Folk Finders

Large letter The Courthouse Square


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From: Clarksville Tobacco Leaf

1   COURT SALE

September 27, 1877--Pursuant to decree in this cause, rendered at the July term 1877 of the Montgomery Chancery Court, I will sell publicly to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door in Clarksville on Saturday, Sept. 29, 1877, all that part of the Jackson, McKiernon & Co.'s lands in Civil District 18 of Montgomery County which were previously sold to Sechler, McCollough & Co., known as the Mt. Vernon Furnace with 4,700 acres of land attached.
This furnace is in good running order, with an abundance of first-class ore, convenient, three miles from the landing on Cumberland River and 2 1/2 miles from the switch on the railroad. Purchaser will have right-of-way to the river and the use of the landing; also right-of-way to the railroad and the right to iron ore from two lots of the lands not sold, from the lands known as the Hezekiah Davis and John P. Vaughan tracts; also, the right-of-way owned by Jackson, McKiernon & Co. through the lands of N.H. Allen, Polk K. Johnson, and C.& M._____.

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From: Supreme Court Records 1869

2   HARRISON vs. WISDOM et al.

A.B. Harrison vs. B.H. Wisdom, Bryce Stewart, B.F. McKraye and Sarah A. Williams, administrix of Joseph F. Williams, deceased. You are commanded to summon Cave Johnson, B.H. Wisdom, B.W. McCrae, administer of T.W. Wisdom, deceased, Bryce Stewart, B.F. McKeaye and Sarah A. Williams, administrix of J.P. Williams, deceased. McCrae, administrator, pleads that he has resigned as administrator of T.W. Wisdom and that J.H. Johnson is now administrator. A meeting of citizens was called at the Mayor's office in Clarksville, Tennessee on the 17th of February 1862, the day after the fall of Fort Donelson to take measures in reference to the whiskey in town. A witness saw A.B. Harrison, the plaintiff, on the street in front of the Mayor's office, who asked the witness what the meeting was about. The witness told him it was to take measures about pouring out the whiskey in town. Plaintiff was on his horse at the time.

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From: Supreme Court Records 1866

3   WEST vs. NOLEN et al.

Bill of Complaint of Isaac D. West against James Nolen, Christopher Dudley of Kentucky, W.B. Russell, David Grant, administrator of Samuel Deaver, E. Adkins, H.C. Rye, B.B. Spicer of Humphreys County, John Stacker, W.L. Dunbar of Stewart County, Joshua Cobb and D.N. Kennedy, George T. Lewis, John Minor and Charles Minor, D. Weaver and Samuel Watson, a citizen of Nashville, George C. Allen, a citizen of Nashville, John Porterfield, a citizen of Nashville, Defendants, humbly complaining, your Orator would respectfully represent and show to your Honor that before and at the beginning of the war, he (Isaac D. West) was the owner in his right of 50-60 Negroes and about 13,000 acres of land, and upon this land there was and is a large iron furnace for smelting iron ore and a flouring mill, grist mill, saw mill, shingle machine, storehouses, there are also six farm and dwelling houses....

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From: Supreme Court Records 1874

4   MICKLE vs. BROWN and O'NEAL

R.A. Mickle, M.C. Mickle, G.W. Clanton and wife, S.A. Clanton, Thomas Cooper and wife, A.M.P. Cooper, all of the County of Graves, State of Kentucky, J.G. Mickle of the city of Little Rock, State of Arkansas, A.B. Mickle of the State of Texas, and Mrs. L.E. Mickle of the County of Montgomery, State of Tennessee, against Albert G. Brown and Peter O'Neal of the County of Montgomery, State of Tennessee, represent to your Honor that they are the legatees of Jonathan C. Mickle who died in the County of Montgomery on or about August ___1859, having duly made and published his Last Will and Testament....

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From: The Nashville American

5   SHARECROPPING REGULATIONS

December 22,1870---A large number of farmers met at the Courthouse in Clarksville for the purpose of uniting upon some plan to reform the labor system. The following regulations offered by Capt. Elliott were adopted: That the system of sharecropping is ruinous to both the laborer and the employer, and that it is detrimental to the public welfare and contrary to the interests of the farmer. A committee to draw up a petition was drafted by J.B. Killebrew, G.T. Abernathy, Willie B. Bryan, Capt. Elliott, Capt. Rawls, W.B. Marshall, W.S. Mallory, T.W. King and J.M. Quarles.

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From: Supreme Court records 1870

6   BEAUMONT vs. BEAUMONT et al.

The Bill and Petition of C. W. Beaumont, guardian of Ida Hamilton Beaumont, Georgie C. and Franklin S. Beaumont, infant children of Franklin S. Beaumont, deceased, a citizen of Montgomery County, Tennessee against said Ida Hamilton Beaumont, Georgie C. and Franklin S. Beaumont, residents of said County of Montgomery, defendants. Your petitioner would represent and show to your Honor that he is the brother of the late Franklin S. Beaumont, deceased, who died intestate in the year 1861, leaving as his heirs at law and distributees of his estate, his three children, the said defendants Ida Hamilton Beaumont, aged at this time about 13 years, Georgie C. Beaumont, aged about 10 years and Franklin S. Beaumont, aged about 6 years. A short time after the death of said Franklin S. Beaumont, his wife also died, leaving said infant children to be cared for by their relatives. The said Franklin S. Beaumont left no personal property, at least not more than enough to pay the indebtedness of his estate. Sterling S. Beaumont, the uncle of said children took charge of them upon the death of their mother and has supported them ever since at his own expense and is now sending two of them to school and paying their tuition bills....He would show your Honor that said Franklin S. Beaumont died seized and possessed of the following described real estate in said County, to wit: one lot in Clarksville, Tennessee....

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From: Supreme Court Records 1874

7   DANIEL vs. WEILL et al.

A Bill of Complaint of W.M. Daniel, a citizen of Montgomery County versus A. Weill and wife Lizzie Weill, Ida Hamilton Beaumont, Georgia C. Beaumont, Franklin S. Beaumont and C.W. Beaumont, guardian, all citizens of Montgomery County, Complainant shows to your Honor that on the 8th of January 1869, Defendant C.W. Beaumont filed his Bill in the Chancery Court at Clarksville against said I.H., G.C. and F.S. Beaumont, alleging that he was the regularly qualified guardian for the defendants, Ida H., Georgia C. and Frank S. Beaumont, minors under twenty-one years; that said minors were the children and heirs-at-law of F.S. Beaumont, deceased...

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From: Supreme Court Records 1821

8   GEORGE NIXON
vs.
GEORGE WEST and PARRY W. HUMPHREYS

Your Orator, George Nixon of the County of Montgomery and State of Tennessee, humbly complaining represents that some years ago he became acquainted with one George West of the County of Montgomery and State of Tennessee and had dealings with the said George West to a considerable amount and upon a settlement with him, the said George West was found indebted to our Orator in the sum of $5,000 for which your Orator received a promissory note from the said George together with a mortgage on ten Negroes, to wit, a Negro man, Jack Stephen, Ruth, Flora, Fred, a Negro boy, Sam, Charles, Lall, Bobo and Bill and a girl Lavina.

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From: Supreme Court Records 1870

9   EDDINGS et al. vs. KENNEDY et al.

The Bill of Complaint of L. Eddings, Ed S. Walton, B.E. Orgain, W.G. Pickering, James R. Drake and Edward L. Williams against D.N. Kennedy, a citizen of Montgomery County, Tennessee; W.C. McClure, a citizen of Memphis, Tennessee; D. Browder, a citizen of the State of Texas; W.C. Smith and wife Fannie V.; E.J. Smith formerly Howard, citizen of Bowling Green, Kentucky; Archie Howard, an infant under twenty-one years of age, a citizen of Kentucky; and E.M. Howard, also an infant under the age of twenty-one years, a citizen of Montgomery County, Tennessee.

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From: Supreme Court Records 1868

10   J.T. DARDEN for HENRY HATCHER
vs.
JANE HATCHER, GRIFFIN ORGAIN and SALLIE

The question in this case arises under the Will of Henry Hatcher, died in which occur the following passages: 4th---I give to Sallie Orgain, my sister, $3,000, the money from the sale of my tract of land to be paid over to her by my executor..... 5th---I give to Mary Susan Hatcher, my niece, a Negro man, now in my possession named John, who is about 26 years old. I also bequeath to Mary Susan Hatcher $800 from the sale of my land. 6th---I give to my niece, Jane Hatcher, $2000 from the sale of my land. The remainder of the money from the sale of my land to be divided equally between my two nieces, Mary Susan Hatcher and Jane Hatcher.

