has exact 25-marker matches in Y-Search with individuals claiming Co. Tipperary and Clare origins.


    Or the families of N-8, N-13, and N-38 may have a connection to the O'Houlihan's who "were originally chiefs in County Clare, where their arms and their proximity to Aidhne suggest a clan affiliation with the O'Shaughnessy's (both the O'Shaughnessy's and the O'Heyne's had important medieval branches settled in just over the Clare border in Limerick). The O'Houlihan's were in any case pushed by Cromwell into Connaught, though; some were dispersed southward to County Cork, where they adopted the form "Holland," by which name they are still known. In Roscommon and Mayo the name became Nuallachain, and was Anglicized as Nolan." The above quote is from the Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland, Chapter IX: The Gaels, 96-97.


    N-31 mismatches N-8 at DYS #389-1 and 389-2 at the 12-marker level. N-31 seems very similar to Irish Type III, but mismatches it by two at DYS #389-1 and 389-2 also. Matches of significance at Y-Search for N-31 are the exact 12-marker O'Bryne (Bryne) Co. Kilkenny result for RE7TY and PJY4B Breen of Ireland result. The match with RE7TY of Co. Kilkenny Ireland is precisely where this Noland haplotype should exist according to research posted at History of Carlow Clan O'Nolan and Tipperary Clan O'Nolan. This Noland haplotype migrated into Co. Tipperary Ireland after its Co. Kilkenny residence and may connect to N-8 and N-13 at Irish Type III. N-32 mismatches N-8 and N-13 at DYS #426 and 439 at the 12-marker level. N-32 also mismatches the WAMH at DYS #426 and Irish Type III at DYS #426 and 439 at the 12-marker level.


    Irish Type III identifying markers are DYS # 439 at 11, DYS 459 at 8 and 9, DYS 464a-d at 13, 13, 15, and 17, DYS 456 at 15, and DYS 463 at 23. N-13 does not match these identifying markers for Irish Type III. N-31 matches DYS # 439 at 11, as does N-8." (22)


    N-31 is of the NOLAND surname and mismatches N-8 at DYS #389-1 and 389-2 at the 12-marker level. The DYS #389-2 at 31 value for N-31 matches N-3 and N-30 of Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught who are the only other two NOLAN Y-DNA results at 31 for DYS #389-2, and they are haplogroup R1b1c10. The DYS #389-2 at 31 value may represent an ancient relationship prior to the introduction of surnames between N-31, Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught, and Tipperary Clan O’NOLAN.


    Certainly, a genetic distance of two with N-8 and three with N-3 and N-30 at the 12-marker level indicates that this NOLAND family does not match the Irish Type III or Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught within the timeframe of surname use, but it does not rule out an ancient connection between N-31, Irish Type III, or Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught. Matches of significance at Y-Search for N-31 are the exact 12-marker O'Bryne (Bryne) Co. Kilkenny result for RE7TY and PJY4B Breen of Ireland result. The match with RE7TY of Co. Kilkenny Ireland is precisely where this NOLAND haplotype should exist.


    Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught resided in Shillelogher (Magh Roighne) Barony, and Tipperary Clan O'NOLAN could have lived in Magh Feimhin, as described above, or perhaps they moved into Tipperary Co. (Ossory) from Kilkenny Co. (Ossory) as feudal tenants of the Butler’s in 1200 upon the building of Nenagh Castle in North Tipperary. Thus, Tipperary Clan O’NOLAN would have had a 265 year relationship with the Norman Butler (FitzWalter) family before the intermarriage of SABINA in 1465, the wife of O’NOLAN, to James Butler. Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O’NOLAN: Connaught also had a history of intermarriage with the Norman’s in the ancient walled city of Galway.


    Though, Donald Reagh (Riabhach) McMorrogh Kavanagh (King of Leinster) has been reported as the father of SOWE (SADHBH, SARAH, SABINE) Kavanagh with husband O’NOLAN as cited in The Irish Genealogist: Official Organ of the Irish Genealogical Research Society: The Kavanagh’s: 1400-1700*, that does not rule out a (O’HEWELANE) O’WOLOGHAN connection. It has long been assumed that all O’NOLAN’S descend from Carlow Clan O’NOLAN and that assumption is in error. Extensive research has not provided conclusive evidence as to which clan this O’NOLAN descends, however, the following evidence can be cited: 1. Sir James Butler of (Polestown) Paulstown, named for Paul Butler, in Co. Kilkenny, the ancestral home of the Corca Laidhe (Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'Nolan: Connaught) married SABH O'NOLAN, the previously married daughter of Donel Reagh Mac-Morrogh Kavanagh, Lord of Ferus, Co. Wexford; 2. The Butler's had a history of obtaining license for marriage of whom ever they pleased; "James, 1st Earl of Ormonde, and 7th Butler, a minor at the decease of his father, but obtained licence four years later, for the sum of 2,000 marks, to marry whomsoever he pleased." (23) 3. James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormonde “had a renewed grant of the prisage of vines (which had been resumed by the crown), and a Brant of the regalities, liberties, &c., of co. Tipperary, with the right of a Palatine in that co. for life;" (24) and 4. Co. Tipperary was the home of Tipperary Clan O'Nolan which may or may not have developed in conjunction with Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O'NOLAN: Connaught with a split disseminating into Co. Tipperary Clan O'NOLAN somewhere between the 5th and 12th century in (Ossory) Osraighe, Co. Kilkenny.


