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bullet Focko COENES was born in 1643. In 1811 all residents of the Netherlands had to take a surname. The surname MOSSEL was taken upon this family. Prior to that time first names only were used. The FIRST SON was always named for the paternal grandfather, second sons always for the maternal grandfather.

The name MOSSEL in Dutch means "mussel" a kind of clam. This family was probably woolcombers in the winter and mussel-fisherman in the summer time. Termunten, where the family lived is still a small fishing village on the sea.

Example:
The name FOCKENS was not a last name. It was the first name of the father of Koen.
Koen FOCKENS b. 1675 & his son, Geert COENES b. 1705.

The "S" added means " son of," so Fockens would be "son of Focken"

and Geert COENES would be "son of Geert KOEN"

the "F" was changed to a "C" from Focken to Coen(es)
The "C" is changed to "K" from Coen(es) to Koen(es)

Parents: Coen FOCKENS and Asse JANS.

He was married to Aeltjen JANS. By law, in 1811 all residents of the Netherlands had to take a surname. The surname MOSSEL was taken upon this family. Prior to that time first names only were used. The first son was always named for the paternal grandfather, second sons always for the maternal grandfather. The name MOSSEL in Dutch means "mussel," a kind of clam. This family was probably woolcombers in the winter and mussel-fisherman in the summer time. Termunten, where the family lived is still (1998) a lovely small fishing village on the sea.

Example:
The name FOCKENS was not a last name. It was the first name of the father of Koen.
Koen FOCKENS b. 1675 & his son, Geert COENES b. 1705.
The "S" added means " son of," so Koen Fockens would be "son of Focken"
and Geert COENES would be "son of KOEN"
The "K" is changed to "C" in KOEN
the "F" changed to a "C"

DIRECT FAMILY LINE OF MOSSEL FAMILY
Focko COENS, b. abt 1650 & Aeltjen JANS
(name; Coen's son Focko)
Coen FOCKENS, b abt 1675 & Trintje GEERS
(name; Focken's son Coen)
Geert COENES,b. 1705 & Jantje CLASES
(name; Coen's son Geert)
Coeno GEERTS,b. 1735 & Aaltje HINDRIKS
(name; Geert's son Coeno)

(This family takes the MOSSEL name)

Hindrik Koenes MOSSEL,b. 1783 & Wyke Derks KROON
(name; Koene's son, Hindrik)
Hindrik would have been the second son-named after mother's side of family)
Koeno Hindirks MOSSEL,b. 1783 & Epke BERENDS SMIT(second wife)
(name; Hindirk's son Koeno)
Koeno Hindirks MOSSEL,b. 1816 & Grietje Meinderts BOSKER
Berend "Ben" Koenes MOSSEL, b. 1861 & Klaassien VONDELING
John Berend MOSSEL,b. 1886 & Adelaide CRUNDEN
John "Jack" Berent MOSSEL,b. 1921 & Betty Jean PARKER
Michael John MOSSEL,b1953 &Julia Elisabeth ROLLE
Kevin Louis MOSSEL, b. 1975 & Brooke HOWELL
Parker Berent MOSSEL, b. 1998
Children were: Coen FOCKENS.


bullet Geert COENES was born on 15 Sep 1700 in Meeden, Groningen, Netherlands. He died in 1706 in Meeden, Groningen, Netherlands. Parents: Coen FOCKENS and Trintyn GEERTS.


bullet Harmen COENES was born about 1646 in Midwolda, Groningen, Netherlands. Parents: Coen FOCKENS and Asse JANS .

He was married to Claaske MEYNERTS.


bullet Aeltyn COENS was born on 23 Apr 1699 in Meeden, Groningen, Netherlands. She was christened in on 23 Apr 1699 in Meeden, Groningen, Netherlands. She died on 17 Aug 1775 in Meeden, Groningen, Netherlands. Parents: Coen FOCKENS and Trintyn GEERTS.

She was married to Jan HINDRIKS on 25 Apr 1728 in Meeden, Groningen, Netherlands. Children were: Lysebeth JANS.


bullet Chester Saul COHEN

He was married to Bernice WOLFENSON . Children were: Terrell COHEN.


bullet Terrell COHEN Parents: Chester Saul COHEN and Bernice WOLFENSON.

He was married to Cafi Marie FISCHER on 30 Mar 1973 in Fresno, California.


bullet Eugene COIN

He was married to Gertrude ROBINSON.


bullet Atwood COLBERT appeared on the census of in Dec 1856 in 1855 Choctaw Roll, Chickasaw District, Indian Territory. He died on 8 Apr 1868. He was born 24 Oc t 1834. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Caroline COLBERT was born in 1852. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Celia COLBERT Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Fullblood (first wife) CHICKASAW.


bullet Charles COLBERT was baptised on 24 Jun 1799 in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. He died on 23 Jul 1800 in MS. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES.


bullet Cornelia COLBERT was born on 1 Dec 1861 in Chactaw Nation, Indian Territory. She died on 18 Apr 1864 in Indian Territory. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS.


bullet Daughter COLBERT died at age eighteen (18) years of age. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Mrs. Halfbreed Chickasaw FRAZIER.


bullet Delilah COLBERT was born on 11 Jun 1864. She was buried in 1886 in Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. She died on 26 Aug 1886. She signed a will on 15 Nov 1893 in husband's will probated in Pickens Co., Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.

She was married to L. P. PARSHALL.


bullet Edward G. COLBERT was born in 1863. He resided at Berwyn, Pickens Co., Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory between 1890 and 1902. He elected Judge in Pickens Co., Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory in 1898. He died after 1903. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.

He was married to Lena HEREFORD in 1887 in Indian Territory. He was divorced from Lena HEREFORD in 1900 in Chactaw Nation, Indian Territory.


bullet Elba COLBERT was born on 16 Jun 1867. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS.


bullet Elizabeth "Betsy" COLBERT was born in 1819. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES .


bullet Ellen A. COLBERT was born on 7 Apr 1857. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Etna COLBERT was born on 1 Sep 1860 in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. He (or she) died on 8 Sep 1863 in Indian Territory. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS.


bullet George COLBERT was born in 1842. He appeared on the census of in Dec 1856 in 1855 Choctw Roll, Chickasaw District, Indian Territory. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Nellie CHICKASAW .


bullet Col. George "Tootemastubbe" COLBERT was born in 1744. Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Fullblood (2nd wife) CHICKASAW .


bullet George Washington COLBERT was born on 19 Dec 1838 in Marshall Co., MS. George Washington4 Colbert (Samuel A.3, Maj. James2, James Logan1)(2348) (#1364) was born in Marshall Co., MS 19 DEC 1838. George died 26 NOV 1899 in Antlers, Pushmataha Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, at 60 years of age.(2349)

He married twice. He married Sarah Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Sorrells before 1859.(2350) (Sarah Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Sorrells is #2117.) Sarah was born in Fort Smith, Sebastian Co., AR.(2351) (Additional notes for Sarah Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Sorrells(2352)) Sarah died 1890 nr Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT.(2353) He married Dora McCarty nr Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, 2 MAY 1891.(2354) (Dora McCarty is #2119.) Dora was born in AR, 1861.(2355) Dora(2356) was the daughter of William McCarty. Dora died 1906 at 45 years of age. Conflicting evidence states that Dora was born in AR, 1868.(2357) She was listed as a resident in the census report in IT, 1900.(2358)

He was listed as a resident in the census report on '1855' Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, NOV/DEC 1856.