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From: Supreme Court Records 1868

11   JOHN R. ELLIOTT vs. LUCY ROSSON et al.

The Bill of Complaint of John R. Elliott, a citizen of Montgomery County, Tennessee and administrator upon the estate of William Rosson, deceased, against Lucy Rosson, widow of said William, and James Rosson, George Rosson, Logan Rosson, John Rosson, Caladonia Rosson, Robert W. Rosson, all citizens of Montgomery County, Tennessee, the last six named children and heirs-at-law of said William and all infants under the age of twenty-one years and against Elisha Luter who lives in the State of Kentucky.

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From: Loose papers of Montgomery County Court Archives 1873

12   BOND

We, Tennessee Sanderson, Thomas Ramey, C.W. Wall and H.O. Wyatt are held and firmly bound unto the State of Tennessee in the penal sum of Two Thousand Dollars, witness our hands this day.... The condition of the above obligation is such that Whereas the above bound Tennessee Sanderson has petitioned the County Court and obtained a license to keep a public ferry on Cumberland River at the crossing of Clarksville and Charlotte Road, known as Rook's Ferry. To The Worshipful County Court of Montgomery County Your petitioner, Tennessee Sanderson, a citizen of Montgomery County, represents to your Worshipful body, that she is the owner of a ferry boat and of the land upon which is the ferry landing road on the north side of Cumberland River at the ferry known as Seven Mile or Rukes Ferry--just above the land known as Seven Mile Island. She states she has been keeping said ferry or having it kept for about two years and her husband kept it for a number of years before; But have done so by an arrangement with other parties, who claimed the ferry privileges at the place. Petitioner is advised that being the Legal Owner of one bank of the river upon which is the road from the ferry and the boat landing, she is entitled to ferry privileges at the place, which will be granted upon application to your Worshipful body...
Quarles, Drane & Quarles, Attorneys
W.S. Mallory, Clerk

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From: Supreme Court Records 1831

13   SAMUEL WILLIAM & wife POLLY et al.
vs.
JAMES BOYD et al.

Samuel William, wife, and others, heirs of Richard Myrick vs. James Boyd, Phillip Duke and Patsey Duke, Executors of John Duke, deceased......and it appearing to the satisfaction of the court that on the 28th day of February 1801, said James sold to said Richard 750 acres of land in Montgomery County for the sum of $1000... ...the Clerk & Master respectfully reports to the Court that a Bill of ___ was filed on the 12th day of February 1830 stating that James Boyd departed this life in 1828 intestate and no person has administered on his estate, leaving the following children heirs-at-law to wit: John, Thomas, Elisha, Andrew and Robertson Boyd; Jane intermarried with Timothy Anderson; Rebecca intermarried with Charles Miles; Elizabeth intermarried with James Powell. Subpoenas...issued against said heirs on the 13th of September 1830 and have been executed on all said heirs except Elisha and James Boyd, who reside in the States of Missouri and Kentucky and James Powell and wife.
Signed, R. McGavock, Clerk

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From: Acts of Tennessee

14   NAME CHANGE

October 28,1817---William Hutcheson of Montgomery County is desirous that he should hereafter be known by the name of William H. Earl. The legislature granted his request.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

15   SUING

January 14,1904---Through her attorney, T.F. Martin, suit has been filed in the Circuit Court by Miss Susie Powers of Palmyra against the L&N Railroad. Miss Powers is suing for $1,950 for personal injuries alleged to have been sustained last October while she alighted from a train at the passenger depot in Clarksville.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

16   CLARKSVILLE

November 29,1889--Following are the names of the petit jurors for the term of the criminal court:
W.C. Harrelson
F.A. Carnes
George Leigh
W.C. Smith
J. Trotter
Ross Wilson
G.C. Welker
J.T. Martin
James Kennedy
John Turner
E.G. Dunlavy
Harvey Whitfield

Names of the Grand jurors
Forman, W.D. Taylor
Will Warfield
Acquilia Harris
I.P. Howard
S.P. Knox
J.B. Williams
Robert Wilson
George Armstrong
Robert Watkins
M.F. Haygood
J.E. Randall
William Garrad
William Caudle

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From: Supreme Court Records 1816

17   LONG & REESE vs. KITTERELL et al.

Your orators, Anderson Long and Abraham Reese, Sr. humbly complaining show that in the year 1810, they instituted their Bill of Equity in the Muhlenberg Circuit Court against John Fairman, that during the tendency of said suit said Fairman died, having made his Last Will and Testament and thereby devised all his estate to Isaac Kitterell against whom said suit was revived. Your citizens show further that said Isaac Kitterell died before any final decree was entered in said cause, leaving Elizabeth Kitterell his personal representative against whom a final decree was entered in said cause at the September term of said court in the year 1816... Your orators state that there is no property in the State of Kentucky out of which said decree can be satisfied....They state of (Will of John Fairman)...Of Montgomery County and State of Tennessee....being of a low state of health and in good memory...I give to Isaac Kitterell after all my just debts are paid, all my real and personal estate...18th November 1809. ...We, Abraham Reese and Anderson Long of the County of Warren and State of Kentucky...demand, sue for and receive of the heir or heirs of John Fairman, deceased, or his heirs late of the County of Montgomery, State of Tennessee, the full and entire amount of a decree in our favor…

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Will & Administrations

18   RACHEL HOUSE

Will Book A. Page 19
Rachel House, Guardian Bond
We, Rachel House, Brian Whitfield & Robert Prince
Dollars are bound in the sum of Five thousand to the justices, this 26th day of January 1797. The condition of the obligation is such that Rachel House is appointed guardian to Jackie House, orphan of James House. If she faithfully executes her guardianship by securing and improving all the estate which may come into her hands until the orphan comes of full age, then the obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force.

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Will & Administrations

19   BRYANT WHITFIELD

Will Book A, Page 11
Power of attorney from Bryant Whitfield to Needham Whitfield. I, Bryant Whitfield of Montgomery County, Tennessee, do appoint my friend Needham Whitfield as my lawful attorney, to convey all my right to the following tracts of land, to wit, two tracts - one lying on Bull run, the other on Tennessee river, containing six hundred and forty acres. Six hundred and forty acres on the south side of Cumberland river, as he sees fit, this 23rd day of April 1798.

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Wills & Administrations

20   JAMES HOUSE

Will Book A. Page 29
Settlement with administration of the Estate of James House, deceased.
Cash paid a judgment obtained in the court of Montgomery County principal $85.00.
To Sundries found the orphan as appears by vouchers $9.62
Agreeable to an order of court to settle with Joseph B. Neville, we find the accounts to stand.
John Stewart

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Wills & Administrations

21   PATRICK MURPHY

Will Book A. Page 30
Indenture of Patrick Murphy to Hugh McClure
Patrick Murphy, an orphan of six years old, son of Patrick Murphy, deceased with the consent of George Neville, does bind himself as apprentice to Hugh McClure, Merchant in Clarksville, to dwell with him and serve him until he arrives at the full age of 21, and McClure will teach and instruct him in the trade of a Merchant, and to teach him to read and write. At the expiration of his term, McClure shall give him one full suit of good clothes and one hundred dollars in cash, or a horse & saddle to that value.

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Will & Administrations

22   SAMUEL TARRANT

Will Book A. Page 14
Sale of the Estate of Samuel Tarrant, deceased
Buyers were:
James Taylor - bell & collar $1.00; trunk $1.10
Barkley William Pollock - one sorrel mare $30.00
James Patton - hoe $1.35
George Neville - hoe & one bed cord $2.31; drawing knife $1.00
Joseph B. Neville - axe & one bell $2.75; pair of chains & traces $3.00
Samuel Earl - tea canister $1.00; one set of plow irons $13.00
Henry Small - one two year old heifer $9.00
John Neville - saddle $6.00; bay horse $40.00
Nancy Tarrant - bed & furniture $3.25; dish, six plates,
two small basins $4.10;
set of horse shoes and one Testament $1.00;
one mare & bell $25.50
Robert Prince - bed & furniture $50.00; six knives & forks,
six tin cups $2.60; pot & hooks, one pair of cards $4.55;
cow & yearling $19.00; one brown horse #30.25
Christopher Owens - dish & six plates $6.75; flat iron $2.50
Ephraim Reese - basin, dish, oven & hooks $9.95; sifter $.05;
one pepper box & nutmeg grater $.30
Cornelius Anderson - six spoons & one basin $2.00
Michael Dillingham - one tin pan, frying pan $3.30;
rifle gun, razor $12.35;
Bible and one cow yearling & bell $24.35; bridle $1.00

