Folk Finders

Large letter Keeping the Peace   1~100


Bar dividing text


From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

1   HACKBERRY



August 10,1929--Friday afternoon, Sheriff George S. Abernathy, Constables W.T. Milling and John Westfield and Deputy W.O. Hudspeth, armed with a search warrant, raided the home of 'Sugar Tree' Joe Lyle of District 19. A forty gallon capacity still was found in the smokehouse. The complete outfit was of copper and there were 150 gallons of peach mash boiling just ready to be run off into brandy. Lyle was attending the funeral of Pugh Jackson at the time and has not yet been arrested.

Feb.12,1930--After six months of liberty, "Sugar Tree" Joe Lyle has been taken into custody and is now in the county jail to await a trial in the Montgomery County for possessing a still designed for the purpose of manufacturing intoxicating liquor.
Lyle disappeared from his home last summer after county officers during a raid on his farm discovered a still and a quantity of mash flavored with peaches. He was indicted by the grand jury, but was in Benton County in West Tennessee and under a capias. Lyle, having been indicted by the grand jury, was arrested by Sheriff Allie Pafford of Benton County.
Deputy Sheriff R.R. Pursell escorted the prisoner back to this county and he was committed to jail to await the trial in court.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

2   PALMYRA

July 30 1923--John 'Big John' Hall, Palmyra farmer, about 50 or 55 years old, and Mrs. Dollie Perigo, wife of Frank Perigo, former fireman at the Palmyra Lime Company's plant, are held in the County Jail here charged with murder in connection with the death of Perigo whose body was found about 6:00 Sunday afternoon, partially buried in a shallow gully on the farm of Sam Broome, near Palmyra, a short distance from Hall's home.
Mrs. Perigo, according to the sheriff, registered no emotion of interest in the finding of her husband's body, merely saying, "Oh, they have found him, have they?" Hall admitted under oath at the inquest at Palmyra, the sheriff says, "that he had spent about fifteen minutes at Perigo's home Friday afternoon and had loaned Perigo $15.00 with which to attend the Junior Order of United American Mechanics' picnic at Lone Oak Saturday.
Perigo's body was found by John Robertson, or Williams, a white man who lives and works on Hall's farm. He testified that he had gone near the gully to pick some luscious looking blackberries to eat while in the field. He said he was attracted to the gully by its appearance and found the body. According to Deputy Joe Stalls and Sheriff Oscar Johnson, the body had been placed in the gully at a place where the gully was about a foot wide and probably a foot and a half deep on the upper side. Some dirt had been placed over the body, and some bushes had been cut around the spot, apparently with a pocket knife and laid over the gully.
Perigo was last seen alive, so far as known, when he was passing up Weaver's Hollow going in the direction of Hall's house Friday afternoon. Mrs. Perigo is said to have ridden a horse to Hall's home early Sunday morning and during the afternoon a son of Hall's went to the home of G.Wallace Dinsmore, a Justice of the Peace in District 19 and pleaded with the magistrate to issue a warrant for the arrest of Mrs. Perigo and her ejection from his father's home. It is said the boy left the magistrate's home, apparently badly disappointed because it was his mother's dying request that Mrs. Perigo be kept away from the place. Mrs. Hall was buried two weeks ago at Blooming Grove in this county on July 17,1923.
Perigo is said to be about 49 years of age. He was twice married and is survived by two children of his first marriage (Lonnie and Ardie). They live with Thomas Jackson near Palmyra. Mrs Perigo was twice married, her first husband being Munroe Durham. She married Perigo about a year ago.
Perigo has been a resident of Palmyra for the past twenty years or more and has been a hard worker, honest, reliable, and well liked by his employer and neighbors. The body was taken to Palmyra this afternoon for interment by Hugh Allen, Shiloh undertaker, who brought it here Sunday night.

