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Large letter Remembrances of Our Past   1~100


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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf-Chronicle

1   LOUISE


March 7,1892--The first wreck of any consequence occurred on the Mineral yesterday evening about 5:00 near Louise Station. The train had pulled out from Louise and was running slowly. The caboose and a freight car immediately in front of it jumped the track and rolled down an embankment. The cars were not damaged to any great extent. Gold Goodlett, New Providence, was in the caboose and sustained severe bruises, but was not seriously hurt. He was unable to come home, however, last night and Dr. Whitfield of New Providence was summoned to his aid. Dr. Whitfield has not returned, consequently the exact damage to Mr. Goodlett cannot be learned.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

2   PALMYRA

December 23,1896--In trying to pass Palmyra Island just above here, a boat(The Kenton) met with trouble of some kind and let one of the barges loose from her. It floated down opposite the town and sunk on the bar on the opposite side of the river.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

3   PALMYRA

December 22,1896--An accident happened at Palmyra this morning by which the Towboat Kenton lost a portion of its tow. This boat had two barges of coal and was enroute to Nashville when a point in the vicinity of Palmyra was reached, one of the barges began to leak and could not be stopped, sinking in the river. The loss is considerable, but the amount could not be learned from the river men. The Kenton proceeded up the river with the remains of her tow.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

4   STEELE’S SPRING

August 7,1913--Wallace Lyle of District 13 sustained a broken leg Monday while loading logs on a railroad car at Steele’s Spring. The fracture is just above the ankle and a very bad one. After the accident, he was taken to the home of John Steele, where his injury was attended to by physicians. He remained there until this morning when he was removed to his home near the Searcy Ferry.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

5   SOUTHSIDE

July 31,1913--Two stables at Southside were destroyed by fires late yesterday afternoon following a flash of lightning which struck one of the buildings. The first destroyed was the property of Albert E. Hudgens, who also lost a fine buggy horse valued at $250.00. The second stable was property of T.H. Durrett. A small quantity of feed also was lost by both gentlemen.
Another bolt of lightning struck a tree near the residence of Mr. Edward Gannaway, badly shocking his son, Fagan Gannaway. Had it not been for a hard rain which followed the electric storm, other buildings would have been ignited with greater losses.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

6   HEMATITE

November 9,1924--A series of storms leaves heavy damage in its wake. A.L. Cunningham possibly suffered the most damage in this section. A barn on his farm containing about six thousand pounds of tobacco was lifted from its foundation and the tobacco scattered over a large area. Much of the tobacco was ruined. A tree was blown across a tenant house on the farm, badly damaged the building but none of the occupants were injured. The front porch was blown from the Cunningham residence. Others in the area whose property was damaged were Hadley Allen and Wayne Wickham.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

7   SALEM

September 27,1928---A barn on the farm of B.R. Richardson, of Salem Community, containing 7 aces of tobacco belonging to Lin Richardson's son, Garnett and his brother Thomas Richardson, was destroyed by fire about 3 pm Wednesday afternoon. The loss was estimated at about $2,000 with no insurance. The tobacco was being cured at the time the barn caught fire.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

8   CORBANDALE

January 31,1917--Clem McCorkle brought a mule to be shod a few days ago. The mule was unruly and to quiet it, Clem put a twister on its nose. In the scuffle, the mule bit Clem’s thumb severely.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

9   SALEM

June 16,1930--A stable and a tobacco barn in the farm of Mrs. Mattie Lyle in the Salem Community of District 17 were completely destroyed by fire about 6:30 Sunday afternoon. The fire was discovered by Mrs. Lyle and a bucket brigade was hastily summoned, but the blaze had gained too much headway. Harness and tools in the stock barn were taken from the blaze, but seventy barrels of corn and a large quantity of hay in the tobacco barn were burned.
The origin of the fire has not been determined. The buildings stood almost together and one quickly ignited from the other. Mrs. Lyle had insurance on the buildings, but not enough to effect the loss estimated at possibly $2,000.00.


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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

10   SHILOH

November 29,1879--A serious accident occurred near Shiloh on Tuesday the 11th inst. While three sons of Mr. A.J. Fletcher were out hunting, one of their guns was discharged accidentally, the ball taking effect in the knee of the youngest, inflicting a painful wound. The ball went nearly directly through the knee. The boy is doing well at this writing.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

11   PALMYRA

May 18,1899--Mr. Dump Edmondson, the sawyer at the mill on the Marable Farm, was painfully hurt when the saw struck a knot and threw off a piece of plank, breaking his nose and spoiling the beauty of his looks.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

12   LOUISE

July 11,1913--Allen Baggett of Louise, lost his stave mill last night by fire. All the machinery, belts, pulleys, etc. were a total loss, with no insurance. The cause of the fire is thought to be incendiary. Mr. Baggett is in town today buying new supplies preparatory to re-engaging in business.


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From: Leaf Chronicle

13   PALMYRA

June 30,1903--Claude Powers and Willie Bowers engaged in fight Sunday night and the latter was cut on the neck. The two young boys of Palmyra quarreled on the way to church and Powers pulled out a knife and struck at him. He was not dangerously cut and no arrests were made.


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From: Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

14   CORBANDALE

June 1, 1936--After having been bitten at 9:00 this morning by a large Copperhead snake, James Herbert Lyle, 6-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Lyle of the Corbandale community, is recovering this afternoon and may be able to be removed to his home later during the day, his attending physicians announced.
Believed to have been in a serious and intensely painful condition, the child was rushed to a local physician's office about 10:30 and was immediately treated with an antidote administered internally and by a special serum which was injected into his veins with a hypodermic syringe. He reactd to the treatment satisfactorily the doctors said.
A few minutes after the child was bitten, the wound was lanced by H.C. Vickers on whose farm the Lyle's reside, and Mr. Lyle sucked much of the poison from the wound. Had that not been done, the doctors said the bite would most likely have been fatal, despite all they could have done so long after the bite.
The little boy was bitten as he accompanied his mother (Effie) and an Aunt, Mrs. Henry Lyle (Pearl), to the Irish Potato patch about 1/2 mile from home. The snake was thought to have been coiled in the pathway and was unnoticed. It coiled around the child's left leg as he stepped upon the serpent, sinking its fangs into the fleshy part of the boy's leg above the knee. The snake was over two feet in length. The boy was rushed to Clarksville by auto when the parents were unsuccessful in reaching a doctor by phone.


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From: Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

15   Sailor's Rest

December 1, 1914--The many friends of Claude Myers, who lives near Sailor's Rest, will regret to learn that he is suffering with a broken leg. While hauling a load of lumber Monday afternoon, one of the mules in some manner fell over the wagon tongue and on Mr. Myers with the above result. At this time he is resting as well as can be expected.