    * Volume Info: 5 (#4, November 1977): 437-447; 5 (#5, November 1978): 573-580; 5 (#6, November 1979): 730-734; 6 (#2, November 1981): 189-203; Abbrev: Nicholls, The Kavanagh’s 1400-1700; Author: Nicholls, Kenneth, Page: 5 (#4, November 1977): 438 did not give the full name nor the date.


    BUTLER FAMILY NAME.

    “The Butler's arrived with the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 12th century and in 1177 Theobald FitzWalter was made the Chief Butler of Ireland by King Henry II. Unlike many of the other Anglo-Norman names, it did not become gaelicised.


    The most prominent Butler family in Ireland is descended from Theobald FitzWalter and Kilkenny Castle is the most magnificent example still extant of a Butler residence. From the 14th to the 20th centuries, the castle was the main seat of the Earls and Dukes of Ormonde, who played a prominent part in Irish history. Other castles with strong Butler links include Cahir Castle: the Butler's came into possession of this castle in 1375 and it was taken from them in 1599. The Butler's also had connections with Knappogue Castle in Co. Clare and with Ormonde Castle in Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary.” (25)


    Fethard.

    The 1881 British Census records a PIERCE NOLAND* born in the year 1825 in Co. Tipperary, Ireland living at 6 Cranford Row, Cranford Lane, Harlington, Middlesex, England with wife JULIA NOLAND and eight year old niece ALICE BRYAN. Genealogical researchers have a branch of this family living in Co. Mayo in the early seventeenth century, which suggests transplantation or dispossession from Co. Tipperary. Connaught or hell may have been the only choice for this family, but perhaps the more likely scenario is that this branch of the NOLAN Tipperary Clan moved into Co. Mayo with the expansion of the Butler family into Connaught. The Maryland estate of PIERCE (NOWLAND) NOLAND, "Fethard," locally pronounced "Feddard," was most likely named after the ancient walled city of Co. Tipperary where this family or clan of O’NOLAN’S originated. Coincidentally, there is another Fethard by the Sea in Co. Wexford.


    The file Descendants of PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND) was saved from NOLAND'S of America by Sharon NOLAND. It is a very large 277 page document be patient when downloading. On 17 February 2007, SUE (NOLEN) AMBURGY provided the file Descendants of JESSE NOLAND and NANCY HICKS as an addendum to Descendants of PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND) saved from NOLAND'S of America by Sharon NOLAND, which listed the descendants of JEREMIAH NOLAND and not his brother JESSE NOLAND.


    * Source Information: Dwelling 6 Cranford Row Cranford Lane Census Place Harlington, Middlesex, England Family History Library Film 1341323 Public Records Office Reference RG11 Piece/Folio 1328/79 Page Number 2.



    8 August 2006.


    “I personally suspect that PIERCE NOLAND was named after Pierce Roe Butler…” (26)



    THE NEXT EARL OF ORMOND? - NOTES ON EACH INDIVIDUAL IN THE KEY RELEVANT PEDIGREE (PART ONE OF THREE).

    “12. JAMES, [BUTLER] 14__-1487; m [arried] 1465, SABINA, da [ughter] of Donell Keagh Kavanagh and by her who d. 1503 or 1508 had Edmond, Theobald and Piers (No. 13), the first legitimate son. SABINA'S husband, O'NOLAN, seems not to have died until shortly before her marriage to James (No. 12) in 1465 (Butler Jo., I, 38); her illegitimate sons, Edmond and Theobald Butler "lay under a cloak" at their parents' marriage in 1465 (Ormond Deeds, iii, 296-300).