Bar dividing text

From: Semi-weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

3   PALMYRA

January 21,1896--Officer Heggie, of the lower portion of the county, a day or two ago, captured Coon Elliott of Pot-Neck, over in Stewart County, and he will be brought here to jail. Elliott is charged with stealing a horse from an old man living in the vicinity of Palmyra named Coon Powell. It is stated that the man was caught up with by reason of his attention of a woman of the vicinity in which he lived, and Officer Heggie learned of Elliott's whereabouts and captured him.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

4   PALMYRA

November 16,1878--A shooting scrape occurred last Sunday at the house of Miss Sivels on Scarce Grease Branch. It seems from what we can learn that a row was raised and Hardin Bradley shot Jim Wynn, the shooting taking effect in his arm, making a slight but painful wound.
Bradley, who was arrested the next day, was tried before Squire Wilson and bound over to the court. (This branch is off Benton Ridge Road)

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

5   DISTRICT 19

January 26, 1932--Robert Elrod of District 19 was fined $18.00 including cost by Bowman S. Meriwether, Justice of the Peace, Monday on a charge of assault and battery Friday night upon McCormack Suggs, farmer of the same district.
Suggs swore to a warrant for the arrest of Elrod after he said Elrod beat him over the head with a rock and manhandled him when he was returning from a meeting at the Union School House when the Eastern Dark Fired Tobacco Association contract was explained to a number of growers. He said Elrod had it in for him ever since a number of months ago when he quarreled with Elrod for the manner if which the latter cut his hair.
Suggs said Elrod accused him of calling him a vile name and talking about him and he said he responded "you are not worth talking about." Then he claimed Elrod leaped of him. The fight occurred near Suggs' home.
Elrod admitted to fighting with Suggs, but said Suggs had been talking about him. He was represented by W.R. Fain Jr., while Suggs was represented by G.B. Lyle.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

6   HAMPTON STATION

September 15,1931--Warrants charging assault and battery with a gun, driving a car while intoxicated, disorderly conduct have been issued against Gracey Appleton, Southside resident, as a result of a disorder on the home of Tom Willoughby near Hampton Station Monday night.
Appleton was alleged to have been disturbing on Willoughby's home and Constable Julius Stanley was summoned to arrest him. Appleton is said to have drawn a shotgun on Stanley and compelled him to leave the place.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Tobacco Leaf

7   HACKBERRY

November 19,1873--An old grudge between William Lane and John Dawson at Mt. Vernon Furnace culminated last Wednesday, 12th inst., in a rather serious affair. Lane fired three shots at Dawson, the last one taking effect, passing through Dawson's right lung. Tom Murphy, a brother-in-law of Dawson, was deputized by the magistrate in the neighborhood to arrest Lane, who fled from the scene of action. Murphy went in search of Lane at several places and in the rounds, searched the premises of William Thompson, a collier at the Mt. Vernon works. Failing to find Lane, some words occurred between Thompson and Murphy, the latter finally leaving, making some threats. After night, Murphy returned to Thompson's, and demanded the door be opened. Thompson refused, telling him that Lane was not there; whereupon Murphy broke the door down and entered, when Thompson struck him in the forehead just below the hair with a hatchet, breaking the skull in, depressing the brain, and a second blow inflicting a severe gash on the back of the head.
Dr. Ussery and Dr. Eldridge were called in to see to the wounded men. Murphy's case required a very skillful surgical operation, which they performed and both parties are doing well with fair prospect of recovery.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

8   DISTRICT 17

May 5,1941--Verile Lee Vance, 33, of the 17th District, was allegedly caught making whiskey in a still described by officers as little more than a cooking utensil, was scheduled to face U.S. Commissioner W.B. Corlew for arraignment at 2:00 tomorrow afternoon.
Vance was charged on a federal warrant with owning and operating an unregistered still and possessing unstamped liquor, after officers said they raided the small outfit at the edge of the woods near his home Saturday. They said Vance was in the act of making a run on the small ten-gallon capacity still at the time, and had made a gallon and a half of whiskey. That was confiscated along with four barrels of mash.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

