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Egan Families of Benzie, Manistee, & Grand Traverse Counties
Contributed by Sean McDonald 




In 1834:
Timothy Egan, according to the age given for him on the 1880 census, was born in Ireland in or around 1834, probably in what was later called "Southern Ireland" or "The Irish Free State." This was the vast portion of the island--all of it but the six counties now constituting Northern Ireland--that achieved independence from Britain in 1920. I say this because Thomas Egan, Timothy's rough contemporary, said on the 1930 census that he had been born in the Irish Free State. Timothy Egan, unfortunately, did not live to see Irish Independence.

In 1840:
According to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records, a Margaret A. Egan was born in this year and was later buried in the parish cemetery, but the church records give no death date for her. I don't know her relationship, if any, to the rest of the Egan clan.

In 1844:
Bridget O'Connor, later to marry Timothy Egan, was born to David O'Connor in Ireland in or around 1844, according to her stated age in the 1880 census. Her age, however, and thus her birth date, changed a fair amount over the years, always with the result of making her younger than the 1880 date would indicate. For example, she states on the 1900 census that her birth date was in August of 1846. In 1920, she indicates her birth date was sometime in 1849. Whatever her real age and birth date, she was born in a country that was perhaps the poorest in Europe, and one oppressed by its English masters both through violence and administrative policies dispossessing the native population. By the time of Timothy Egan's and Bridget O'Connor's births, the British overlords, for whom the island was essentially a cash machine, routinely denied Irish residents an education, access to the trades, or land enough to earn a living even in good times. Beginning only a year or two after Bridget's birth--by which I mean 1844, which roughly accords with her stated ages on the 1870 and 1880 censuses--the potatoe crop, which was the main staple of the Irish diet, failed repeatedly over the course of several years, causing widespread famine. By 1850, the year Bridget says in the 1920 census that she emigrated from Ireland, huge numbers of Irish were fleeing devastation and death there by sailing to Canada and America, often with nothing but the clothes on their backs, and sometimes with not even this basic protection. Not a few of the famine immigrants literally arrived in the new world naked, too poor even to clothe themselves. Many more arrived sick from typhus and other diseases contracted en route. Huge numbers of emigrants also died on the voyage to America and had their bodies unceremoniously tossed in the sea. Arriving in survivable condition was of itself a remarkable achievement.

In 1847:
Patrick Egan was born in Ireland in November of this year, according to the 1900 census.

In 1850:
Bridget Egan says in the 1920 census that she emigrated to the U.S. in 1850, becoming a naturalized citizen in 1865.

In 1863:
According to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records, a James S. Egan was born in this year and later buried in the parish cemetery, but the records don't give his death date. I don't know his relationship, if any, to the rest of the Egan clan described in this chronology.

Also in this year, Thomas Egan immigrates to the U.S., either from Ireland or Canada, according to the 1920 census.

In 1864:
Patrick Egan immigrates to the U.S. this year, according to the 1920 census. His granddaughter Edna Chandler says he entered the U.S. from Canada, so I assume this date marks the year he crossed from Canada into Michigan, but it could also signify the year he immigrated to North America from Ireland, I guess.

In 1865:
Per birth date and birthplace of daughter Ellen, as stated in the 1870 census, Bridget and perhaps Timothy, will have been in Michigan since at least this date. However, it bears keeping in mind that Ellen's age, too, did not always accord in later years with the age given for her in 1870. For example, in 1880 Bridget says Ellen, her eldest child, was 12 years old rather than 15, as one would expect her to be, based on her age in 1870, which was 5.

Also, Bridget says in the 1920 census that she became a naturalized citizen in this year, although I do not have any confirmation of this yet. There was no law requiring that she or the other Egans become citizens, but starting the citizenship process may have been a requirement for obtaining land grants from the state, which several of the male Egans did in 1874. In any case, at least five of the male Egans did complete what's called a "Declaration of Intent," which is the first step toward becoming a citizen. On Timothy's Declaration, the only one for which I have a copy, the date is not entirely legible. My best interpretation of the date given there is October 12, 1874, which was less than a month after he and other Egans received Michigan land grants.

In 1866:
Laura S. Greiner was born in Michigan on January 15, 1866, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records and her stated birthplace on the 1900 census. She was later to marry Patrick Egan.

In 1870:
The census finds Bridget Egan (nee O'Connor) as the head of household in this year rather than Timothy, who is presumably living and working elsewhere. She is 25 years old and "keeping house" in Grant Township. With her are Ellen, 5, and Thomas, 10 mos., born in July. The value of her real estate is $1,000; that of her personal estate is $300. Her children were born in Michigan. A Nellie Eagan should also be listed among the children here, according to her 1925 death record that named Timothy and Bridget as her parents, but Nellie may simply have been a nickname for Ellen, or a diminutive of it, since their ages roughly correspond. Otherwise, Nellie resided somewhere other than home in her childhood years. I know of no record that lists a Nellie Eagan among Bridget's children.