    13. PIERS, [BUTLER] c [irca] 1466-1539; succ [eeded] 1515, as 8th. Earl of Ormond; for his purported 1528 surrender of, and 1538 restoration to, this earldom see: Butler Jo. Vol. 1 No.4 p.246; created 23 Feb. 1528, Earl of Ossory (in the Peerage of Ireland, in tail male) at Windsor (Cal. Carew MSS., 1515-74. Pp. 37-39); m [arriage] 1495, Margaret, da [ughter] of Gerald (FitzGerald), 8th. Earl of Kildare, and by her who d. 1542 had Nos. 14 & 15.” (27)


    CALENDAR OF ORMOND DEEDS, 1413-1509.

    VOL. III.


    P. 338: Entry Number 339.


    “Indenture (in English) made at Kilkenny on the 12th day of January in the year 1508, between Sir PERS [PIERS BUTLER] BUTTELER, knight, and DOWNYLL O’WOLOGHAN, carpenter, witnesses that Sir PIERS has granted and to farm given for his heirs and assigns unto DOWNYLL during his life the three stone mills of the aforesaid town, with their meadows, “inchis,” and appurtenances, that is to say in length from William Archer’s ground unto the common “correll” (quarry) and in breadth from the King’s Way in the west to the Nore in the east; also the mill of Donmore with the great “inche” and appurtenances, which “inch” is in length from Merransground and so to the common way and Pollbolloke; also the old mill of Callan within the same town. Further Sir PIERS and his heirs shall bring and carry all millstones, iron and brass and all other necessaries at their own cost unto the aforesaid mills and so at all times and as oft as shall be required during DOWNYLL’S life. Also DOWNYLL shall “gate and make all myllstones in the montayne and tember in the wode at his cost at all tymes excepte mette and drink ouer the said Sir PERS his airs and asigns ande so durant the foresaide DOWNYLL’S life” Also the said DOWNYLL and his servants shall do all manner of works freely unto the aforesaid Sir Piers and anywhere as is desired except for meat and drink. Also the said DOWNYLL shall have the third part of all manner of corn that shall be ground within the aforesaid mills at all times during his life’ also hat it be lawful and free unto Sir PIERS to have at all times unto his horses and hackneys (hakensis) free pasture in the meadows above-written, with all blood-shedding according, and so during DOWNYLL’S life.


    January 12, 1509. BUTLER Seal.”


    DOWNYLL O’WOLOGHAN (O’NOLAN) and Piers Butler, the 8th Earl of Ormond, thus, could have been related possibly being half-brothers both having the same mother and different fathers. Fethard is in Middlethird Barony, Co. Tipperary, and there is a descendant of the Piers Butler in the above record living in Middlethird Barony in the 1659 Pender census: Piers Butler. There is also mention of TADEUM OHWOLAGHAN* in a statement by Oliver Cantwell, Bishop of Ossory, in 1510.


    * This information was extracted from the Tenth Report, Appendix, Part V. The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Fingall, the Corporations of Waterford, Galway, &c., Historical Manuscripts Commission, (York., London., United Kingdom) HMSO, 1885, 264.


    A principal Irish name and their number in Pender’s 1659 census for Lower Ormond Barony, Co. Tipperary was NOLLANE, 15. The 1664-67 Hearth Money Rolls were a levied tax on the basis of the number of hearths in each house and include the following:



    HEARTH RECORDS, 1666: BARONY OF MIDDLETHIRD - PARISHES OF ST. PATES, ROCK, AND DANGERDORGANE.

    Gortmaceill.



    HISTORICAL TIMELINE - CO. KILKENNY.


    Nenagh Castle.

    * Theobald FitzWalter (Butler) built Nenagh castle in the year 1200. Nenagh is in North Tipperary. The castle is one hundred feet tall and fifty-three feet at its base.


    INDEX TO GRIFFITH'S VALUATION OF IRELAND, 1848-1864.



    CALENDAR OF ORMOND DEEDS, 1172-1350.

    VOL. I.


    P. 242-43.


    “Estreats of Co. Kilkenny, 19-20 Edward II (1325-6).


    [The King is described only as Edward, but the dating of the feasts and years can only apply to the reign of Edward II.]


    Estreats of county Kilkenny on Thursday next after the feast of St. Andrew in the 19th year of King Edward, Fulc de fraxineto being sheriff.”


    “BENET O’NOLAN by pledge of Philip and Maurice Noungill xxd.”


    CALENDAR OF ORMOND DEEDS, 1350-1413.

    VOL. II.


    P. 234.


    “Given at Carrykmcgryffyn on the 9th day of February in the 21st year of Richard II.


    February 9, 1398.