9   SOUTHSIDE


September 2,1919---On Saturday night last, Sam Baker, colored, caught Dave Slayden, also colored, in an upstairs room of his home. For what purpose Slayden was concealed in Baker’s house is not known, but the two engaged in a scuffle with Baker succeeding in throwing Slayden out the window, which resulted in a fractured skull for the intruder. The extent of injury was not learned at the present.
Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

10    DISTRICT 13

June 13,1933--Clarence Byard, about 42, resident of District 13, was lodged in the county jail Monday afternoon by Deputy Sheriff Tom E. Huggins, and Gracey Cotton is at home suffering from a pistol wound in his cheek as a result of an altercation Sunday night at Brodie's Filling Station on old 13 and 48.
Byard is charged with assault and battery with a revolver. Hearing has not yet been set.
Cotton told Deputy Huggins that Byard shot him during an argument when he went to him a second time Sunday night to purchase liquor. One bullet grazed the side of his skull and the other lodged in the cheek.
Genie O'Neal, Negro, said he heard the shooting when he had gone into the filling station to buy some peanuts. He hurried out and found Cotton wounded. O'Neal conveyed him home. Cotton was not believed to be critically wounded.



See article #32 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

11   PALMYRA


January 19,1933--Making, according to Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont, who with Deputy T.E. Huggins arrested him, a complete confession to the robbery and slaying Sunday night of Kleeman Hughes, 34-year-old partially paralyzed farmer of the Palmyra community, John Robert Davenport, 27, was jailed here this morning without bond.
Davenport, captured about 3:30 a.m. today by the weary sheriff and deputy on a road on the edge of Houston County a short distance from the Montgomery County line, admitted in route to Clarksville, according to the sheriff, that he beat Hughes down with a stick he had cut in the woods near the Hughes home, took $38.00 from a purse in his trousers pocket and left him dying on the roadside.
The deed completed, Davenport went to Nashville where he paid $25.00 for a secondhand Ford Coupe in which he returned to this section early Monday night. From this city, he went to Houston County to accompany a woman who had been with him part of the time since the robbery and slaying of Hughes.
We suspected Davenport in our first investigation of the case Sunday night and had since been on his trail constantly.
When placed under arrest, the sheriff had not mentioned the killing nor had he said a word to Davenport until he arrived at the scene of the crime. Stopping his car Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont asked the prisoner "who used a mailbox directly in front of them?" Davenport replied he believed it belonged to the widow Hughes. "Isn't that Kleeman Hughes' mailbox?" the officer suddenly asked, and Davenport replied that the officer was trying to frame him. Confronted with proof he had gathered after tireless investigations the prisoner declared, "You know too much, I'll just tell you the whole thing."
He then related the circumstances leading up to the murder. He said he did not mean to kill Hughes but after he had struck him, the victim cried out. He hit him again to silence him, and said he must have struck him harder than he intended.
Davenport confessed before W.B. Corlew, Justice of the Peace, his reason for killing: "the depression and his desire to buy an automobile". He will be formally charged with murder in the first degree.
Davenport had only a few cents of money in his possession when arrested this morning. He had a bill of sale for the automobile he purchased in Nashville.

See article #33 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

12   DISTRICT 19

July 17,1923--Two young men, Andrew Pulley and Frank Powell, have furnished bonds before Marable McFall, Justice of the Peace of District 19, for their appearance at a preliminary hearing now set for July 28 in connection with charges lodged against them as a result of a cutting and disorderly affair Saturday night a short distance from the Central Church in District 19.
William Vaughn, about 20 years of age, son of Riley Vaughn, is in serious condition from wounds alleged to have been inflicted by Pulley during the trouble which followed an ice cream supper at the church. The men, it seems, were engaged in an argument regarding their attention to some girls at the supper and according to Joe Stalls, Deputy Sheriff at Palmyra, who arrested Pulley and Powell, both the defendants made battle on Vaughn. There is said to be a grudge of long standing between Vaughn and Pulley, which is believed to have contributed to the trouble.
Pulley is charged with assault and battery with a knife with intent to commit murder and charges of unlawfully carrying a pistol and disorderly conduct were brought against Powell. Vaughn suffered from a four inch knife wound across his left breast.

