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bullet Reed Patrick STANLEY (Private). Parents: Daniel Scott STANLEY and LEDIKER.

He was married to Sabrina Reneé SHULTZ on 22 Mar 2012 in Half Moon Cay, Bahamas.


bullet Rex Elmo STANLEY (Private). Parents: John Neal STANLEY and Esther Grace HYAMES.

He was married to Frances MARTIN on 8 Jun 1947. Children were: Dennis Martin STANLEY, Diana Lynette STANLEY, Lynda Ann STANLEY, Lana Jane STANLEY, Rita Joyce STANLEY, Ronald Guy STANLEY.


bullet Rhoda STANLEY was born on 28 May 1827. She was buried in Damascus, Columbiana Co., OH. Damascus (Quaker Meeting Minutes)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ID: I3965
Name: Rhoda Stanley 1
Sex: F
Birth: 28 MAY 1827
Burial: Damascus MM, Damascus, Columbiana Co., OH 1
Reference Number: 3965

Father: Solomon Stanley b: 26 DEC 1787
Mother: Mary Cobbs b: 18 MAR 1789

Sources:
Title: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol IV
Author: Hinshaw, William Wade
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc. 1994.
Note: Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930
Reproduced on Broderbund Software's Family Archive CD #192
Volume IV. (Genealogical Records: The Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930).
Note: Secondary
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Page: 996
Parents: Solomon STANLEY and Mary COBB.

She was married to GALBRAITH.


bullet Richard STANLEY Parents: Shadrack STANLEY and Agnes LADD.


bullet Richard STANLEY was born in 1664. Parents: Sir Thomas STANLEY 1ST Earl of Derby and Eleanor De NEVILLE.


bullet Richard STANLEY was born about 1412. He died about 1467. Parents: Sir John STANLEY Knight Sheriff of Anglesey and Elizabeth Isabel HARRINGTON.


bullet Richard STANLEY Parents: Samuel STANLEY and Sarah Mary WILLIAMS.


bullet Richard de STANLEY Parents: Adam de STANLEY.


bullet Rita Joyce STANLEY (Private). Parents: Rex Elmo STANLEY and Frances MARTIN.


bullet Robben Neal STANLEY (Private). Parents: Daniel Scott STANLEY and LEDIKER.


bullet Robert STANLEY was born in 1765 in Hanover County, VA. Parents: Shadrack STANLEY and Agnes LADD.


bullet Robert STANLEY Parents: Sir William STANLEY 6th Earl of Derby and Elizabeth VERE.


bullet Robert Clemence STANLEY was born on 25 Dec 1840 in Bedford Co., VA. (168) Both of Robert C. STANLEY's parents were born in VA.
Sources:
1850 Bedford County, VA Census, Northern Division, residence 546


He resided at Brush CreekTwp, Highland Co, Ohio in 1880. (169) He appeared on the census of in 1880 in Brushcreek Township, Highland Co, Ohio. S 354
Vol. 33; E.D. 38
Sheet 29, Line 6
Head of Family: Stanley, Robert C.
Color: W; Sex: M; Age: 39; Birthplace: Ohio
County: Highland; MCD: Brushcreek Township

Stanley, Margaret, W, 35, Ohio
Stanley, William P., S, 9, Ohio
Stanley, Myrta L., D, 7, Ohio
Stanley, Robert L., S, 5, Ohio
Stanley, Frank, S, 4, Ohio
Stanley, Alice, D, 3, Ohio
Stanley, Laura, D, 2, Ohio
Bobb, Charlie, NR, 21, Ohio



He resided at Brush Creek Twp, Highland Co, Ohio in 1900. He died on 25 Aug 1919 in Ross Co, OH (next to Highland Co, OH). Parents: Pleasant M. STANLEY and Sarah Ann HUGHES.

He was married to Mary Margaret RHODES on 10 Nov 1867 in Highland Co, Ohio.(170) Children were: Leora STANLEY, William Cary STANLEY, Myrta Louella STANLEY, Robert Lander STANLEY, Frank Edward STANLEY , Alice Eliza STANLEY, Laura Margaret STANLEY, Ulrich Sloan STANLEY , Walter Huff STANLEY.


bullet Robert De STANLEY Parents: John De STANLEY Knight Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and Jane LASCELLES.


bullet Robert Lander STANLEY was born on 11 May 1874 in Brush Creek Twp, Highland Co, Ohio. Parents: Robert Clemence STANLEY and Mary Margaret RHODES.


bullet Ronald Guy STANLEY (Private). Parents: Rex Elmo STANLEY and Frances MARTIN.


bullet Rulena STANLEY was born on 5 May 1894 in Cedarville, Green Co, Ohio. She died on 31 Jan 1912 in Great Bend, Barton Co., Kansas. Parents: William Cary STANLEY and Flora Ann NEAL.


bullet Ruth Joyce STANLEY (Private). Parents: John Neal STANLEY and Esther Grace HYAMES.

She was married to Robert JAMES on 3 Jul 1946.


bullet Samuel STANLEY was born about 1758 in Hanover Co., VA. Parents: Pleasant STANLEY Sr. and Sarah MAGAHE.


bullet Samuel STANLEY was born on 21 Sep 1759. Parents: William STANLEY and Elizabeth WALKER.

He was married to Sarah Mary WILLIAMS. Children were: Richard STANLEY, Isaac STANLEY.


bullet Samuel STANLEY was born on 1 Apr 1796. Parents: Waddy STANLEY Sr. and Rebecca LADD.