    (2) James, Earl of Ormond, appoints PHILIP O’HEWELAN and Philip Walsh his bailiffs for receiving full seisin in his name from John fitz Elys, son and heir of Geoffrey McElyot, in all messuages, rents, etc., as above.


    Same date and place” [as previous entry].


    CALENDAR OF ORMOND DEEDS ~ VOL. I-VI.

    "February 9, 1398 - James, Earl of Ormond, appoints PHILIP O'HEWELAN and Philip Walsch his bailiffs for receiving full seisin in his name from John fitz Elys, son and heir of Geoffrey McElyot, in all messuages, rents, etc., in Portnekyll in the tenement of Langford and elsewhere in county Waterford. Given at Carickmcgryffyn on the 9th day..."


    P. 309-10.




    [Rest of deed frayed away.]


    [April, 1412].”


    CALENDAR OF ORMOND DEEDS, 1413-1509.
    VOL. III.


    P. 75-6.

    “Rental of James, Earl of Ormond, in counties Kilkenny and Tipperary for Easter term in the 10th year of Henry VI.


    [The name of the place faded.]”


    • PHILIP O’HEWELANE for 1 ½ acres 4d.
    • PHILIP O’HEWELANE for ½ acre 2d.
    • THOMAS O’HEWELANE for one garden 2d.
    • PATRICK O’HEWELANE for ½ acre 2d.

    Leaghbaly.


    • THOMAS O’HEWELANE for 6 acres 18d.

    P. 177-78.


    “Anastasia daughter of Robert Erchedekne quit claims to DONALD son of DONALD O’WHOLOWHAN and his heirs for ever all her right in all messuages and tenements, etc., which she has in Carrhygyn, Loghedare, and Carregele and elsewhere in County Kilkenny.


    Witnesses: William Drule, John Philpote, Edmund Graas, Phillip Graas, James Drule, William O’Cathyl, sergeant, Sir Maurice O’Hole, vicar of Kylmanagh, James Tywe, Thomas son of Philip Erchedekyn and Oliver Seynt Legger.


    October 21, 1456.”


    SHORT HISTORY OF FETHARD.

    Oliver Cromwell's letter addressed to Piers Butler of Fethard discussing his visit to the town is dated 3 February 1650. "Extensive building activity inside the town shows that Fethard was a strong and fairly prosperous place in the late middle ages. Its strategic importance is perhaps reflected in the fact that from the late 1400s Earls of Ormond were attending courts held in Fethard, and many Ormond ordinances were issued from here." (28)


    * Oliver Cromwell's letter to Colonel Piers Butler:


    'Articles of agreement between Oliver Cromwell, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and Colonel Piers Butler, Governor of the town of Fethard for the surrender of Fethard, County Tipperary'. 3 February 1650.


    This letter can be accessed at the Manuscripts' Department of the National Library of Ireland: Reference # NLI Deed 7403. A reproduction of the document (with explanatory note) can be seen in Noel Kissane's Treasures of the National Library (Dublin, 1994). NLI Reference # Ir 027 n 47.


    * The above information was provided by e-mail from the Duty Archivist, Department of Manuscripts, National Library of Ireland on 22 August 2006.


    12 June 1688 - PIERCE NOLAND “Feddard” Patent.

    12 June 1688 - PIERCE NOLAND “Feddard” Patent, 2.


    NOWLAND (NOLAND) BROTHERS - ARRIVING FROM IRELAND TO AMERICA.

    • PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND): 1675, settled in Cecil Co. Maryland
    • and then moved to Charles Co. where he spent most of his life.
    • PHILLIP NOWLAND (NOLAND): 1677, settled in Loudoun Co. Virginia.
    • THOMAS NOWLAND (NOLAND): 1678, settled in Anne Arundel Co.
    • Maryland.
    • WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND): 1678, arrived in Maryland on the same
    • ship as his brother Thomas.
    • HENRY NOWLAND (NOLAND): 1679, settled in Kent Co. Maryland with his
    • sons: Henry, Jr. and Richard.
    • DARBY NOWLAND (NOLAND): 1680, Darby and wife ANN BROWNING settled
    • in Cecil Co. Maryland.

    A PHILIP NOWLAN owned 100 acres in Ballydrom, Co. Carlow, 1641 according to O'NOLAN: The History of a People by Fr. John NOLAN & Art Kavanagh. They cite the PHILIP NOWLAN acreage in NOLAN, NOWLAN, NOWLAND Owners of Land Co. Carlow, 1641. Fr. John NOLAN & Art Kavanagh also cite a HENRY O'NOLAN (NOLAND) (NOWLAND) of Carrigslaney, Co. Carlow in rebellion with the Kavanagh's of Garryhill during the year 1584. This PHILIP and HENRY are obviously of Carlow Clan O’NOLAN and not related to Tipperary Clan O’NOLAN.