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Will & Administrations

23   JAMES HOUSE

Will Book A. Page 17
Sale of the Estate of James House, deceased
Buyers were:
Rachel House - bed & furniture $21.00; bed & furniture $18.00;
trunk $2.00; bay mare $410.00; axe $1.00; cow & yearling $12.00;
hoe & two tin jacks $.64 ½; two table cloths, two towels,
pillow case $.25; churn & butter tub $.16;
hunting saddle & bridle $.25; tub, pegging & can $.75;
pot & Dutch oven $2.00; spider & shotgun $5.50;
piece of sole leather, tow padlocks $1.12 ½; smoothing irons $1.00;
set of tea, four knives & forks $1.10; dish, five plates, basin $.50;
two chairs, wool hat, raccoon hat $1.27.
Robert Prince - frow & iron wedge $6.80; shotgun,
pair of horse shoes $6.68; one old saddle & bridle $.30
James Taylor - two wagon bridles, side of leather $4.00; one bell & collar $.25
Lawrence House - bay mare with one eye$38.00; pair of saddle bags $2.75;
pair of horse shoes $.30
Caleb Lindsey - roan horse $27.00
William Reasons - sorrel horse & padlock $11.35
Buckner Killebrew - pair of horse shoes, curry comb #1.75;
set of old iron $.30.
Thomas Lainer - pair of horse shoes, currycomb $1.75; set of old iron $.30
Henry Williams - bell & collar $2.50
Bryant Whitfield - two pair hears; wagon & hind gear $75.50
Needham Whitfield - ax & shoemaker tools $4.25
David Bealer - saddle $10.00
Ruben Pollard - log chain $11.00
John Keathley - two hoes #2.60
Henry Small - one plow mold, bottle with Laudanum $2.75
James Patton - handsaw & bell $5.90
Joseph B. Neville - two augers, drawing knife $1.80; bay mare & bell $16.00
Total amount received from sale of the Estate was $299.68

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From: Montgomery County, Tennessee Will & Administrations

24   BARKLEY WILLIAM POLLOCK

Will Book A. Page 30
Bill of sale from Barkley William Pollock to Christopher Owens
I, Barkley William Pollock of Montgomery county, Tennessee, have sold to Christopher Owens, one black or brown mare about nine or ten years old with a colt the mare has new suckling. Likewise, another black mare and colt, the mare three years old this last spring, the oldest mare branded T.S. for Thomas Starks of Robertson County, Tennessee, who raised the mare, this 23rd day of October 1798
Test:
M. Phillips

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

25   SEVEN-MILE FERRY

March 16,1907---The Supreme Court delivered opinions in a number of cases this morning among which was the following from Montgomery County.

W.T. RICHARDSON vs. C.B. LYLE

Montgomery County affirmed. The suit involved the ownership of the Seven-Mile Ferry. The county bought the ferry for $3500 and each of the litigants claims the amount as owner of the ferry. Richardson owns the land on one bank and Lyle on the other.
Some years ago, Gholson and Lyle bought the Seven-Mile ferry and later sold it to the county for $3500. The Richardson brothers entered suit against Mr. Lyle and the Chancery Court decided against them. The case was then appealed and today the Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the lower court in Mr. Lyle’s favor.

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From: The Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

26   SALEM

January 18,1861---By order of the County Court of Montgomery County, Tennessee made at the January term of 1861, I will, on the 18th February next, sell to the highest bidder at the late residence of Mrs. Jane Ramey in Montgomery County the following Negroes: A Negro woman named Emily with three children very likely---on a credit of 12 months with interest form date with two good securities.
W.E. Newell

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From: The Weekly Chronicle

27   COMMISSIONERS SALE OF LAND

C.C. WALL et als vs. WILLIAM WALL et als


In obedience to a decree of the county court of Montgomery County made in the above cause at the January Term, 1876, I will offer for sale to the highest bidder, at the Court House in Clarksville on Saturday January 29,1876 tracts of land situated in District 19 of Montgomery County, Tennessee, one containing 32 1/2 acres, bounded on the Northwest by P.H. Williamson, East by Jesse Jackson, North by C.C. Wall belonging to the estate of Susan Wall, deceased. This tract will be divided into two or more tracts, a plat of which can be seen at this office and will be sold to suit purchasers.
Terms: 1/3 cash, credit of 1 and 2 years. Notes with good security required, bearing interest form date, and a lien retained until all the purchase money is paid.
Peter O’Neal, Clerk & Com’r.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

28   JUDGE CHARLES W. TYLER

March 22,1881---In the House, 10th instant, Mr. Rhodes, of Montgomery, offered a resolution to appoint a committee of three to prepare charges and specification against Judge Charles W. Tyler. It was accompanied by the following memorial:
Clarksville, Tennessee     March 16,1881
to the House of Representatives of the General Assembly of Tennessee
The undersigned respectfully represent to your honorable body that Charles W. Tyler, County and Criminal Judge of Montgomery County, is guilty of crimes and misdemeanors which render him wholly unworthy of the office, in this:
(1) Habitual neglect of duty as a public officer
(2) Drunkenness in office
(3) Drunkenness in off ice, materially interfering
with the discharge of his public duties
(4) Misapplication of all the revenue of the county
to purposes not authorized by law
(5) Misappropriation of the county funds
(6) Attempted assassination
We respectively pray your honorable body to take such steps as may satisfy you of the probable truth of the charges to the end that order may be taken for his due impeachment as provided by the Constitution and Laws of the State.
C.W. Beaumont, John S. Neblett, S.F. Beaumont, Henry Frech, John J. West, A. Howell, R. Tompkins, W.H. Crouch, H.C. Merrit, J.J. Crusman, G.H. Wilson, D. Kincannon, Thomas L. Yancy, B.W. Macrae, F.G. Irwin, and R.H. Williams.
On the 17th, Mr. Bagewell read the following letter form Judge Tyler:

Dr. Sir:
On yesterday, as I am informed, Representative Rhodes introduced into the House of which you are a member, a resolution which provides for the appointment of a committee to investigate charges then and there made, with a view to my impeachment. Will you do me the kindness to call up the resolution at your earliest opportunity, and ask that the same be adopted and the committee be appointed charged with the full investigation of said charges. By so doing you will greatly oblige.
Yours Respectfully,
Charles W. Tyler

The rules were then suspended and the resolution was adopted, and the letter of Judge Tyler was ordered to be spread upon the minutes.
The speaker announced the appointment of the following committee: Messrs: Rhodes, Jones, Cochran, Higgins, Cassells, Harrison, and Wilson. Mr. Rhodes asked to be excused from serving upon the committee, which was granted. Mr. Houston was appointed.
They met in Room #3 at noon today and adjourned until Monday.
They will ask the House to grant them the privilege of sending for persons and papers.

March 25,1881---James H. Holly, Sergeant at Arms for the special committee appointed to investigate certain charges against Judge Charles W. Tyler of Montgomery County, returned from Clarksville this morning, accompanied by about 15 witnesses who have been summoned to appear before the committee. The committee will meet in Judge H.H. Harrison’s office on Cedar St. tonight at 7:30 when the examination of witnesses will be proceeded with.
The following is a list of witnesses that has been summoned; H.C. Merritt, R.H. Burney, John S. Neblett, E.C. Campbell, Lewis Munford, R.D. Moseley, A. Howell, A.H. Munford, H.H. Lurton, B.H. Owen, John Pettus, G.H. Slaughter, R.D. Read, C.W. Bailey, C.E.L. McCauley, Ed Munford, C.H. Bailey, Henry Smith, C.G. Smith, John J. West, Clay Stacker, James E. Rice, C.D. Bailey, G.R. Harris, William Warfield, S. Kellogg and Duncan Marr.

Courier-Journal
The testimony did not show anything, except that the defendant was not on hand to attend to his duties as county Judge. The witnesses were of the opinion that he was under the influence of whiskey, but not incapacitated to attend business. He was absent several weeks once, when it was reported that he was drunk. When he came back, he appeared perfectly sober and at himself. Rumors as to his conduct were fearful.
Judge Tyler Himself, was present and examined the witnesses, and proved that they knew nothing positive as to any of the charges.
Mr. Bailey and Mr. Moseley, officials of Montgomery County, testified as above.
Mr. Howell, a banker in Clarksville, testified that in his opinion he had not seen Tyler under the influence of whiskey in the last two years. In examining his account with the bank, he found Tyler had given a check to his nephew for $25 for clerical work. He drew $467 form the railroad fund in 1879.
Mr. Slaughter said he had seen Tyler several times under the influence of whiskey, saw the check in favor of E.J. Munford.
The balance of the testimony amounted to little, being in reference to Tyler’s duties as financial agent of the county.
Col. Yancy represents the prosecutor and Judge Miliken the defense, both of Clarksville.