See article #34 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

13   LOUISE

January 11,1937--Five hours after he was charged with having stolen the 1931 Model Ford Coupe belonging to Boyd Dillard from in front of Mrs. Lee Chester's Roadhouse on Highway 48 Saturday afternoon, Dillon Baggett of the Louise community was arrested by Deputy Sheriff J.A. Rinehart. The auto, its front bumper, radiator, and hood badly bent up was found where it had been abandoned on the creek bank some 300 yards from Baggett's home.
Baggett, according to the officer, did not deny riding to his home in the car, but he claimed he did not remember whether he had driven it there or not.
Deputy Rinehart said he was also investigating a 'tip' that Baggett was drunk at the time the car was taken, and that a second count of driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquors may also be brought against him.
Mr. Dillard had left the switch key in the lock.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

14   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

November 9,1918--Henry Whitlow and Ruth Meeks, meat sellers of District 13, having partaken of 'Joy Water' yesterday, took Commerce Street for a speedway in the afternoon and in their hilarious ride down the hill, crashed in the jail yard, tearing their meat wagon to pieces, crippling the horse, and bruising their own anatomies considerably. Deputy Sheriff Johnson happened on the scene just as the wreck occurred and with humanitarian aims gave each a nice bed and cell in the jail. Considering their celebration incomplete without some fireworks, they proceeded to tear up their bedding and set fire to it with some matches that had escaped the eagle eye of the jailer. The hose was turned on their cells and the fire put out before either celebrant was scorched. Taken before Squire Smith this morning, the magistrate furnished the 'set pieces' for their desired fireworks by fining each a sum amounting with cost to $26.00.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

15   ANTIOCH

January 20,1913--The skeleton of a man in summer clothing was discovered in a dense woods near Hackberry Thursday night by a crowd of opossum hunters headed by Johnson Yarbrough. The young hunters were frightened by the ghastly sight and did not make an investigation until Friday.
An examination next day showed that all the flesh was decayed except part of one foot which was protected by a shoe, and that possibly two years had elapsed since death. From the dried fragment of flesh in the shoe, it was ascertained the man was white. The sum of $1.61 was found in the pockets, a small collapsible drinking cup, a memorandum book without entries, compliments of McEwen Bank of McEwen, Tennessee, in it two ticket coupons from tickets bought at Clarksville and Cumberland City. Nearby gold-rimmed spectacles were found. The teeth indicated a person of middle age. No signs of violence or robbery and who he was and how the remains came there are mysteries. Found on a hillside in a dense woods about two miles from Hackberry and half a mile from Antioch Church.
Squire Matthew Sanders was notified and after holding an inquest, had the bones and clothing put in a box and buried.
During the first week in August, Ed Bagwell, who was cultivating a field of tobacco within twenty yards of the spot where the skeleton was found, saw many buzzards flying over the spot.



January 23,1913--The skeleton found near Antioch Church last Thursday night, is thought to be a Mr. James C. Bunnell.
On July 29 Mr. Bunnell of Clarksville disappeared. On that day a carnival company was setting up its shows on the Public Square. Mr. Bunnell came uptown and as late as noon was seen at the corner of Franklin and Second Street at the Northern Bank. Since then, he has never been seen nor heard from.
The skeleton found was about the size of Mr. Bunnell. Mr. Bunnell had a brother, Dolph Bunnell living at McEwen. He also had a nephew connected at that time with the Bank of McEwen. In the pockets of the coat was found a memorandum book marked 'compliments of Bank of McEwen, McEwen, Tennessee'.
When Mr. Bunnell left home on the morning of July 29, he wore a pair of low tan shoes. The shoes found on the skeleton were also of that pattern. He also used eye glasses and at all times carried a pair with him. A pair of gold-rimmed glasses were found near the skeleton.
Relatives have been notified of the find and Mr. Blake Bunnell of Erin and Lee Orrell of Clarksville will go to Hackberry tomorrow and endeavor to identify the remains.
Mr. Bunnell wore a black hat when he disappeared, but the hat found was brown; it may have faded.