Another Bridget Egan, presumably not related to our family, was also living in the region at this time period. By 1870 she is married to one George Owen and living in Manistee.

In 1874:
On Sept. 15, 1874, Timothy and Patrick Egan each receive 160-acre land grants from the Traverse City land office; Thomas Egan receives a land grant of 158.6 acres. All grants were presumably in Grant Township, Grand Traverse County, where the four Egan households and various family members were living adjacent to each other in 1880. All three grants were awarded on the same day. On June 1, 1882, a John Egan, possibly unrelated, also receives a land grant of 158.69 acres, from the Traverse City land office.

It may also have been during this year that Timothy, Thomas, and two Patrick Egans completed Declarations of Intent to become U.S. citizens, a process which they don't appear to have completed. It may have been done in order to become eligible to obtain state land grants. In Timothy's Declaration, the only one I have, he solemnly swears that "...it is bona fide my intention to become a citisen (sic) of the United States and I renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to each and every foreign prince, potentate and state of sovereignty whatsoever and particularly the Queen of Great Britain of whom I have been a subject." He must have enjoyed swearing to that last part. My best interpretation of the illegible date scrawled on this document is Oct. 12, 1874. A John Egan, possibly unrelated, went beyond the Declaration and actually became a citizen of the U.S. in Grand Traverse County at a later date than the others. Someone by his name received a land grant from the state in 1882, so perhaps his citizenship was also effected that year.

In 1879:
Dollie Agatha Hoyt was born on May 8, 1879, according to her Grand Traverse County death certificate. She was later to marry George Egan. She died in 1949.

In 1880:
Timothy, 46, and Bridget, 36, are living and farming in Grant Township in Grand Traverse County. They both say they were born in Ireland, as were each of their parents. These ages would make Timothy's birth year approximately 1834, and Bridget's approximately 1844. Living with them are Ellen, 12, Thomas, 8, Patrick, 6, John, 5, Edmond, 3, and Mary, 11 months (born July), all of whom were born in Michigan.

The Census shows Timothy and Bridget living adjacent to several other related and semi-related households. All together the related, and possibly related, families, in order of visitation, are:

1) Timothy and Bridget Egan, 46 years and 36 years respectively, and their six children: Ellen, Thomas, Patrick, John, Edmond, and Mary.
2) Patrick Egan, 50 years, farming, living alone, born Ireland.
3) John Egan, 52 years, farming, living alone, born Ireland.
4) Thomas Egan, 32, farming, born Ireland. His age makes his birth year approximately 1848. Living in his household are:
Ellen Sweeney, 45, Aunt, keeping house, born Ireland. Her name could be a possible maiden name for Thomas's mother.
Martin Stock, 18, "Son of Mrs. Sweeney", laborer, born Canada, parents born Ireland (in 1920 he says he was born in Michigan). The relationship implies he's Thomas's cousin.
5) Patrick Sweeney, 55 years, farming, living alone, born Ireland.
6) Willis Southwick, 24 years, farming, born Michigan, parents born NY. A Southwick later married into the Thomas Egan family. Living in his household are:
Edward, 21, brother
Mary Ellen, 16, sister
Arthur E., 6, brother
Harriet C. (?), 47, mother
(Willis and father William, below, were living in Porter Township, Cass County, Michigan in 1860, according to the census for that year.)
7) Joshua Morgan, 24, farming, born New York, as were parents. Living in his household were:
Matilda, 45, mother
Lorena, 16, sister (future wife of Thomas Egan)
8) William Southwick, 56, farming, living alone, born NY, father born NH, mother born NY.
9) John Carroll, 40, farming, born Ireland. I include he and his family here only because they were an Irish family living in close proximity to the Egans. Living in his household were:
Mary, 40, wife, born Ireland
Mathew, 13, son, born MI
Mary E., 10, daughter, born MI
Francis, 8, daughter, born MI