He was married to Elizabeth SPENCER. Children were: Aaron STANLEY, Jane STANLEY, John Martin STANLEY, Lindsay STANLEY, Lucy STANLEY, Rebecca T. STANLEY, Lucinda STANLEY, Eliza STANLEY.


bullet Sandra Lynn STANLEY (Private). Parents: Dewight Elwin STANLEY and Helen JENNINGS.


bullet Sarah STANLEY was born on 6 Mar 1738 in Cedar Creek, New Kent now Hanover Co.,VA. She died in 1789. Parents: Thomas STANLEY Jr. and Elizabeth CREW.

She was married to Jehu STUART on 4 Jul 1765 in New Garden, Rowan Co., NC.


bullet Sarah STANLEY was born about 1844 in Bedford Co, VA. Parents: George W. STANLEY Jr. and Rebekah Ann RUSHER .


bullet Sarah STANLEY was born on 24 May 1766 in Hanover Co., VA. Parents: Thomas STANLEY and Sarah CREW.

She was married to Josiah STRONG.


bullet Sarah STANLEY was born on 18 Nov 1807. She died on 2 Oct 1890. Parents: Thomas STANLEY IV and Priscilla LADD.

She was married to Thomas B. WOOLMAN. Title: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol IV
Author: Hinshaw, William Wade
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc. 1994.
Note: Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930
Reproduced on Broderbund Software's Family Archive CD #192
Volume IV. (Genealogical Records: The Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930).
Note: Secondary
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Page: 764, 995, 1017
Title: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol IV
Author: Hinshaw, William Wade
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc. 1994.
Note: Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930
Reproduced on Broderbund Software's Family Archive CD #192
Volume IV. (Genealogical Records: The Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930).
Note: Secondary
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Page: 1017


bullet Sarah STANLEY Parents: Harris STANLEY and Rachel MARTIN.


bullet Sarah STANLEY was born on 9 May 1808. Parents: James Crew STANLEY and Mary JONES.


bullet Sarah "Sally" STANLEY was born about 1799 in Bedford Co, VA. Parents: George W. STANLEY Sr. and Mary CREWS.

She was married to Jasper C. THOMPSON on 15 Feb 1817 in Bedford Co, VA.


bullet Sarah de STANLEY was born about 1285. Parents: William De STANLEY and Joan De BAUMVILLE.

She was married to Richard (Roger) HAWKSET about 1305 in Wirral Forest, Cheshire, England.


bullet Sarah Elizabeth STANLEY was born in 1769 in Hanover Co., VA. Parents: Pleasant STANLEY Sr. and Sarah MAGAHE.

She was married to William HOLLOWAY on 19 Jul 1790 in Campbell Co, Va.


bullet Shadrack STANLEY was born in 1740 in Hanover County, VA. He died on 4 Sep 1792 in Guilford Co., North Carolina. He signed a will in Guilford County, North Carolina. "I, Shadrack Stanley of Guilford County and state of North Carolina (illegible),
being weak and indisposed in body, but of sound and disposing mind and memory,
do make this my last will and testament in (illegible) following - trust my will
is that my body be decently interred in a plain, becoming manner according to
the descretion of my heretofore named executor.

Item - my will is that all the debts that I shall owe to any person or
persons at the time of my decease shall be well and truly paid and discharged in
convenient time out of my personal estate.
Item - I give unto my son, Robert Stanley a tract of land joining on the East
side of the land where I now live that I have partly paid for, provided he
fulfills the payment according to my agreement with John Rankin, the former
owner of the land.
Item - I give the use and profit of all my estate both real and personal to
my son, Jehu Stanley to have the care of and bringing up my children untill they
come of to be of age, but if any of my daughters should marry in the time my
will is they should have a head of cow and calf if they can be spared - And when
my children all come to be of age, I give to my four sons, namely Jehu, Edward,
Richard Harry, and Shadrack all my real estate whatsoever and wheresoever, to be
equally divided between them, not preferring one before the other, but if either
of them should die without lawful issue, his or their part or parts shall go to
the surviving. Also I give to my three sons, namely Edward, Richard Henry, and
Shadrack each as I have (illegible) saddles.
Item - I give unto my son Jesse Stanley ad debt to me from William Duval in
Virginia to use in the family as he thinks best.
Item - I give unto my four daughters, namely, Mary, Judith, Elizabeth, and
Agness all my personall estate of whatsoever name or nature not here disposed of
to be equally divided between them not preferring one before the other, but if
either of them should die without lawfull issue, her or their part or parts to
go to the survivors.
And lastly, I constitute, appoint and make my son Jesse Stanley and my friend
Joel Sanders jointly executors of this my last will and testament.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this first
day of the eighth month in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and
ninety-two.
Signed, sealed, pronounced and declared by the said Shadrack Stanley to be
his last will and testament in presents of us. --- Hezekiah Starbuck. Eleazer
Hunt. Phebe Stanley."

He resided at Hanover County, VA and Guilford County, North Carolina. He was baptised in Quaker. Parents: John F. STANLEY and Alice BALLARD.

He was married to Agnes LADD on 2 Dec 1764. Children were: Robert STANLEY, Jesse STANLEY, Judith STANLEY, Mary STANLEY, Edward STANLEY, Anna Elizabeth STANLEY, Richard STANLEY, Agness STANLEY.


bullet Solomon STANLEY was born on 26 Dec 1787. Parents: Littleberry STANLEY and Agatha STANLEY.