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From:The Chronicle

16   Sailor's Rest

July 6, 1878--A man by the name of Potter was bit on the face by a rattlesnake near Sailor's Rest station on Thursday of last week and died the next day. He was hauling saw-logs and stooped to lift one when he was bitten on the cheek.


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From: Nashville Union and American

17   CORBANDALE

August 21, 1873--Thomas and James Morris on Wednesday were emptying flour in barrels in a small dairy near Corbandale when the house was struck by lightning; James was instantly killed and Thomas was stunned.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

18   PALMYRA

July 2,1904--Marvin Patterson, the little son of the Methodist minister at Palmyra, was thrown from a horse this week. His head struck a rock, inflicting a large gash on the back of it. The horse stepped on his leg, hurting him quite severely. He was picked up by Polk Smith and carried to Dr. Eldridge's, who dressed his injuries.


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From: The Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

19   SALEM

June 5,1880--On Sunday last, Sam Morrison, son of Mr. James Morrison on the south side of the river, accidentally shot himself with a pistol. The ball entered his leg near the knee joint and producing a very painful wound.


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From: The Leaf-Chronicle

20   ORGAIN'S CROSSROADS

July 6, 1878--On last Saturday evening, one mile north of this place, the team of Mr. William Durham ran away with his son, Jacob, threw him from the wagon and broke both bones of his left leg. He seemed to suffer considerably but we all hope to see him out again soon, for Jacob is one of our best boys and everyone likes him.


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From: The Leaf-Chronicle

21   LOUISE

November 18, 1896--Just before noon Walter C. Perkins, a brakeman on the Clarksville Mineral Railroad, was painfully injured at Louise Station. The train had stopped at the tank to take on water. Perkins was attending to filling the engine tank, when suddenly the weight chain broke and he was struck on the side of the head with the pipe from the water tank and seriously injured, as a big gash was cut on his head. He was able to come to the city of Clarksville where his wound was dressed early this afternoon and now he is reported to be getting along well, with prospects of no bad results following the accident.


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From: The Chronicle

22   HACKBERRY

January 1, 1908--Thomas Hodges, a well-known merchant of this county, having stores at Slayden and Hackberry, accidently wounded George Martin on Monday while out hunting near Slayden. They were in the woods together and Martin was walking behind Hodges when the latter's gun, which rested on his arm, exploded. The load of buckshot took effect in Martin's breast and face and he is seriously injured. Physicians were promptly summoned and it is thought that he will recover. Seventy-two shots were picked from his body. Mr. Martin is in the employ of Mr. Hodges, and the shooting as purely accidental and is greatly deplored.


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From: The Leaf-Chronicle

23   MCALLISTER'S CROSS ROADS

June 17, 1913--Thomas and Delilah Jane Harper and two of their small children were returning home in the southern part of this county from a visit to relatives near Beefrange in Dickson County, when the mule they were driving ran away. All were thrown from the buggy. Mr. Harper suffered a broken hip and several broken ribs. Physicians think he will recover. Mrs. Harper sustained more serious injuries and is thought she cannot recover. The two children were only slightly injured. The party left the home of J.R. Hamilton about 5 p.m. Sunday and had gone about 2 miles when the mule broke into a run as they started down a small hill. Mr. Harper was utterly helpless in his efforts to stop the animal and all were thrown out. They were soon picked up and taken back to Mr. Hamilton's home where they have since been carefully nursed.
June 18, 1913--Mr. and Mrs. Harper of the south side who were seriously injured are getting along favorably. One of his ribs was broken and his back injured. Mrs. Harper was injured internally.


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From: The Leaf-Chronicle

24   SOUTHSIDE

July 2, 1926--"I'm going to shoot my toes off," Dotson Neblett, 20 year-old farmer of Southside, and a bridegroom of June, playfully told his wife, Mrs. Marie Williams Neblett, Monday afternoon, pretending he was angry. Ignorant of the fact that the shotgun which he pointed at his right foot was loaded, young Neblett pulled the trigger. The youth was brought to the local hospital where he underwent an operation Monday night for the amputation of two of his toes on the right foot. Although he has suffered considerably, young Neblett's injury, according to physicians, will not likely prove serious without infection. He left the hospital Tuesday afternoon.


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From: The Leaf-Chronicle

25   CANAAN

August 5, 1908--W.J. Weakley's house was burned Friday night with all contents except 4 feather beds. Loss about $750; no insurance. The fire originated in the kitchen, separate from the house, and both buildings were in flames before the family awoke. Mrs. Weakley, who had given birth to a child 2 days previously, was carried out on the bed, some of the other children narrowly escaping the fire.
By Monday following, contributions to the family in clothing, furniture, provisions, etc. caused Mr. Weakley to remark that he was about as well fixed as before except the loss of the home and that he had good neighbors.
This residence, built of huge logs and with a massive stone basement and chimney, was one of two houses in this district that were older than the state, having been built in North Carolina Territory.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

26   INDIAN CREEK

October 1, 1923--T.O. Swift of District 22, tobacco barn burned this weekend. He lost 4 acres. He carried $350 insurance on the barn and tobacco.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

27   SAILOR'S REST

January 16, 1918--Another example of just how cold last Friday was, was given by W.A. McFall of Sailor's Rest. Fourteen of his guineas were roosting in trees near the house and were picked up frozen Saturday morning. During the rain and snow Friday, the fowls' feathers became wet and during the night the feathers froze, coating the birds with ice which proved to be more than they could stand.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

28   SALEM

August 4, 1896--Parties from the 17th District today report that Edward, son of Tobe Cocke, who was so badly injured on the head by being thrown from a horse into a gully, was thought to be resting better today, but the informant stated that the results of the injuries sustained by the young man were yet in doubt.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

29   HACKBERRY

December 22, 1896--Will Hiter, son of the late Chester Hiter, a well-known farmer of the 18th District, happened to what came near being a fatal accident while fox-hunting one night last week. He and some friends were riding through the woods at a swift gait following the hounds when he was caught by a limb and thrown from his horse. In falling, he struck on his back and was painfully, but not seriously, hurt. He was carried home where a physician was called and he is now able to be out on crutches.


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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

30   DISTRICT 16

July 12, 1887--Mrs. Walter Morrison, a resident of the 16th District, while picking blackberries last Thursday, fell into a gully and sustained injuries which will likely prove fatal.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

31   SHILOH

October 9, 1923--Probably the biggest barn fire of the present season is reported in District 20 with the loss by Walter Mickle and tenants of a barn and between 15,000 and 16,000 lbs. of tobacco. Mickle estimated his loss at $1,500, exclusive of insurance on the tobacco. It was said to have been one of the best crops in the neighborhood.


