Folk Finders

Large letter The Village Post Office




From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

1   SOUTHSIDE

April 5,1941--An interesting history of Southside was recently reviewed by S.M. Moore in a letter to his cousin, Mrs. Boyd Neblett, of Salem Community. Mr. Moore recalled a number of interesting characters and events in the founding and early history of Southside this part of his letter follows:
When we moved to Montgomery County in 1870, Southside was just a briar patch. The only house there was the one where Mrs. Hattie Coke now lives. I think it then belonged to Wash Workman. It stood in a field about 100 yards from the road, and in the yard out next to the road, was a small log house with one door and a small window. A man by the name of Ont Collins swept out this little log house and made a few repairs on it and started a small store, also established a post office Collinsville. This little business was such a success that he built a residence and dug a well just south of the W.J. Lyle place. Also, he built a larger store. He also sold whisky, but I think the whisky business wasnít a success.
In the meantime Southside began to build up. People began to build residences, but the first frame house built in town was built by Phid Collins, brother to the merchant. This house was later purchased by W.J. Lyle, who improved it for a home. It was about this time that the Rev. Lewis Lowe began to visit Southside and he saw at once the needs of Southside. There was neither church nor school. He made the acquaintance of Ont Collins, the merchant. While Collins was a very immoral man, he and the Rev. Lowe came to be very great friends. Once while on a visit to Southside he told Collins he would like to build an arbor so they could have preaching at Southside.Collins told him he would lend him a helping hand in anything he wanted to do. So they talked this over with the people and all agreed to help with the work. So they started the work and it wasnít long before everybody in town turned out to help build the arbor.
It was in August and it was very warm. The Rev. Lowe pulled off his coat and waded into this work until it was completed. Some gave one, then a load of wheat straw. Then they rustled lumber enough for seats for the revival. So you see the Rev. Lewis Lowe has accumulated a host of friends in Southside and they loved him.
He became the most beloved preacher that Southside ever had. They had the revival that summer. It was in the early seventies and the Rev. Lowe preached the first sermon that was ever preached in Southside.
The people got together and built a log school house. They used this schoolhouse for both school and religious services. I think Eskew Batson was the first one to teach in the new structure. Then Miss Mattie Hunter, Finis Hunterís sister; after this they organized a Sunday school in this school. My mother took part in this organization.
The people from the old Chapel Hill neighborhood would come up and help us with the singing. Now this goes to show that all that Southside needed was someone to take the lead and the Rev. Lowe was the one for the place. But Lowe felt that his work was finished because as Southside began to build up and business began to expand he thought that it was time for this prosperous little town to have a church. He kept this in view until he got the people to donate enough money to build a church. Early in the winter of 1877 they began work on the church. The contractor was Mr. Powers, father of Fountain E. Pitts Powers, also a relative of the late Douglas Powers, a retired mail carrier in Clarksville.
As has been stated in the forgoing the Rev. Lowe was one of the most beloved ministers of the gospel who ever came to Southside. The church was finished in August of 1877 and they had one of the greatest religious revivals of modern times that summer. It seemed that God poured out his spirit and swung back the gates of heaven on the people of Southside.
It prompts me to say that the present generation of Southside while they may not realize it owe to the Rev. Lewis Lowe a debt of gratitude which they can never repay.



From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duckís Journal)

2   LETTERS TO SANTA CLAUS
December 1910


Dear Santa Claus--I will write you a letter to let you know what I want you to bring me. Please bring me a doll, a doll buggy, doll bed, a little stove, some candy, nuts, oranges, apples, fire crackers and sparklers and a slate pencil. Don't forget mother.
Your little girl, Louise Ussery

Dear Santa Claus--I am a little boy just three years old. I want some candy, oranges, a little train, fireworks and a box of matches. Just bring me a little of everything you have and donít forget Aunt Prudy Toler. She is at my house now.
Your little boy, Bailey Plummer

Dear Santa Claus--I am a little boy nine years old. I will write you asking what I want you to bring me. I want a pistol that will shoot 50 times, a pair of gloves, and a neck scarf. Now, Santa, I havenít asked for much of you, so donít forget to bring lots of fireworks and eatables.
Your little friend, George Walton Powell

