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From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

1   1780


Moses, Isaac, Joseph and James Renfroe, Nathan and Solomon Turpin, Isaac Mayfield, James Hollis, James John and the widow Jones along with their respective families attempted a permanent settlement in Montgomery County, but because of Indian killings and uprising at Robertson Station, they left and went to Battle Creek located two miles north of Sycamore Creek where, during the night Indians attacked and killed Joseph Renfroe and James John along with his wife and family, only the widow Jones escaped to tell the tale.

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From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

2   COL. MONTGOMERY


In 1785, Col. John Montgomery became Commissioner of Clarksville and in 1789 became one of its Justice of the Peace until his death on November 27,1794 in Eddyville, Kentucky where, while hunting, he was killed by Indians while he was attempting to defend a wounded friend, Col. Hugh Timon.

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From: History of Montgomery County

3   THOMAS FLETCHER


July 3,1791--Thomas Fletcher and two friends were killed and scalped by Indians on the confluence of Cumberland River and Red River.

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From: History of Montgomery County

4   SEVIER STATION


Those slain in the vicinity of Sevier Station in 1791-1792 included Thomas Grantham, Robert and William Sevier, Mr. Boyd and Valentine Sevier IV. Many others were killed or wounded, houses burned and stock stolen or killed.

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From: History of Montgomery County

5   FARM ATTACKED


October, 1792--Obadiah Roberts' farm on Bushy Creek was attacked by Indians. His house was burned and his horses were stolen. Mr. Roberts survived the experience.

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From: History of Montgomery County

6   ATTACK ON THE CUMBERLAND


January 16, 1793--Col. Hugh Tinnin's farm was attacked by Indians. He was wounded and his horses stolen.
On the 18th Indians attacked a boat on the Cumberland and killed Major Shelby, James Harris and a man slave of Shelby's; his woman slave was kidnapped.
Within the next few days, Indians fired on several boats on the Cumberland including the Davidson boys near Clarksville.

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From: History of Montgomery County

7   SYCAMORE CREEK


April 11, 1793--John Hammond and Mr. Dowdy were killed near Sycamore Creek. A day later, two more men were killed right on the outskirts of Clarksville.

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From: History of Montgomery County

8   RED RIVER


December, 1793--John Dier and Benjamin Lindsey were killed on the Red River. John Dier had been hired to translate the Creek and Chickasaw languages for General Robertson.

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From: History of Montgomery County

9   FIRE SET


March 18,1794--Indians set fire to the house of Thomas Harris but it was not destroyed.

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From: History of Montgomery County

10   MANY KILLED


September 13,1794--Miss Roberts was killed on Red River; on the 14th, near the same place, Thomas Reasons and his wife were killed. Many other people were killed, houses burned and horses stolen over the next few days.

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From: History of Montgomery County

11   PRISONERS TAKEN


October 24,1794--Col. Isaac Titsworth and John Titsworth were moving their families and camped at the mouth of Sulphur Fork on Red River, near Clarksville. During the night they were attacked by Indians. Many were killed or wounded and several taken as prisoners, including the Colonel's daughter and other small children. Later the children were found dead and scalped along the road. Later Indians attacked a hunting party led by Col. Hugh Tinnin. The Colonel and Hugh F. Bell escaped but two of their companions, Abednego Lewellen and Evan Shelby, Jr. were killed.

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From: Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

12   FRAZIER AIDS TENNESSEE INDIANS


July 22,1909---Senator James B. Frazier, of Tennessee, has undertaken tostraighten out a tangle in the remnant of Tennessee's Indian affairs and has taken up the cases of about 100 descendants of Cherokees in the upper Cumberland river country with Special Commissioner Guion Miller of the court of claims. The names of the Cherokees in the Senator's mind were left off a list of those entitled to participate in the distribution of $4,000,000 money due Indian's who are heirs of those who were entitled to land in the Indian Territory, but who never received any. In each case where a claim has been rejected, Mr. Miller will give Senator Frazier the government's reason, and in turn, Senator Frazier will look to the interests of any meritorious claimants. They have until August 30 to file their exceptions, showing causes why their names should best have been left off the list, as mentioned.

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From: Clarksville Chronicle

13   HORRID TREACHERY - POISONING INDIANS


February 6,1844---The following is an extract from a speech lately delivered by President Houston, of Texas:
“I ask you to go back with me to ‘38. Our intercourse with the Indians was characterized by flagrant violations of justice on our part. They came in among us peaceably and tranquil. When they returned home, traders went out with them, packing poison, with a view to kill off all those who sat down at the first table, for they do not treat their ladies with so much respect as we; they are rather ungallant, and always eat first. What was the result? Three hundred and fifty Comanche were poisoned and died. Many more were poisoned, but some recovered. Tho survivors burned the men who had thus treacherously sacrificed so many of their people. This was proclaimed as a foul murder of the whites, on the part of the Indians; but it was only murdering traders who, in fact had murdered them.”

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From: Clarksville Chronicle

14   CHOCTAW INDIANS


September 30,1845--“Pitchlyn, the elective chief of 25,000 civilized Choctaws beyond the Mississippi,” says the Mississippi Free Trader, will probably visit Washington this winter for the purpose of applying to Congress for the admission of his nation as a ??? into the United States with a delegate in Congress. A Constitution, it is said, has been adopted by the voters of the nation, and every preliminary step taken for submitting it to Congress, and this distinguished chief selected as their representative.”




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