He was married to Mary COBB. Children were: Walter STANLEY, Joanna STANLEY, Amy STANLEY, Littleberry STANLEY, Agatha STANLEY, Tacy STANLEY, Nathan STANLEY, Rhoda STANLEY, Solomon STANLEY.


bullet Solomon STANLEY was born about 1772. Parents: John STANLEY and Ursula STANLEY.


bullet Solomon STANLEY was born on 8 Apr 1829. Parents: Solomon STANLEY and Mary COBB.


bullet Stephen Patrick STANLEY (Private). Parents: Partick Neal STANLEY and Deborah Mariel STEPHENSEN.


bullet Strangeman STANLEY was born on 7 Nov 1745 in VA. He died on 20 Jun 1829 in Leesburg, Highland Co, OH. Parents: James STANLEY and Catherine HUTCHINS.

He was married to Jemima MILLS on 15 Aug 1765 in Guilford Co., North Carolina. Deep River Meeting, NC

He was married to Jemima JONES in 1806 in Guilford Co., North Carolina.


bullet Susannah STANLEY was born in 1764 in Hanover Co., VA. Parents: Pleasant STANLEY Sr. and Sarah MAGAHE.

She was married to Jesse BRADLEY on 22 Sep 1783 in Bedford Co, VA. Married by Charles Clay.


bullet Susannah STANLEY was born on 8 Dec 1775. Parents: Zachariah STANLEY and Susannah MENDENHALL.


bullet Tacy STANLEY was born on 1 Feb 1823. Parents: Solomon STANLEY and Mary COBB.

She was married to GIBSON.


bullet Talitha STANLEY was born on 30 Apr 1823. Parents: James Crew STANLEY and Rachel COWGILL.

She was married to Joseph STANLEY.


bullet Terri Allison STANLEY (Private). Parents: Dewight Elwin STANLEY and Helen JENNINGS.


bullet Thomas STANLEY Jr. was born on 23 Oct 1689 in Old St. Peters Parish, New Kent now Hanover Co, VA. He was christened in on 24 Oct 1689 in St. Peters Parish, New Kent Co., VA. He was baptised after 23 Nov 1689 in Quaker, Old St. Peters Parish, New Kent Co, (now Hanover Co.), VA. He died on 7 Aug 1754 in Hanover County, VA. He was also known as STANDLEY. He was Quaker Monthly Meeting (MM) Minutes. -His 2nd wife may have been Mrs Mary (Watkins) Hutchins Holmes, who is
traditionally given out as wife of Thomas Stanley by many researchers
-White Oak Swamp MM, Henrico co,VA on 28 2M 1700 Thomas Standley's name
first appeared when he signed cert of a marriage held in New Kent MH
-White Oak Swamp MM on 20 5M 1706 Thomas disowned; on 18 11M 1706/7 OS
Thomas Standley condemns misconduct; put on probation
-White Oak Swamp MM on 1 8M 1726 Thomas Sr disowned for marr.out


Parents: Thomas STANLEY Sr. and Rebecca HOLMES.

He was married to Elizabeth MADDOX in 1709 in Quaker Friends Meeting House, New Kent, now Hanover Co., VA. Thomas belonged to the Ceder Creek Quaker Meetinghouse but was disowned for marrying a non-Quaker. She later became a Quaker and he was reinstated. St. Peter's Parrish, New Kent County, Virginia
Name also spelled: STANDLEY Children were: Joseph STANLEY, Maddox STANLEY, Elizabeth STANLEY.

He was married to Elizabeth CREW on 9 Aug 1726 in Charles City Co. Quaker Friends Meeting House, VA.

Children were: Margery STANLEY, Mary STANLEY, Thomas STANLEY, Pleasant STANLEY Sr., John STANLEY, Zachariah STANLEY, Sarah STANLEY, Ann STANLEY, Nathan STANLEY, Joseph STANLEY.


bullet Thomas STANLEY Sr. was born about 1663 in Preston, Lancaster, England. FATHER OF Thomas STANLEY of New Kent, Virginia NOT PROVEN as of June 2004 by this researcher.

A Thomas, James & Edward STANELY appear to be closely related and migrated to VA from England.

1704 VA Rent Rolls:
STANLEY, Thomas, Parish of St. Peters and St. Paul, 1704
STANLEY, Edward, Henrico County, 1705

Histories of the STANLEY families often ultimately trace this lineage to William de Alditheley, son of Adam de Alditheley, son of another of the same name who accompanied William the Conqueror into England in the Norman invasion of 1066. William de Alditheley married Joan, daughter of Thomas de Stoneley of an ancient Saxon family, and they lived in Stafffordshire, whose land he exchanged for the lands of Stoneley, whence he took his name.
________________________________________________________________________Thomas Stanley was born in about 1663 Preston, Lancashire, England.

About 1689, Stanley moved his family to the Virginia Colony. Thomas Stanley settled in St. Peter's Parrish, New Kent County, Virginia, AFTER he married Mary Holme in 1685, in Middlesex County, VA. Thomas and Mary's daugter was born in Middlesex County, Virginia.
Their son, Thomas Stanley was born in St. Peter's Parrish, New Kent County, VA on November 23, 1689. Thomas Stanley married Elizabeth Crews in a Quaker Meetinghouse in Henrico County on September 08, 1726. By 1738, Thomas and Elizabeth Crews Stanley had moved to Hanover County, VA.

Their son Pleasant Stanley, Sr., was born April 25, 1733 in New Kent County. Pleasant Stanley, Sr., married Sarah McGhee about 1757, possibly in Hanover County, VA, and they settled in the area near White Oak Swamp in Hanover County, VA, where they attended Cedar Creek Quaker Meetinghouse. Before 1763, Pleasant Stanley, Sr., had moved his family to Bedford County, VA.