March 29,1881---C.W. Tyler comes by his attorneys and defends by general denial that he’s not guilty thereof, defendant respectfully asks leave to make the following general statement, that all of said charges now at issue are a repetition of charges made against him in two successive canvasses in Montgomery County for the office of Criminal and County Judge; that he met and disposed of the same before the people, who at the ballot-box decided in his favor; that then as now his defense consisted in facts admitted by all fair-minded men, public law records, and evidence, constituting a part of the public history of said county. But ready now as then to meet said charges, he here proceeds to reply to each and every one of said specifications.
Louisville Commercial---The Tyler investigation was continued this evening and the impression is that it is not going to amount to anything.
The American---Has the following: committee will report tomorrow morning that the testimony was insufficient to warrant the present articles of impeachment against that gentleman.

April 5,1881---In the house yesterday morning, Mr. Houston reported to the general assembly that there was insufficient evidence to warrant articles of impeachment and that the committee was closed and present cost of the investigation by the committee.
Legislature Notes---It is thought that the bill to abolish the office of County and Criminal Judge of Montgomery County will not be reached this session.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

29   COUNTY COURT

April 10,1880---An amount was appropriated by the County Court to pay the expense to Washington of Tim Conway, insane, formerly of the U.S. Army, for the purpose of placing him in the National Asylum, and B.W. Herring, Esquire, was appointed to take charge of him on his journey thither.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

30   LIBERTY BONDS

April 22,1918---T.E. McReynolds, Councilor to District 17 for the sale of Liberty Bonds, accompanied by Dr. Charles E. Diehl, went to Salem Methodist Church in that district Sunday, where Dr. Diehl delivered a splendid address, following which subscriptions amounting to $2150 were made. Mr. McReynolds is enthusiastic over the prospect in District 17 and states that he is expecting that section to go over the top without difficulty.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

31   PUBLIC COURT

June 1,1853---One of the b’boys engaged with laudable energy in stirring up a mess at the circus, where brought before Squire Ward, and had the pleasure of contributing $2 for the benefit of the State, according to the statute in such case made and provided.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

32   DISTRICT 13

July 28,1933--The criminal court returned a verdict of guilty against Clarence Byard, District 13 resident, giving him a sentence of eleven months and twenty-nine days in the workhouse and a fine of $100.00. Byard was found guilty of shooting Gracey Cotton with intent to kill. The testimony was conflicting in a number of details. Several of the witnesses admitted that they had been arrested and served sentences.
Witnesses for Cotton said that he did not appear to be drunk when seen after the shooting. Cotton said that he bought whiskey from Byard that afternoon and had gone back to get more whiskey when the shooting occurred. He claimed that he met Byard some distance at the back of the station and asked for whiskey. Byard refused, and according to Cotton's testimony, he called him a liar and at that, Byard began firing at him.
Witnesses for Byard said that someone came to the back door of the Brodie Filling Station located at the intersection of 48 and old 13 and knocked violently on the door. Byard rushed to the door with his pistol and as he opened the door, someone struck at him with a large stick. Byard then struck at the man with his pistol, his gun striking the man, he stated. Then as soon as he could he fired three times at the man, who fled without making any noise except the sound made while running.
Byard said that he did not know that he had hit anyone until the next day. Byard pleaded self-defense of his property.

See article #10 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

33   PALMYRA

April 24,1933--Submitting a plea of guilty, John Robert Davenport, about 25, was sentenced to life imprisonment by the criminal court jury today for the murder of Kleeman Hughes, aged 40, paralytic farmer of near Palmyra. Davenport gave three reasons why he "pulled this job." He had gathered ideas of high living, wanted an automobile, and wanted to get married. The defendant told the officers that he walked the railroad from Clarksville to Corbandale on January 15th of this year, the day he committed the crime. He then walked across a field where he cut the sassafras stick with which he struck Hughes. The stick, about 3 1/2 feet long and rough, was exhibited in court this morning. When he arrived at Hughes' farm, he met a Negro who engaged him in conversation. Then he went to the gate to wait for Hughes. It was about 8 o'clock Sunday night when Hughes returning home from church arrived. He first struck him with the intention of knocking Hughes unconscious so that he could rob him, he stated. He said that Hughes "hollered" and he struck him with more force the second time but did not intend to kill him.
Then, he went through Hughes pockets and removed $38.00, which he carried with him. Davenport went to Nashville and bought a car for $25.00. This car was given to Mr. Hughes' family by the officers. The court tried the case in less than two hours and the jury reached a decision of life imprisonment in about ten minutes.

See article #11 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

34   DISTRICT 19

July 30,1923--Andrew Pulley and William Vaughn were held to the state on charges of assault and battery with intent to commit murder at the preliminary hearing at Sailor's Rest before G.W. Dinsmore and Marable McFall, Justices of the Peace. A coincidence in connection with the trial was the arrest of the prosecutor Vaughn on a warrant sworn out at the outset of the trial by Pulley, who charged Vaughn with assaulting him with a rock which he said caused him to cut Vaughn.
Charges against Frank Powell were dismissed.

See article #12 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

35   SOUTHSIDE

November 22, 1937--A $5 fine and a reprimand was administered Saturday afternoon by General Sessions Judge Ridley Goodpasture to Miss Dollie Harvey, 34-year-old resident of Southside Community, who was charged with whipping her mother, Mrs. Will Harvey, about 70. The daughter said she resented an insinuation by her mother that she had "stolen" articles which were misplaced during laundering. The other said her daughter whipped her with some buckberry bushes and then struck her on the arm with an iron poker.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

36   HACKBERRY

January 22,1932--Tom Mixon, District 18 farmer, was held to the state under a $250 bond by W.B. Corlew, Justice of Peace, this morning on a charge of possession and transporting of a quart and a pint of liquor. Mixon’s arrest resulted from a raid on the home of Teamont Eads, also of District 18, Tuesday by Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont and Deputy Sheriff Tom Huggins.
A small still was discovered in the Eads home with a quart of liquor. Eads was arrested and pleaded guilty Thursday before Magistrate Corlew and was held to the state under bonds of $250 each for possession of liquor and owning and operating a still.


Mixon was implicated by Eades, who alleged that Mixon had been aiding him in the manufacture of the liquor. A warrant was served for the arrest of Mixon then and this morning he pled guilty to the charges.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

37   LONE OAK

September 9,1930--Ruling that the proof introduced by the state warranted his holding the defendant for further investigation and that the plea of defense counsel for bail was insufficient for him to act on, W.B. Corlew, Twelfth District Justice of Peace, this afternoon bound the charge of first degree murder against Joe Castleberry, Lone Oak Blacksmith, over to the grand jury and remanded him to jail without bond. “I will leave the decision as to bail to County Judge John Talley Cunningham” said the magistrate. (NOTE: Castleberry was later granted liberty under a $3,000 bond)

October 9,1931--With a jury empanelled at 10:45 a.m. the trial of Joe Castleberry got under way at 11:00 a.m. today.
The white-haired defendant pleaded not guilty to the indictment read by Attorney General Matt G. Lyle.
The first witness to take the stand was Mr. A.L. Akin, who said he is the father of sixteen children. Douglas Akin, he said, was married and the father of one child. The witness was chiefly used to establish the fact that Douglas Akin was slain and that the homicide occurred at Lone Oak in Montgomery County.
The second witness was Lynwood Tarpley. Mr. Tarpley, undertaker, said he sealed four wounds, three in the back and one in the right side.
The twelve men who are trying Castleberrry are: F.M. Tanner, C.M. Blanks, Hugh Holt, J.B. Tucker, A.L. Stanley, J.C. Loggins, Hicks Polk, Lonnie Hogue, H.G. Heflin, J.L. Holt, E.S. Nicholson, and Floyd Swift.

October 20,1931-- Eight witnesses Monday afternoon testified they saw Joe Castleberry, Lone Oak blacksmith, shoot Douglas Akin on the morning of September 5,1930, and the number of shots fired varied from three to six. All said Akin was standing in the county road leading by Castleberry’s shop when Castleberry came out of the shop and began firing.

October 23,1931--Joe Castleberry was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to ten years imprisonment for the shooting to death of Douglas Akin. It was understood that the jury reached a verdict easily. Not a single juror was for first degree murder and the electric chair and not a single one was for acquittal.

December 18,1931--Joe Castleberry, on December 7, entered the state prison at Nashville voluntarily to begin his sentence. He took his own commitment prayers, preferring not to make an appeal and to enter the prison with out being escorted by transportation officers.