Dear Santa Claus--We are two little boys, three and six years old who are anxious to have you make us a visit Christmas. We live on the southside of the river near the 7-Mile Ferry and oh, Santa Clause, please donít let the ferry frighten you away. If the cables are broken and you canít cross with your reindeers just engage a balloon and come on. We want a sweater each, a little wagon, a knife, some books, some blocks, some BB shots for my air gun, some fireworks, lots of nuts, candies, oranges and raisins. We will go to bed early and keep our eyes shut tight.
Your little friends, Pete and Vernon Neblett

Dear Santa Claus--Please bring me a piece of hair ribbon and a pair of leggings, a pair of gloves, a pair of overshoes, a box of candy, work box. and all kinds of fruits, a new dress and a ring. Donít forget sister.
Your little friend, Ada Suiter

Dear Santa Claus--Please bring me a little stove and a fascinator, some oranges, nuts, candy and fireworks. Please bring something nice to my sisters and brother.
Your little girl, Annie Mai Cocke



From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

3   MARION

February 10,1893--Marion was named in honor of Mrs. Matt Gracey, and it is an important point on the road. It is on the line between the counties of Montgomery and Dickson and for a year was the terminus of the Mineral. This is a good business point and they have a post office. By the way, Marion is not the name of the office. When the petition was sent in, the post office department asked that some other name be given it, that while there was not a post office by that name in the state, there were some that approached it so nearly that confusion might result. To compromise the matter, ďDogwoodĒ was substituted.



From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

4   MARION

June 19,1918--Mrs. Scottie B. Trotter of District 20 received the following ďMotherís DayĒ letter from her step-son ďover thereĒ: Co A, 28th Inf, France, May 11,1918

My Dear Mother, As Motherís Day comes around it is not for me to turn my thoughts to mine, and naturally, my own mother being dead, I turn to you with all the filial affection thatI would bestow upon my own.
The day of unrest is just drawing to a close. I watch the sun as it sinks in the West and I wonder if that same sun is shining for you as it is shining for me - but only more brilliant.
At present I am here across the mighty ocean fightingfor not only my country, but for that great IDEAL. And you can depend upon it if Uncle Sam depends upon me, he will find that I shall do all the good for himand as much as I can to the enemy.
I cannot, though, refrain from letting my fancy linger back in the States. When this cruel war is over, round the home fires I have hopes that I shall be able to tell you of my experience here. At times it might appear to you that I am negligent, but believe me I do not want to be ungrateful. I sincerely hope that you will enjoy the best of the health and that Damn Good Fortune is thrown in your way best good looks and the deepest gladness. Give father and the rest of the family the best of my regards. I remain, Your Step Son.
Capt. Joseph R. Trotter



From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

5   LETTER FROM ARTHUR BAGGETT

December 10,1918--To Mrs. Mary M. Baggett
Dear Mother: This leaves me OK but I have sure been busy for the last month or two. We have been doing all we could to end the war and the only thing I can hear is, "I wonder when we will be ready to start home or when will the war be over."
Anyway, no one is worried as to how it will finish, only how long it is going to take. As long as we receive support from you people over there as we have heretofore, we will keep going right on into Berlin. I would like to see the Allied flags flying over the Kaiser's palace anyway. But let us hope and pray that the people over there will wake up and see where they are wrong and end this cruel struggle. You cannot imagine the awfulness of this thing until you have seen it. Not only the millions of men and untold amount of money it has cost both sides, but there are other things even worse--men, women and children who have been in captivity for as long as three years, made to work and slave for the enemy and starved and died, been abused and outraged, and numbers of atrocities and crimes too numerous to mention. No wonder they were surprised at the way the US troops fight and that they don't seem to fear any of the traps or devices they have to face. Every man over here in the Allied Forces seems to realize that anything but a complete victory would be dangerous to the future peace and welfare of the world. I would rather be at home and see you all now, and if the good Lord spares me, I expect to be there some day, but I want to see the finish of this argument first and then I can see that my dear wife and children and all the people back home can feel safe from ever being the victims of the most cruel people history has ever known.
Your loving son,
Arthur



From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

6   SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE

December 31,1918--To Mrs. May Powers, December 8,1918
Dear Mother,
Well, I guess you all are beginning to think I am not going to write anymore, haven't had much time for writing lately. I was transferred to the 81st Div., Co G, 323 Inf. and was on the front in real action. On the 12th of November we began hiking and have been hiking ever since. Have hiked about 170 miles. Well, I will never forget what we went through with when we went over the top, will not undertake to write it, hope to tell you about it soon, but I am thankful I went through all OK and didn't even get a scratch. We were out on No Man's Land when the armistice was signed and you know that was a happy hour. I will never forget the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918.
Well, I don't know when I will get to come home, hope to get there in the spring by the time to make a crop. I feel that I have done my part over here and I am anxious to get home as a child for Santa Claus to come. There is no place like the good old USA for me.
Love to all,
From your son, Louis Powers