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From: The Leaf-Chronicle

32   CORBANDALE

January 3,1910--H. A. Ellis, Henry "Red" Hughes and George Hughes of District 19 were hunting on Dec. 29, 1909 and George fired at a bird. The other two men were in range when Henry received nearly the entire load of shot in the side, from head to foot and Ellis received one shot through one finger. Neither was seriously injured.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

33   STORM DAMAGE

March 13, 1923--According to Leonard Suiter, Justice of the Peace in District 13, that section was hard hit by the wind and rain storms, most serious damage being done to young orchards and timber. A tobacco barn containing a large crop of tobacco, some corn and hay on the farm of W.R. Fain was blown down with heavy loss to the contents. On W. D. Weakley's farm, a barn was blown down and 2 cows killed. Mrs. Mary Manning also lost a barn.
R.L. Lyle was another loser from the storm. His large tobacco barn on his farm on the Seven Mile Ferry Road was totally demolished, but it is not thought the tobacco is injured. Farm implements were damaged.
In the Salem community, a portion of the roof was blown off Tom Ramey's house. A load of tobacco in the barn on Bailey Richardson's farm was caught in the debris and had to be removed during the night. Norman Freeman's stock barn was blown off the pillars. A poultry house on the farm of Tom Bedwell was blown away and the roof blown off his stable. A tobacco barn on the farm of Paul Neblett was blown off its pillars and a number of fruit trees on the farm of Boyd Neblett were uprooted. A large quantity of timber on the farm of Newell and Homer Cocke was damaged and Floyd Mellon's stock barn was practically demolished. The roof was blown off of John Kellow's and a portion of the roof was blown off of W. Davis' tobacco barn. Several large poplar trees on John Edmondson's farm were blown down. The roof was blown off the home of Hatton Mills and Brack Hodges' corn crib was blown down. A tree was blown across Salem Methodist Church and one in front of the church crippled telephone wires.
Most serious damage in District 22 was to Mt.Zion Methodist Church. It was unroofed. Three tobacco barns on the farm of W. B. McCurdy were blown down. The barn on the farm of Mr. Harvey was blown off its foundation.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

34   SALEM

January 23, 1918--The probable destruction by fire at Mr. R.L. Ussery's home in the Bend neighborhood, was narrowly averted. A rug on the parlor floor became ignited from the grate. The fire was making good headway when discovered by Walter Ussery. Buckets of water were brought in to play and the fire quickly extinguished.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

35   HACKBERRY

September 1, 1908--Uncle Buck Rose was thrown from a wagon Sunday afternoon at his home in District 19 and received injuries that may prove fatal. He was standing in the rear of the wagonbed when the team made a sudden start forward, throwing him heavily to the ground, inflicting what is feared internal injury.
Mr. Rose is about 75 and hardly able to bear up under such a heavy fall.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

36   CORBANDALE

August 16, 1923--Fire of undetermined origin Tuesday night destroyed the storehouse belonging to Mr. B.J. Corban and the general stock of merchandise of C.C. Trimble at Corbandale, entailing a loss of probably $3,000 or $3,500 according to estimates of the value of the stock and the building.
The fire was discovered about 9:00 by Mr. Trimble, who had locked the store and had started to his house. He had forgotten a book he intended to take home and was returning to the store when he discovered the fire.
About 4 a.m. the house occupied by Ben Ridley, a negro, about 50 yards from the site of the store caught fire and was destroyed together with practically all of Ridley's household goods. It is thought the house caught fire from the embers of the store fire. The amount of Ridley's loss wasn't stated today. The Trimble store was one of the largest in Corbandale.


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From: Weekly Tobacco Leaf

37   16th and 20th

August 3, 1888--The heaviest rain ever known in that section fell in parts of the 16th and 20th Districts and the edge of Dickson County last Sunday about noon.
The various forks of Batson's Creek were swollen way beyond their largest proportions and Indian Creek, close on the county line, became a roaring river, our informant says. Hardly a fence was left in that section and fields of tobacco and corn were, in some instances, washed up by the roots and in others, beaten and whipped into shreds by the downpouring waters.
Fierce and incessant lightning accompanied the flood. Jerome Trotter's chimney, on Indian Creek, was struck and demolished by the lightning and his family muched shocked, although none of them hurt. The lightning also struck a mule belonging to Robert Bumpus in the same neighborhood.
Farmers were busy all day Monday and Tuesday making temporary fences to protect their exposed fields from the livestock. Fortunately, all the houses in that section are on the ridges and there is no loss of life to report.
J.K. Ramey, who lives on Barren Fork of Batson's Creek, informs us that the creek at his house would have easily floated a large Cumberland River steamer. From an empty tub sitting in his yard, he learned that the rainfall amounted to 7 1/2 inches. The rain fell for nearly an hour. The Cumberland River was brought up more than two feet by the water that fell in this section.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

38   SALEM

April 4, 1910--Jewell Corlew of District 17 was in town Saturday. He has had considerable trouble with the buzzards this season. They have attacked his tobacco beds and have torn off the canvas and tramped the beds until all of the plants have been destroyed. Saturday morning he found fifty of the pests and could hardly drive them away. As it is a violation of law to shoot them, he is at a loss what to do on the premises.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

39   MCALLISTER'S CROSSROADS

June 24, 1918--It is reported that Millard Fillmore Batson, a farmer of the 22nd District, about 61 years of age, suffered a fractured skull Sunday at the hands of his son, Howard Batson.
It seems from disconnected reports that the men engaged in an altercation at some place on the farm and that the son, using a 2X4 scantling, struck his father a slanting blow on the side of the head, causing a fracture of the skull. Doctors in this city were summoned and dressed the wound, which they say is rather serious.
No particulars as to the nature of the case could be secured.


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From: The Clarksville Daily Tobacco Leaf-Chronicle

40   MARION

January 25, 1895--Mr. Albert Dickson, while driving to town yesterday with a load of tobacco, happened to have a painful and perhaps serious accident. He was driving across the Mineral Railroad at Marion Station when his team became frightened at a hand-car, ran away, upset the wagon and seriously injured Mr. Dickson. He was carried to his brother-in-law's in that neighborhood and was not able to continue the journey.