The 1880 Agricultural Census, which was separate and different from the Population Census described above, shows Timothy "Agen" as a farm owner in Grant Township with 45 acres of tilled land (a definition which included fallow land as well as "grass in rotation, whether pasture or meadow"). During 1879 he'd grown 1 acre of buckwheat which produced 20 bushels of crop, 3 acres of "Indian Corn" yielding 40 bushels, 12 acres of oats yielding 185 bushels, 12 acres of wheat yielding 45 bushels, and 2 acres of "Irish Potatoes" yielding 150 bushels. He also had 5 acres of grassland mown, and 4 acres not mown. In 1879, he harvested from these lands 7 tons of hay. He also had 115 acres of "woodland and forest," and one acre that was described as unimproved land that was not growing wood--perhaps an old field no longer in use. The value of his farm "including land, fences, and buildings" was said to be $600. The value of his farm implements and machinery was said to be $80. He had one "milch" cow and one other head of cattle simply described as "other"--a reference, perhaps, to the calf he says "dropped" on his farm during the previous year. He hadn't bought, sold, or slaughtered any cattle during that year, and neither had any "died, strayed (or) been stolen and not recovered." The cattle allowed him to produce 75 lbs. of butter on the farm in 1879. None of the milk from his cow had been sold or sent to "butter or cheese factories" during the previous year. Likewise, he hadn't made any cheese on the farm himself. In addition to the cows, he also had one pig and 15 chickens ("barn-yard poultry"), and they'd laid a total of 75 eggs during the previous year. He owned no horses, asses, or mules to help him with his work, but perhaps he borrowed a horse when needed from Patrick Egan next door, who owned two. The total value of his livestock was said to be $50. The cost of "building and repairing" fences on the farm in 1879, he judged to have been $20. He claimed no costs for fertilizer or hired labor in 1879. He estimated the "value of all farm productions (sold, consumed, or on hand) for 1879" to have been $339. He also cut 50 cords of wood during that year, and he judged the total "value of all forest products sold or consumed in 1879" to have been $45.

The 1880 Agricultural Census showed Patrick "Agen" as a farm owner in Grant Township with 40 acres of tilled land, 119 acres of woodland and forest, and 1 acre of unimproved lands not growing wood. During 1879 he'd grown 1 acre of buckwheat which produced 10 bushels of crop, 2 acres of Indian Corn yielding 30 bushels, 15 acres of Oats yielding 200 bushels, 6 acres of wheat yielding 30 bushels, and 1 acre of Irish Potatoes yielding 30 bushels. He had 5 acres of mown grassland, and 5 acres not mown, and those grass lands yielded 6 tons of hay in 1879. The value of his land, fences, and buildings was said to be $600. Nothing is entered for the value of his implements and machinery, making me think that he shared those with Timothy, who had $80 worth. He had two Milch Cows and one other head of cattle simply identified as "other," and he'd had two calves born on the farm during the previous year. The cows had allowed him to produce 75 lbs. of butter in 1879. He apparently sold no milk nor sent any to butter or cheese factories during the previous year, and he made no cheese on the farm himself. None of the cattle had been bought, sold, slaughtered, lost or stolen. He also had two horses, but no swine or poultry. The value of his livestock was said to be $160. I don't know if this included the value of the horses. He claimed no costs for building and repairing fences, for fertilizer, or for hired labor in 1879. The value of all farm productions in 1879 he judged to have been $220. He also cut 30 cords of wood during the previous year, and he judged the total value of all forest products sold or consumed in 1879 to have been $25.

The 1880 Agricultural Census showed Thomas Egan (rather than "Agen," as the last names of Timothy and Patrick were spelled by the census taker) as a farm owner in Grant Township with 28 acres of tilled land and 130 acres of woodland and forest. During 1879 he'd grown 6 acres of oats which had produced 100 bushels of crop, 3 acres of rye yielding 33 or 38 bushels, 4 acres of wheat yielding 40 bushels, and 2 acres of Irish Potatoes yielding 100 bushels. He also had 10 acres of grasslands, all mown, which yielded 6 tons of hay. The value of his land, fences, and buildings was judged to be $600. His farming implements and machinery were worth $20. He had no cattle, sheep, swine, or poultry, but he did have 2 horses, and they must have been defined as livestock, because the value of his (otherwise nonexistent) livestock was judged to be $100. His costs during 1879 for building and repairing fences was said to be $10. He claimed no costs for fertilizer or hired labor. He estimated the value of all farm productions the previous year to have been $230. He apparently neither cut any wood in 1879, nor derived any income from forest products.

Neighbors William and Willis Southwick were enumerated on the Agricultural Census this year, but neither John Egan nor Patrick Sweeney were, so perhaps they were engaged in the farming operations of Timothy, Patrick, and/or Thomas.

In 1882:
On June 1, 1882, a John Egan, possibly unrelated to our clan, receives a land grant of 158.69 acres from the Traverse City land office. The Grand Traverse County Naturalization Index shows that a John Egan became a naturalized citizen of the County sometime after the other Egans submitted their Declarations of Intent. Perhaps he did this in or around the time of his land grant. In any case, he appears to have completed the process rather than just submitting a Declaration, as the others had done.