He appeared on the census of in Dec 1856 in 1855 Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co.,Choctaw Nation,Indian Territory. He died on 26 Nov 1899 in Antlers, Pushmataha Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory.

Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.

He was married to Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS before 1859.



Children were: Molcy (Molsey) COLBERT, Etna COLBERT, Cornelia COLBERT, Mary C. COLBERT, Elba COLBERT, Martha "Mattie" Aletha (Althena?) COLBERT, Georgia Ella COLBERT.

He was married to Dora MCCARTY on 2 May 1891 in Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Children were: George Washington COLBERT Jr., Henry C. COLBERT, Rufus COLBERT, Rutha (Ruthie) COLBERT.


bullet George Washington COLBERT Jr. was born in 1892 in Indian Territory. He appeared on the census of in 1900 in Indian Territory. He died on 20 Aug 1901 in Indian Territory. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Dora MCCARTY.


bullet Georgia Ella COLBERT was born on 14 Dec 1872. She died on 14 Jan 1880. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS.


bullet Henry C. COLBERT (Private). Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Dora MCCARTY.


bullet Isabella COLBERT was born on 8 Dec 1850. She appeared on the census of in Dec 1856 in 1855 Choctaw Roll, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. She was buried in Jan 1879 in Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. She died on 16 Jan 1879. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Maj. James Isaac COLBERT was born about 1768. He attended in 1780 in Pensacola. In the early 1780's, he was placed under the tutelage of the firm of Panton, Leslie, and Company of Pensacola by his father, there to obtain an education and employment.

Maj. James2 Colbert (James Logan1)(121) (#1074) was born circa 1768. James died MAY 1842 in Doaksville, Towson Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, at 73 years of age.

He married three times. He married Susan (Susannah) James before 1799.(122) (Susan (Susannah) James is #1914.) Susan was born 27 MAR 1783. Susan(123) was the daughter of Benjamin James. Susan died 3 DEC 1863 at 80 years of age.(124) Her body was interred DEC 1863 nr Soper, Choctaw Co., OK. According to conflicting evidence, she married Maj. James Colbert in MS, 24 JUN 1799.(125) She was listed as a resident in the census report in Chickasaw Nation, MS, 1818. Susan was baptized at in Monroe Mission, Pontotoc Co., MS, 6 JAN 1828. Religion: Presbyterian.(126) Susan was divorced from Maj. James Colbert in MS, before 1830. She resided in Marshall Co., MS 22 MAR 1841. On 22 MAR 1841, "Susan Colbert of Marshall Co., MS, for love of my daughter Susan M. James and her daughters Amelia James and Margaret James, who are also my granddaughters," a Deed of Gift of Negro slaves .... "all of which Negros are in the possession of my son Joseph Colbert in Chickasas Nation West of Mississippi River; also to Margaret James in her own right Negro girl Mary, 8 yrs & now in possession of her father Saml. [sic]] M. James & to remain so until Margaret reaches 18 yrs or shall marry." Witnessed by Wm. B. Spinks, Green Davis. Acknowledged in Marshall Co., MS, by Gordentia Waite, Clk Prob Ct. on 24 MAR 1841. Filed in Red Rive Co., TX, Deed Record Book G, p.172.

She was listed as a resident in the census report on '1855' Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, NOV/DEC 1856.(127) He married Mrs. Halfbreed Chickasaw Frazier after 1799.(128) (Mrs. Halfbreed Chickasaw Frazier is #21528.) (Additional notes for Mrs. Halfbreed Chickasaw Frazier(129)) He married Nellie circa 1841.(130) (Nellie is #12180.) (Additional notes for Nellie(131)) She was listed as a resident in the census report on '1855' Choctaw Roll, Chickasaw District, IT, DEC 1856.

According to conflicting evidence, he married Susan (Susannah) James in MS, 24 JUN 1799.(132) He was listed as a resident in the census report in Chickasaw Nation, MS, 1818. James was divorced from Susan (Susannah) James in MS, before 1830. James's occupation: Chickasaw Chief in Chickasaw Nation, before 1842.

In the early 1780's, he was placed under the tutelage of the firm of Panton, Leslie, and Company of Pensacola by his father, there to obtain an education and employment. He returned to the Chickasaw country by 1789 and within six years became a tribal interpreter. From 1814 to 1818, he was employed as United States interpreter to the tribe at a salary of $400 a year.

He was a Chickasaw Tribal Interpreter between 1814 and 1818 in Chickasaw Nation. In the early 1780's, he was placed under the tutelage of the firm of Panton, Leslie, and Company of Pensacola by his father, there to obtain an education and employment. He returned to the Chickasaw country by 1789 and within six years became a tribal interpreter. From 1814 to 1818, he was employed as United States interpreter to the tribe at a salary of $400 a year.
He appeared on the census of in 1818 in Chickasaw Nation, MS. He was a Chickasaw Chief before 1842 in Chickasaw Nation. He died in May 1842 in Doaksville Towson Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Halfblood (3rd wife) CHICKASAW .

He was married to Susan (Susannah) JAMES on 24 Jun 1799 in MS. He was divorced from Susan (Susannah) JAMES before 1830 in MS. Children were: Molcy (Molsey) COLBERT, Charles COLBERT, Susan "Sukey" COLBERT , Thomas COLBERT, Joseph Edwin COLBERT, James Isaac COLBERT Jr., Tennessee Robinson COLBERT, Susan Miller COLBERT , Samuel A. COLBERT, Elizabeth "Betsy" COLBERT, Matilda COLBERT.

He was married to Mrs. Halfbreed Chickasaw FRAZIER after 1799. Children were: Daughter COLBERT.

He was married to Nellie CHICKASAW. Children were: George COLBERT.


bullet James Isaac COLBERT Jr. was born on 10 Sep 1802. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES .


bullet James Logan COLBERT(22) was born in 1721 in Carolinas or Scotland. The Colberts
The Colbert family had tremendous influence over the Chickasaw Nation and for many years, virtually ruled the Chickasaw. They had tremendous wealth and exercised good business judgment. They were interpreters and diplomats, and tried to help the Chickasaw better themselves. Even though history records that they failed somewhat; nevertheless, they did succeed in helping to move the Chickasaws to a new country, faring better than many other tribes. The treaties that the Colberts worked for provided that the Chickasaw would be paid for their lands prior to their removal. As a result, the Chickasaw were the most prosperous of all of the Indian Tribes arriving in the Indian Territories.

James Logan Colbert, 1721 - By one account, James left his Scottish homeland, emigrated to America, possibly aboard the Prince of Wales in January, 1736, landing in Savannah or Darien, Georgia. He was not listed as a passenger.