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From: Clarksville Weekly chronicle

41   MCALLISTER’S CROSSROADS

January 29,1881--We regret to learn that Mr. Millard Batson, son of Mr. Carney Batson, in the 16th District, had his hand badly crushed by a corn sheller a few days ago. Four of his fingers were amputated by Drs. Gholson and Rye.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

42   SHILOH

March 21, 1913--Burl Allen of Shiloh, who was shot by Wash Mitchell at Palmyra Sunday night, when an effort was being made to take from him his new bride to whom he was married a few hours earlier, is in serious condition as the result of a pistol wound to the head.
A .30-calibre ball fired by Mitchell plowed around his skull, producing a fracture which yesterday required an operation. Two hours time by three surgeons was required to remove the shattered bone. Blood poison has since developed, rendering Mr. Allen's condition precarious.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

43   RIVERMEN

December 21, 1896--Elisha Beard and Newt Eleazer left the Clarksville Wharf Saturday with a barge and went down the river to Stewart County. About the time the craft and its crew of two were passing the Outlaw Landing near Palmyra, Beard being at the stern steering the barge with an improvised steering oar made of a plank, he lost his footing and fell into the river. Beard tried to get his partner's attention, but was not rescued until a point opposite Sailor's Rest was reached, having been in the freezing water almost two hours and having managed to keep afloat for a number of miles.
Finally, his partner Eleazer pulled him out, paddled to the shore and placed him by a fire. Then Eleazer left him then to overtake and land the barge, but in this he was unsuccessful, as his rope broke and the craft floated on at will, being lost opposite Sailor's Rest. Eleazer returned to Beard and the two went to the station to await the arrival of the up train.


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From: The Daily Leaf-Chronicle

44   LONE OAK

August 5, 1896--While Alfred Black was leading a mule along near the hitching posts at Antioch Church a day or two ago, he was kicked on the left side by a horse which had attempted to kick his mule, and three of his ribs were broken. He was badly injured, but is now reported to be getting along as well as could be expected.


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From: The Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

45   SALEM

April 26,1873--The house of Mr. Henry Wall at the Seven-Mile Ferry, together with its contents, was destroyed by fire on the night of the 22nd. When Mr. Wall was awakened, the house was so far gone that he had barely time to save himself and his five little children. All the clothing of the family was lost. This is a severe loss upon a clever man who can ill afford it and we trust those who are more fortunate will lend a helping hand to him and his misfortune.


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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

46   DISTRICT 17

August 5,1890--During the rain and thunderstorm Friday evening, John Morrison had a stack of hay and one of straw struck by lightning and burned. There were three stacks in a row and not over 20 feet apart. The lightning struck the two outside stacks and left the one in the center standing unharmed.


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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

47   ANTIOCH

July 6,1872--On Friday of last week as Mr. Thomas Thompson on the south side of the river was threshing wheat, on of his legs was caught in the machine and broken in two places below the knee. This is indeed an unfortunate accident to a worthy citizen.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

48   CORBANDALE

May 27,1908--Ellis Lewis, a farmer who lives in the 19th District near Corbandale, lost his dwelling and nearly all of its contents by fire Tuesday night. The fire resulted from a defective flue in the kitchen and seems to have spread with great rapidity.
The family was asleep when the fire broke out and did not awake until the roof was almost ready to fall in. They were able to save some of their wearing apparel and bed clothes, but everything else in the house was destroyed. The loss is about $300 and no insurance was carried.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

49   DISTRICT 13

February16,1927--Awakened by the roaring flames as they ate their way through the bedroom wall, Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus Kelly narrowly escaped being burned to death in their home about 11:00 Friday night. As the members of the family made their escape through the front door, they saved a number of articles of furniture and most of their clothing. No one was injured.
The fire which started in the kitchen, is believed to have originated from sparks that fell from the stove into the kindling box nearby. When the family was awakened, the kitchen and the roof over the entire house were enveloped in flames.
The loss, which remains unestimated today, was partially covered by insurance.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

50   CORBANDALE

May 24,1918--The hard rains we had this week washed new-worked land badly, yet afforded good reason for setting tobacco. Someone who had more land ready than he had plants, stole the plants off one of Gabe R. Fessey’s best beds. Mr. Fessey made an attempt to trail them up, but the continued rains prevented it.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

51   HACKBERRY

September 25,1929--Although suffering considerably from a wound in his right foot, accidentally inflicted about 9:00 a.m. Tuesday when a gun he was holding was discharged, Howard Yarbrough, 19-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. L.J. Yarbrough, District 18, was resting satisfactorily at the Clarksville Hospital this morning and little fear was that he would lose his foot.
Cullom Yarbrough rushed to inform his mother, while Clay Baggett helped to get him home.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

52   SALEM

March 21,1913--Equinoctical storm last night swept Montgomery County doing much damage. A barn on Joe T. Allen’s farm near the Seven-Mile Ferry was completely wrecked; also one on R.L. Lyle’s farm in the same vicinity was lifted from its foundation and otherwise damaged. In Mr. Lyle’s yard were several chickens hovels with hens and young chickens which were entirely blown away.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

53   TOBACCO BARNS BURN

October 2,1919--A tobacco barn on the farm of John Wolard in District 13 containing the crop of Wolard and a quantity of tobacco belonging to Jesse Byard was destroyed by fire about noon today. Wolard’s loss is estimated at between $1200 and $1500. Byard’s loss is not known. The fire originated from blazes under the tobacco.
It is reported that a barn belonging to a Mr. Hall near Palmyra was also destroyed by fire this afternoon.

October 6,1919--The latter part of last week, J.A. Harvey and Raymond Baggett of near Louise lost a barn containing 2 acres of tobacco and also a barn on the farm of J.W. Lewis near Cumberland City containing 3 acres of tobacco was burned. The losses were approximately $600 and $700 respectively.
Burrell Allen near Shiloh had the misfortune Monday to lose a barn and 4 acres of tobacco belonging to Mr. Allen and Mr. R.C. Welker. The total loss was probably $1000. All three of the above barns and tobacco were insured.

October 16,1919--A new tobacco barn on the farm of Reid Lyle in District 13 and 23 acres of tobacco belonging to Reid, S.J. Lyle and Dave McCarroll was destroyed by fire early this morning. The loss is estimated at $6000. $2300 insurance was carried on the tobacco and $500 on the barn.


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From: Leaf Chronicle

54   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

July 31,1902--George Arms, a young white man of the 13th District narrowly escaped a watery grave this morning in the Cumberland River at the foot of Commerce Street. The ferryman Henry Arms and his brother, George, were engaged in constructing a platform on this side of the river by which teams could drive upon the ferry boat during low water. They were both in the water and the ferry boat, which had been anchored nearby, started for the bank on the opposite side. George Arms attempted to swim to it but got in swift water and was carried underneath. His brother went to the assistance and Mr. Williams, who was in the pleasure yacht “City of Clarksville”, went to him in a canoe. He was brought to the bank resuscitated after much hard work.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

55   SOUTHSIDE

December 12,1924--Faxon Harris, son of Deputy Sheriff Sam Harris, is reported suffering intensely at his home near Southside as the result of a gunshot wound in the eye accidentally inflicted Saturday by Leon McCloud, a neighbor, while the two were bird hunting. Only the two were in the field when McCloud fired at some birds. A stray shot struck Harris in the eye, penetrating the eyeball. The shot has been removed and it has not been determined whether he will lose the sight of his eye.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

56   SHILOH

January 28,1936--Carpenters today were repairing damage resulting from fire to the Shiloh school which barely missed being destroyed Monday when sparks are thought to have escaped through cracks in the “swinging” flue swept from the rafters and ignited the building, both the ceiling and the roof. Noticing the smoke, the principal, Miss Agnes McCarroll summoned 8 men assembled in a store nearby and a bucket brigade was formed. The men were first compelled to build a makeshift ladder and chop four holes through the shingle roof. The damage will be around $25 Supt. N.L. Carney said.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

57   MCALLISTER’S CROSSROADS

March 8,1899--Sid Jones, while chopping wood, split his foot open.