    * There is record of a _______ NOLAND born about the year 1600 in Co. Mayo and a NOLAND, dubbed first, born 1625 in Mayo. JAMES NOWLAN is also recorded in the Strafford Inquisition of Co. Mayo as of Ballinrobe, 1632.


    THE STRAFFORD INQUISITION OF CO. MAYO (R. I. A. MS 24 E 15).

    BARONY OF BURRISHOOLE.

    P. 25.


    "Said lord viscount did also, on 6 August 1632, purchase of JAMES NOWLAN, of Ballinrobe, gent. 1/2 cartron in the half qr of Rosstwogh; and 1/2 cartron in the half qr Irrishane, in the town of Ballytarsny for the consideration of £5 st." (29)


    * It is not known whether the above three individuals were of Carlow Clan O’NOLAN or Offaly - Kilkenny Clan O‘NOLAN: Connaught, however, research suggests an Offaly - Kilkenny relationship through the Co. Tipperary NOLAN family.


    NOLAND'S OF AMERICA.


    "Some of the first NOLAND'S that were recorded as landing in Maryland were:
    • CATHERINE NOLAND in 1655.
    • PHILLIP NOLAND in 1677.
    • THOMAS NOLAND in 1678.
    • WILLIAM NOLAND in 1678.
    • HENRY NOLAND in 1679.
    • DARBY NOLAND in 1680.
    • PIERCE NOLAND in 1684.

    Although the records showed that these early settlers landed in Maryland, many of them quickly moved into other states, particularly Virginia." (30)



    "Here is a list of items that was required as the absolute barest necessities that a person should have to survive in this new land as it was posted back in the late 1600's by Lord Baltimore. He was trying to entice new settlers and would give them free land if they would come to Maryland with the following equipment." (31)


    • FOOD:
    • Meal, Oatmeal, Peas, Oil, Vinegar, Aqua Vitae,
    • Salt, Sugar, Spice and Fruit.
    • APPAREL:
    • Caps or Hats, Collars, Three Shirts, One Waistcoat,
    • Two Suits of Canvas, One Suit of Frize, One Coarse
    • Cloth Coat, Three Pairs of Stockings, Five Pairs of
    • Shoes and Broad Tape of Garters.
    • BEDDING:
    • Two Pairs of Sheets, Canvas and a Rug.
    • TOOLS:
    • Broad Hoes, Narrow Hoes, Broad Axes, Felling Axes,
    • Nails, Steel Handsaws, Pick Ax, Whipsaw, Hammer,
    • Shovel, Spade, Augers, Chisels, Piercers, Gimlet,
    • Hatchets, and a Grindsaw.
    • ARMS:
    • One Musket, Ten Pounds of Powder, 40 Pounds of Lead,
    • One Sword, One Belt and One Flask.
    • HOUSEHOLD GOODS:
    • Iron Pots, Gridirons, Kettles, Skillets, Platters,
    • Frying Pan, Spits, Spoons and Dishes.

    "The value of these items in 1670 was about 20 English pounds. That was a lot of money in those days and many of the early settlers were forced to make do with much less than the articles mentioned above. Most of the items were manufactured products and since there was virtually no manufacturing facilities in the new country at that time, if the new arrivals wanted to wear warm clothes, use tools or cook food, those items had to come with them." (32)


    "There was great stress put upon bringing tools to help clear the land, build houses, make the basic furniture to go in them such as tables, chairs, beds, etc., and to plant the crops once the land was cleared. The people that survived were indeed a hardy breed!" (33)


    The above quoted information furnished by Sharon Noland of NOLAND'S of America.


    IRISH PASSENGER LISTS.

    St. George - London - Waterford - Maryland - Oct 7, 1677


    The following is the passenger list for the St. George, a merchant ship that sailed from Waterford, Ireland to Maryland (don't know what port) in 1677, carrying 180 passengers.


    "Oct. 7 [1677] Portsmouth. Ralegh Hull to Robert Yard. This morning sailed from Spithead the St. George of London for Waterford and thence for Maryland, wind N. E."


    On November 1, 1678, John Quigley, a merchant captain, not the captain of the ship, appeared before the Secretary of Maryland and applied for land warrants for transporting 180 settlers into the province on the ship St. George of London. Following is the list of settlers. The original spelling is duplicated, along with the original order of names.