Another account which seems to be backed up by documentation, claims that James was born in the colonies approximately 1721 and traveled west to Muscle Shoals, Alabama from one of the Carolinas with a band of British traders and eventually came to the Chickasaw towns and settled among the Chickasaw as a youth and was adopted by a Chickasaw family. His contemporary, fellow trader James Adair wrote that he "...lived among the Chikkasaw from his childhood, and speaks their language even with more propriety than the English".

New Information: Guestbook visitor, Richard Allen Colbert writes,
"He was born in America, on Plumtree Island in North Carolina to be more precise. If you don't believe me, would you believe James Colbert himself. On July 25, 1783, he sent letter to Governor Harrison of Virginia stating that he was "born" in America." I do not have a copy that I can send via computer, but it is located in the "Calendar of Virginia State Papers and other Documents," from January 1, 1782, to Dec. 31, 1784, Vol. III) (Richmond: Sherwin McRae, 1883), pp. 513-515. In addition, when James Colbert spent the summer of 1783 at Long Island on the Holston River with Malcolm McGee and the chiefs of the Chickasaw Nations to discuss peace terms with John Doone and Joseph Martin of Virginia, John Donne wrote a letter to General James Wilkenson, and said: "from his education and mode of life, being bred among the Indians from his infancy ...." QUESTION: How could this happen? ANSWER: His father was a Chickasaw Indian trader and took him to live among the Chickasaws after his real mother died. Father's name was William Colbert. He began trading with the Chickasaws in 1722. Also, in the Draper Collection of Manuscripts, Lyman C. Draper interviewed Malcolm McGee. McGee was asked to describe several of the Indian traders he knew. He described them by their Nationality, i.e., ADAIR-Irish, BUBBY-English, BUCKLES-English, HIGHTOWER-Dutchman, COLBERT-Carolinian. Note: McGee did not say Colbert was a "Scotsman." He said he was a "Carolinian." Also note that McGee was once married to Elizabeth Oxberry Harris, daughter of Christopher Oxberry and Molly Colbert. If anyone should know where James Colbert was born, it would be McGee.
- Richard Allen Colbert to Viki Anderson, Jan 6, 2001

He married three Chickasaw wives and had nine children: seven sons and 2 daughters. He lead his life as an Indian trader, interpreter and leader of men during a time in history which was a turbulent struggle for land and new opportunity.

The Chickasaw depended on the British traders for goods, English guns and ammunition. The British were more than happy to frustrate French and Spanish designs on the Mississippi Valley by supporting the Chickasaw and teaching them to use the weapons. James operated a lucrative trade, established a plantation and owned cattle and 150 slaves. Many mixed-bloods cultivated a new life-style, and congregated around the headquarters of commissary John McIntosh on the Natchez Trace. British authorities looked on men like Colbert with suspicion and disdain, but Colbert proved to be a loyal ally of the British during the American Revolution.

James and his Chickasaw followers harassed, frustrated, and repelled the Kings Enemies, patrolling the river country against invasion. French, Spanish, British, and Americans all courted the Chickasaw who skillfully played one against the other. The Chickasaw had begun to divide politically with one group showing favoritism toward the Spanish and the other lead by James Colbert staying loyal to the British. In 1781, James Logan Colbert lead an attack on Ft. Jefferson, an American military post erected in 1780 by George Rogers Clark on Chickasaw lands without Chickasaw permission. The siege lasted 5 days, but the Americans held the fort. James was wounded three times in the encounter. The Americans abandoned the fort in June of 1781.

After the British lost the American Revolution and the Anglo-Spanish War in Florida, they abandoned their colonization of the Mississippi Valley. The pro-British Chickasaw were not about to embrace the Spanish who claimed the territory between the mouth of the Yazoo River and the Ohio. They instead transferred their allegiance to the Americans. By 1782, according to some reports, there were almost three hundred whites and possibly a hundred blacks living in Chickasaw country, many of them Loyalist refugees from a failed rebellion at Natchez. James Colbert fashioned these men into a band of resistance fighters near Chickasaw Bluffs, assaulting Spanish boats on the Mississippi. A group of 150 Loyalists and 200 Indians attacked Spanish commerce on the river. The raids climaxed in 1782 with the capture of a boat carrying Señora Nicanora Ramos, the wife of Governor Cruzat of Saint Louis near present day Memphis. She was well treated and released after 22 days.

James first wife was a full-blood Chickasaw. They had a daughter, Sally. His second wife also was full-blood Chickasaw. They had several children: William, George, Levi, Joseph, and Samuel. His third wife was a half-blood Chickasaw. They had two children; James Holmes and Susan.

James brought up his half-blood children as Indians. It is ironic that while James spent a good deal of his adult life seeking the Indian ways, his children would raise their children in the white mans culture, sending them to schools to become well educated. They became shrewd businessmen and leaders who exerted tremendous influence in Chickasaw councils well into the nineteenth century. In December, 1783, James died en route home from Pensacola in a fall from his horse. Some people believed that Caesar, the slave that returned home to tell the tale, had killed him.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sources include:
Adair's History of the American Indians, James Adair, published in London, 1775.
The Chickasaw, Duane K Hale & Arrell M. Gibson ISBN 1-55546-697
The Five Civilized Tribes, Grant Foreman, ISBN 0-8061-0923-8
The American Revolution in Indian Country, Colin G. Calloway, ISBN 0-521-47149-4

Updated information - Additional references and correspondence:
Kerry Armstrong - correspondence
Who was Who Among the Southern Indians, Don Martini, published 1998

He resided at moved to the Chickasaw Nation and married into tribe. about 1740 in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. He died on 7 Jan 1784. Conflicting evidence states that:
James was born in Scotland, circa 1721. James immigrated, 10 JAN 1735/6. Destination: Darien, GA. James's occupation: Trader in Chickasaw Nation, before 1784. One source states that, "Among the most influential mixed-bloods of the Chickasaws, were the five sons of James Logan Colbert, a Scotsman who came to live among the tribe in 1729 and married three Chickasaw women. Four of his sons became chiefs of the tribe. One Colbert had three wives, one Indian and the other two were white women. Both were sisters with the last name Allen."
("Chickasaw Chiefs and Prominent Men").

Another source states:
that James Logan Colbert came to America aboard the PRINCE OF WALES, which landed at Darien, Georgia on January 10, 1736. Also on board were John McIntosh, Lachlan McGillivray, and John's older brother, Lachlan McIntosh. All these men played significant roles in the history of the "Five Civilized Tribes." -- (Martini).

Another source states:
Chickasaw interpreter, Malcom McGee, in an circa 1841 interview with historian Lyman Draper, stated that James Logan Colbert was from the Carolinas. Colbert, himself stated at one time he was born in the Carolinas.

About 1740, he moved to the Chickasaw Nation and married into the tribe.

He was married to Fullblood (first wife) CHICKASAW about 1740 in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. First Fullblood Chickasaw is #1706 Children were: Sally Homachota COLBERT , Celia COLBERT, Gen. William "Chooshemataha" COLBERT.