January 20,1913--Two and a half years ago Morris Minor of District 19 disappeared during the summer. After he had been gone for several days, relatives became alarmed and formed a search. He walked away from home and was seen by railroad section men and others coming toward Clarksville but at Hematite all trace of him was lost. He was never seen nor heard from again.
It is only a few miles from Hematite to where the skeleton was found. Minor was a middle-age man, nearsighted and wore glasses all the time. The skeleton matches a man of his stature. He frequently traveled on the L & N Railroad between Cumberland City and Clarksville and would likely have the ticket coupons in his pockets.

January 23,1913--Mr. Albert Minor, a brother, was accompanied from Hackberry by Mr. H.T. Hodges to the spot where the remains of a human skeleton were buried. When the teeth and skull were shown him, Mr. Minor almost instantly declared that it was not that of his brother.
The human skeleton was found by possum hunters near Hematite last Thursday night.

Bar dividing text

From:

16   


Bar dividing text

From:Daily Leaf-Chronicle

17   HACKBERRY

November 20, 1896--Reports of doings of White-Cappers comes from the 18th District of the county.
Several nights ago two unknown men went to the home of James Kelly, a planter living on what is known as Goolinghorn Branch, and called him to the door, when he was shot at several times, one of the bullets grazing his right temple and another passing through the lower part of his vest. The regulators ran before they were discovered.
A night or two after the above occurrence, regulators visited Nick Lyle's home in the same district, and after calling Lyle and several farm hands to the door, they began a regular fusillade. A bullet passed through the clothing of one of the farm hands but nobody was wounded. The regulators fled.

Bar dividing text

From:Tennessee Watchman

18   MORE COUNTERFEITS!!!

February 9,1821--Counterfeit 2 dollar notes on the Branch Bank of the State of Tennessee at Clarksville, have made their appearence in circulation, purporting to have been engraved by Murray, Draper, Fairman, & Co. with their names on the bottom of the note, encompassed in a nice border and also purporting to be signed by Hu. L. White, Pres. and Luke Lea, Cashier executed with tolerable skill, though much rougher and paler than the genuine notes; the paper is something inferior to that on which the genuine notes are engraved and written-but the writing of the plate, as also the end borders, are so nicely and well imitated as to defy detection. Those that hve made their appearance, are of letter X payable to J. Hoston instead of J.H. Poston, dated May 17,1815, No.5189; the other letter Z payable to J.H. Poston, No.1646, dated Jan.4,1817. There is a criterion by which the base notes can be detected, (by reference to a genuine note) at the top on the right and left hand, the word "TWO" is environed with nice borders-on them the flower border is always to be found on the righthand and the smooth border on the left; the case with the counterfeits are precisely different-the flower border is always to be found on the left and the curve line around the word "of" in the beginning of the style of the Bank on the base notes is more than double as heavy as that around the same word on genuine notes. To the genuine notes the number is in small roman letters, the counterfeit has a large capital "N" in copperplate hand without any letter "o" at the end.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

19   ESCAPED


January 31,1890--William Carter, col., sent to the penitentiary from this county in December,’88 for mule stealing, his sentence being for four years, escaped from that institution soon after Christmas. Last Saturday Sheriff Charles W. Staton was informed that he was living near Palmyra, going by the name of William Hensley, and went down there for him, but he left the neighborhood a day previous.
Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