    • Michaell Delany
    • John Butler
    • Michaell Dormedy
    • Edmd. McMahony
    • Charles Quigley
    • Owen Carty
    • Stephen Walton
    • John Power
    • Terrance Quigley
    • James Carty
    • Jefry Sweatman
    • Pat Bryan
    • Larance Quigley
    • Dennis Carty
    • Luke FitzGerald
    • Thomas Coleman
    • Lionell Girlings
    • Daniell Shea
    • John Rogers
    • And Simons
    • Darby Dillan
    • Thomas Shea
    • David Hughes
    • Thos. Owens
    • Ebenezer Reed
    • Phillip Welsh
    • Dennis in Craff
    • Margt. Doubin
    • Peter James
    • Anthony Coleman
    • Patrick Mely
    • Ann Craford
    • Wm. Gregory
    • William Dunn
    • Henry Murphy
    • Jane Warwick
    • Thomas Morris
    • Matthew Quigly
    • John Sealy
    • Ann Coburne
    • John Hilliard
    • Canice Quigley
    • Austas Quigley
    • Susan Lane
    • Peter Coveny
    • Christ. Everit
    • Jane Murphy
    • Dorothy Symot
    • Laughlin Dayly
    • Jane Quigley
    • Ann Cantwell
    • Elan Dalton
    • George Fingles
    • Cate Quigley
    • Margt. Prince
    • Margaret Haynes
    • William Ogan
    • Daniell Quigley
    • Margarett Sulivan
    • Honner Conner
    • William Hanagh
    • Jane Shea
    • Wm. Hearbottle
    • Ellin Fanin
    • William Coheran
    • Cate Quigley
    • Richard Bonny
    • Honner Coghlin
    • John Bise
    • Margt. Quigley
    • Edmond Hallison
    • Honner Bryan
    • Hugh Mullin
    • Ellinor Shigins
    • Thos. Weirdlock
    • Cate Dwyer
    • Thomas Welsh
    • Denis Costican
    • TeaMdy Meaher
    • Ellen Cavenah
    • Robert Dunn
    • Cate Costican
    • Edmond Daniell
    • Margt. Jacob
    • James Lane
    • Timothy Leary
    • Richard Maher
    • Mary Kemp
    • Samuell Swallow
    • John Delany
    • James Alexander
    • Pat. Bryan
    • John Powell
    • William Welsh
    • James Crough
    • Elias Roberts
    • Margaret Corban
    • Mary Langam
    • John Luby
    • Fran. Lambseed
    • Giles Kelly
    • Ann Preston
    • Walter English
    • Lar. Halandhap
    • Cate Cann
    • Mary Ryan
    • John Butler
    • John Burke
    • Mary Bryan
    • Jane Butler
    • Garrett Russell
    • Edmd. CrafeJane
    • Mary Sulivan
    • John Francis
    • Tho. Killam
    • Cate fizGerald
    • John Baker
    • John Duvall
    • Pat Ryan
    • Prisscell Dougin
    • William Baker
    • Edmond Daniell
    • Mary Bary
    • Nell Cransbrough
    • Thomas Walker
    • Derby Donoah
    • Ann Screwton
    • Christy Varely
    • James Carew
    • Owen Child
    • Jane Barry
    • Mary Varely
    • Thomas Screwton
    • Tarty Hogan
    • Margt. Day
    • Jenett Varely
    • Mary Screwton
    • David Roach
    • Mary Cavenagh
    • Elizabeth Varely
    • John Hawkins
    • Phillip Slattery
    • Pat Wheelan
    • John Varely
    • John King
    • Toby Butler
    • John Hargreaves
    • Christ. Varely
    • THOMAS NOWLAND
    • David Henderkin
    • Eliz Hargreaves
    • James Varely
    • Roger Doelin
    • Jane Giles
    • Tho. fizGerald
    • Michaell Shea
    • James in Owen
    • Thos. Quigley
    • John Britt
    • James Caroll
    • Richard Ready
    • Morris fizGerald
    • Robt Pendergast
    • Dennis Brothy
    • John Egan
    • William Simple
    • Gart. Lincoln
    • Pat Fannin
    • James O.Cahall
    • Laughlin Eagan
    • Chris. Carwick
    • Jane Mascall
    • Peter Mery
    • Thomas Clynton
    • Ellis Welsh
    • Anthony Arthur
    • Arthur King
    • SHILLIAM NOWLAND
    • John Hollam

    Captain John Quigley hath appeared before me and made oath upon the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God that the severall persons within named amounting to the number of one hundred and eighty were by him imported into this province in the Ship St. George of London, and that neither himself nor any person for him by his consent privity or knowledge hath made use of their or any of their rights for taking up of land according to the condition of plantations. Given under my hand the first day of November anno 1678.