He was married to Fullblood (2nd wife) CHICKASAW before 1742. Second Fullblood Chickasaw is #1707 On October 29, 1927, the Mississippi D.A.R. unveiled the first historical marker in Prentis County. The speaker at the event was Frank R. King of Tuscumbia, Alabama, president of the Tennessee Valley Historical Association. The subject of his address was the Natchez Trace:

Natchez Trace

Mr. Chairman, Daughters of the American Revolution, Ladies and Gentlemen:

It has been a pleasant thought to me for the past few days to think that I would have the privilege of being with you today. I am almost three score and ten tomorrow is my birthday, after that I will not play telling anymore.

I want to be honest with you and tell why I am with you today. This is my first appearance in public, the first invitation I ever had to make an address and fearing that I could not wait so long for another I had best accept as I might not have the second call.

Of the old trails, horse paths and roads that passed through Colbert County, Alabama into Mississippi, there were three that were in the early day of the greatest importance. They came to notice as follows:

The Natchez Trace - 1700
Gain's Trace - 1801
Jackson's Military Road - 1814-1816

The Natchez Indians from whom the town of Natchez takes it's name, if tradition may be believed, came from Mexico where they had lived for centruries; and after the fall of the Montezuma Empire, to which they were allied, they fled from Spanish tryanny. They followed the rising sun from the west and finally reached the Mississippi river which they crossed and settled at a point on the river where the City of Natchez now stands.

At this time they were a numerous people and occupied a territory from Natchez to the Wabash. They were worshippers of the sun.

In 1713 the French settled the Natchez country and formed a military and trading post there which they maintained until 1764 when it fell into the hands of the British. Later it went into the hands of Spain. In 1798 by treaty it came to US. In 1815 it was the capitol of Mississippi. For two and a quarter centuries, the city of Natchez has been, as it shifted from one Nation to another, an important place.

Our Representatives in their treaties with foreign countries, in the early days, neglected to get the matter of Import Duties properly adjusted, and when our boats either at New York or Philadelphia, loaded with our own manufactured goods, came to Mobile or New Orleans, we were compelled to pay excessive import duties. [To]...avoid these duties, we loaded goods on the Ohio at Pittsburgh, Pa., and floated down this stream to the mouth of the Tennessee, and up that stream to Colbert's Ferry, which was at the crossing of the Natchez Trace.

The goods were unloaded at Colbert's Ferry and carried by pack horses to Cotton Gin Port on the Tombigbee, where they were loaded on boat and carried to St. Stephens in Washington County in the Territory of Mississippi.

The Natchez Trace did not cross Tombigbee River at Cotton Gin Port, but both Gain's Trace and Natchez Trace leaving Colbert's Ferry was for quite a distance one and the same.

Prior to 1800, there were no roads except Indian trails leading to that part of Mississippi territory. Our early roads followed these trails as did many of the early railroads. Fom Nashville, Tennessee to Natchez, Mississippi a distance of 550 miles there was not a single white settlement and only occasionally Indian villages.

At the time it was not so much used by travelers going to that country, but was much used by the traders of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama who had carried their boat loads of cotton, and other products from the upper Tennessee waters, over the rapids of Muscle Shoals, down the Tennessee, into the Ohio River, and finally to New Orleans; who returned to their homes by Natchez, over the Trace, which was only a bridal path through the cane and woods. The remoteness from civilazation and the density of both cane and woods made the trail an ideal place to rob and kill the returning boatmen; who were always supposed to have large amounts of money from the sale of their goods.

This trail was made famous for such deeds by a man named Tom Mason, who lived near Cross Plains in Roberson county, Tennessee. He went from there to Natchez where he organized his band which consisted of himself and his two sons and eight other bad men. They terrorized the home coming travelers for years, until the outrages got to be so frequent the Gov. Claiborne of Mississippi territory offered a large reward for his capture, dead or alive. So strong and defiant this band became, that they would sometimes capture officers who were after them. Finally, they were so closely hunted that they moved West.

This trail was infested with another band of robbers headed by two brothers from Kentucky by the name of Harp. They were known as Big and Little Harp, one being a large and and the other a small man. After murdering and robbing travelers they would repair to 'Nick-a-Jack Cave' where thay would remain in hiding until they felt safe to come out and commit other crimes. Nick-a-Jack cave is that point which determines the north east corner of the State of Alabama [Mississippi?], an Indian site of great antiquity.

The Indians were shrewd traders and in disposing of their lands in the early days they always reserved the Ferries. Some of them yielded great fortunes to their owners. It has been said that Colbert's Ferry on the Natchez Trace was worth $20,000 annually.

John A. Murrell who was born in Williamson county, Tennessee about 1810 and has had the worst reputation for murdering and robbing of any man that ever operated on the Trace. I have gone to the trouble of writing many letters to that part of the state of Tennessee in which he lived at different times and my investigation of him has made me chage my mind as to his guilt of many charges that have been laid at his door. All admit that he stole horses and Negro slaves and did an extensive business. He was arrested many times charged with murder but the Courts always acquitted him upon this charge. Mr. Park Marshall of Franklin, Tennessee an eminent lawyer, writes me that Murrell belonged to a good family of people and has many relatives where he was born and that they are universally respectable people and that he had made extensive investigations regard him [Murrell] and that he was convinced that most of the charges were grossly exaggerated. He wrote the story of hes life, a little pamplhlet consisting of sixty pages which had a considerable circulation in both Alabama and Mississippi, but are now very rare. Iknow of but one copy and it is in the hands of a second hand dealer and the price is $10. just sixteen and two thirds cents a page.

Thomas H. Benton, born in N.C. in 1782 a early day settled in Tennessee, on Duck river at Gorden's Ferry and was the Secretary of Captain John Gorden, the keeper of the Ferry. He represented Tennessee in the legislature and server upon Jackson's staff. On the admission of Mossouri as a state he was chosen United States Senator in 1820, and served for thirty years. His mother owned a very large plantation on the Natchez Trace at or near Gorden's Ferry. He wrote many books, all relative to the workings of our Government.

Merriweather Lewis, an American soldier, and explorer born in Virginia in 1774 was sent with Mr. Clark to make discoveries in the northwestern part of this country also to discover the source of the Missouri river. His reports resulted in the purchase from France the vast territory then called Louisiana. The news coming by ship to New York and carried from there to Mr. Jefferson in Philadelphia by a carrier pidgeon, the quickest transportation in that day. So pleased with the manner in which Mr. Lewis and Mr. Clark performed this task that Mr. Jefferson rewarded them both. Lewis with the Governorship of Lousiana and Clark as agent to the U.S. for Indian affairs.

Mr. Lewis died on his way to Washington traveling the Natchez Trace in 1809. It is a debatable question to this day whether he was a victim of a robber and murdered or took his own life. He never married and all who love a thrilling story should read the story of Mr. Merriweather Lewis and his sweetheart, Miss Theodocia, the daughter of Aaron Burr. Tennessee named the territory where he died for him, Lewis county and erected a substantial monument to his memory by the trace near the spot where he died.