See article #37 in Keeping the Peace


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From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck's Journal)

38   HACKBERRY

April 26,1889--The Sanders case was called yesterday. Both sides announced ready. Eleven jurors were enlisted and the jury will be completed and testimony begun this morning. A large crowd from “the Goldenhorn” was in town today for the trial.
(The results of the trial were not listed in the paper. The girlfriend got married before the trial ever started. The children were named Norman and Morris. Morris was born May 30,1887. Norman ended up in Texas and Morris in Indiana. Robert Finney later married Rosa Lee Milam and had a daughter born on June 25,1891, about 26 months after the trial.

From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

January 29, 1891---The Criminal Court is moving along with the docket at a moderate gait and several cases were disposed of yesterday. The case of The State against Finney Sanders, charged with the murder of his wife, was called and a nolle prosse entered.
Sanders, it will be remembered, has been tried on this charge twice in the Criminal Court here and each trial resulted in a hung jury. It was evident to the Judge and Attorney General that the defendant could never be convicted, hence the action.

See article #42 in Keeping the Peace


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From: The Clarksville Star

39   LOUISE

December 24,1926--Ed York, 40, a cord wood cutter of the Louise community, was dismissed on a charge of incest by J.R. Harper, Justice of the Peace, Monday afternoon following the plea of not guilty entered by both York and his 19-year-old daughter, Viola. Viola was taken by force from the shanty near Louise owned jointly by J.H. "Carver" Marcum and Leslie Scott with whom he, Viola, and his 7-year-old daughter were spending the night last Tuesday.
The father and daughter both admitted that they confessed to be guilty of the charges on the night of the mob's visit but said it was because their lives were endangered and they knew of no other course to pursue. The men were masked and each carried a gun, they testified. York said he was dragged and kicked for a distance of some hundred yards from the shanty where he was whipped. He said members of the mob accused him of being a spy.
The daughter appeared highly indignant at the outrage committed against her father and declared he had treated her in a gentlemanly manner in every respect.
Scott and Marcum both told the court they had noticed no improper relations between the two on the afternoon and evening when they were at their home. Both testified that the father and the younger daughter slept with their heads in one direction and the older daughter was lying in the opposite direction.
Two other witnesses, Sam Byard and Ivy Hollis, with whom the father and daughter had also visited, corroborated the other witnesses' statements claiming they had seen nothing improper in the relationship between father and daughter.

See article #45 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

40   LONE OAK

October 12,1935--Owen and James Proctor, brothers of the Lone Oak community, were bound over to the grand jury under bonds of $250 each this morning when given a preliminary hearing before Magistrate John R. Dickson on charges of disorderly conduct.
Both of the men were charged with disorderly conduct and Owen was accused of the theft of $5 from Roscoe Baggett, which is alleged to have occurred during the making of change Saturday night at Baggett’s Lunch Stand at Lone Oak.
Baggett testified that Proctor took $5 of his money when he reached into the cash drawer without being invited. Proctor wanted change and Baggett would not give it to him.

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From: The Leaf Chronicle

41   DISTRICT 22

January 19,1906--G.W. Maxey, a young white man from the 22nd District, was placed in jail yesterday. The circumstances surrounding Maxey’s incarceration are unusual. At the last term of Criminal Court, he was convicted of carrying brass knucks and fined. The fine was secured by two gentlemen whom Maxey was working for and everything went along smoothly until Maxey married several days ago.
Maxey, it is said, left the employ of the two men who secured his fine and the latter gave him up. He was arrested and will now have to secure other bondsmen or work out his fine.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

42   PALMYRA

March 22,1918--The trial of Jesse T. Bryant for the murder of Henry Baggett on October 29,1915 was begun in Criminal Court yesterday. Mrs. Bateman, formerly Mrs. Henry Baggett was the first witness for the State.
Her evidence on direct examination was in substance as follows:
She stated that she lived with her husband on a place near that upon which Mr. Bryant lived. Mr. Bryant, she said, came by where she was with his gun and made improper proposals to her, which she rejected until he “told me I had to submit, which I did”. She stated her husband was told of the affair and he told her to take the pistol and if Bryant again bothered me to use the gun on him.
The day of the killing, I went to where my husband was chopping wood near the Bryant home. I went out to where he was and after being there a short time I went down to the Bryant home with the pistol in my bosom. While nursing my child he saw the pistol I had and asked me to give it to him, which I did, as he was constable and I thought he had the right to demand it. While Mrs. Bryant and I were talking, Mr. Bryant sat in the door where he could see my husband and without hearing a word spoken, I heard two shots only, and when I run out I saw my husband lying on the ground bleeding. After I went out, I heard Mr. Bryant say that when trouble came up between him and Baggett a year or two before that, if ever he had to do anything of this sort he would make a finish of it.
She also stated that she went to the home of Bryant with the pistol, which he saw she had for the purpose of killing him, as her husband had told her if she did not kill Bryant that he would and then kill her.

March 23,1918--Jesse T. Bryant, who is being tried in the Criminal Court for the murder of Henry Baggett on October 29,1915, in the 19th District near Palmyra, went on the witness stand in his own behalf at 3:15 yesterday afternoon following a short recess after the conclusion of the State’s testimony.
On direct examination, Bryant said that he was 56 years old and that for the past two years had lived in Clarksville and was now employed by the Dunlop Milling Company as a carpenter. He was born in Dickson County and moved to Montgomery County in 1869. Since that time he had been employed by the Palmyra Lime Works at various intervals and when not working there had farmed. He had served two terms as constable of the 19th District and was holding said office at the time of the homicide in 1915. Baggett and he were boys together, and three or four years before the killing, they had some trouble over the sale of a horse to Baggett by Bryant, and that since that time they had never borne a pleasant feeling for each other but that friendly relations had been maintained between the two families.
Bryant says that there were illicit relations between himself and Mrs. Baggett about two months prior to the killing. Mrs. Baggett, he said, came to his house one Monday afternoon in August during Mrs. Bryant’s absence. Bryant says he was lying in the yard on a pallet under a shade tree, and that Mrs. Baggett, after being told that Mrs. Bryant was not at home, sat down on the ground near Bryant. During the conversation, Bryant says that Mrs. Baggett told him that she had seen “her fellow” at church the night before and that he was coming to see her the following Wednesday.
Bryant says he told her if she was going to act that way with the other fellow she had just as well do it with him. She agreed, he said, and when asked “when and where”, she replied “most any time I can get rid of Old Henry”, referring to her husband.
The next morning, Bryant told the jury, he was on the road near the Baggett home when he saw Mrs. Baggett approaching. He squatted down beside the road and when the woman approached, she sat down between his knees. Bryant testified that he told the woman it would not do for them to be seen in that position and suggested that they go into the woods. The woman agreed.

March 23 1918--A few days before the killing, Bryant said he met Mr. and Mrs. Baggett on the road and when near him, the woman asked Baggett for his pocket knife, which he forced her to take from his pocket. The woman then went home and Baggett called Bryant’s attention to a nearby tree which he said he thought contained bees and requested Bryant to go with him to examine the tree. Bryant stated that his suspicion was aroused by that request, but started toward the tree followed by Baggett. Turning around suddenly, Bryant said Baggett was facing him and had his hand in his hip pocket. Bryant says his suspicion had become so thoroughly aroused then that he left Baggett and went to his own home.
The defendant testified that on the day of the killing, October 29,1915, he went to Palmyra in the morning and upon returning home about 12:30, his wife told him that Mrs. Baggett had been there twice that morning and stated that she had come to kill Bryant. Bryant says that shortly after he had finished dinner and was sitting on the porch, he saw Mrs. Baggett coming toward the house and that Baggett was cutting wood near a spring a short distance from the house, as he had done frequently before. Mrs. Baggett approached the house and told Bryant to get in the house because her husband was coming to kill him. Bryant, together with the woman, went into the house and were sitting by the open door when the woman told him that she had a pistol and Bryant told her that she had better give him the pistol, but she refused to do it. About that time, Bryant says he looked out of the door and saw Baggett approaching the house about 30 yards away. Bryant says he stepped to the porch and told Baggett to stop but he did not heed the warning. When in about thirty feet of the porch, Bryant says he pulled out his pistol and fired at Baggett, who did not stop. In a moment he fired again and Baggett acted as though he had been hit but did not stop. The third shot struck him in the forehead and he fell on his left side and lived only about five minutes. Bryant says that Mrs. Baggett then laid her pistol on the table and told him to take it.
Bryant then telephoned Esquire B.J. Corban, who came to the scene and held an inquest.