    Source: Maryland State Archives. Land Office, Patent Records, Liber 15, Folio 553. Annapolis, Maryland: 1678.


    1,000 YEARS OF O'NOLAN HISTORY IN IRELAND & THE NEW WORLD: MICHAEL O'NOLAN, COUNTY GALWAY - 1473, (ESTIMATED BIRTH: 1410-1440) AND THE DESCENDANTS OF DONELL OGE O'NOLLOGHAN (O'NOLAN) & JULIAN FALLON OF GALWAY - 1500, DONELL OGE O’HOLOGHAN (O’NOLAN) OWNER OF QWAROWN BROWN (CARROWBROWNE) CASTLE - 1574, TOMHAS O'H-UALLACHAIN (THOMAS NOLAN) & AGNES MARTIN, BALLINROBE CASTLE, MAYO COUNTY IRELAND - PRIOR TO 1585 THOMAS NOLAN RESIDED AT "THE CREVAGHE" (CREAGH CASTLE) PURCHASING ENNISCRONE CASTLE IN COUNTY SLIGO AFTER 1597 DYING 18 JUNE 1628; JOHN NOLAN & FAMILY ATTACKED AND FORCEFULLY EVICTED FROM ENNISCRONE CASTLE, 1641-42; JOHN NOWLIN LIVING IN ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1643; THOMAS NOLIN (NOLUN) OF JAMES CITY COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1717; WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1740.


    Part II. HISTORY OF OFFALY - KILKENNY CLAN O'NOLAN: CONNAUGHT.


    Part III. DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1740 & ALBEMARLE COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1744.


    Part IV. O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLEN) (NOWLIN) (NOLUN) (NOLIN) (NOWLING) (NOLEN) CENSUS, DEED, LAND, MARRIAGE, & OBITUARY RECORDS, 195-1990: IRELAND, VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE.


    Part V. O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLEN) (NOWLIN) (NOLUN) (NOLIN) (NOWLING) (NOLEN) CENSUS, DEED, LAND, MARRIAGE, & OBITUARY RECORDS, 195-1990: ALABAMA, ARKANSAS, FLORIDA, NEW HAMPSHIRE, OKLAHOMA, & TEXAS.


    Part VI. OF THE NOLANS (NOLA): ORIGINS OF THE IRISH AND SCOTTISH - CORCA LUIGHE (CORCA LAOIDHE) AND DAL RIADA (DAL RIATA) - R-U152 (R1b1b2a1b4) (R1b1b2a1b7) (R1b1b2a2g) (R1b1b2h*) (R1b1c10) - DYS #385a AND 385b AT 11 AND 17 - A CORCA LUIGHE (CORCA LAOIDHE) OSSORY (OSRAIGHE) AND DAL RIADA (DAL RIATA) ULADH HAPLOTYPE IN CO. DONEGAL, ULSTER, IRELAND, 1600s.


    Part VII. NOLAN Y-DNA HAPLOGROUP I2a DYS #385a and 385b at 11 and 17 and the FOMORIANS of IRISH MYTHOLOGY.


    NOTES.

    1. Noland History by Sharon Noland @ http://www.members.tripod.com/nolandsharon/history.htm.

    2. Ibid.

    3. The Clan of O’Nolan @ http://www.irishclans.com/cgi-bin/iclans.cgi/clandisplay/site/goti/iclans?alias=e928407803.

    4. Journal of the Archaeological Society of the County of Kildare and Surrounding Districts: Historical Notes on the O’More’s and their Territory of Leix, Lord Walter Fitzgerald, Vol. 6, 1909-1911 @ http://www.clanomore.com/journal.htm.

    5. O’Nolan: The History of a People, 132.

    6. Ibid, 133.

    7. Ibid, 45.

    8. Jewel Nolen, The Nolen Story, 13.

    9. Ibid.

    10. Nolan Clan - Family Surname @ http://onolanclan.org/surname.html.

    11. O’Nolan: The History of a People, 233-34.

    12. Ibid, 284.

    13. Ibid, 219.

    14. Ibid, 268.

    15. The Parish of Mowney @ http://www.ballingarry.net/Slieveardagh%20history/mowney.html.

    16. The History and Antiquities of the County Carlow, John Ryan, 1833; John Ryan, History of Carlow County Ireland.

    17. Kingdom of the North @ http://ulsterman3.tripod.com/Kingdom_of_the_north.htm.

    18. Corpus of Electronic Texts, The History of Ireland (Book I-II) (Author: Geoffrey Keating) Section 44, Part 54 @ http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100054/text054.html, 314-315.