Lorenzo Dow and Peggy, his wife were frequent travelers of the Trace. Since the days of George Whitfield, it has not fallen the lot of another minister of the gospel to enjoy the great celebrity as that of the late Lorenzo Dow. He and his wife were both exceedingly handsome and it was told by Mr. Dow that his courtship with her consisted of but one word. What would we older men have given fifty years ago to know that magic word.

It was a Colbert's Ferry that Mr. Dow before crossing the river met Mr. John Lee Swaney, the mail carrier in 1804 or about that time. The meandering course of Mr. Dow's travels took him to many strange places that were remote from civilization. He went to England where he was imprisoned for preaching what the called a strange doctrine.

James Allen was well educated and of a family in easy circumstances he came to Nashville, Tennessee, intending to settle there as a lawyer but from some disgust entered the Chickasaw Nation, where he conciliated the favor of General Wm. Colbert, a half breed chief of large fortune. He served in the Creek War with General Jackson in 1814 and was a great friend of the General's.

Mr. Allen's admiration for the General was beneficial to him in more than one way. Miss Susie Colbert, his daughter was a beautiful woman and Mr. allen was not able to resist her charms and he went to the old general and told him that he wanted to marry his daughter, Susie. The General gave Mr. Allen his consent and in a few days, Susie wrapped in a shawl leaving only a small space that she might see her way, went to the cabin of James Allen just at night fall, knocked at the door and being invited in she took her seat. According to Indian fashion their courtship this ended.

Their daughter, Peggy [Allen] was beautiful and received many proposals from traders returning from New Orleans over the Trace. The US Agent in charge of the Chickasaws, Samuel Mitchell fell deeply in love with her but she did not return it. He appealed to her grandmother and considering it a very good match sent Peggy off to the Agent with a string of well loaded packhorses and ten Negroes for her dowry. Peggy was compellet to make the journey but she persistently refused Mitchell saying that she would never marry a drinking white man or an Indian. After two weeks of importunity, he sent her home. Just then there turned up a very handsome young man, Simon Burney from the Natchez country who lover her very deeply, and her father and herself both feared interference by Mitchell and his friends and she and Burney married at once and left the Nation and went to his home near Natchez.

General Samuel Dale, the hero of the canoe fight on Alabama River, compared his ride from Milgeville, Ga., to New Orleans with that of Paul Revere's. [pointing out his grave in Lauderdale, county, Mississippi], [the canoe fight is described at the end of this speech]

When Ft. Mims had it's massacre in 1813, a runner was sent to St. Stephens to Col. Gains and he read it aloud for the information of those around him in the citizens fort. It at once created a panic and Col. Gains remarked if we would get Gen. Jackson with his Brigade of mountain volunteers the Creek Indians would be soon quieted. There was a young man Mr. Edmonson who was a guest in the Gains home that volunteered to thake the message. Mrs. Gains prepared provisions for him, while this was being done he was provided with letters to friends along the trace who were requested to supply him with a new or fresh horse each day. He leaving the jaded horse until his return. All his friends most of whom along the Trace were Indians or half breeds willingly met the request and young Edmonson made the trip to Nashville in a most wonderful short time and fell before them prostrated from exhaustion. Gen. Jackson and Gen. John Coffee hurried to the scene and we all know the result.

Greenwood LeFlore, Panton and Company, McMinn and Company, a branch of the great firm of Swanson and Miller, of London, had an extensive establishment at Pensicola. The wealthy inhabitants of Natchez district sent their orders once a year, very often ordering their merchandise direct from the London house. Sometimes the order from a single home would be L300 - L500 and in a instance L1000 sterling. This would include a cask of London Particular Madeira, a cask of sherry, a cask of porter, and a barrel of French cognac. These goods were usually sent, on their delivery at Pensicola, in a keel boat to Natchez, by the lake route and up the Amite and Manchac. Occasionally the Natchez planters make the trip to Pensicola with their own boat and a Negro crew.

Louis LeFlore, the father of Greenwood LeFlore, owned one of these boats and in this business laid the foundation of his large fortune. He established an extensive plantation and cattle reanch in Yazoo Valley, in the present county of Holmes, where he died a few years after the last treaty with the Choctaws. He had 100 slaves and as many Indians living about him. He was a small man, a French Canadian. Though over eighty years old he was a great hunter and often spent the whole days in overflowed swamps and prairies. Trading houses were established under the supervision of the governor on the Tombigbee for the Choctaws, and near Fort Pickens for the Chickasaws. The first goods sent to the former were consigned to Louis LeFlore. He carried them in a keel boat from Natchez, down the river to Manchac, thence down to Amite, across the lakes and up the Tombigbee to Ft. Stoddard the point of delivery. Joseph Chambers was the first factor and George S. Gains, his successor.

Greenwood LeFlore was a son of Louis LeFlore and Rebecca Cravat an Indian Princess. It is interesting to know that his father established a trading post and called it LeFlore Bluff which is where the city of Jackson, the capitol of Mississippi now is situated.

[skipping a paragraph - on the copy of the speech I have, this part of speech is not legible]

James Logan Colbert prior to 1716[?] lived in one of the Carolinas, a Scotch youth who responded to the call of the wild and joined some English traders and adventurers who were traveling West and stopped east of the Tennessee River. We would say north from here, The Muscle Shoals. He was adopted by an Indian family and soon developed a fondness for trading and amassed a fortune owning land and Negro slaves. Three times he married Indian girls, the first two full blood Chickasaws and the third a half breed Chickasaw. He was the father of eight children. The name of their first daughter is not recorded, the sons by the second marriage were William, George, Levi, Samuel and Joseph. And the son and daughter by the last were James and Susan.

He became influential with his tribe and was soon a bold leader in their wars; and in 1780 led an expedition against the Americans at Fort Jefferson on the Ohio where he received a bullet wound in the are. The siege lasted five days but the Americans held the Fort. The fort was built by the direction of Thomas Jefferson who at that time was Governor of Virginia. His instructions to get permission for its erection were not carried out hence the trouble.

In the Chickasaw battles along the Mississippi River country he was valiant to such an extent that it has been said by good authority that James Logan Colbert at that time was the most famous Chief of the Chickasaw Nation.

In 1784 or near that time he was killed while on his way from the Nation to Georgia as was supposed by one of his Negro slaves named Caeser who accompanied him returning, reported that his horse threw him causing his death.

George Colbert was born in 1764 in that part of the Chickasaw Nation now known as Lauderdale County, Alabama where he grew to manhood along the banks of Cypress and Blue Water Creeks whose cool swift sparkling waters cover a gravel bottom, the home of the lordly trout which are taken in goodly number to this day by the sportsmen of that locality. These streams pour their waters into that part of the river known as Colbert and Muscle Shoals; where in the fall of the year gather in countless numbers wild ducks and geese who feed on the mossy grass which grows in the shallow water ans which is one of the attractions for them now. Added to this bed of the river is strewn with mussels and periwinkles which were not only relished by the fish and fowls but was a guarantee of food to the Indians in times of scarcity, as is evidenced by large piles of these shells, periwinkles and mussels, from one to four feet deep that can be seen in numerous place along the banks of the river from Colbert Shoals to the old home of Double Head, the Cherokee Chief. That was paradise to the hunter of that day.