Their son, George Stanley, Sr., was born in Bedford County, VA about 1765. George Stanley, Sr., married Mary Crews in Bedford County on November 09, 1791.


He Land purchase of 800 acres unhabited forest in the Cedar Creek in 1714. Thomas Stanley, James and Thomas Stanley. for the consideration of the importation of sixteen persons to dwell within this our colony of VA, whose names are William Porter, William Hodgkinson, Richard Baker, Henry Kiplin, Adam Newman, William Schlade, Thomas Millot, Isaac Palmer, Tobert Bookle, John Draper, Peter Bryan, John Haley, Daniel Hughes, William Bogling, John Bitnal, and Peter Clark, one tract of land containing 800 acres, lying and being on both sides of Cedar Creek, in St. Paul's Parish, New Kent Co. 16 Dec 1714."

Thomas Stanley, Sr. and his sons purchased land in the part of New Kent Co. that was erected into Hanover Co., Nov. 1720.

Thomas Stanley, Sr. for 25 shillings 251 acres on both sides of Cawthorns Branch in Hanover Co. adjoining his line and that of John Williamson, William Harris, and Chiswell, 10 Dec 1724.




He died on 7 May 1714 in Hanover County, VA. He emigrated to Virginia in late 1600's; settled in new Kent Co. (now Hanover Co.), VA. (171) A BRIEF HISTORY OF PRESTON, LANCASHIRE, ENGLAND

Preston, is north of Liverpool, close to the Irish Sea. The Isle of Man, ruled and owned by Stanley family, is located in Irish Sea across from lancanshire.

PRESTON IN THE MIDDLE AGES

Preston began as an estate belonging to a priest. It was called priest's tun (tun was the Saxon word for farm or estate). Later the name changed to Preston.

In the 12th century the village of Preston changed into a town. This was partly because it of its position. Firstly Preston is on a river. In those days it was much cheaper to transport goods by water than by land so goods could be easily transported to and from Preston. Preston was also the first place inland where the river could be bridged so a great deal of traffic passed through the area. Preston was also on the main road from northern to southern England. Many people passed through the town and spend money there.

In 1179 Preston was given a charter. (A charter was a document giving the townspeople certain rights). Preston may have had about 1,500 inhabitants and about half a dozen streets. It would seem very small to us but towns were very small in those days. By the standards of the time Preston was a fair sized market town.

Though Preston was too small to have stone walls it did have stone gates, where tolls could be charged on goods entering the town.

By the 12th century Preston had a weekly market. From the 13th century Preston had a fair as well as a market. In the Middle Ages fairs were like markets but they were held only once a year for a period of several days. People would come from all over Lancashire to buy and sell at a Preston fair.

In the Middle Ages there was a leper hospital just outside Preston. It was dedicated to St Mary Magdelene.

About 1260 the Franciscan friars arrived in Preston. The friars were like monks but instead of withdrawing from the world they went out to preach and to help the poor and the sick. Fransiscan friars were called grey friars because of their grey habits.

By the 14th century there was a grammar school in Preston.

PRESTON IN THE 16th AND 17th CENTURIES

In 1539 Henry VIII closed the friary. Despite the religous changes of the 16th century most of the people of Preston remained staunch Catholics.

Preston flourished during the 16th century. The main industry in Preston was textiles. Both linen and wool were made in Preston.

Like all towns at that time Preston suffered from outbreaks of plague. A particularly severe outbreak occurred in 1631. But each time it struck the population soon recovered.

In 1642 came the civil war between king and parliament. The people of Preston steadfastly supported the king. But in February 1643 parliamentary troops attacked Preston and quickly captured it. The mayor was killed. However the royalists reacpatured Preston in March 1643. They did not hold it for long. In April 1643 the royalists were forced to withdraw from Preston and the surrounding ara. The civil war ended in 1646 and the King was captured. In 1648 a Scottish army tried to restore him to his throne. They marched into Lancashire but they were met by an English army east of Preston and they were routed.

In the late 17th century Preston probably had a population of about 3,000.

From 1699 the streets of Preston were lit by oil lamps.

At the end of the 17th century the travel writer Celia Fiennes described Preston a very good market town. She was impressed by the range of goods on sale on market day and commented on the 'pretty church'.

PRESTON IN THE 18th CENTURY

In the early 18th century a writer said Preston was: 'A pretty town with an abundance of gentry in it, commonly called Proud Preston'.

In 1688 James II was deposed as king of England and Scotland but in 1715 a Scottish army attempted to put his son, James III back on the throne. The Scottish army marched into Preston. Many of the townspeople were sympathetic as James II was a Catholic and Preston was a stronghold of Catholicism. Some townspeople joined his army.

However an English army soon marched to Preston. The defenders erected barricades and dug trenches. The first English attack on Preston was driven back. The English then set fire to the outskirts of Preston but, fortunately for the defenders, the wind was blowing away from the centre of the town and the flames did not spread.

Then English reinforcements arrived from the East and English soldiers completely surrounded the town. Realising their position was hopeless the Scots surrendered. They were held prisoner in the church and were fed on bread and water at the expense of the townspeople. Furthermore 12 people were executed for treason at Preston.

The Scots returned in 1745 and they marched as far as Derby but they then turned back. This time no battle took place in Preston.