Also in 1882, a Fritz W. Eagan bought land in Benzie County from a Samuel Gilbert on March 9, 1882, per Benzie County Register of Deeds. His relationship, if any, to the Egan clan in this chronology is unknown.

In 1884:
Daniel Timothy Egan, infant son of Timothy and Bridget Egan, dies of "cholera infantum," at age one year, 7 months.

In 1885:
John F. Egan was born to Patrick Egan and Laura Greiner on July 11, 1885, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records and a conversation with his daughter, Edna Chandler.

In 1889:
Thomas Egan was born on August 11, 1889 to Patrick and Laura Greiner of Grant Township, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records. He died a year later.

In July of 1889, a note about Timothy Eagan appeared in the Grant Township Correspondence section of the Grand Traverse Herald newspaper, according to a newspaper transcription on the Grand Traverse County GenWeb site. The note read in full: "Timothy Eagan has lost four head of cattle. Some wretch gave them poison. There were three cows, all that he had. The neighbors have clubbed together and raised money to buy him another cow."

In 1890:
Thomas Eagan, age 1 year, 1 month, and 17 days, died on September 18, 1890 in Grant Township of unknown causes--this per Grand Traverse County death records. His parents were Patrick and Laura Eagan of Grant Township, who were Edna Chandler's grandparents.
He's buried in St. Raphael's cemetery.

Timothy Eagan, age 52, farmer, married, born Canada, dies on November 20, 1890 in Grant Township of an unknown cause--this per Grand Traverse County death records. All this information, including the spelling of his last name and the unexpected birthplace, which one would expect to be Ireland, are recorded in the Grand Traverse County death Liber. No information as to parentage was included.

In 1891:
Etta M. Wright born on October 5, 1891 to William Wright and Cora Wright, nee Owenshire. She was later to marry Edmond F. Egan.

In 1892:
Laura Egan bought land in section 24 of Colfax Township, Benzie County from Garner Almira on August 17, 1892. The instrument she used to do this was a quitclaim deed, per Benzie County Register of Deeds.

Also in this year, Eva Hall was born on September 14. She was later to marry John F. Egan.

In 1893:
An Annie M. Egan was born on July 11, 1893, according to St. Raphael's Parish cemetery records. I don't know who her parents were. She died a few years later in 1898.

In 1894:
On January 16, 1894, Bridget Egan bought a parcel of land in section 33 of Colfax Township, Benzie County, from Orville H. and Eliza Stebbins, per the Register of Deeds. The boundaries of the parcel are described in the Benzie County land records without giving the acreage. The instrument used to transfer the title was a warranty deed, and the price Bridget paid for the land was $165. The Stebbins themselves had bought the parcel only three months earlier from Charles and Clara Phalen. The price they had paid was $150, so the amount they realized in the sale to Bridget was $15, minus any improvements made or fees associated with their purchase.

In 1896:
Patrick B. Egan was born to Patrick and Laura Egan of Colfax Township on July 6, 1896, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records.

In 1898:
Annie M. Egan, born July 11, 1893 to parents unknown, died on April 14, 1898, and is buried in St. Raphael's cemetery, according to parish records.

In 1900:
Soundex shows Bridget Eagan, 53, born Aug. 1846 in Ireland, living in Colfax Twp., Benzie County, a naturalized citizen. Living with her are:
Ellen, daughter, 33, born Nov. 1866 in Michigan, housekeeping.
"Edmund" Eagan, son, 22, born Nov. 1877 in Michigan, day laborer.
Mary, daughter, 20, born July 1889 in Michigan, at school.

Thomas Eagan, 44 years old, born in Ireland, was still living and farming in Grant Township in this year, according to his soundex card for the census, although the age given for him here does not jibe with his age in 1880 or the age given for him on his 1930 death certificate. According to the documents from those years he would have been 51 or 52 in 1900. Living with him were wife Lorena, 36, born May 1864 in New York; son Albert T., 19, born Dec. 1880 in Michigan; son Lewis C., 17, born Sept. 1882 in Michigan; daughter Katie M., 15, born Aug. 1884 in Michigan; and "Work Hand" Percey Burley, 10, born Feb. 1889 in Michigan.

Thomas is also recorded in the Grand Traverse County Directory this year as living and farming on 160 acres in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $880, although according to Manistee County Historical Museum Director Steve Harold, the market value was probably twice this amount. He was the only Egan listed in the county in this year.

A Thomas Eagan, Jr., age 32 (born June 1868), was living in this year with his Grant Township cousin, Patsey Stack, according to his 1900 soundex card.