From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

7   LETTERS TO SANTA

December 12,1908
Dear Santa Claus, I am going to school and I am in the 2nd grade and will be in the 3rd grade if I pass. I will write and tell you what I want you to bring me. Bring me a trunk and fur, oranges, apples, nuts, candy, fire crackers and donít forget my little brother. Bring him a little red wagon and rubber ball and rattler.
I guess I must close.
This little tot signed no name.

Dear Santa Claus: I will drop you a few lines to let you know I want you to bring me a doll with black curly hair and will go to sleep and I want a teddy bear and a little rocking chair and a little ring and a little doll bed and candy, apples and please donít forget my sisters and bring them something nice and please donít forget mama and papa. I am a little girl nine years old and now, Dear Santa, donít forget this little girl.
Georgia F. Gupton
Clarksville, Rt. 2, Box 46

Dear Santa Claus: I want you to bring me a doll that will go to sleep and bring me a bracelet and a signet ring and a doll bed and some candy, apples and a cocoanut, and donít forget this little brown eyed girl. Donít forget sisters and mama and papa and bring sisters something nice for Christmas. Dear Santa, donít forget me Christmas, and come the 25th of December
From your brown-eyed girl
Idella Gupton

Dear Santa Claus: I want you to bring me a doll and some nice books and School basket, and a box of nice stationary with a book of stamps. Bring my little brother a drum and ball and a horn. Please bring us lots of good things to eat.
Your little friend
Mabel Frances Meacham
Woodlawn, Tn.



From: Tennessee Watchman

8   MAIL PICKUP

January 20,1821---List of letters remaining in the Clarksville Post Office:

ALLEN, James
ALLEN, William T.
ANDREWS, Jesse
AVERY, Nathan
BARBER, Benjamin
BARTEE, Jesse
BISHOP, William
BRANKS, George W.
BRIANT, William
BROWN, William L.
BRUSH, Zenas
BRYSON, John
CARVEN, Henry
CAYCE, William
CLARK, Elisha
CLARK, Washington
COOK, Stephen P.
COLCOUGH, George
COVLEY, William
CRUCEMAN, William
DANCY, Nancy
DANCY, William E.
DAVIDSON, Charlton
DAVIS, Ambrose
DAVIS, James H.
DUFF, Mary
DUNLAP, William C.
EASON, John S.
ELLIOTT, James
FOWLER, Ellick
GALBREATH, Duncan
GARRETT, Isaac
GIVAN, Peter
GOSSETT, Elisha
GOSSETT, John
GRACE, Nancy
HARRISON, Ann
HARRISS, Mary
HOLLEY, William
HOLT, Peter
HUTCHESON, James
INGRAM, Sterling
JACKSON, Wells
JOHNSON, John
JOHNSON, Johnny
JONE, Richard
JONES, Sam
KAVANAUGH, Andrew
KIRK, George
KNIGHT, William
LIGON, Joseph
LOCKERT, John
MANN, Robert
MARR, Peter N.
MARSHALL, John
MERRY, Catherine S.
MERRY, John
MERRY, Prescilla S.
MILES, John
MINOR, William T.
MOORE, Henry
MORRIS, Hollaway
NEBLETT, Rebekah S.
NIXON, George
OSBOURNE, Noble
PETERSON, Roland
PIKE, Joshua
POPE, Jacob
PRITCHETT, David
PUCKETT, Samuel N.
PURYEAR, Mary F.
ROBERTS, James
ROBERTS, James H.
RUDOLPH, Peter
RAMSEY, John
ROOK, John
SAWYER, Robert
SHEMWELL, Joseph
SMITH, John M.
SMITH, Thomas
STONE, Duncan
STROUD, Joseph
TAYLOR, William
TERRILL, Joseph
THOMAS, Phencan
TURLEY, Mr.
VANCE, William
VAUGHN, Joshua P.
VENTRESS, James
WAGGONER, George
WATSON, Matthew
WATSON, Thomas
WEAVER, John E.
WHITWORTH, Philmer
WHITWORTH, Sally
WILHOIT, James
WILLIAMS, George N.
WINN, Samuel