March 27,1918--In the Criminal Court yesterday afternoon, the jury returned a verdict of murder in the second degree against J.T. Bryant whose trial for the murder of Henry Baggett on October 29,1915, has been in progress since the middle of last week. The punishment is not less that ten or more than twenty years in the State penitentiary.
A motion for a new trial was immediately entered by the council for the defense and Bryant was released pending further developments on his original bond.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

43   BOOTLEGGING

January 18,1930--Although he entered a plea of not guilty to possessing liquor, Melton Neblett, Southside resident, was held to the state this morning by W.B. Corlew, Justice of the Peace, under a $500 bond and was fined $50 by City Judge Callis Tate. Neblett was arrested on Commerce Street Wednesday when Patrolmen Jerry Lee and J.W. Baggett detected liquor bottles protruding from his pockets. A search of his clothing revealed seven half-pint bottles, the officers stated.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

44   MARION

December 1,1928---Some form of punishment, which is to be pronounced on December 8, will be administered to Alfred Ferrell, 15-year-old student at Marion School, for striking and painfully injuring his teacher, Miss Nannie Swift on Wednesday. Judge John Talley Cunningham in County Juvenile Court Friday afternoon, found Ferrell guilty of assault and battery.
The trial was unique and spectacular, being the first of its kind to come before Judge John Talley Cunningham. A large number of schoolteachers attended. The boy was represented by his father and Collier Tate, local attorney.
Miss Swift, according to a number of witnesses, had slapped Ferrell when he "gave her back talk" when she corrected him for monopolizing the water cooler at the school. The boy seized a tobacco stick with a nail driven through the end of it and struck Miss Swift across the face. She sustained a severe and exceedingly painful wound.
Before Mr. Tate finished his argument of the case, Judge John Talley Cunningham invited him to sit down, then pronouncing the boy guilty.

December 6,1928--Alfred Ferrell, youth who has been tried before Juvenile Judge John Talley Cunningham on a charge of assault and battery upon his school teacher and who is to receive his punishment next Saturday, was a student at Marion School. Ferrell was convicted of striking his teacher with a tobacco stick after she had corrected him for disobedience and Judge John Talley Cunningham withheld punishment until December 8.

December 8,1928--A suspended sentence of two years in the reform school upon the grounds that his father whip him in the presence of Supt. A.W. Jobe was this morning given Alfred Ferrell, student of Marion School who some two weeks ago struck his teacher, Miss Nannie Swift in the face after being reprimanded. The youth’s father escorted him to Mr. Jobe’s office after Judge John Talley Cunningham had passed sentence upon him and flayed him soundly with a strap. Mr. Jobe said he was whipped good and upon making his report to Judge John Talley Cunningham the youth was dismissed.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

45   PALMYRA

October 14,1929--The murder trial of J. Robinson Williams, Palmyra farmer, indicted for the slaying on August 8 of Pugh Jackson, moved swiftly in Montgomery County Criminal Court today and this afternoon Williams took the stand in his own behalf. The state rested its case about 2:00 and by 3:10 the defendant had been dismissed from the witness stand after being cross-examined by General Matt G. Lyle. Miss Fannie Williams, his daughter, about whom the father says he slew Jackson, was testifying for her father at 3:15 this afternoon.
The defense may finish this afternoon and the case will probably be given the jury early tomorrow morning. Collier Goodlett is representing Williams.
The state has used only four witnesses: Frank Jackson, Palmyra, brother of the dead man; J.H. Wickham; Wallace Dinsmore; and Joe Ellis.

October 16,1929--J. Robinson Williams, 54 year old Palmyra farmer, was this morning sentenced to two years in the state penitentiary for the fatal shooting on August 8 of Pugh Jackson on a charge of voluntary manslaughter.
Williams' counsel entered a motion for a new trial which will be argued before Judge John Talley Cunningham Saturday morning.
The jury received the case about 1:30 PM Tuesday and was unable to arrive at a verdict that afternoon. This morning the verdict was given by W.R. Fain, foreman. First ballot was six for acquittal and six for conviction.
Williams contended that he shot Jackson because he had conducted an illicit love affair with his 26 year old daughter, Miss Fannie Williams, who on the witness stand Tuesday afternoon, said that Jackson was the father of her illegitimate child. She admitted that she and Jackson had been intimate and that these relations were carried on two or three times a week for some time. She said Jackson was the father of her illegitimate child, who has been playing about the courtroom during the two days of the case.

October 19,1929--Williams withdraws his motion for a new trial and will go to the pen on Monday.

See article #73 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

46   LONE OAK

November 7,1931--Circuit Judge Morton, Friday afternoon, overruled a motion for a new trial made by W.N. Leech, Charlotte counsel for Sandy Harris, Lone Oak Postmaster and station agent, as a result of a jury’s verdict Wednesday afternoon which gave Mr. Harris a judgment of $300 for damages done his place in the re-routing of State Highway 48.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

47   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

April 24,1930--Governor Henry Horton today pardoned Will Baggett, 57, who was convicted in Montgomery County in 1919 of killing his stepdaughter and sentenced to the penitentiary for life.
The pardon papers set out that Baggett killed his step-daughter, Lillian McCarver, when he shot at her escort. He was said to have objected to the attentions of the man to Miss McCarver.
Baggett had served eleven years of the time and it was pointed out that until two months ago, he had not lost a day’s work in the stove foundry in the last ten years. For the past year he has been in poor health.
The petition for a pardon was filed by a number of citizens of Montgomery County and the clemency was recommended by the advisory board of pardons.

See article #109 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

48   LOUISE

March 10,1921--The first hearing in the case of J.A. Harvey vs. the L&N Railroad in which the plaintiff seeks $2,500 damages for personal injuries and the destruction of his wagon, which it is alleged was struck by the Mineral train at the Louise Crossing in November 4,1916, was begun in Circuit Court this morning.
The jury, which was selected Wednesday afternoon at the conclusion of the Beard suit, is composed of E.A. Broadbent, Ed Rittenberry, Charles Shelton, R.E. Miller, Ike Powers, Bill Waller, Jabe Steppe, T.H. Mills, Jake Cusham, G.H. Reasons, J.G. Blackard and R.S. Boyd.
The plaintiff is represented by H.N. Leech and C.B. Lyle. The defendant is represented by M. Savage and John S. Daniel.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

49   DISTRICT 16

April 2,1921--A verdict of guilty of simple assault was returned in Criminal Court this morning against R.F. Parker, District 16 farmer, whose trial on a charge of felonious assault began Friday morning. The case went to the jury late Friday afternoon, but considerable difficulty was found in reaching a verdict, which resulted in a compromise of the indictment.
Judge John Talley Cunningham assessed a fine of $50 and costs, but a motion for a new trial was filed by the defendant's counsel, Hon. Austin Peay.
That the rifle accidentally discharged as he crawled through the fence, the bullet entered the ground near his feet, and that he had no intention of shooting it at Howard Batson the prosecutor, was the defense offered by Parker.
Batson and Parker, neighbors, it seems, had had words regarding the pasturing of Parker’s cow on Batson’s rye patch, which Parker had sown for Ewing Pursell who sold the farm to Batson. As compensation for sowing the rye, Pursell had agreed to furnish Parker pasturage for his cow, to which Batson objected when he became the owner of the place.
It seems that Batson, though apprised of the agreement between Pursell and Parker, had turned Parker’s cow off the rye patch on one or more occasions. Parker said that he was going over to see Batson about the proposition and took his rifle along, but that he made no effort to shoot Batson and it was shown that the man had had no words on that morning. Batson was nearby when the rifle was discharged and believed that the shot was intended for him.
It was also shown that Parker, M.M. Dunn, and Andrew Collins went to the scene of the alleged shooting some time after it had occurred and succeeded in digging up a rifle bullet, which Parker said he had fired into the ground.
Parker was represented by Hon. Austin Peay. Attorney General Matt G. Lyle was assisted in the prosecution by John S. Daniel of the firm of Savage, Daniel, and Savage.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

50   SOUTHSIDE

October 15,1904--Thomas Walton and Bradley Key, colored, residents of District 16, were tried before Squire Baxter Watkins and fined $10 and $2.50 respectively for assault. The two engaged in a quarrel over a woman and Walton, it is said, took a shot at Key with a double barrel shotgun. Walton’s aim was bad and Key was not hurt.

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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

51   SOUTHSIDE

January 9,1895--Bill Durham, a free man. A unanimous verdict of not guilty was rendered. The judge ordered the sheriff to take the prisoner Bill Durham out of the courthouse and set him at liberty and for the first time since last September, Durham breathed the air of heaven, a free man.
So ends the case, which from its peculiar circumstances has attracted great interest from all parts of the county. It is understood that the jury reached their verdict on the first ballot.