The census for this year shows Patrick Egan, 52 (born in Ireland Nov. 1847), living with his wife Laura, born in Michigan, and their four children in Colfax Township, Benzie County. Her age was 35 (born in June of 1865). The children living with them were:
John F., 14, born July 1885
Clara E., 12, born December 1887
George B., 8, born Jun 1891
Patrick B., 3, born July 1896
David R., 1, born July 1899
Patrick's age and birthplace should put him in the company of the other Egan pioneers in Grand Traverse County, the ones who were living in close proximity in Grant Township in 1880, but no Patrick corresponding to the age given here was among them in 1880. There was a Patrick in the 1880 group, but the age given for him was 50, not 32, as this Patrick would have been in that year. According to a conversation with Edna Chandler, Patrick's Granddaughter, Patrick had lived for some period of time in Canada before crossing into Michigan at Port Huron and settling in Detroit for a while, where he worked as a lamplighter before moving north.

Also in this year, Patrick Egan bought land in section 24 of Colfax Township, Benzie County from the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company. The deal took place on June 21, 1900, and the instrument used was a warranty deed.

A Patrick Egan is also listed in this year in the Manistee County Directory. It shows him living and farming on forty acres in Cleon Township. His land there was officially valued at $160. Is this the pioneer Egan who was living in Grant Township in 1880?

In 1901:
Thomas Egan was living and farming on 271 acres in Grant Township, per Grand Traverse County Directory. His land was officially valued at $1400. He was the only Egan listed in the county this year.

Patrick Egan is shown as a landowner on the Colfax Township Platte Map this year, per Benzonia Public Library.

In 1903:
Laura Egan bought land in section 24 of Colfax Township, Benzie County from Patrick Egan on November 20, 1903 using a warranty deed. Source: Benzie County Register of Deeds.

Also in 1903, the "Sprague's History of Grand Traverse and Leelanaw Counties" was published. It described Grant Township this way: "The town contains one Methodist Episcopal and one Second Adventist church, four school buildings and a town hall, the latter built at a cost of eight hundred dollars. There is one small saw-mill in the town, employing about eight hands. It is a thrifty farming community."

In 1904:
Grand Traverse County Directory: Thomas Egan, the only Egan listed in the county this year, was living and farming on 271 acres in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $1580.

In 1905:
Grand Traverse County Directory: Thomas Egan, the only Egan listed in the county this year, was living and farming on 271 acres in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $1500.

Also in 1905, an Edith G. Egan was born on August 15, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records. I don't know who her parents were. She died three years later.

In 1906:
Clara "Eagans" (apparently a variant spelling of Egan), 18, of Colfax Township, Benzie County, married George Hanes, 27 of Grant Township, Grand Traverse County, on February 21, 1906. The marriage, performed in Nessen City by Rev. James Golden, Roman Catholic Priest, was witnessed by George Egan of Colfax Township and Mary Egan of Nessen City. Clara was the daughter of Patrick Eagans and Laura Garner (Garner seems to be a misspelling of Greiner) of Colfax Township. George was the son of Benjamin Hanes and Julia A. McMyrtry of Grant Township.

In 1907:
Grand Traverse County Directory: Thomas Egan, the only Egan listed in the county this year, was living and farming on 240 acres in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $1340.

Also in 1907, Katie Matilda Egan, age 22, married Frederick Arthur Southwick, age 24, on February 6, per Grand Traverse County marriage record. The marriage, performed in Grant Township by L.E. Holmes, "Minister of the Gospel," was witnessed by Albert Egan of Grant Township, Grand Traverse County, and Clara Carmean of Colfax Township, Benzie County (these two were to marry a year later). Frederick was a farm laborer living in Colfax Township, although he had been born in Grand Traverse County to Charles Edward Southwick and Margeret L. Hanes. Katie Egan was the daughter of Thomas Egan and Reina Morgan (Reina seems to be a diminutive of Lorena or Lorenia, as her name is variously spelled in other documents).

In 1908:
Albert Thomas Egan, 27, of Grant Township married Clara Ann Carmean, 18, of Benzie County on January 29, 1908, per Grand Traverse County marriage record. The marriage took place in Traverse City, witnessed by Robert Elbalter of Traverse City and Mrs. Lorenia Egan of Nessen City (Albert's mother). Albert was a farmer born in Grant Township to Thomas Eagan (different spelling!) and Lorenia Morgan. Clara was a domestic born in Ohio to Jesse Carmean and Retta Wiswasser. The ceremony was officiated by Traverse City Judge of Probate Fred Walker.

Edith G. Egan, born August 15, 1905 to parents unknown, died on September 14, 1908 and is buried in St. Raphael's Cemetery, according to parish records. I don't know her relationship to the other Egans.

On July 28, 1908, a son named Lauren Egan was stillborn to parents Albert Egan and Clara Carmean of Grant Township.

In 1910:
Grand Traverse County Directory: Thomas Egan, the only Egan listed in the county this year, was living and farming on 240 acres in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $1340.