In the 18th century Preston continued to trade with Europe. Hemp, timber and iron were imported from the Baltic region. Preston also traded with the West Indies. Some ships from Preston took part in the slave trade. For centuries wool and linen were woven in Preston. However by the late 18th century they had given way to cotton. The first cotton mill in Preston opened in 1771. Some cotton was made in mills but there were also hand loom weavers, who made cotton cloth in their own homes.

In the mid-18th century a writer said that Preston: 'may for its beauty and largeness compare with most cities. For the politeness of the inhabitants none can excel. Here is a handsome church and a town hall where the corporation meets for business and the gentlemen and ladies for balls and assemblies. Here is likewise a spacious marketplace in the midst of which stands a fine obelisk. The streets are neatly paved and the houses well built of brick and slates. The town being a great thoroughfare (i.e. a stopping place on the main road to Scotland), there are a good many inns for the travelers. This town has a pretty good trade for linen yarn, cloth, cotton etc.'

Another writer, of the same period, said that Preston: 'Lives chiefly by its being a great thoroughfare and by many families of middling fortune living in it'.

From 1771 stagecoaches ran from Preston to Wigan and Warrington. In 1792 a canal was built to Lancaster.

PRESTON IN THE 19th CENTURY

By the time of the first census in 1801 Preston had a population of 11,887. By the standards of the time it was a large town. It grew rapidly. By 1851 Preston had a population of 69,361. This was despite outbreaks of cholera in 1832 and 1848.

Like all early 19th century towns Preston was dirty and insanitary. The situation improved a little in the late 19th century with the building of sewers but even in the early 20th century many of the townspeople used earth closets (basically a bucket that was emptied at night into a cart by the 'nightsoilmen').

During the 19th century there were some improvements in Preston's amenities. From 1800 Preston had night watchmen that patrolled the streets at night. The first modern police force was formed in 1836. In 1809 a dispensary where the poor could obtain free medicines opened. The Royal Infirmary opened in 1870.

After 1816 the streets of Preston were lit by gas. A cornmarket, where grain could be bought and sold was built in 1824. In 1838 the railway reached Preston. From 1832 there was a piped water supply. At first it was provided by a private company but in 1853 the corporation bought the waterworks.

The first museum in Preston opened in 1841. In 1855 a cemetery was opened. Also in 1855 St Johns Church was built. A new Town Hall was built in 1867. Also in 1867 a cattle market was built.

In the late 19th century the council opened public parks. Miller park was laid out in 1864. Moor Park opened in 1867. Farington Park was opened in 1885.

From 1879 horse drawn trams ran in Preston. Also in 1879 a free library opened in the town hall. The first telephone exchange in Preston opened in 1881. In 1893 the Harris Museum and Art Gallery opened.

A training school for deaf and dumb children opened in 1894. Victoria Jubilee Technical School opened in 1897.

During the 19th century industry in Preston was dominated by cotton. By 1835 there were 40 cotton mills. There was industrial unrest in the early 19th century with demonstrations in 1808 and 1818 and a strike in 1836. In 1853-54 the employers locked out the employees.

The docks in Preston also flourished during the 19th century. Albert Edward Dock was built in 1892. As well as export and imports to other countries there was a considerable coastal trade in the 19th century. Grain was 'imported' from other parts of the country and coal from the Wigan coalfield was 'exported' to other parts of Britain.

PRESTON IN THE 20th CENTURY

In 1901 the population of Preston was almost 120,000. The Leyland steam wagon company was formed in 1896. In 1904 they began making petrol driven vehicles. The name of the company was changed to Leyland Motors in 1907. After 1918 the cotton industry, which had dominated the town for so long, collapsed. There was very high unemployment.

However, some new industries such as electrical goods and engineering came to the town, which largely offset the decline of textiles. In 1918 aircraft manufacture began in Preston. Courtauld's rayon factory opened in 1939.

In the 1920s and 1930s nearly 3,000 council houses were built in Preston. Another 1,500 were privately built. Penwortham and Fulwood grew rapidly.

In 1903 Sessions House was built. The Town Hall was added to the building in 1933. A Cenotaph was built in 1926.

Preston escaped serious bomb damage during World War II and nobody was killed. However in 1944 61 people were killed when a plane crashed in Freckleton.

In the 1950s immigrants from India, Pakistan and the West Indies came to Preston.

In the 1950s and 1960s the cotton industry continued to decline and eventually virtually ceased. The dock also declined and closed altogether in 1981. Things grew worse in the late 1970s as firms such as British Leyland began making people redundant. Furthermore the Courtalds factory closed in 1979 with the loss of nearly 3,000 jobs. It was a severe blow to the local economy. Mass unemployment returned. The only bright spot in the gloom was the expansion of service industries like tourism.

In the 1950s and 1960s there was a great deal of slum clearance in Preston and many new council houses were built. The Larches estate was built at Ashton. Other estates were built at Middleforth Green, Brookfield and Penwortham. From the mid 1970s the council's policy changed from tearing down old houses to giving grants to the inhabitants to improve them.

The Preston by-pass was built in 1958.

The St Georges Shopping Centre was built in 1964. The Fishergate centre followed in the 1980s.

The ring road was built in the early 1970s. So were a bus station and a Guildhall. In 1999 the Guildhall was refurbished using a National Lottery grant.

PRESTON IN THE 21st CENTURY

In 2001 a football museum opened.

Preston has become a regional shopping centre for Northwest England. In 2002 Preston was made a city.
He was a member of White Oak Swamp MM, Henrico Co., VA. Thomas STANDLEY'S name first appeared when he signed certificate of marriage held in New Kent Monthly Meeting (MM) minutes.