From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

9   LETTER PICK UP

April 18,1846---List of letters remaining at the Post Office in Clarksville:

ADAIR, Stephen
ADAMS, Betty Ann
ADKINS, John W. A
ALLEN, George
ARMSTEAD, George
ATHERSON, William
AUSTIN, Albert W.
BAILEY, J.
BARCLAY, P.M.
BARNHILL, T.S.
BARKER, C.M.
BARTON, M.D.
BELL, Peter
BENTON, A.D.
BILDRY, Rev. W.S.
BLAKEMORE, G.C. or F.W.
BOLD, Pricilla
BOSTON, Thomas H.
BRODDIE, D.S.
BROWDER, Peter C.
BROWN, Henry
BRYAN, Hardy
BYRN, Mr.
CASS, S.F.
CHAMBERS, George
CLARKE, D.S.
CLARKE, Julia A.
CLARKE, Lucy D.
CLIFTON, Chesterfield
CLIFTON, Henry S.
COBB, Theodore
COLLINS, William B.
COOPER, Vincent
CORDON, James
COYLE, John
CROCKETTE, William
CROW, John
CROWDER, L.Y.
DANIEL, James B.
DAVIS, James W.
DAVIS, Malinda
DAWSON, William
DeGRAFFENREIDT, Fleming
DOAK, Daniel G.
DURRETT, Allen Simpson
EATON, Robert
ESCUE, Robert
FARLEY, Thomas J.
FERGUSON, Miss M.C.
FERGUSON, Robert F.
FESSEY, William
FOWLER, James
GANNING, Peter
GARDNER, David
GARRETTE, Samuel B. Gilliam & Marshall
GIVENS, Henry
HAMNEDIAN, R.F.L.
HARRIS, John Henry
HAWKINS, William
HEATHERINGTON, W.C.
HERBERT, Mildred
HOFFMAN, Philip P.
HOGAN, John
HOLSTED, M.
HOPPER, E.H.
HOUSTON, Robert
HUGH, John F.
HUNT, James M.
HUNT, Nancy
HUTCHINGS, John
IRBY, Martha
IRWIN, John
JANS, Margaret
JOIS, Pinkney
JONES, E.A.
JONES, Joseph M.
KEEBLE, Martha
KING, William
KOY, Dr. E.
LACY, John C.
LAMBERTH, Mr.
LONG, Susan
LUNSFORD, W.J.
LYNCH, David
MABRY, Rev. J.
MALORY, Rev. S.S.
MAY, Mitchell
McEWEN, R.H.
MINOR, Mary B.
MITCHELL, R.B.
MITCHELL, T.P.
MITCHELL, William
MIZE, Dennis
MOODY, Mary
MOORE, Nicholas P.
MOORE, Richard
MORRIS, John
MORRIS, Mrs. Michael
MORRISON, B.F.
MOORE, Lewis B.
NORTON, P.E.
OLIVE, Abel
ORGAIN, Lucy
OSLEY, Edward
PAYNE, R.S.
PERRIN, Louisa Ann
PETTUS, E.W.
PHILIPS, Capt. William
REEVES, Timothy
REID, John
RICE, William C.
ROWLEY, Catherine
RUSH, Alecy
SALOMON, William H.
SARVER, Michael
SCHMIDT, Peter
SEAT, Britton
SEVIER, Michael
SEVIER, Sarah E.
SHELTON, John F.
SHELTON, Joseph G.
SHELTON, William
SKINNER, J.C.
SMITH, Elizabeth
SMITH, William H.
SNEED, John
SULLIVAN, Denis
STURDEVANT, Joseph
THOMAS, Mary W.
THOMAS, Thomas E.
THOMPSON, Henderson
TRAVIS, John
WAKER, William C.
WALKER, E.D.
WALKER, Frances E.
WALLER, David
WARRENER, William
WASHINGTON, George A.
WASHINGTON, Thomas
WATKINS, W.F.C. Watson & Bailey
WHEFRID, Robert
WHELESS, James
WILKERSON, John C.
WILLIAMS, Fielding L.
WOODS, James
WYATT, Washington I.
WYNNE, Alexander
YOUNG, James A.
YOUNG, William




From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

10   SAILORíS REST

June 24, 1871---A post office is established at Sailor's Rest, just below the mouth of Yellow Creek. J.D. West was chosen postmaster.