His soundex card for the census shows Thomas, 54, living in Grant Township with wife "Larine," age 44. He was born in Ireland, she in New York. Also in their household are:
son Lewis, 28
son Albert, 29
daughter-in-law Clara, 20
daughter Katie Southweck (elsewhere spelled Southwick), 24
Katie's husband Fred A. Southweck, 27
Katie and Fred's daughter Velma, 2
All of them were born in Michigan except for Clara, who was born in Ohio.

Census shows Bridget, 63, living in Thompsonville, Benzie County. Living with her are:
Ellen, 40, daughter, seamstress?, working at home.
John, 33 or 35, son, occupation illegible, working in saw mill.
Mary, 30, daughter, housekeeper.

Bridget's son Edmond F., 32, a laborer, is living five houses away with his wife Etta M., 18, no occupation.

Laura Egan is listed as the head of the household in Colfax Township, Benzie County this year. Her husband Patrick is not enumerated with her and the rest of the family. Four of the children from 1900 are still present and accounted for in this 1910 household, and a new one, Charles, is also listed. John is 24 and still single, George is 18, Patrick is 13, David is 11, and Charles is 7. Clara is not present because she married George Hanes in 1906, and now lives with him in Grant Township.

A Hattie Eagan, age 6, was listed on her soundex card for this census year as living in or around Thompsonville, Benzie County with someone named Clinton "Formns".

In 1912:
Mary Adeline Egan was born to Edmond and Etta Egan (nee Wright) on December 1, 1912, according to the date printed on the program for her 2005 funeral.

In 1913:
Etta M. Egan, nee Wright, occupation: housewife, born Oct. 5, 1891, married to Edmond F. Egan, dies of pneumonia in Copemish on Jan. 15, 1913, per Manistee Co. Death Liber. She was 21 years, 2 months, and two days. The family folklore has always maintained Etta had died in giving birth to Mary Adeline a month and a half earlier, but perhaps complications of Adeline's birth contributed to Etta's death without being referenced on her death certificate, which only lists pneumonia as a cause. Her parents are listed in the county death liber as William Wright and Cora Owenshire of Copemish.

Also in 1913, "Baby Girl" Egan was stillborn to parents Albert Egan and Clara Carmean of Grant Township, their second child to have been born dead.

Bridget Egan bought land from a Mrs. R(illegible) Hickey in section 33 of Colfax Township, Benzie County. The deal took place on Feb 12, 1913, according to the Benzie County Register of Deeds.

Patrick or Patricia K. Egan bought lot #5 in Nessen City from Mary E. Obermeyer on the same day Bridget made her purchase: February 12, 1913. Source: Benzie County Register of Deeds.

Grand Traverse County Directory: Thomas Egan, the only Egan listed in the county this year, was living and farming on 240 acres on Rural Route #1 in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $2690.

In 1915:
Manistee County Directory shows Patrick Egan living on 40 acres, estimated to be worth $900 (perhaps twice that in real terms), in Cleon Township. The farm was in section 3 of the Township; the nearest post office was in Nessen City. Perhaps this was the pioneer Egan that was living in Grant Township in 1880. If so, he would have been 85 in this year, a very advanced age for his time and place.

A Patrick Egan also appears on the Colfax Township Platte Map this year, in the same spot he occupied on the 1901 map. In 1915, however, Laura Egan has assumed ownership of a portion of the 1901 acreage. Perhaps there were two Patricks in the area at this time period, one in Cleon Township and the other in Colfax Township, or perhaps a single Patrick Egan owned and farmed both lands, one being a home and farm and the other being extra acreage.

In 1919:
Patrick B. Egan, born July 6, 1896 to Patrick and Laura Egan, died on January 18, 1919, and was buried in St. Raphael Parish cemetery, according to parish records. He was a veteran of World War I.

In 1920:
Soundex says Bridget is 71 years old, and that she immigrated in 1850 (making her approximately 1 year at the time of immigration), and was naturalized in 1865. Previous documents have indicated that she was born about 1844-5, making her about 75 or 76 in 1920, and making her five or six years of age at the time of immigration. Her age at the time of immigration seems to imply that she may have immigrated here with her father, David O'Connor. Her mother's name is unknown. In this year, she's widowed and living in Colfax Twp., Benzie County. Her grandchild Mary A., 7, is living with her.

In this census year, Thomas Egan, 65, is still living in Grant Township, Grand Traverse County, along with wife Lorenia, 54, son Albert T., 38, daughter-in-law Clara A., 29, and son Lewis C. or E., 37, who is the only single member of the household. Thomas is said to be a general farmer who owns his farm but is still paying its mortgage. He was born in Ireland, as were both of his parents. He's said to have immigrated to the U.S. in 1863 and to have become naturalized in 1867. He can neither read nor write. Lorenia and all the other members of the household can read and write. Lorenia is said to have been born in New York, as were both her parents. Albert and Lewis were both labourers on the farm, born in Michigan. Clara, Albert's wife, was born in Ohio, as were both her parents.