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From: Clarksville Tobacco Leaf

58   PALMYRA

February 3, 1877--We regret to learn that S.A. Wilson, Esq. living near Palmyra, had his barn burned on Thursday of last week. It is said to have contained about 10,000 pounds of tobacco.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

59   HACKBERRY

April 21, 1900--This morning about 8 o'clock, Luther Baggett, son of Hon. John W. Baggett of this county, accidentally shot himself with a pistol. The weapon was carried in his hip pocket and was discharged by accident. The bullet struck the inner side of the left thigh above the knee and passing around, lodged in the flesh on the outer side of the leg. Drs. Marable and Winston will locate and remove the ball this afternoon at 4 o'clock.


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From: The Clarksville Star

60   TARSUS

November 22,1927--Luther Ragan, 35-year-old farmer of District 19, was but slightly improved this morning from a serious head injury resulting from being struck on the forehead Monday morning by the butt of a tree which he and a farmhand had sawed down. His attending physicians feared that a fracture of the skull had been sustained by Mr. Ragan.
The accident occurred on Mr. Ragan’s farm early Monday morning. The tree fell before he realized it and Mr. Ragan did not jump clear in time. The butt bounced upward striking him. Mr. Ragan was unconscious for nearly an hour. He was conveyed on a wagon to his house where the doctor was summoned.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

61   SAILOR'S REST

August 4,1896--An unusual case of ferocity displayed by a domestic animal is reported to have occurred a day or two ago in the vicinity of Sailor’s Rest, on the farm of the widow Minor.
Two fine mares were grazing in a lot, when they were attacked by a rapacious boar. One of the animals was struck on the leg and the flesh ripped down, causing the animal to fall, when the maddened hog literally cut the mare to pieces with its tusks, making 21 wounds. The other mare received one incision of the hogs tusks deep into the side, but this was sufficient to cause death. A mule was also attacked after the two horses had been killed, but after receiving two wounds, the mule managed to escape from the lot.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

62   "TWO PASSENGER TRAINS COLLIDE AT CORBANDALE"

April 25,1913--In a head-on collision of trains #101, southbound, and #103, northbound, on the L&N at Corbandale, Percy Taylor, a mail clerk, was killed outright and a dozen others injured, one of whom, George Miller, of Erin, a fireman, may die.
The wreck, which is one of the worst in many years on the Memphis line, was caused, it is said, by a mistake on the part of Engineer William Hockersmith, of the northbound train, who received orders at Erin to meet the southbound train at Corbandale. He misread the name Corbandale for Clarksville and planned to make no halt at the former place. Acting on the same order, train #101 had proceeded to Corbandale and was standing on the main track waiting for the other to come in and take the siding as is customary for northbound trains to do.
Train #104 was about 30 minutes late and was running at a high rate of speed as it approached Corbandale. Without a thought of danger, the Engineer was forcing on every pound of steam, when suddenly, as he rounded a sharp curve at that point, he sighted the other train a short distance ahead; he was utterly helpless to stop his own train and it crashed into the other at about forty miles an hour.
Both trains carried a large number of passengers and there was considerable excitement among them after the shock. Many of the lamps were torn from the ceiling of the cars, but fortunately fire did not start. The locomotives were almost demolished and four cars were badly crushed and splintered. The mail cars in both trains telescoped over the tenders of the closet located in the front of a mail car, when the collision took place.
A strange coincidence was that Taylor had resigned and was making his last trip. He recently inherited a ranch at Lorenzo, Texas, worth $60,000 and was going there to live.
The relief train from Clarksville arrived about two hours after the wreck and the surgeons at once set about ministering to the sufferers.

Dec.4,1913--Two freight trains collided at Corbandale last evening. The crews saved themselves by jumping when they saw the impending danger and no one was seriously hurt. The wreck was caused by the engineer on the northbound train misreading his orders; he misread the name Corbandale for Clarksville.


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From: The Clarksville Star

63   STEELE SPRINGS

December 21,1926--Mrs. T.L. King, prominent citizen in District 13, is reported to be in a serious condition today as the result of burns she received Sunday afternoon when her clothing was ignited from a heater. Flesh was burned from her right arm and her left hip was also badly scorched. At noon today Mrs. King was said to be resting as well as could be expected considering the intensity of injuries.
The accident occurred as Mrs. King was reading a newspaper in front of a heater in the home late Sunday. Her dress did not touch the stove and just how it became ignited from the stove puzzles relatives. Interested in her reading, she did not notice the flames until the fire ate thru her clothing and burned her. Her screams brought the aid of Mr. King and a neighbor who successfully snatched the ignited clothes from her body before she was fatally burned. Although her condition is more serious due to her advanced age, Mrs. King has a good chance to recover according to her physicians.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

64   MARION

November 22, 1945--A truck loaded with burley tobacco and a Boillin-Harrison truck collided on a blind curve yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock between Marion and Lone Oak, about a mile north of Marion. Both trucks were badly damaged, although the occupants escaped serious injuries. Dude Proctor, Jr. who was driving the tobacco truck, was thrown from the cab across the road, but was not hurt. Frank Waldrop was driving the warehouse truck.
The road was completely blocked by the accident and traffic was routed by way of Shiloh.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

65   ANTIOCH

December 10, 1945--Miss Martha Ellen Yarbrough, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Yarbrough, Clarksville, Rt. 1, is in Clarksville hospital today with a fractured left leg below the knee and three broken teeth; and Jim Huggins, son of Frank Huggins, Lone Oak community, is charged with reckless driving and failure to stop at the scene of an accident as a result of a collision on Highway 48 about two miles southwest of Clarksville Saturday night.
Miss Yarbrough and Miss Rachel Corlew, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Corlew, were returning home from Clarksville and Miss Corlew, who was driving, said they met another car near the old cavalry stable, which forced her to the extreme right side of the road. The car sideswiped her automobile, she said, and it crashed against a light pole. The transformer broke and fell across the Corlew automobile. The occupants narrowly escaped electrocution.
Miss Corlew said the other car sped on without halting. N.I. Burton, who came by the scene of he wreck a few minutes later, conveyed Miss Yarbrough to the hospital and then took Miss Corlew home. Her car was damaged beyond repair.
Officers arrested young Huggins Sunday night and his hearing in General Sessions Court has not been set pending recovery of Miss Yarbrough.