He was St. Peter's Church. ST. PETER’S PARISH CHURCH
OF NEW KENT COUNTY, VA

St. Peter’s Parish Church of New Kent County, VA has historic ties to our STANLEY ancestors through the short-lived membership of the earliest known Thomas1 Stanley, and the influence of being the sanctioned church in the area this family lived.

Most English colonists that settled Virginia were unlike their rebellious counterparts in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. They brought with them a love of the Church of England and a desire to establish a similar Church of Virginia. This became the official church of the state, partly by persuasion and partly by force.

As Virginia was settled, it was geographically divided into governmental units of counties and ecclesiastical units of parishes. Although the boundaries of New Kent County and St. Peter’s Parish have changed over the years since they were formed in 1654 and 1679 respectively, the 20th century parish of St. Peter is, as it was originally established, entirely within New Kent County.

In 1679 two churches were founded in the St. Peter’s Parish one was located on the Pamunkey River about 3 miles west of the present village of Old Church and referred to as the Upper Church. It became a part of St. Paul’s Parish in 1704 and in Hanover County in 1720 when a boundary line was made. The other, or Lower Church (also called Broken-back Church) was located presumably near present day Tunstall Station. It was thought to be abandoned in 1704 on completion of a new brick church.

The earliest known record that definitively refers to Thomas1 STANLEY exists in the records of the Old St. Peter’s Church with the baptism of his three sons: James in 1688, Thomas in 1689, and John in 1691. Which of the 2 churches the STANLEYS attended is a topic for future research. It is thought that shortly thereafter, the Stanleys became allied with the Quaker movement that had begun in that area. In 1691, Quaker missionaries Thomas Wilson and James Dickinson held a successful initial meeting at Black Creek, despite an interruption by the sheriff. Thomas STANLEY'S name begins appearing in the Quaker Henrico Monthly Meeting minutes in 1700.

St. Peter’s Parish had a rocky beginning. From 1680-1700 the parish had 12 ministers. Occasionally, for months at a time, the parish had no clergy at all. From 1686-90 the Vestry Book shows at least 10 references to a border dispute with a neighboring parish. A letter from the Rev. Nicholas Moreau to the bishop in 1697 states that he had "got in the very worst parish of Virginia and the most troublesome."

There is some debate as to whether the STANLEYS were already Quakers and only had their sons baptized to avoid trouble, or if they converted to quakerism during the 1690’s. If the latter were true, could this turmoil in the local anglican church have contributed to their decision to join the Friends Meetings?

Regardless of when or why he became a Quaker, Thomas STANLEY was definitely in the minority and undoubtedly had a more difficult life because of his Friends membership. In 1705 Robert Beverley wrote about Virginia, "There are very few dissenters...they have not more than five conventicles amongst them, namely three small meetings of Quakers, and two of Presbyterians."

Until the Bill of Rights was adopted much later in 1776 stating that "all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion," the State of Virginia and the Church of Virginia were closely intertwined. The salaries of ministers were fixed by law; lands were provided for their support. People were taxed to support the church, provide vestments for the clergy, equipment for use in church services, pay ministers’ salaries and support the poor and orphaned.

In Virginia, the government of the church rested in a group of lay members called the vestry. Members were usually influential landowners and local leaders serving from year to year until their resignation or death. Vestries possessed both ecclesiastical and some civil authoirty. Although counties were recognized as the units of civil administration, social responsibilities were the duries of the vestries. The care of the poor, the sick, the aged, and the orphaned was in their hands. They had the responsibility to bring moral offenders to court.

In 1699 "the high Sheriff of New Kent County is ordered to Collect from each Tithable person in this parish 42 pounds of tobacco to defray the parish charge and make payment to the Severall persons to whom it is proportioned." The long fight between Quaker and Episcopalian over payment of priests’ wages had begun. In 1704 the vestry ordered that "the church wardens cause a good pair of stocks to be built and set up just without ye church yard." Were the stocks built with the outspoken Quakers in mind?

Quakers suffered numerous fines and jailings, but the evidence is scarce as to whether the STANLEYS were affected during their years in St. Peters Parish. One historian suggests the persecutions influenced Thomas STANLEY'S 1714 purchase of 800 acres of unhabited forest in the Cedar Creek area, and eventual move to that area in 1721.

Rev. Nicholas Moreau who, as we saw above, felt he had landed in the "worst" parish, also expressed concerns about the Quakers who were meeting in New Kent County during the last decade of the 17th century. He related in 1697, "I have brought to church again two families who had gone to the Quakers’ meeting for three years past, and have baptized one of their children three years old...I have another old Quaker 70 years of age who left the church these 29 years & hope to bring him to church again within the next few weeks...If ministers were such as they ought to be, I dare say there would be no Quakers nor Dissenters." The reader may easily visualize the tenacious Rev. Moreau imploring our Thomas STANLEY to rejoin the anglican church.

The Brick Church was completed in 1704 (except for the tower which was added between1722 and 1740) and replaced the two previous buildings in the parish. Thomas STANLEY, although no longer a member, was still living in the area.

The later history of the Brick Church may not involve the STANLEYS, but is still interesting to note.

On January 6, 1759 Martha Dandrige Custis married George Washington. There is some dispute as to whether they were married in the Brick Church or at the Custis plantation, but there is strong belief by noted historians that the Brick Church was the site. Martha’s father, Major John Dandridge had served as a churchwarden and vestryman for St. Peter’s Parish.