From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

11   MAIL IS IN

July 25,1846--List of letter in the Clarksville Post Office. Must be taken up by September 13.
J.D. Bradley, Postmaster.

ALLEN, Samuel
ALLEN, Samuel F.
ADAMS, William C.
ADKINS, John H.
BACON, T.H.
BARKER, C.M. & Co.
BARKER, Mrs. E.M.
BARKER, Maria
BARNETT, D.R.
BARTLETT, Isaac
BAUGH, John
BEARER, Col.
BENSON, Mrs.
BENTON, Joseph W.
BERTON, George C.
BLACKBURN, S.D.
BOILLEN, Nathaniel
BOYD, Mrs. A.W.
BRAME, Thomas J.
BRANTLEY, Patsy
BROWN, A.C.
BROCKMAN, Brown
BROCKWELL, J.M.
BROOKS, M.S.
BRUNSON, Mrs. Dr.
BUNTON, Wylie J.
BURNEY, William
CARNEY, Miss N.
CHADWICK, William A.
CLIFTON, Henry E.
COLLINS, William B.
COOK, T.H.
CROCKETT, William
CROSS, William
DASHAZER, Jonathan J.
DAVIS, James
DAVIS, William H.
DENTON, Reuben (servant)
DOSS, Philip Stanton
DRANE, G.
DURRETT, William
EDMONDSON, William Ellison, Anderson & Co.
ELLISON, James and CO.
ERWIN, William
FANNING, F.
FAUNTLEROY, J.M.
FLINN, Robert
FRIERSON, S.W.
GANFORD, H.L.
GARRETT, Bill & Co.
GILBERT, Capt. Thomas
GLASS, Miss Mary
GRADY, Reuben
GRANDE, Miss Eliza
GREER, William E.K.
GREY, Joseph
GRIMES, William
GWALTNEY, A.R.
HARPER, James H.
HARRISON, James D.
HARSON, James
HICKS, Isaac
HOPSON, George B.
HOPSON, H.R.
HOPSON, J.J.
HORN, Judson
HUGHES, W.F.
HUTCHISON, George H.
HUTCHISON, I.T.
HUTCHISON, James
JEFFERSON, T.G.
JENKINS, C.H.
JOHNSON, Ben Frank James
JOHNSON, James
JOHNSON, Mrs. P.
JONES, Harriett
JONES, J.M.
JORDAN, John T.
KELLEY, Ira W.
KELLEY, John
KILLEBREW, William
KING, Sarah F.
KIRK, Samuel
LAIRD, Peter
MARRER, David
McCALL, Mr.
McCARLEY, W.W.
McEWIN, Silvia
McKOIN, J.G.
McMAHON, Thomas
MILLER, George
MILLS, Niles
MORRIS, John D.
MOSS, William H.
MUMFORD, Thomas J.
NEWMAN, George W.
NOLEN, John
NORFLEET, W.L.
ORR, Henry B.
PACE, Hardy
PAIN, A.B.
PEARSON, Charles
PETTES, Mrs. M.
PETTES, Thomas F.
POWERS, Jacob
PRITCHARD, Cary
RAWLINS, Mrs. E.C.
RENNELS, Green
RICE, W.C.
ROBERTS, Mrs. M.
ROBSON, M.T.
ROGERS, Thomas
ROLLOW, Rosal
ROSS, William R.
RUSSELL, Hallek
SEABROOK, Daniel
SAMUEL, Ann
SCHRODT, Peter
SEVIER, Michael R.
SHELBY, A.J.
SHELTON, Coleman
SHEPHERD, J.G.
SIDNER, Samuel
SMITH, B.J.
SMITH, Edward S.
SMITH, James M.
SMITH, William
SNORTON, George
SPEED, William W.
TEANTOR, William
THOMAS, John J.
THOMAS, Mary
TRICE, James
TUCK, John
TURNEY, John M.
VALENTINE, H.
WALES, William
WARD, Samuel G.
WATSON, J.R.
WATTS, E.M.
WHITAKER, W.J.
WILLIAMS, John W.
WOOD, Dr. B.
YOUNG, W.C.