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From: The Daily Leaf Chronicle

66   SALEM

August 19, 1910--Charles Bailey Walls, the two-year-old son of Mr. Sterling Walls, residing at the Seven Mile Ferry, drank carbolic acid this morning and is in a precarious condition. A quantity of the poison is kept in the Walls home for disinfecting purposes and someone who used the bottle earlier in the morning left it within reach of the child. His mouth and throat are terribly burned, but the attending physician says he will recover.


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From: The Daily Leaf Chronicle

67   BRIARWOOD

September 12, 1901--Buck Phipps of the south side sustained a painful accident this morning by means of which he lost 2 fingers on the left hand. He was running a hay baler on Bailey Johnson's place across the river when his hand was accidentally caught in the baler with the above result. The fingers were entirely severed from the hand.


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From: The Daily Leaf Chronicle

68   MARABLE'S CROSSING

May 19, 1900--Elea Weakley, while loading logs on a wagon at Hussey's Mill near Marable's Crossing in the 19th District, had his leg broken. Weakley, it seems, was already a cripple and, being unable to move out of the way quick enough, was caught by a log that had become uncontrollable and had rolled back on him, his assistants saving themselves by jumping out of the way.


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From: The Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

69   SHILOH

March 18,1892--William Carney Allen, while trying to get John Hicks’ mare out of his lot Sunday evening, threw a rock at her, breaking her leg just above the knee. The matter was quietly settled by the two men, W.C. Allen giving a $150 filly for the damages. Mr. Allen will have the animal killed to prevent further suffering.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

70   LONE OAK

April 24, 1908--Landy Baggett of the southern part of the county, well-known as a large egg peddler, had his ankle dislocated today at 2:00 while delivering eggs to the Arlington Hotel.
He had gotten out of his wagon with a basket of several dozen eggs and started into the kitchen with them where he was in the habit of delivering them. In a hurried way, he pushed open what he thought was the door to the kitchen, but which was instead the opening to the elevator shaft and fell to the bottom, a distance of 10 feet. His foot turned as he struck the bottom, dislocating his ankle.
Dr. Maurice Langos Hughes was called in and with the aid of a few bystanders dressed the wound and thinks there will be no serious trouble. Mr. Baggett suffered intensely until the physician arrived with anesthetic which relieved him and he was resting very well at the hour of going to press.
This is a very unfortunate incident as Mr. Baggett is a poor man with a large family.


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From: The Clarksville Star

71   PALMYRA

February 16, 1927--Three mules, valued at $500, perished early this morning when fire destroyed the large stock barn of Edward Powers, District 19 farmer. The fire resulted when a cow upset a lantern in a pile of hay while Mr. Powers was feeding his stock about 3:00. The lantern exploded and the flames spread so rapidly that Mr. Powers could not reach the doors of the mule stalls. In his frantic attempt to obtain an ax to cut an opening in the stalls through the wall on the outside, Mr. Powers stumbled over a piece of wood and sustained a painful injury to his knee, rendering him unable to continue the attempt to rescue the animals. The cow made her escape out the front door.
Together with the mules, a quantity of hay, 50 barrels of corn, and a number of farming implements were also destroyed. Mr. Powers was unable to estimate his loss.
The destruction of his stock barn this morning marks the 5th heavy fire loss Mr. Powers has suffered during the past 10 years. Twice his dwelling was burned to the ground, his stock barn has also been destroyed twice, and one large tobacco barn containing his entire crop burned during the 10-year period. A small amount of insurance was carried on the stock barn which burned today.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

72   YELLOW CREEK

October 26, 1936--Death and destruction rode the highways of Montgomery County Saturday night as an automobile wreck left dead Alpha L. Powers, 53, a prominent citizen. The driver of the other car, Norman W. Andrews, a Nashville salesman, is under bond to face charges of involuntary manslaughter and driving while drunk.
Mr. Powers was a farmer of the Palmyra community, an auto salesman for Clarence G. Carney, a member of the board of Education since July 1921, a member of Tarsus Methodist Church, an Odd Fellow, and a member of the Hackberry Council of the Junior Order of American Mechanics. Mr. Powers was beloved as a neighbor, a father, a husband, and as a brother.
Injured were Earl W. Powers, 26; Miss Madeline Powers, 18, student at Austin Peay Normal School; and Wiley Jackson, 63, also of Palmyra. The accident happened near Hilltop on Highway 48, not far from Coke's filling station.


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From: The Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

73   YELLOW CREEK

December 28, 1912--After his death had been announced and a shroud bought, life returned to the body of Richard Brindley, a citizen of District 19 of this county, the live corpse frightening a number of watchers in the death chamber. This story, coming from Yellow Creek, has been substantiated and is a most remarkable one, surpassing in many respects other happenings of this kind.
Christmas Day, Mr. Brindley, whose home is near Palmyra, went over to Yellow Creek to visit friends. He had not been well for several days and on the night after his arrival, was taken ill with what was thought to be colic and before the service of a physician was secured, he supposedly passed to the Beyond. The news was immediately telephoned to his wife and at midnight she gave Hussey Brothers of Palmyra an order for the undertaking and in the company of friends, started with a shroud for the body of her husband. In the meantime, life had returned to the corpse to the astonishment of those with it. Mrs. Brindley a short time later arrived with the shroud to find her husband alive. Mr. Brindley arose, got in the buggy with his wife and drove back to Palmyra, taking with them the shroud which had been bought a few hours earlier for his burial. After having the matter explained, the Undertaker obligingly took back the robe and called back several men sent to dig a grave.
Mr. Brindley's experience somewhat alarmed him and he is now in Clarksville under the treatment of a physician, hoping to fortify himself against another lapse similar to the one he so fortunately escaped.