During the Civil War, the building was in the path of the Union Army as they marched to Richmond, and served as a stable for horses. Gen. William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, son of Gen. Robert E. Lee, supervised the restoration after the war.

The last restoration was in 1964 when the building was restored to its colonial appearance. Remarkably, the Brick Church still stands today, almost 300 years after it was built. The 5-acre adjoining graveyard contains some ancient tombstones dating to the early days, along with oak, holly, and cedar trees. St. Peter’s Parish Brick Church is the 4th oldest church in Virginia, located at 8400 Saint Peters Lane; New Kent, VA.

Sources:
Anderson, Alvin L., Stanley and Allied Families, Vol I, Gateway Press, Inc, 1996.
Brock, Henry Irving, Colonial Churches in Virginia, The Dale Press, Richmond, 34.
Fischer, David Hackett, Albion’s Seed, Oxford University Press, 1989.
Harris, Malcolm Hart, Old New Kent County Some Account of the Planters, Plantations, and Places in New Kent County, 1977, 73-77.
Hinshaw, William Wade, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 1950.
"St. Peter’s Parish Church," a leaflet distributed by St. Peter’s Parish Church.
"St. Peter’s Parish," a pamphlet distributed by St. Peter’s Parish Church, 1979.
Worrall, Jay Jr, "To Celebrate the Stanley Family in Virginia," speech to NSFA , 1995.
He was Quaker (MM) Monthly Meeting Minutes. After careful reading of Hinshaw's Quaker records, The National Stanley Association clarifys that Mrs Mary (Watkins) Hutchins Holmes, who is traditionally given out as wife of Thomas Stanley by many researchers, is actually his Mother-in-law.

White Oak Swamp MM, Henrico co,VA on 28 2M 1700 Thomas Standley's name
first appeared when he signed cert of a marriage held in New Kent MH

White Oak Swamp MM on 20 5M 1706 Thomas disowned; on 18 11M 1706/7 OS
Thomas Standley condemns misconduct; put on probation

White Oak Swamp MM on 1 8M 1726 Thomas Sr disowned for marr.out. He resided at New Kent which became Hanover County, Virginia. Parents: Thomas STANLEY and Penelope BRADSHAW. Parents: Edward STANLEY.

He was married to Rebecca HOLMES on 27 Feb 1685 in St. Peter's Parish, Norfolk, Middlesex County, VA. The National Stanley Family Association indicates Henshaw Quaker records, when carefully read, indicate Mary HOLMS, is the mother-in-law of Thomas STANLEY. Many researchers have Mary HOLMS listed as wife of Thomas STANLEY, which is incorrect. Children were: Mary STANLEY, James STANLEY, Thomas STANLEY Jr., John F. STANLEY, Joseph STANLEY, Jacob STANLEY.


bullet Thomas STANLEY was born on 9 Feb 1730 in Cedar Creek, New Kent now Hanover Co.,VA. He died on 10 Oct 1797 in Hanover County, VA. He was Quaker Monthly Meeting (MM) Minutes. -Cedar Creek MM, Hanover co,VA on 12 Apr 1755 Thomas, son of Thomas, of
Hanover co,VA, disowned for marr.out; his father under care of MM for
permitting the marriage but he cleared himself of all blame
Parents: Thomas STANLEY Jr. and Elizabeth CREW.

He was married to Sarah CREW on 1 Mar 1755 in Cedar Creek, New Kent now Hanover Co.,VA. Thomas belonged to the Ceder Creek M. M. but was disowned for marrying a non-Quaker. She (Sarah CREW) later became a Quaker and he was reinstated.

Thomas Stanley was disowned by the Cedar Creek M. M. for marrying a non Quaker. Sarah later became a Quaker and he was reinstated.

1787, 1, 13 Thomas Jr. gct Wrightborrough MM, Ga.
1792, 6, 9 Thomas Jr. prcf Wrightsburrough MM, Ga.; cert not acc because he mcd & has not appeared as a Fr since his return to this country; cert returned to Ga. acc accept, accepted, acceptable mcd married contrary to discipline
Children were: Littleberry STANLEY, Thomas STANLEY IV, Waddy STANLEY Sr., Margaret "Peggy" STANLEY, Nancy STANLEY , Sarah STANLEY, James Crew STANLEY.


bullet Thomas STANLEY was born in Aug 1616. Parents: Edward STANLEY and Isobel WARBURTON.

He was married to Mary EGERTON on 25 Dec 1663. Children were: Sir Edward STANLEY 1st Baron of Mounteagle.

He was married to Mary CROPPER.


bullet Sir Thomas STANLEY 1ST Earl of Derby was born in 1435. He Acceded on 27 Oct 1485. The Complete Peerage Vol. IV, pp. 205-207 He died on 29 Jul 1504 in Lathom, Lancashire, England.
He was a 1st Earl of Derby. He was buried in Priory, Burscough, Lancashire, England. Parents: Sir Thomas STANLEY Knight Lord of Lathom and Joan GOUSHILL.

He was married to Eleanor De NEVILLE after 10 May 1457. Children were: George STANLEY Baron Strange of Knockyn, John STANLEY, Thomas STANLEY, William STANLEY, Sir Edward STANLEY 1st Baron of Mounteagle, Richard STANLEY, Jane STANLEY, Catherine STANLEY, Anne STANLEY, James STANLEY Bishop of Ely, Margaret STANLEY, Alice STANLEY, Agnes STANLEY.