See article #163 in Keeping the Peace


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From: The Progress Democrat

52   FINED

February 25,1891--S.P. Jones, a citizen of the south side, was fined $4 and cost by City Recorder Bailey this morning for being drunk. Jones was arrested last evening by Officer Hinely.

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From: The Chronicle

53   JURY VERDICT

February 26,1876---In the case of Jasper Butler, which was tried last week, the jury rendered a verdict of murder in the second degree and fixed his time in the penitentiary at twenty years.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

54   HOG CASE

September 20,1889--The jury in the celebrated hog case, in which W. Hoge Anderson was plaintiff, and eleven of his neighbors were defendants, gave the plaintiff $.01 damages, and the cost to the defendants will be about $500.00. The defendants were allowed to keep the pet pigs.

See article #212 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

55   LONE OAK

November 5,1931---A Montgomery County Circuit Jury late yesterday afternoon fixed the amount of damage done on the farm of Sandy Harris of Lone Oak community in District 18 in the rerouting of State Highway 48 at $300. Both Harris and Montgomery County were appealing from a $550 appraisal by a jury of view. The County offered Mr. Harris $300 rather than enter into a sit. Mr. Harris contended that in rerouting the road, it was constructed in the rear of his home and he had no outlet to it. His house fronted the old road. The jury, in announcing the judgment, specified the actual land condemned in constructing the road as being worth $50 and estimated the other incidental damages in inconvenience and the like at $250. No appeal was filed yesterday afternoon by either side.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

56   CLARKSVILLE

January 17,1880--J.E. Moseley, Sheriff, carried on Monday last the following prisoners, all colored, to Nashville, to be tried by the supreme Court, which is in session at that place:
Pete Williams
Henry Bowman
Bob Wheeler
George Bennett
William Carneal
Allen Gupton.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

57   HILLTOP

June 16,1933---Preliminary hearing is set before W.B. Corlew, Justice of the Peace, for Clarence Byard, District 13 resident, charged with the assault and battery with a revolver on Gracey Cotton, for Tuesday morning at 10:00.
Cotton told officers that Byard shot him as a result of an altercation at Brodie's Filling Station on Old 13 and 48, Sunday night. The quarrel is said to have occurred over some liquor. Cotton is recovering satisfactorily from the would. He was shot in the cheek by a .22 bullet and another bullet grazed the side of his head.

June 21,1933---Clarence Byard, District 13 resident, was placed under a $25 bond and held to the Grand Jury on a charge of assault and battery with a revolver in a preliminary hearing before Squire W.B. Corlew Tuesday.

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From: Tennessee Watchman

58   CLARKSVILLE

June 1,1821--On Thursday the 24th a special court was held in this place for the trial of two slaves, the property of Mr. William Sullivan of this county, charged with having occasioned the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Crockett, by poison. The court and jury were occupied until about 11:00 on Their Night, with the examination of the case of Travis, when, for the want of sufficient proof, he was acquitted.
On the succeeding day came on the trial of the other slave, Kinchen, the son of Travis; and after a patient and full investigation of the case he was found guilty. We learn that the sentence of death pronounced on him by the court, is to be carried into execution, on Friday next, the 8th inst.

See Death Notices for Obituary.


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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

59   CLARKSVILLE

February 25,1890--Criminal Court is in session this week. Yesterday Joe Foeman, who struck Officer Stafford on Christmas Day, was tried for assault and battery with intent to kill. The jury found him guilty and fixed his term at five years in the penitentiary. Last evening the court was engaged with the case of Tom Simons for cutting Will Peyton; col., in Gallow Hollow last fall.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

60   MURDER TRIAL

February 19,1917---After nearly 68 hours of deliberation, the jury in the trial of Charley Baggett for the murder of Dr. Wickham at Hackberry was discharged this morning at 10:00 by Judge Tyler of the Criminal Court without having arrived at a verdict. The vote stood 8 for acquittal and 4 for conviction.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

61   TRIAL OF WILL HAYES

April 20,1909---Honorable Michael Savage was elected special judge of the Criminal Court this morning by the local bar to reside during the absence of Judge Tyler, who is in Nashville.
This afternoon, the murder case of State vs. Will Hayes will be called. The defendant is charged with the murder of Wesley Schmittou in District 22. There are a number of witnesses in the case and it will require several days to try it.
Court reconvened this afternoon at 1:30, when the murder case was called. Both sides announced ready and the selection of a jury began.

April 21,1909---After considerable delay, a jury was secured shortly before noon today in the Will Hayes Murder case.
Seventy talesmen were summoned and the challenges were nearly exhausted by both State and defense, the former having one and the later three when the last juror was accepted. The following is the jury; J.R. Maveety, S.E. Meeks, W.G. Potter, H.M. Black, John Sugg, J.H. Haddock, Ely Carpenter, Ebon Powell, W.M. Wilard, J.H. Hancock, D.F. Burgess, and R.L. Morrison.
The defendant is charged with the murder of Wesley Schmittou, which occurred in District 22, in March 1909. Hayes married the dead man’s sister, (Fannie Schmittou, in 1905), and it is said the trouble was brought about by the defendant striking Wesley Schmittou’s mother and unmarried sister. Wesley resented the assault and in a difficulty, Hayes is alleged to have pulled his knife and stabbed Schmittou in the heart, inflecting wounds, which soon caused his death. The 1st witness placed on the stand was the prosecutor in the case, E.V. Schmittou, father of the dead boy. He was not present at the killing, but saw the body son afterwards. The coat worn by Schmittou at the time was brought into court and identified by the witness. He did not know of any trouble between the two prior to the killing.
Mrs. Schmittou, the dead boy’s mother, was the next witness. She testified that Hayes came to her house about 1:00 on the day of the killing and asked where her husband was and then asked where Wesley was. An argument came up about sheep which Dawson’s dogs had killed. Said Hayes appeared to be angry and wanted to take spite out on her. She brought up the subject of furnishing wool and knitting certain articles for his wife and child. This seemed to enrage him and he began cursing. She started to put a board on the fireplace and tapped him on the leg with it when he continued cursing and she ordered him out of her house. She said he struck her with his fist on her head and back, pulled her hair, and struck her with a chair. Her daughter, Minnie, was present and got mixed up in the quarrel and Hayes struck her; also Minnie’s child aged nine years. He left after that and Minnie got a gun.
About an hour afterwards, Wesley came and she told him of the trouble. She said Wesley didn’t seem especially angry. He left home whistling and laughing, and said he was going to Will Hodge’s.
On Cross-examination, she was not shaken in her evidence.
Minnie Schmittou was called and in the main corroborated the statement of her mother.
Court adjourned at noon for lunch.

April 22,1909---The Hayes murder trial is expected to go to the jury tomorrow. The State rested its case this morning shortly before noon and this afternoon the defense will introduce testimony; the 1st witness being the defendant, Will Hayes.
Yesterday afternoon, the 1st witness was Bob Biter, who testified as to the location of the Hayes and Harvey homes. He went to the Hayes home the morning after the killing and saw a pool of blood there.
Mrs. Nettie Harvey, sister of the dead boy, and wife of Will Harvey, was the most important witness for the state. She testified to having seen the murder. Said Wesley came to her home, which joins the Hayes place, about eight minutes before the killing and was in the best of humor. Told her about Will Hayes beating his mother and sister, but did not appear to expect any trouble. Said, it was a matter between Hayes and his God. Testified to saying, he was going over to Will Hayes to get his knife or pay for it. She followed Wesley to the fence, and saw him from the time he left until he was killed. She claimed to be standing at the fence about 20 steps from where the body was found and saw the whole affair.
The trouble came up over the knife. Wesley called to Hayes from the lane that he wanted his knife or money for it, and Hayes told him he could get what he was coming after. With that, Hayes jumped over the fence, knocked Schmittou down, ran and caught him, and stabbed him in the heart and cut him across the back.
John Olney and Will Harvey told of being some distance away, at the woodpile, but saw Hayes stabbing Schmittou.
On the cross-examination of John Olney Harvey, he contradicted Will Harvey and Mrs. Nettie Harvey by saying that Will Harvey was not at the woodpile, and Mrs. Nettie Harvey was not at the fence, but was standing beside him at the time of the killing. He was badly twisted up and told a disconnected story.
This morning when court convened, Attorney General Lyle presented an affidavit stating that the witness John Olney Harvey had made a statement on the witness stand entirely different from that told him, and the State was taken completely by surprise. He therefore asked that the State be allowed to introduce witnesses to show the condition of the mind of the witness.
The state therefore introduced, to show the condition of the witness’ mind, his mother, Mrs. Sallie Harvey, Deputy Sheriff Robert Black, John Harvey, and Mr. Underwood, the latter two being members of the jury which held an inquest over Schmittou’s body.
The State here rested and the court adjourned until this afternoon