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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

74   CORBANDALE

September 20,1889--Last Wednesday morning as the 3:30 am northbound train was within a mile of Corbandale, it ran against an immense stone weighing several tons which threw the engine and 15 cars off the track down an embankment to the river’s edge. Recent rain so loosened the earth on the bluff as to cause the stone to roll down upon the track. The engineer was badly bruised and one of the brakemen was seriously injured. Both were looked after and properly treated. Repairs have been made upon the road and trains were running on regular time as of yesterday.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

75   PALMYRA

June 15,1928--It was not known at 3 this afternoon just how serious were the injuries of Wiley Devasier, 35, and Frank Rainey, 24, construction employees of the L & N Railroad who were injured at the Palmyra tunnel about 12:30 this afternoon when a large rock upon which they were standing loosened by a blast fell to the track below, the distance of 25 feet. The men were in the Clarksville Hospital but Rainey did not appear to be seriously hurt, although he was badly shocked and nervous.
Devasier appeared to be seriously injured from a bad wound on the head and lacerations about the body. The injured men were rushed to Clarksville on a caboose pulled by a freight engine which was on the East side of the tunnel and were hurried to the hospital. Details of the accident were meager. It was said that the two were blasting at the mouth of the tunnel on the East side.
The boulder blocked the track and at 2:30 this afternoon it had not been cleared away although the section crew had been attempting to move it for some time.
The accident happened just after the northbound Pan American had passed.

June 16,1928--Neither was critically hurt, but Rainey may lose his left arm. The arm was broken, the flesh torn away between the elbow and wrist and his right ear was almost torn from his head. His scalp was also badly lacerated. A large rock pinned Rainey’s left arm and had to be jacked up before the arm could be released.
Devasier sustained bad cuts on his scalp and body bruises. Both were reported resting comfortably today.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

76   LOUISE

April 25,1907--Thomas Biter was perhaps fatally injured Wednesday while at work on the L & N trestle beyond the Cumberland River, about 1/2 mile from the freight station. Biter is a member of Foreman Winfield’s gang, who are engaged in making some repairs on the trestle. He lost his hold in some way and fell to the ground below, a distance of 30 feet. His skull was fractured and he was badly bruised up. His right side seems to be paralyzed. Little, if any hope is entertained for his recovery.
He was brought to Clarksville on a hand car and taken to boarding cars in the L & N yards. Later he was removed to the home of his cousin, Joseph Davis, on Elder Street. He is 23 years old and lives near Louise.

April 26,1907--The body was shipped to Louise this afternoon at 2:45 on the Mineral accommodation.



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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

77   FESSEY HOLLOW

May 18,1909--A very hard rain fell in this section Saturday evening and over a space about one mile by two or three miles long was almost a water spout. All fences, gardens, poultry yards and young fruit trees in the low land were washed away. The farms most seriously damaged are J.M. Harris, G.H. Carver, Gabe R. Fessey, B.U. Swift, J.B. Williams and P.L. Harned. From the Harris place to Williams, land planted in corn or made into tobacco hills was washed bare and the farms exposed. M.M. Hussey’s saw mill on the Fessey place, was damaged about $300, including material carried away.
B.U. Swift was damaged about the same. Dr. Wickham lost two mules drowned in attempting to cross a bridge that was afloat, and the driver, Louis Cherry, almost drowned.
The downpour lasted more than an hour. After the flood subsided, the funny incidents were remembered and told. J.A. Hendrick’s family went upstairs when the water entered the house. G.R. Fessey and family, nearby, were as much frightened, but all stood their grounds, or water, till stacks of lumber came floating by and the spring house left, then they began packing the children to the hill, barely able to stand against the current almost waist deep. A yearling calf came down in a lot of drift and was saved in Mr. Fessey’s yard. Mr. Fessey had a hog pen near the yard in which was a log trough and several shoats. The pen was washed away and the pigs jumped in the trough and landed safely in the garden.
Mr. Williams and Mr. Harned’s damage was principally gravel and other debris piled on their land, their fences were down, but not carried beyond the railroad embankment.
Humphrey Woodenjaw


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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

78   SHILOH

March 18,1892--One of J.D. Fletchers sawyers, T.B. Powers, had the end of his thumb sawn off at the factory Saturday.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

79   CORBANDALE

August 3,1915--Wayne Wickham, mail carrier, was severely shocked by lightning Saturday while on his route. Lightning struck a wire fence near the road and knocked Mr. Wickham unconscious.
R.D. Coleman, carrier on another route, ran into a gully turning his buggy over Tuesday. In righting the buggy, the horse became frightened and ran away with the empty buggy, going through a wire fence and badly cutting the horse. It happened near home, so he finished the trip soon.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

80   LOUISE

February 5,1940--Struck by a bicycle on the Lone Oak and Louise Road Sunday morning, Robert Crocker, 13-year-old son of Rev. and Mrs. M.I. Crocker of Louise Community, is confined to his home today with a fractured left ankle. The accident occurred as the youth walked toward his home from Sunday school. Lucian Black, son of Earl Black, was reported to have been riding the wheel.


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From: The Chronicle

81   ANTIOCH

March 28,1874--Mr. John W. Ussery, an old and highly esteemed citizen, living on the south side of the river, met with a painful accident Thursday morning of last week.
While riding up Budd’s Creek, which was much swollen from the previous night’s rain, his horse mired in the quicksand and fell with him, breaking one of his legs below the knee. We are glad to hear, however, that his injuries are not considered dangerous and hope he will soon recover.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

82   SALEM

June 11, 1919--Lauren Edmondson, a young farmer of the Bend, was seriously hurt Monday afternoon when he was kicked by a mule. Mr. Edmondson was plowing in the bottom and the mule became contrary and would not go as the driver wished. Upon being urged, the mule kicked Mr. Edmondson, knocking him a distance of 12 feet. He is resting very nicely now.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

83   CORBANDALE

June 11,1919--Mr. R.M. Powers, an old Confederate veteran, having a crippled arm since the War, fell Thursday and broke that arm. It is hoped this will not be serious.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

84   CORBANDALE

June 11,1919--Henry Thomas, while hunting last week, shot the forefinger off his left hand. The accident occurred when he climbed a fence and pulled the gun after him.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

85   CORBANDALE

June 11,1919--A young mule belonging to Earl Fessey went into a gully, could not extricate itself and was drowned by the hard rain Sunday night.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

86   SOUTHSIDE

May 20,1916--Mrs. Willie Neblett accidentally dropped a heavy carving fork which stuck in her foot causing her much pain for several days.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

87   HACKBERRY

August 22,1919--Cullom, 9-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jones Yarbrough of Hackberry was seriously injured yesterday afternoon when kicked in the face and on the body by a horse he was trying to drive from the barnyard into the stable. The little boy sustained a broken jaw bone, a broken rib, and the loss of two teeth.
It is said that the boy in an effort to drive the horse into the stable, struck the horse’s hind leg with a switch making the horse kick with all force thereby receiving blows from both feet.
He was brought to Clarksville this morning by his father and the wounds were dressed by Dr. Brandeau. The injuries are quite severe and painful but the boy was carried to his home this afternoon and is resting as well as can be expected.