Laura S. Egan, 53, was living with her son, George B.L. Egan, 28, in Benzie County, according to her soundex card for this year's census.

Nellie Egan, Bridget's daughter, age 41, was boarding on Lake Avenue in Traverse City in the home of one Paul Ritter, according to her soundex card for this year's census. Her age here is at variance with the one given on her death record just five years later, which was 57. If that age was correct, then her age in 1920 would have been 52 rather than 41.

Patrick Egan, age 65, was living in Benzie County with his daughter-in-law, Eva M. Egan in this census year. He is said on his soundex card to have been born in Ireland. On the line for citizenship information is written "1864 Al." I think this means he immigrated to the U.S. in 1864 and is still an "alien." When someone has been naturalized--like Bridget Egan, for instance--the citizenship line gives the year of immigration, the letters "Na," and then the year of naturalization. So Bridget's citizenship line in 1920 reads "1850-Na-1865." Eva, 27, was the head of the household of which father-in-law Patrick Egan was a part, and she and all her kids were born in Michigan. The names and ages of the kids, all daughters, were Lena, 7, Grace, 5, and Claudie, 14 months. According to a conversation with Edna Chandler, this family ultimately included nine children, these three plus Paul, Edna, Fay, Walter, Margaret, and Laura. Claudie and Walter died young, she said.

Martin Stock, presumably Thomas Egan's cousin, age 59, was living in Lodi Township, Washtenaw County, Michigan this year, according to the census.

In 1921:
Grand Traverse County Directory: Thomas Egan was living and farming on 240 acres on Rural Route #1 in Grant Township. His land was officially valued at $2800.

In this year, two other Egans are listed in the Directory. One of them, Nellie C. Egan, boarding at 641 East 8th Street in Traverse City, was a daughter of Timothy Egan and Bridgett "Conor," according to her 1925 death record. The other Egans, Edward J. and Blanche, were listed in the Traverse City Directory as having "removed to Benton Harbor, Mich." I don't know if they are related to our Egan clan.

In 1922:
Virgie May Egan was stillborn to parents Albert Thomas Egan and Clara Egan (nee Carmean) on April 2, 1922, per Grand Traverse County death records. This was their third child to be born dead. The record also includes the information that Clara Carmean was from Ohio.

In 1923:
A notice or article about a court action involving John Egan appeared in the Benzie Banner newspaper on July 19, 1923, according to the Benzonia Public Library's newspaper index. The index describes the story as being about liquor.

In 1924:
Paul M. Egan was born to John F. and Eva Egan on March 11, 1924, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records.

In 1925:
Nellie Eagan, single, 57 years old, died in Traverse City of intestinal obstruction, according to Grand Traverse County death records. A housekeeper, she was born in Michigan to Timothy Eagan and Bridgett Conor (the O before the last name is not included here), both of Ireland. Her birth date, judging from her age, would have been in or around 1868. Since no record that I know of lists a Nellie Eagan as a child of these two, she was either raised elsewhere than in their household, or she was known as Ellen in childhood years. Her age at death corresponds roughly with ages given for Ellen in early censuses. Perhaps her name was a nickname or a diminutive of Ellen.

In 1927:
Patrick Egan died on September 11, 1927, and was buried in St. Raphael's Parish cemetery, according to parish records. Those records identify him only as "Father." I assume this is the Patrick Egan that married Laura Greiner and lived in Colfax Township, because the pioneer Patrick Egan living in Grant Township in 1880 would have been 97 in this year, an unlikely longevity. Also, the parish records show Laura S. Egan dying in 1940, and they identify her as "Mother."

In 1928:
Bridgett Egan died on November 11, 1928, per her Benzie County death record. I've lost this record, so I don't know the cause of death or the other details, but it did say that her father's name was David O'Connor of Ireland, and that her mother's name was unknown.

In 1930:
Thomas Egan (who died later this year), 81, occupation "none," was still living in Grant Township. The respondent for this year says Thomas was born in "Southern Ireland I.F.S." (Irish Free State), as were his parents. In 1920 legislation was passed dividing Ireland in two. Thomas's age seems to vary from year to year. His age at first marriage is said here to be 31, his wife's 16. He can't read or write. Luckily, Lorenia J., age 66, occupation none, can read, according to respondent. Both she and her parents are said to be from New York. This census shows Thos., a Naturalized Citizen, having immigrated in 1864. In other years he's said to have immigrated in 1863. He is not a veteran. Living in his household are:
C. Louie, son, age 47, single, can read and write, born MI, occupation laborer on farm, not a veteran.
Albert T., son, age 49, married to Clara below, age at first marriage 27, can read and write, born MI, father born S. Ireland I.F.S., mother born NY, occupation laborer on farm, not a veteran.
Clara L., daughter-in-law, age 40, occupation none, married to Albert, age at first marriage 18, can read and write, born Ohio, parents born OH.
Herbert J. Southwick, grandson, age 7, attending school, born MI, parents born MI.