From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

12   MAIL

July 6,1844---List of letters in the Clarksville Post Office to be picked up:

ALLEN, William W.
ALLEN, Nancy
ANDERSON, Arthur
AVERITTE, Mary A.
ARMSTRONG, Warner
BOLDMAN, Henry
BELL, Montgomery
BELL, Theodore A.
BROWNING, James D.
BULLEN, Miss C.
BUMPASS, William
BUTLER, Nathan Buck & Lane Co.
BARNES, Lavinia
BROWN, A.F.
BARKSDALE, Nathaniel
CALMER, Mrs. S.
CATNALL, George
CHAVIS, Harrison
CLARK, Mary Ellen
CLARK, John
CLARK, William
COLLINS, Robert
COLLINS, William B.
CROCKETT, James
CROWDER, John H.
DANIEL, C.
DANLEVY, John
DAVIDSON, Beverly
DAVIS, Temple H.
DEADMAN, Andrew
DONALDSON, A.Y.
DUKE, W.E.
ELLIS, David
EDWARDS, James A.
FAUNTLEROY, B.F.
FLETCHER, Robert
FOWLER, James
FORT, Elizabeth D.
FORTSON, R.D.
GAINES, Henry P. Galbreath-Williams Co.
GARLAND, James
GEORGE, Richard
GILBERT, Mary Jane
GORDON, Sally A.
GRAY, Fairfax
GREEN, Mr.
GREENFIELD, T.
HARBER, Mildred
HARISH, Jacob
HARLAN, Joseph
HARRISON, George W.
HARRISON, William M.
HAUPT, Henry
HELM, John B.
HERRIN, H.N.
HILL, John or Green
HITER, George W.
HOLLAND, C.
HOSEY, George J.
HURST, Catherine
IRBY, William H., Maj.
JACKSON, Stephen
JOHNSON, John Jones & Smith Co.
JONES, J.M.
KIMBROUGH, Thomas G.
KING, Duncan
LAMBETH, Ann E.
LONG, Malinda
LYNCH, David
MANLOVE, C.H.
McLAUGHLIN, William
McREYNOLDS, James A.
MERRIWETHER, Miss M.
METLOCK, James
MILLS, Fountain P.
MONTGOMERY, George
MOORE, L.B.
MOORE, T.M., Dr.
MORE, John L.
MOSS, William D.
NEWTON, Horatio D.
NEERWANDER, Joseph
OLDHAM, George W.
OLDHAM, Moses
PAGE, Elizabeth
PERKINS, John H.
POINDEXTER, N.J.
POINDEXTER, Sarah
POWER, John L.W.
RAMEY, Howard
RIGGINS, William
RINEHART, William
RING, James
ROACH, William P.
ROBERTSON, James D.
ROBERTSON, Lewis
ROGERS, Elizabeth
ROOT, Joseph
SATTERFIELD, Elisha
SCHACHT, Jove, Rev.
SCOTT, Elizabeth
SHAW, John G.
SHAW, S.W.
SHELBY, Jerry
SMITH, G.W.
SPEED, W.W., Mrs.
SPRINGS, Benjamin
STEVENS, Drury, Rev.
TALER, Mr.
TAYLOR, G.
TAYLOR, Robert P.
TAYLOR, T.C. Temperance Society
TERRY, F.
WALES, Frederick
WALKER, E.J.
WELLS, R.F.
WILLIAMS, F.
WILLIAMS, James P.
WILLIAMS, James W.
WILLIAMS, John W.
WILLIAMS, Thomas
WILLIAMS, William H.
WILLIAMSON, C. Brenan
WILLIS, Sarah
WOODWARD, John F.
WRIGHT, Henry
YARBROUGH, Alexander
YARBROUGH, Joseph C.




From: Nashville Union and American

13   JORDAN SPRINGS

March 14,1873---The post Office at Jordan Springs will soon be changed to Walnut Grove Mills nearby; J.A. France will be postmaster.



From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

14   LETTERS

July 6,1918---Mr. and Mrs. B.H. Dunbar of Palmyra are in receipt of the following letter form their son, Glenn, of Company B, 117th Infantry, now stationed Ďsomewhere in FranceĒ.
Dearest Mamma:
Well we are here and safely. Had a nice trip over and never lost a man. Canít tell you how we came and what we saw. Itís a beautiful country here and if it wasnít for the guns booming in the distance, you wouldnít know there was a war. I never realized the old Atlantic was so big and broad.
I want you all to write two or three times a week, weather you heard from me or not. You do not know how letters are appreciated over here. Guess maybe some of the Sergeants will be sent up to the front for instruction pretty soon. I hope we will get to go.
Have never seen Fritz come over on a air raid yet. Have seen lots of German prisoners though.
Hurry and write and give my love to all the family and regards to everybody with most of it for you and daddy.
Your devoted son, Glenn

In a separate letter to his Daddy he stated this: ďYou folks back in the States can rest assured that the Americans are going to give a good account of themselves over here. The more I see of this world, the more I thank the good Lord I am an American. There just isnít any other country that can compare with it. England comes nearest to it. But coming near is allĒ.