All Chickasaws were expert swimmers and regarded as almost amphibious and it must have been a glorious sight to behold this manly boy when his soul was in the chase over the hills and hollows as he rushed, like the swift footed deer he pursued or in his pirogue gliding upstream guided by a narrow muddy streak of water, leading to the feeding buffalo soon so to lie bleeding by his side. Thus passed the early life of the young Colbert who did not dream that soon he would be guiding the destinies of his Nation. At twenty -six be built a comfortable residence on the south side of the Tennessee river where the Natchez Trace crosses leading from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi. Signs of the old trace are plainly visible from the Colbert house looking south through a pasture and near the place where the plow share has not yet done its full share of destruction. The trough shaped depression through the hills plainly tell the direction which it took.

The lower ground is marked with water sores which must be infectious as our highways of the present day are afflicted with them. The house is built of the best material and fastened together with wooden pins. The two front rooms, one above the other are twenty four feet by eighteen with a nine foot ceiling. The back room is the same size. The foundation is of stone and the front porch is held up by black walnut well dressed columns about seven or eight inches square with the corners nicely beveled. The stone chimney since the removal of the mantle is the most attraction feature of the place since it is ten feet broad at the base and maintained a width of eight feet for more than twenty feet above the ground. where it tapers to about six, it was plastered with cement which showed that it was of a good quality. As 138 years of rain and exposure has made but little sign. The mantle was sold to a Cincinnati party about thirty or forty years ago for $100.00. And was stored in a government building at Riverton, (Old Chickasaw) which unfortunately was soon burned and the mantle lost.

Mr. W.M. Buckhannon obtained a Kodak picture of the mantle the day it was stored and it can be seen at his home at Riverton, Alabama. Ten years ago a half a dozen of his old cabins used by his Negro slaves were still standing. They were made of hard poplar logs nicely hewed facing about thirty inches, using only four to the side. Only one is left now which is near the house and is occupied. The Main house was loaded on a flat boat at Ross' landing, Tennessee in 1790, where the city of Chattanooga stands and floated over Muscle Shoals down the Colbert's Ferry, demonstrating that they were good craftsmen.

A few miles southwest of the home lived his younger brother, James who shared well the honors of the family. He being the archivist and Historian of the Chickasaw Nation.

Also southwest, lived another brother at Buzzard Roost which is something like a half mile south of Barton Station on the Southern Railroad. This was the non-corruptible Chief Levi Colbert, who deserves more space than can be allowed him in this article. The sons of these brothers were sent to school in Florence, Alabama, to a man named Lorance,and they with some white friends became involved in mischief that Mr. Lorance thought corporal punishment was what they needed and proceeded to administer it beginning with the white boys and no sooner begun that the Indian boys were faintly seen disappearing throught the window and sown the street leading to the river at a gate never seen before by th

Children were: Col. George "Tootemastubbe" COLBERT, Maj. Levi "Itawamba Minco" COLBERT , Samuel COLBERT, Joseph COLBERT.

He was married to Halfblood (3rd wife) CHICKASAW before 1768. Halfblood Chickasaw is #1708
Halfblood died 1822 in Tockshish, Chickasaw Nation, MS TER Children were: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT, Susan "Susy" COLBERT.


bullet Joseph COLBERT was born about 1767. He was an Interpreter in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory in 1799. He died in Colbert's Ferry, on Tennessee River, Alabama. Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Fullblood (2nd wife) CHICKASAW.


bullet Joseph Edwin COLBERT was born on 5 Jan 1801. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES .


bullet Maj. Levi "Itawamba Minco" COLBERT was born in 1759. Levi Colbert
1759­1834, was my gggg grandfather. Levi was the most famous of James Logan Colbert's sons. He obtained the title of Itawamba Mingo meaning "Bench Chief". When Levi was a young man, he learned that the Creek Indians were going to attack the Chickasaw to take their land. It was fall and many Chickasaw warriors were away hunting. Levi immediately gathered as many of the young men of the nation that he could, of those that were still at home, and went forward to meet the enemy. His outnumbered, small band of young warriors surprised, and killed or wounded the would be attackers.

After the hunters returned and learned of the brave and successful act, they rewarded Levi giving him the name "Itte-wamba Mingo". Itte meaning "wood" which alluded to the bench or stool he was given to sit upon in council. Prior to this, the custom was that all warriors sat on the ground while in council. Levi was physically elevated by being given a stool to sit on. From his quiet manner he was also given the name "Okolona" which means calm or peaceful. Itawamba County, Mississippi and the town of Okolona, Mississippi are both named for him.

Levi Colbert was possibly the wealthiest and most powerful of the Colberts. He lived just west of Cotton gin Port located in Monroe county, Mississippi. He owned four-thousand cattle, five hundred horses, a large herd of sheep and several head of swine. At one time he had a part interest in the famed Colbert Ferry on the Natchez Trace which was said to have been worth $20,000 annually. Levi's brother George was the principle owner and keeper of the ferry.

Levi and his brothers took part in many treaty meetings with the Americans from the 1790's through the 1830's. During this time Andrew Jackson was very much in favor of removing the Indians to the west. In 1826, the United States sent a delegation of three commissioners, William Clark, Thomas Hinds, and John Coffee to meet with the Chickasaw to persuade them to exchange their homelands for territory located west of the Mississippi. Indian delegates were not impressed and Levi Colbert responded:

..."We never had a thought of exchanging our land for any other, as we think that we would not find a country that would suit us as well as this we now occupy, it being the land of our forefathers, if we should exchange our lands for any other, fearing the consequences may be similar to transplanting an old tree, which would wither and die away, and we are fearful we would come to the same... We have no lands to exchange for any other. We wish our father [the President] to extend his protection to us here, as he proposes to do on the west of the Mississippi, as we apprehend we would, in a few years, experience the same difficulties in any other section of the country that might be suitable to us west of the Mississippi... Our father [the President] wishes that we should come under the laws of the United States; we are a people that are not enlightened, and we cannot consent to be under your Government. If we should consent, we should be likened unto young corn growing and met with a drought that would kill it."

The commissioners returned to Washington, DC., without a treaty. In 1828, Levi Colbert lead a party of Chickasaw to explore lands in the west and toured portions of what is now Oklahoma in the winter. The expedition returned and its members reported to the council, which informed the United States Government that the Chickasaw would not "consent to remove to a country destitute of a single corresponding feature of the one in which we presently reside."

By 1829, Levi was so prominent in tribal affairs, that he was identified as being "to the Chickasaws, what the Soul is to the body. They move at his bidding. They agree or disagree to any measure that he, and those over whom he knows how to exercise his authority as the Speaker of the Nation may bid. As to their King, he is without power. Like all Indian kings, or the most of them, he is but the subject of some more able and intelligent mind ­ Levi Colbert is that mind."
McKenney to Eaton, June 27, 1829, ibid.