April 23,1909---The Hayes murder case in the criminal court will go to the jury late this afternoon. The defense closed its case this morning about 11:00 and the State began the introduction of rebuttal evidence. At 1:00 court adjourned until 1:45 with one more witness to introduce. Mr. Callis Tate will open the argument for the State and will be followed by W.D. Howser and F.G. Gilbert for the defense Attorney General Lyle will close for the State.
Will Hayes, who is the defendant, went on the stand yesterday afternoon in defense of his own life. Hayes is relying upon the pleas of self-defense, and according to his statement the dead man was the aggressor in the fight which caused his death. He said he went to the home of Emps Schmittou between 12:00 and 2:00 on the day of the killing to get something for his baby and that Mrs. Schmittou raised a fuss with him about a sheep-killing dog that belonged to his Aunt, Mrs. Randall. That Mrs. Schmittou picked up a board and hit him across the legs and one the arm. He said he hit Mrs. Schmittou three times when she started toward him. That her daughter, Minnie, hit him in the back with her fist. He then went out in the hall and Mrs. Schmittou picked up a knife and stick and he held a chair between them to keep her from striking him. That John Schmittou, who is deaf and dumb, got a knife and Minnie got a gun and he left. He went toward home. Mrs. Schmittou followed him and called Mrs. Hayes and Mrs. Randall out and had a talk with them. After that, Wesley Schmittou came to his house up the lane and called him and he went towards Wesley, who asked for a knife or ten cents, which he owed him in exchange for a knife, made several days before. He told him he didn’t have the money and Wesley asked him to pay for another knife. Told him he didn’t have the money, but would pay him as soon as his father came. He gave Wesley the knife and latter opened it to see if the blade was all right. He wanted to know who in the H--- gave him authority to whip his mother and sister while his father and himself were away. Defendant said he told him he didn’t go there to raise a disturbance and it started after he got there. Wesley said he would have his knife or money and Mrs. Hayes, wife of defendant, called to them to stop fussing and walked toward them. Wesley told his wife that if she came any further he would cut her throat and made about the same remark to defendant who stepped back. Wesley struck at him with the open knife, which he held in his right hand, while he put his left hand into his pocket he (Hayes) thought to get another knife. He struck at defendant again, when the latter struck him with the knife, after which Schmitttou turned and walked down the lane about 20 steps, pulled a rock out of his pocket and threw at defendant, and went some distance further and threw another rock when he fell. Mrs. Hayes followed her brother, Wesley, down the lane and helped him up when he fell the second time and soon afterward he expired from the effects of a heart stab. The defendant also went up to Schmittou and was holding his head at the time of his death. He said an open knife was lying by the side of Schmittou’s body.
Mrs. Ransdell was introduced and testified to having heard Schmittou tell Hayes and his wife not to come any further, also as to Schmittou striking at Hayes.

April 24,1909---The jury which has the Hayes murder case under consideration has not yet reached a verdict.

April 26,1909---Will Hayes was found guilty of the murder of Wesley Schmittou in the criminal court Saturday night and his punishment fixed at ten years in the penitentiary. The defendant’s attorney made a motion for a new trail and if overruled the case will probably go to the Supreme Court.
He is about 25 years old. His father, wife and two children were present during the trial.

See article #67 in Keeping the Peace


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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

62   POLICE COURT

May 18,1853---Two of Mrs. Uncle Tom Stowe’s favorites were hauled up before his honor Squire Ward, on Monday last, for indulging their pugilistic properties, and twenty and twenty-three lashes were administered respectively. Their feeling were somewhat lacerated, but their backs were “more so”.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

63   POLICE COURT

May 18,1853---Four individuals of the same denomination, appeared before his honor the Mayor, the same day, on the charge of gambling, and sentenced to a public whipping. After this interesting performance, the culprits were summoned as witnesses against the Misses Anderson, who had permitted gambling in their house. By a system of hard and promiscuous swearing the ladies were acquitted.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

64   POLICE COURT

May 18,1853---Drury Ray and Wiley Minton were arraigned before his Honor Major Bailey on a charge of stealing a gun and a trunk containing one hundred and seventy-five dollars, and were bound over to the next term of the criminal court.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

65   CLARKSVILLE

June 1,1853---Two colored individuals, charged with maliciously and feloniously converting to their own use, certain and drivers articles of plunder, belonging to W. Landsburg & Co., were brought before his honor, Major Bailey, but were discharged for want of evidence.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

66   CLARKSVILLE

June 15,1853---A negro woman, and Elias, for rape, were not tried at the last term of the Criminal Court, on the ground that public prejudice was too strong against them.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

67   FORGERY

June 15,1853---William L. Miller, who was tried last week for forgery, was acquitted. The judge charged the jury, that it would not be forgery in Miller to sign a fictitious name as security to a bond for marriage license, inasmuch as no person’s right would be prejudiced by his act.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

68   CLARKSVILLE

June 22,1853---John Dolan was brought before his Honor Squire Bailey for beating a negro, and was fined five dollars and costs.
He was afterwards tried before Squire Bailey for an assault and battery on Mr. Gorrel and also on a charge of malicious mischief. He was bound over to the Criminal Court on both charges.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

69   MURDER

February 8,1854---Criminal Court commenced its setting on Monday, Judge Turner on the bench. The trial of Ben Harbert for murder will commence this week. Several other important cases will come up at this term. The town was full of strangers, brought here by court, and for trading purposes, and everything appeared brisk and business like. Uncle Sam had a crowd after him all day long and towards night he was somewhat hoarse from his continued “going, going, gone.”

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

70   COUNTERFEITING

February 15,1854---John Vaughn, arraigned on a charge of counterfeiting, was tried on Monday last and acquitted. On same day -- Crotzer, charged with assault and battery, was fined $10.

February 22,1854---In our report of a case of assault and battery last week we made Mr. Crotzer pay a fine. This was a mistake -- Crotzer was the man upon whom the assault was committed.


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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

71   THEFT

May 24,1854---Two black boys were arraigned before Esq. Bailey, last Monday, for stealing a pair of boots from Francis Holt, and as it was proved to the magistrate that they liked tanned leather - prompted no doubt by an accommodating disposition - he thought he would give them a little untanned, in the shape of a row cowhide, and place the present in the hands of J.C. Read for delivery.
P.S. Deaf & dumb Jack was witness for the State.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

72   DISTRICT 13;

June 13,1921---Hearing for H.E. McCormack, farmer of the Southside neighborhood, on charges of public drunkenness and transporting liquor was continued in city court this morning until Thursday.
It is charged by police, the McCormack, when arrested Saturday night, was drunk and had a small amount of liquor in two ½ pint bottles on his person. McCormack made bond and was released.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

73   LONE OAK

August 15,1923--Preliminary hearing was set at 1:30 today for Robert Lyle, Negro, who was arrested near Lone Oak this morning, charged with assault and battery, sworn out by his brother, Henry Lyle. The warrant charged that the prosecutor and his son Herbert Lyle, had been driven out of their own woods by Robert Lyle who used Henry Lyle's ax and his own knife. Bob Lyle does not deny the charges. It is claimed that the assault came as a result of a dispute over Bob Lyle and his children taking stove wood out of Henry Lyle's woods. Practically all of Henry Lyle's clothing was cut off in the attack but no cuts received.

August 17,1923--A fine of $5.00 and costs was imposed on Bob Lyle charged with assault and battery with a knife and an ax on his brother, Henry Lyle.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

75   CLARKSVILLE

June 8,1953---John Brisland and Drury Reed engaged in a most brutal fight in the market house. Brisland was very badly hurt, his face being frightfully bruised and cut up. Reed was tried before His Honor, Squire Wood and fined $5 and cost.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

75   CRIMINAL COURT

October 26,1953---A man named Alley, arrested and tried before his Honor Squire Bailey, on a charge of shooting James Murphy, with intent to kill, was held to bail in the sum of $2000, for his appearance to the next term of the Criminal Court. Being unable to give the required bail, he was sent to jail.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

76   CLARKSVILLE

May 24,1854---A difficulty occurred last Saturday between a man named Pennington and a woman who rejoices in the cognomen of Margaret Darragh. Pennington being a little doubtful about his personal safety brought the matter before “Squire Bailey,” who bound the enraged Margaret in the sum of $500 to keep the peace. An informant who was present says the trial was quite an interesting one, and that Miss Darragh, in consequence of the magistrate’s decision seemed to forget that the third commandment was binding under such circumstances.




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