    19. History Series #1: The History of Osraighe: Roots of County Kilkenny @ http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/history/ossory.htm.

    20. The Osraighe Region @ http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/ossory.htm.

    21. History Series #1: The History of Osraighe: Roots of County Kilkenny @ http://www.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/history/ossory.htm.

    22. Nolan Y-DNA Family Discussion and Unique Haplotypes @ http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/nolan/disc.

    23. Ormonde Pedigree @ http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~sfreer/ormonde.html.

    24. Ibid.

    25. Butler Family Name @ http://www.irelandseye.com/irish/traditional/names/family/butler.shtm.

    26. Roger Nowlan, Secretary of the Nolan Clan Association, e-mail 8 August 2006.

    27. The Next Earl of Ormond? - Notes on Each Individual in The Key Relevant Pedigree (Part One of Three) @ http://www.butler-soc.org/nextormond/tsld001.htm.

    28. Short History of Fethard @ http://www.fethard.com/histor/history.html.

    29. Strafford Inquisition, 25.

    30. Noland’s of America.

    31. Ibid.

    32. Ibid.

    33. Ibid.









    Here are my websites:


           




    DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM NOWLAND (NOLAND) (NOWLIN) OF GOOCHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1740 & ALBEMARLE COUNTY VIRGINIA, 1744.

    O'NOLAN (NOWLAND) (NOLAND) (NOWLEN) (NOWLIN) (NOLUN) (NOLIN) (NOWLING) (NOLEN) CENSUS, DEED, LAND, MARRIAGE, & OBITUARY RECORDS, 195-1990: IRELAND, VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE, ALABAMA, ARKANSAS & TEXAS.

    TOWNSHIPS OF CARLOW COUNTY, IRELAND.

    BENNER, GOTTHARDT, HAGELGANS, & LORENZ GENEALOGY.

    POETRY OF GLENN ALLEN NOLEN.

    FAMILY PHOTOS OF GLENN ALLEN NOLEN.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN MOBLEY OF SOUTH RIVER PARISH, ANN ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND, 1687.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN M. (MAC) HORTON: GEORGIA, 1827.

    BLUE MOUNTAIN DAM, AR: CEMETERY RELOCATION RECORDS.

    DESCENDANTS OF CHRISTIAN ADAM BARTH AND CATHERINE WUNDERLICK.

    WEB PAGES OF GLENN ALLEN NOLEN.

    BISHOP GENEALOGY.


    Here are some of my favorite websites:


    ONLINE SHORT STORY BY EDWARD EVERETT HALE (1822–1909): THE MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY. THE HARVARD CLASSICS SHELF OF FICTION, 1917.

    CENSUS OF CARLOW COUNTY IRELAND, 1659.

    NOLANDS OF AMERICA.

    EARLY HISTORY OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE.

    1860 CENSUS WILLIAMSON CO. TN.

    1880 CENSUS YELL CO. AR.

    MOBLEY CEMETERY, YELL CO. AR.

    CEMETERY RECORDS OF YELL CO. AR.

    DESCENDANTS OF PIERCE NOWLAND (NOLAND)- VERY LARGE DOCUMENT: BE PATIENT.

    THE NICOLAUS HEINRICH CRIST ACCOUNT BOOK - NICOLAUS HEINRICH CRIST (1716-1783) & ANA CATHERIN NOWLIN (1720-1783).

    NOWLIN GENEALOGY.

    UNITED STATES MIGRATION PATTERNS FROM 1660.

    HAVANA ARKANSAS CITY CEMETERY.

    HISTORY OF THE FIRST REGIMENT ALABAMA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY C. S. A.

    11TH ALABAMA CAVALRY REGIMENT, CSA, ALABAMA.

    NOLENSVILLE, TN

    SUGAR GROVE CEMETERY, LOGAN COUNTY ARKANSAS.

    ISBELL GENEALOGY.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN ISBELL.

    IRELAND'S HISTORY IN MAPS.

    DESCENDANTS OF JOHN NOWLAN (NOWLIN).

    ASHOKAN FAREWELL (HARPSONG), SONG DURATION: 3:08.

    MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF THE CELTIC RACE.

    IRISH MAGIC AND TUATH DE DANAANS.

    WHO WAS WHO IN ROMAN TIMES: NOLANS, NOLA, NOLAN.

    IRISH SEPT AND CLAN PAGES.



    E-MAIL GLENN ALLEN NOLEN @ ganolen@gmail.com.