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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

88   SAILORS’ REST

August 15,1885--Our esteemed friend Esquire McFall lost a valuable saddle horse while crossing the ferry at Sailors’ Rest last week. The horse became frightened and jumped overboard. In jumping he snagged himself on an iron pin attached to the boat in such a manner as to cause his death.

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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

89   MARTHA’S CHAPEL

October 27,1893--Ed G. Dunlavy’s store at Cherry Grove, in the 17th District, was burned Thursday morning between 1 and 2 a.m. It is supposed that rats ignited a match from which the flames originated. There was no one sleeping in the store. Mr. Dunlavy was asleep at his home some 50 yards away and when awakened the flames were eating their way through the roof. It was impossible to save anything of importance from the stock which, with the house, was a total loss. He has insurance amounting to $1,100 on stock and building. Mr. Dunlavy did a general merchandising business and was prospering. His friends will regret to hear of his misfortune and will hope to hear that he will again soon be upon his feet.


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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

90   TARSUS

September 8,1893--Enos Harned, the venerable father of County Superintendent P.L. Harned, was thrown from a horse Sunday morning at Corbandale, breaking his collar bone. While his injuries are not of a very serious nature, they are quite severe on an old gentleman.
The Leaf-Chronicle most earnestly desires to be able to report his recovery in the future.


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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

91   PALMYRA

January 3,1893--Quite a serious railroad wreck took place at Palmyra Sunday evening and trains were delayed over 12 hours. A freight train was going south and was rolling down the grade north of the station at a lively rate. Just as the bridge over the little creek near the station was reached a car jumped the track. This threw three others from the track and the train was going at such a rate of speed that the trestle was considerably damaged, the ties and rails being torn up and some of the bridge timbers injured.
The wreck took place only a short time before the train from the south was due, which passes here at 7:22 for Louisville. This train was crowded with holiday passengers, all of whom had to remain at Palmyra all night. Two wreckers were put to work and by keeping at it all night the track was cleared by 8:00 this morning enough to allow the trains to pass. Several freights cars were considerably torn up but none of the train men injured.


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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

92   SHILOH

August 18,1892--A serious accident befell our worthy citizen, W.E. Welker, Saturday while on his way home from his work. His mule became frightened and threw him on his head and shoulder. He is now in a critical condition, having no recollection of the accident whatever and not even knowing how and when he was hurt. He talks perfectly sensible, but the moment a statement or an inquiry is made it is forgotten and in a few moments it will be repeated. The doctor, however, thinks he will recover.


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From: The Leaf Chronicle

93   CORBANDALE

December 18,1902--Miss Ada Wickham had two ribs broken in a fall Sunday. The horse she was riding fell with her.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

94   HACKBERRY

May 1,1918--William, 14-year-old son of Mrs. William Reid, was thrown from a mule Sunday and his left arm broke. Dr. Norris set the arm and he is doing nicely.


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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf-Chronicle

95   SALEM

May 19,1893--C.D. Roberts sustained a painful accident Saturday evening at the new church now being erected near the Methodist Parsonage, on the south side. He and several other men were on a scaffold at work when the structure fell, precipitating them to the ground several feet below. Mr. Robert’s leg was caught under the falling debris and was broken between the knee and ankle. The wound will be some time in healing but no serious results are feared.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

96   ROUND POND

May 5,1937--At least two persons were painfully hurt and two automobiles damaged in an early morning collision on Highway 48 near Round Pond community today.
Arthur Waynick was treated by a local physician for severe lacerations about his face but his injuries were described as only minor. His daughter, whose name was not learned, received similar cuts but did not require medical attention.
The pair were riding in a 1929 model Ford sedan driven by Waynick’s nephew, Sidney Waynick. Their car, traveling south, and a new Terraplane sedan driven by F.W. Hillsman of Centerville, Tennessee collided almost head-on. All other passengers in both cars escaped injury.
The accident occurred about 6:00 when Hillsman said he attempted to pass a truck. He said he saw the Waynick car approaching about 150 yards away and he applied his brakes. Due to being wet from having driven through water, the brakes failed to hold securely. Just before the collision he steered sharply to the left to prevent a direct head-on crash. The right side of his car struck the left side of Waynick’s car.
A fender was damaged on the Terraplane, the radiator grill smashed and one headlight broken.
Hillsman said he carried insurance to cover damage to the Waynick car which officials of Durrett Motor Co., where it was taken for repairs, said the cost would run about $45.
No arrests were made.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

97   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

June 5,1935--While playing under a tree in front of the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Rose of District 13, Charlie Rose, Jr., five years of age was bitten by a copperhead snake about 2:30 p.m. today.
Mrs. Rose heard the child crying but at first thought that he had stuck a piece of glass in his foot and did not hasten to him. When his cries continued she investigated and discovered the child’s right ankle where the fangs of the reptile struck was swelling. She also discovered the snake and called TERA workers at the Briarwood Schoolhouse who killed the serpent.
The little boy was conveyed to a local doctor’s office where the ankle was lanced and treated. His physician said he did not believe much poison had gotten into the blood and was hopeful the injury would not be serious. Mrs. Rose and neighbors soaked the wound in kerosene and also applied the lacerated body of a live chicken to it, before rushing the boy to a physician’s office.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

98   MT. ZION

June 23,1906--Richard Harper, who lives in the 22nd District near Lone Oak, lost 150 bushels of wheat, nearly his whole crop, by fire Friday afternoon.
Mr. Harper had hauled in and stacked all but one load of his wheat and had six stacks of fine grain awaiting the thresher. When he had gone back to the field for the one remaining load he observed smoke and returning, found them in flames.
The origin of the fire is not known with certainty, but is supposed to have caught from Mr. Harper’s pipe which he had been smoking about the place.


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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

99   CORBANDALE

March 20,1888--Pole Marable, an old negro man nearly deaf, was knocked off the track by a freight train last Wednesday. He was badly hurt, but got up and walked home.

From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle
August 31,1892--Pole Marable, colored, was killed by the southbound passenger train at Marable’s Crossing below here Saturday morning. He was seen on the side of the track by the engineer of the train, who took him for the track walker and did not discover his mistake until it was too late. The man was horribly butchered, his neck being broken, his right leg cut off and one of his shoulders torn all to pieces. He was an aged negro and was an old servant of the Marable family.


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

100   MT. ZION

June 26,1935--Mrs. R.H. McCurdy is recovering from painful injuries sustained Saturday night in an automobile wreck near Mt. Zion Church. The accident occurred when the car of Mr. and Mrs. McCurdy and the automobile of R. Baldwin collided at a curve. Mrs. McCurdy was thrown against the windshield and received severe lacerations. Mr. Baldwin said the lights on the McCurdy car blinded him. Both cars were badly damaged.



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