20   SHILOH

March 17, 1913--A runaway wedding which resulted in a pitched revolver battle took place at Shiloh in this county Sunday evening. The groom received a bullet in the head said to have been been used by Wash Mitchell, also of Shiloh vicinity.
Burl Allen, who is a thrifty young person of that section, and Miss Lola Sykes were married yesterday by Esquire H.E. Allen, member and Chaplain of the Montgomery County Quarterly Court and brother of the groom. After the ceremony, the couple, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Cleve Allen, went to Palmyra to take a train. At the depot, they were overtaken by the bride's father, John Sykes, accompanied by Wash Mitchell and the shooting followed.
Mitchell, it is said, claimed he was deputized to arrest Allen. After his wounds were dressed, Gus Carver, a Deputy Sheriff at Palmyra, brought him to Clarksville this morning. It is claimed no warrant ever was sworn out for him and he was released. It is understood a warrant has been sworn out for Mitchell, who it is now claimed, is posing as an officer without authority.
Allen's statement said Mitchell fired in his face.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

21   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

February 24, 1913--John and William Chadwick, sons of J.H. Chadwick of District 13, are mixed up in a shooting affray in Stringtown Saturday night in which Burnis Suitor lost his life and Douglas Suiter was wounded; today they waived a preliminary hearing and will await action of Criminal Court. Both young men are in jail. It is understood they will make a plea of self-defense when the case comes to trial. They all attended a dance at the home of Jesse Byard. During the evening a row took place and the Chadwicks left. It is claimed that when only a short distance away from the Byard residence, they were come upon by Burnis, Douglas and Cleveland Suiter, and the shooting took place. The bullet that killed Burnis Suiter struck just below his heart. Douglas Suiter was shot through the left knee, sustaining a serious wound. The Chadwick boys proceeded to their home and awaited the sheriff, who had been notified by telephone. The body of Burnis Suiter was buried at Macedonia Church Sunday afternoon after funeral services at the home of William Suiter by Rev. Mr. Hensley.
Antioch Cemetery


Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf-Chronicle

22   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

July 31, 1923--The probable use of bloodhounds in an effort to run down thieves who Monday night broke into and robbed James Black's general store in the old Fambrough stand in Stringtown, District 13, was considered early this morning by Sheriff Oscar Johnson upon request of one of Black's sons who notified the sheriff of the robbery.
The prizes, consisting of pocket knives, watches, etc., on a punchboard, were taken together with an undetermined amount of money from the cash drawer and a quantity of merchandise. Officers investigated the robbery during the day.
The robbers entered the store through a window and it was discovered this morning when the store was opened.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

23   PALMYRA

March 25, 1913--Another tragedy reported from near Palmyra. In this instance, two hearts which would flutter as one and an irate father were the main makings of the play.
Miss Heallon Speakman, 14, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. U.S. Speakman, is the young lady. John Floyd, a stalwart young fellow who has just attained his majority and a neighbor to the Speakman's, fell head over heels in love wih this winsome little Miss. It was one of those life or death cases and meant everything to him.
Columbus Hall, kindhearted uncle of Miss Speakman, consented to assist young Floyd in securing his license and did so, going on bond. At the last minute and when the happy couple was on the point of eloping to a minister, Father Speakman got wind of what was transpiring and promptly forthwith and at that identical moment went on the warpath. Before the young lady left her home, her father appeared with a warrant and had Floyd and Mr. Hall arrested, charged with perjury and falsifying to the County Clerk about the girl's age.
Both men were given a hearing before Squire Joe Corban and bound over to the Grand Jury. Hall furnished $1,000 bond and was released, but the would-be groom was not so fortunate and was put in jail where he languishes awaiting the slow approach of the next Grand Jury.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf-Chronicle

24   LOUISE

July 23, 1923--Deputy Sheriff Joe Stalls and J.B. Hussey, bloodhound owner of Erin, were unsuccessful in their efforts Sunday to trail robbers who entered the store of Sam Harris at Louise Saturday night and looted Davis' cash drawer and the stamp drawer in the post office of between $10 to $16 in cash.
The dogs struck the trail at the store and kept on it in and out of creeks for a distance of about a mile but finally lost the scent. About $8 or $9 was secured from the post office drawer and about $7 from the store cash drawer. The thieves forced an entrance through the back door of the store.
Sheriff Oscar Johnson was notified and ordered the bloodhounds sent to Palmyra, where Deputy Stalls joined with the owner in the search.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