He was married to Margaret BEAUFORT Duchess of Suffolk before 1482.


bullet Sir Thomas STANLEY Knight Lord of Lathom was born about 1405 in Knowlesley, Lancashire, England. Mercian Saxon Cheshire
After Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, increasing numbers of invasions took place from Scandinavia - the much feared Norse men, or Danes. Yet, they too in turn grew peaceful and wholesale woodland clearances continued as they settled and farmed new lands in the area. By the mid-7th century, Christianity had become widespread, and early churches were erected, one of the oldest at Eccleston, near Chester ("eccles" was actually an old Celtic-Welsh word for a church).

In some ways, Cheshire marked a frontier between the Danes in the north and east and the Welsh to the west, and at least two defensive ditches were dug to keep them out - the celebrated Offa's Dyke, built by King Offa of Mercia between 760-780 AD, and the earlier but less well known Wat's Dyke, built some time before 655 AD, which remained the recognised border until the Norman conquest.

Mercian place names are evident throughout the county, recognised by the suffix 'ham' (from the Saxon word 'hamm' meaning a settlement), and 'burgh' or 'bury' (indicating a fortified settlement or stronghold). Old Cheshire townships like Frodsham, Eastham, Weaverham, Wrenbury and Prestbury all reveal Mercian Saxon origins.

He died 11 Feb1458 in Knowsley, Lancashire, England. He was a Knight Lord of Lathom. Knight of the Garter. Succeeded his father in Mann and his other estates in 1432. He had been knighted some years before his father's death. In the same year he was appointed Lieutenant of Ireland for six years, and shortly afterwards Comptroller of the King's Household.

During the first year of his rule in Ireland he called together a Parliament for the redress of grievances; but, being called to England by the King's command soon afterwards, that kingdom fell into great disorder, and he was obliged to return to it in 1435, when he successfully repressed a serious revolt.

In 1441 he was appointed one of the Lieutenant justices of Chester, at a salary of £40 per annum. He was one of the Commissioners who treated with the Scotch for a truce in 1448, and, when it was concluded, he became one of its conservators. He also served on a commission for the custody and defence of the town and castle of Calais from 1450 to 1455. During the year 1451 he held the office of sole Judge of Chester, and in 1452 he was commissioned to treat for a new truce with Scotland.

In 1456 he was summoned to the House of Peers as Baron Stanley, being made Lord Chamberlain of the King's Household, and, in the following year, one of the Council of Edward, Prince of Wales. He was again appointed one of the ambassadors to treat with the Scotch in 1460, "but, dying the latter end of the year, the nation was deprived of this very great and valuable person, and the King of one of his best subjects" . . . He was brave in the field, wise in the Senate, just to his Prince, an honour to his country, and an ornament to his family."

He married Joan, daughter and heiress of Sir Robert GOUSHILLl, by whom he had issue three sons, Thomas, William, and John; and three daughters. Parents: Sir John STANLEY Knight Sheriff of Anglesey and Elizabeth Isabel HARRINGTON.

He was married to Joan GOUSHILL. Children were: Sir Thomas STANLEY 1ST Earl of Derby, John STANLEY, Catherine STANLEY, Margaret STANLEY, Sir William STANLEY, Elizabeth STANLEY, Sir Edward STANLEY.

He was married to Maud ANDERNE in 1409 in Lathom and Knows, Lancashire, England.


bullet Thomas STANLEY was born on 25 May 1752 in Hanover Co., VA. He died on 28 Feb 1823 in Springfield, Columbiana Co., OH. Parents: John STANLEY and Ann BALLARD. Parents: John F. STANLEY and Martha HUTCHINS.

He was married to Unity CREW on 12 Dec 1780 in Cedar Creek, New Kent now Hanover Co.,VA. Children were: Moses STANLEY .


bullet Thomas STANLEY IV was born on 19 May 1757 in Hanover Co., VA. He died on 8 Jun 1831 in Damascus, Columbiana Co., OH. ID: I3920
Name: Thomas Stanley 1 2
Sex: M
Birth: 19 MAY 1757
Death: 8 JUN 1831
Burial: Near his home, Damascus, Columbiana Co., OH 1
Residence: 1833 Columbiana County, Oh
Reference Number: 3920

Marriage 1 Priscilla b: 6 DEC 1772
Children
Isaac Stanley b: 24 MAR 1803
Thomas Binford Stanley b: 5 SEP 1805
Sarah Stanley b: 18 NOV 1807
Micajah Stanley b: 11 FEB 1810
Henrietta Stanley b: 14 APR 1814

Sources:
Title: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol IV
Author: Hinshaw, William Wade
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc. 1994.
Note: Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930
Reproduced on Broderbund Software's Family Archive CD #192
Volume IV. (Genealogical Records: The Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930).
Note: Secondary
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Page: 995
Title: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol IV
Author: Hinshaw, William Wade
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc. 1994.
Note: Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930
Reproduced on Broderbund Software's Family Archive CD #192
Volume IV. (Genealogical Records: The Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy, 1750-1930).
Note: Secondary
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Electronic
Page: 764, 1017
Parents: Thomas STANLEY and Sarah CREW.

He was married to Edith STANLEY on 8 Jun 1790 in Columbia Co., GA. His first cousin once removed, daughter of John STANLEY and Millicent STANELY. Children were: Milley STANLEY, Edmund STANLEY, John STANLEY, Elijah STANLEY, Frances STANLEY.

He was married to Priscilla LADD . Children were: Isaac STANLEY, Thomas STANLEY, Sarah STANLEY, Micahaj STANLEY, Henrietta STANLEY.

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