In 1830, two events would finally break the Chickasaw resolve to not be removed. Congress enacted Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act and the state of Mississippi passed statutes that abolished the Chickasaw tribal government and tribal laws. Chickasaw leaders were subject to $1,000 fine and imprisonment if they attempted to govern their people. This violated Chickasaw treaties with the United States Government. The tribe immediately asked President Andrew Jackson to stop Mississippi from enforcing these laws, but he refused to help.

Negotiations began in 1830 to cede the Chickasaw lands. President Jackson met with the Chickasaw in Franklin, TN in treaty. Levi Colbert and other leaders bargained shrewdly for as much compensation as possible for their homeland and the improvements they had made to it. The Franklin treaty provided for the cession of all remaining Chickasaw lands in exchange for a tract west of the Mississippi. And that the United States was to pay for the tribe's traveling costs, provide the Chickasaw with food for 1 year after their emigration and give them a $15,000 annuity for 20 years.

This treaty had a nullification clause in case the Chickasaw could not find a suitable tract of land. In October of 1830, a delegation of Chickasaw was sent west once more. They could not find suitable land and returned. Levi Colbert sent a letter to President Jackson stating that the Chickasaw could not find suitable land, and cited the Franklin treaty's clause. That letter nullified the agreement.

Another treaty signed at the Pontotoc Creek council house in 1830 was signed by tribal leaders under duress. After many subsequent meetings, in 1834, the US government finally agreed to amend the treaty to provide the Chickasaw with larger individual allotments, a Tribal Fund for their traveling expenses and provided for a Chickasaw Commission to handle the affairs of Indians deemed incompetent to handle business affairs and thus protected them from the swarms of land speculators that were eager to cheat the Chickasaw out of a fair price for their land.

From the 1834 treaty, Article 4 "...Many of their people are quite competent to manage their affairs, though some are not capable, and might be imposed upon by designing persons; it is therefore agreed that the reservations hereinafter admitted, shall not be permitted to be sold, leased, or disposed of unless it appear by the [419] certificate of at least two of the following persons, to wit: Ish-ta-ho-ta-pa the King, Levi Colbert, George Colbert, Martin Colbert, Isaac Alberson, Henry Love, and Benj Love, of which five have affixed their names to this treaty."

This commission existed from 1834 to 1845 in order that Chickasaw property owners would be treated fairly by eager land speculators, even if they were not very knowledgeable of business affairs. The commissioners protected their people from being swindled.

Levi Colbert died in 1834 on his way to Washington DC to discuss the Pontotoc treaty, he fell ill at the home of his daughter and son-in-law at Buzzard Roost (Levi's former home which was a half mile south of Barton Station on the Southern Railroad) and did not recover. It is unknown if Levi was buried there or taken back to his home at Cotton Gin Port.

Levi had married several wives. Seletia Colbert, had lived at Colbert's Ferry where the Trace crossed the Tennessee River. Another wife is said to have lived at what is now known as the French Farm, not far from Okolona, in Monroe County. His granddaughter, Frances Elizabeth Kemp tells us of his wife, Minto-Ho-Yo who was a full-blood Chickasaw. Levi and his wives had many children: sons - Martin, Charles, Alex, Adam, Lemuel, Daughtery, Ebijah, Commodore, and Lewis; daughters - Mariah, Charity, Phalishta and Asa.


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This article was supplied to me by Sandra Riley of Page, AZ, thanks Sandra!

Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Fullblood (2nd wife) CHICKASAW.

Children were: Mariah COLBERT.


bulletMariah COLBERT. Mariah Colbert
was my ggg grandmother. She was a daughter of Levi Colbert and Minto-Ho-Yo. Not a great deal is known about her, but fortunately Mariah's life is recorded in part through her daughter Frances Elizabeth Kemp. Mariah Colbert was probably born in Mississippi. Mariah married another prominent Chickasaw leader, Joel Kemp, sometime before 1842 at Old Doaksville, OK which was near the town of Idabel. They were the parents of ten children, six growing to maturity. Around 1852, the family moved to Panola County near the Red River. Mariah and Joel, two sons and four daughters are buried at the family grave near their home. Their known children were: Simon Burney, Joel Carr, Frances Elizabeth, Lillie, Mary Jane, Charity, Daisy, Laura, & Isabella Abigail. During the Civil War, when groups of 15 - 20 Rebel soldiers would stop by the house, and Mariah would cook a whole hog in the wash pot to feed them. They would eat everything and move on.
Parents: Maj. Levi "Itawamba Minco" COLBERT and MINTO-HO-YO.


bullet Martha "Mattie" Aletha (Althena?) COLBERT was born in 1868. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS.


bullet Mary 'Molly' COLBERT

She was married to James GUNN . Children were: Rhoda GUNN.


bullet Mary C. COLBERT was born on 28 Jul 1864 in Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory.(23) born in Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choc Nat, IT 28 JUL 1864. Mary died 1942 in OK?, at 77 years of age. Her body was interred 1942 in Frisco Cem., Pontotoc Co., OK.

She married Dr. George Henry Truax in IT, 29 JUL 1886.(5926) (Dr. George Henry Truax is #6575.) George was born in Port Whitby, Ontario, CAN, 12 MAR 1856.(5927) George(5928) was the son of John Butler Truax and Emily 'Emma' Ross. George died 5 FEB 1930 in Frisco (now Stonewall), Pontotoc Co., Chickasaw Nation, IT, at 73 years of age. His body was interred FEB 1930 in Frisco Cem., Pontotoc Co., OK. George enrolled in Stonewall, Pontotoc Co., Chickasaw Nation, IT for the Dawes Chickasaw Roll on 1898 and appears on Dawes card number 38
She enrolled in 1898 in Stonewall, Pontotoc Co., Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. Mary enrolled in Stonewall, Pontotoc Co., Chickasaw Nation, IT for the Dawes Chickasaw Roll on 1898 and appears on Dawes Chickasaw Card #38, Roll #112, age 34, 1/2 blood She died in 1942 in OK. She was buried in 1942 in Frisco Cem., Pontotoc Co., OK.. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS .

She was married to Dr. George Henry TRUAX M.D. on 29 Jul 1886 in Indian Territory.(24) Or 27 JUL 1886? See Chickasaw Dawes Card #38.; Chickasaw Loves, - she was his second wife.; Leaders & Leading Men; Southern Indians; Pontotoc Quarterly; and History of I.T.









Children were: Arthur Cleveland TRUAX, Pearl E. TRUAX, James Corbitt TRUAX, Ruby G. TRUAX, William Bryan TRUAX, Jewel TRUAX, Opal TRUAX.


bullet Mary Susan COLBERT was born before 1836. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Rhoda GUNN.


bullet Matilda COLBERT was born on 10 Jun 1820. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES.


bullet Molcy (Molsey) COLBERT was a Physician in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. She appeared on the census of in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. She was baptised in Monroe Mission, Pontotoc, Co., MS. She resided at in Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Sarah Elizabeth "Lizzie" SORRELLS . Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES.


bullet Rufus COLBERT (Private). Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Dora MCCARTY.