From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

15   LETTER FROM A
WORLD WAR I SOLDIER

November 8,1918---Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Ussery have the following letter from their son, Lewis:
Somewhere in France October 19,1918

Dear Hold Folks,
Well, this is Saturday evening and we are not doing anything. I have just bought a box of candy, a rare thing over here. It is put up in a tin can weighting 1 pound. I am feeling fine today. All day the sun has been shining and it is warm and good. This makes two days of sunshine. I have French money and paid one franc for the candy, which is 20 cents. We have a little YMCA here, which furnishes the boys all their tobacco and I got my candy there.
This evening is the first time I have been able to get any paper and I got enough to last several days. I will let you hear from me every few days if possible. It will be a pretty good while before I hear from you all, so most of the boys say the Y has a piano here and we are having some picnic this evening.
I expect I will go to town in a few days which will be something new to me to go to a French town and see everything. You ought to see the cabbage over here, they sure are something, large, you bet. I never saw so much green stuff to eat as the French have in my life. I have seen some mighty pretty orchards over here.
I am getting along fine and hope you all are feeling fine. I am a little weak from my cold. Send my mail the same old way.
Louis (Lewis?) Ussery



From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

16   PALMYRA

August 13,1918---Roy D. Powersí letter to his mother at Palmyra
ďI received your letter saying you had gotten my card. I donít see why you should have been five weeks getting it.
I have written twice every week. I knew you wasnít expecting me to be over here so soon. I knew I was coming, but I didnít want to tell you.
When I get ready to come back, I will tell you then.
I will enjoy the trip back much better than I did coming over, not because I am afraid of the Kaiser, but I will be glad to know I am coming home.
If the food crop is good, we will do our bit. If the Red Cross asks you for one dollar, give them ten, for they are doing their part.
Well, I havenít time to write any more today. I will finish later.

I will tell you about our 4th of July celebration. In fact, ours didnít amount to very much. In the evening while we were hanging around the cook shack waiting for supper, the Germans began theirs. All at once, we heard the shells flying through the air, and began falling all around us. We ran in the cook shack all in a bunch. I donít see how we survived like we did. The shells cut trails as large as my body and flying shrapnel flew in every direction. I was so badly frightened when shooting was over I didnít know what to do. I came out and was looking where the shells exploded and thought I smelled gas so I put my mask on and wore it a few minutes. I removed it as soon as I found there was no gas. Just about an hour after that we were standing around talking about it, and here came some more. I went in a dugout so that when the shell burst I was way under ground. After that I sneaked out and got my bed and moved in. I couldnít stay on the outside and get in quick enough. Since that time, I have been near, only leave when I have business away. I have a number of large rats that play around me at night. I had much rather contend with them than the iron that falls outside. I went in the front line trenches the 5th but I didnít stay long. I had no business there, whatever. This a very quiet sector at times. Sometimes it is four and five hours that you never hear a gun fired. You know it is always calm before a storm. When they start, they come like rain. I am looking for it every minute.
If we stay here long, we will soon get so we wonít care for them. I have been near the front line other places and heard the shells whistle, but this time it looked as if they knew just where we were and were shooting directly at us. We shouldnít worry, for every one they send us they get two or more back in return.
In all these villages here in this German territory, the people are German. The French captured it and took them prisoners. All the old men and women are still here. When they see American soldiers, they always have a smile on their faces. They also wave the U.S. Flag at us. But they canít be trusted. They only do that because they canít do anything else and get our confidence. We laugh and make a game of this, but really there is no fun about. The people back home donít realize there is a war going on. They donít know what it means to be a soldier in war. This war has ben on for four years, and we just realize that it is.
The way the boys are coming over it canít last much longer. I wish I knew how many were hereĒ.
Your son, Roy D. Powers
Company C, 110th Engineers, A.E.F.




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