Living approximately ten households away from him in Grant Twp., Grand Traverse County, is George B. Egan, Patrick and Laura Egan's son, age 39, mechanic in a garage. He is apparently newly married, since he gives his age at first marriage as 39. He was born in MI, his father in Southern Ireland I.F.S., and his mother in MI. He was not a veteran. His wife is Dollie D. Egan, age 50, occupation none, whose first marriage was at age 27. She was born in MI, her father in Ohio, and her mother in NY. Both of them could read and write.

Grand Traverse County death records show that Thomas Egan, still alive at the time of the census, died on June 20, 1930. An 81 year old farmer, still married, he died in Traverse City of "gangrene of the leg." He is said in the record to have been born in Ireland to parents John Egan and Kate Foley, also of Ireland. Thomas and Timothy Egan's ages were about 14 years apart, so I'm not sure what their relationship was--brothers? cousins? In any case, it's possible that John Egan and Kate Foley were Timothy's parents also. They could also have been the brother and sister-in-law of his parents--in other words, his uncle and aunt.

In 1940:
Laura S. Egan, born January 15, 1866 in Michigan, wife of Patrick Egan, died on September 12, 1940, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records. Those records identify her as "Mother."

In 1943:
Patrick Egan, age 70, son of Timothy Egan and Bridget O'Connor, both of Ireland, died on Feb. 28, 1943. He died in the Traverse City State hospital, where he'd been resident for more than two years. The causes were senility and terminal pneumonia, according to his Grand Traverse County death certificate. C.W. Terwilliger of Kaleva handled the funeral, and he was buried in Nessen City, Michigan on March 3, 1943. Prior to his residency in the hospital, which had lasted for 2 years, 3 months, and 14 days, he had been a resident of Thompsonville.

Also in this year, an announcement or article about Edna F. Egan's marriage to Henry L. Chandler appeared in the January 28th edition of the Benzie Banner, according to the Benzonia Public Library's index.

In 1949:
Dollie Agatha Egan of Grant Township, wife of George B. Egan, died on September 9, 1949 of "cancer of the intestinal lower bowel." She was 70 years, 4 months, and 1 day when she died. Her husband, the informant for her Grand Traverse County death certificate, was only 58, twelve years her junior. Her father was Simeon Hoyt of Ohio; her mother was Catherine Orr of New York. David J. Nugent of Mesick handled the funeral, and she was buried in Grant Township Cemetery on September 11, 1949.

In 1956:
Paul M. Egan, born March 11, 1924 to John F. and Eva Egan, died on September 16, 1956, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records. He was a veteran of World War II. He was also the brother of Edna Chandler.

In 1959:
John F. Egan, born July 11, 1885, son of Patrick and Laura Egan, husband of Eva Egan, died on November 18, 1959, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records. He's identified in the records as "Father." He was the father of Edna Chandler and Paul M. Egan.

In 1962:
Clara A. Egan, age 71, wife of Albert Egan (who was the informant here), died at the Traverse City State Hospital on January 27, 1962, where she had been a patient for three days prior to her death. Her occupation had been housewife. The cause was arteriosclerotic heart disease with congestive failure, which she'd had for 2 years, accompanied by Diabetes Mellitus. The D.J. Nugent Funeral Home of Mesick handled the funeral services, and she was buried in Grant Township. The daughter of Jesse Carmean and Loretta Wiswasser, she was born on January 29, 1890 in Van Wert County, Ohio.

In 1969:
Having left high school early to marry Walter Jack McDonald, Adeline McDonald resumed her studies later on in life at night school, and graduated from (Brethren?) High School in 1969--the same year her son Patrick McDonald graduated from the school's day program.

In 1980:
Eva Egan (nee Hall), born September 14, 1892, wife of John F. Egan, died January 2, 1980, according to St. Raphael Parish cemetery records. She's identified in the records as "Mother." She was the mother of Edna Chandler and Paul M. Egan.

In 2005:
Mary Adeline McDonald (nee Egan), called Adeline by all who knew her, died on October 12, 2005, and was buried in the Marilla Township cemetery where her husband, Walter Jack McDonald, known as Jack, had been buried in 1989.

 

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