He was married to Jane ROSENBAUM.


bullet Rutha (Ruthie) COLBERT was born in 1897. She appeared on the census of in 1900 in Indian Territory. She died on 2 Apr 1917. Parents: George Washington COLBERT and Dora MCCARTY.


bullet Sally Homachota COLBERT was also known as House of In-cun-no-mar. Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Fullblood (first wife) CHICKASAW .

She was married to Thomas LOVE. The Love Family
The Love family was possibly the largest of the mixed-blood families in the Chickasaw Nation and second only to the Colbert family in service to the Chickasaw Nation.

Thomas Love was my ggggg grandfather. He was a refugee Tory from Virginia who settled among the Chickasaw in 1782. After his father William Love ("English Bill") had been killed, Thomas said that he took off through a briarpatch and made his lifesaving escape.

He led a quiet existance. He was described in July, 1875 as "a person of high esteem". He assisted in marking the Creek-Chickasaw boundary in 1796. Another countryman, John McIntosh, appointed him administrator of his estate in 1803. He was still living in 1818 and apparently died about 1830.

Thomas had two wives; his first wife, was Sally Colbert, half breed Chickasaw, daughter of James Logan Colbert. His second wife was a full-blood Chickasaw woman named Emahota. Following the Chickasaw tradition of the husband becoming a member of the wife's family, he became a member of the house of In-cun-no-mar. Thomas fathered eight sons and five daughters.

Emahota was born in 1791. She sold land in Marshall County, Mississippi on April 8, 1836. She was listed on the 1840 LaFayette County census. She removed to Indian Territory in November, 1844. The 1847 census lists her as half white, head of household, consisting of one male over 18 and 2 females over 16. She died at Burneyville on September 25, 1873.

Sons: Henry, Isaac, Benjamin, Slone, Robert Howard, Samuel, William, and Thomas
Daughters: Delilah (married a Mitchell, then John B. Moore), Betsy(married James Allen), Sally (married James T. Gaines), Nancy Mahota (married James M. Boyd), and Lucinda (married Samuel A. Colbert)

By the 1820's, most of the Love family were living in a prosperous farming community located about six miles southwest of the present town of Holly Springs, MS. In 1826, a Presbyterian missionary located a station they called Martyn Station near Henry Love's home which stood at the crossing of two Indian trails near Pigeon Roost Creek. Many of the family's children attended school there.

Thomas died in 1830.

Seven of his sons became Chickasaw leaders, particularly during and after the removal to Indian Territory.

There is a journal excerpt mentioning Henry and Slone by William Calhoun Love, grandson of Robert Love of Pennsylvania.
Children were: Henry LOVE, Isaac LOVE, Benjamin LOVE, Slone LOVE, Robert LOVE, Howard LOVE, Samuel LOVE, William LOVE, Thomas LOVE, Delilah LOVE, Betsy LOVE, Sally LOVE, Nancy Mahota LOVE, Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Samuel COLBERT was born about 1761. Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Fullblood (2nd wife) CHICKASAW.


bullet Samuel COLBERT was born in 1855. He appeared on the census of in 1856 in 1855 Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co.,Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. He died in 1878. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Samuel A. COLBERT was born on 14 Nov 1816. Samuel A.3 Colbert (Maj. James2, James Logan1)(650) (#1319) was born 14 NOV 1816.(651) Samuel died 27 AUG 1880 nr Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, at 63 years of age.(652) His body was interred AUG 1880 nr Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT.(653)

He married three times. He married Mary.(654) (Mary is #1411.) (Additional notes for Mary(655)) He married Rhoda Gunn before 1833.(656) (Rhoda Gunn is #1363.) Rhoda was born in Pontotoc, MS, 16 APR 1818. Rhoda(657) was the daughter of James Gunn and Mary 'Molly' Colbert. Rhoda died 25 JUL 1876 in Colbert, Panola Co., Chickasaw Nation, IT, at 58 years of age. Her body was interred JUL 1876 in Love Cemetery, nr Colbert, Bryan Co., OK. She was listed as a resident in the census report in Chickasaw Nation, MS, 1818. Rhoda was separated from her husband, Samuel A. Colbert in Chickasaw Nation, 31 MAR 1836.(658) Samuel Colbert and Rhoda Gunn signed a seperation agreement on 31 MAR 1836, with Rev, Thomas C. Stuart as arbitrator.

Some sources indicate that she married first, Oke-lah-na, a Chickasaw brave who later deserted her. They were supposed to have been married by Father Stewart at Monroe Mission, Mississippi. A question comes to mind, "Was this perhaps the Indian name of Samuel Colbert?"


He married Lucinda 'Lina' 'Ciney' Love in Holly Springs, Marshall Co., MS, before 1834.(659) (Lucinda 'Lina' 'Ciney' Love is #1026.) Lucinda was born in Holly Springs, Marshall Co., MS, 14 JAN 1816. Lucinda(660) was the daughter of Thomas Love and Homahota 'Mehotah' (House of I-tok-abba). Lucinda died 9 AUG 1890 nr Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, at 74 years of age.(661) Her body was interred AUG 1890 nr Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT.(662) She was listed as a resident in the census report on '1855' Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, NOV/DEC 1856.

Samuel was separated from his wife, Rhoda Gunn in Chickasaw Nation, 31 MAR 1836.(663) Samuel Colbert and Rhoda Gunn signed a seperation agreement on 31 MAR 1836, with Rev, Thomas C. Stuart as arbitrator.

He was listed as a resident in the census report on '1855' Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, IT, NOV/DEC 1856.(664)

He died on 27 Aug 1880 in Nelson, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES.

He was married to Lucinda LOVE in Holly Springs, Marshall Co., MS.

Children were: Atwood COLBERT, George Washington COLBERT, Sarah Love COLBERT , Virginia COLBERT, Isabella COLBERT, Caroline COLBERT, Samuel COLBERT, Ellen A. COLBERT, Wilson McAlester COLBERT, Edward G. COLBERT, Delilah COLBERT.

He was married to Mary.

He was married to Rhoda GUNN before 1833. Some sources indicate that she (Rhoda GUNN) married first, Oke-lah-na, a Chickasaw brave who later deserted her. They were supposed to have been married by Father Stewart at Monroe Mission, Mississippi. A question comes to mind, "Was this perhaps the Indian name of Samuel Colbert?" He was separated on 31 Mar 1836 in Chickasaw Nation. Children were: Mary Susan COLBERT.


bullet Sarah Love COLBERT was born on 9 Aug 1844. Parents: Samuel A. COLBERT and Lucinda LOVE.


bullet Susan "Sukey" COLBERT appeared on the census of in 1818 in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. She appeared on the census of Nov/Dec 1856 in 1855 Choctaw Roll, Kiamitia Co., Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES .


bullet Susan "Susy" COLBERT was born in 1770. Parents: James Logan COLBERT and Halfblood (3rd wife) CHICKASAW .


bullet Susan Miller COLBERT was born in 1814. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES.


bullet Tennessee Robinson COLBERT was born on 6 May 1805. Parents: Maj. James Isaac COLBERT and Susan (Susannah) JAMES .

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