25   LOUISE

July 31, 1913--Joe Poole struck John Schmittou on the head with a table leg at Louise Tuesday inflicting a severe wound. Schmittou is a youth. They met in a store at Louise and Poole, it is said, offered indignities which the boy resented. When he did, Poole picked up a leg off a new table, which was part of the store's stock, and struck him a heavy blow. He was rendered unconscious by the lick and has since suffered several hemorrhages from the ears and nose. Poole was arrested and put under bond.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

26   MT. ZION

October 21, 1933--T.W. Blackford, groceryman of the Mt. Zion Community near Lone Oak, returned to his home last night with a strange kidnapping story. He was held captive for two weeks by two men who accosted him in Nashville. They forced him to drive them through Florida and return.
Blackford was able Friday morning to effect his escape in Chattanooga when the two men left him alone for the first time. He stated that they entered a restaurant to get breakfast and left him alone in the car. When they left, he started for home. The kidnappers were known as George and Sam.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf-Chronicle

27   HACKBERRY

July 14, 1923--A number of barrels, a kiln, and other paraphenalia used in connection with the operation of a still were destroyed late Friday afternoon by Sheriff Oscar Johnson, Deputies Herschel Walker and Joe Stalls, and Constable J.R. Harper, near the Oakridge Schoolhouse on the Districts 18 & 20 line. According to the Sheriff, there was evidence that the still had been in operation on the site about a week ago.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

28   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS

December 11, 1899--Saturday night during a crap game a difference arose between Mike Ward and Charley Arms. Ward went for his shotgun and when he returned with it, Arms took it away from him and broke it across his head, knocking him down.
Ward claims that he grabbed a stone as he fell, and jumping to his feet as Arms started away, threw the stone at him, striking Arms in the back of the head.
Arms is also wounded in the hand, as he alleges, by a pistol ball. Arms, it is understood, claims that the pistol doing the shooting was held by Walker Ward, Mike's son, and that the stone which hit him in the back of the head was thrown by John Wolard. Two shots were fired. After the fracas was over, S. B. Arms, father of Charley, notified the officers. Sheriff A.C. Stafford and Deputy G.L. Welker investigated, but are making no arrests at this time. This morning the Wards and Wolard came and gave themselves up. They will waive an examining trial and give bond for their appearance at Criminal Court.

Bar dividing text

From: Progress-Democrat

29   HEMATITE

September 7, 1892--News of a robbery at Hematite on the Clarksville Mineral Railroad has been received here. Frank Shean is the L & N agent at this place and a day or two ago he left his office for a short while, going down to a creek nearby to bathe. When he went out he noticed a yellow, cock-eyed negro seated on the platform, but thought nothing of his presence. Upon returning to the office in a short while, Mr. Shean found that the place had been broken into, his gun had been taken from its accustomed place and his trunk was missing, while the yellow negro had disappeared.
Upon searching the surrounding woods, Mr. Shean found his trunk but it had been broken into, a perfectly new suit of clothes that had never been worn was gone as was also $50 in cash. No arrests had been made at last account nor can any definite clue be found as to the guilty party. Suspicion points to the cock-eyed mulatto, but who he is or where he is Mr. Shean does not know.
Mr. Shean was formerly L & N agent at the Princeton Junction near Clarksville, is well-known in this city and his loss is regretted by many friends and acquaintances.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

30   PALMYRA

November 28, 1914--Sheriff Welker returned last night from Palmyra, where he went in answer to the notice given him of the burglary of the Post Office. He states that he made a close investigation of the house and all papers, etc. on the floor, but failed to find anything that would give him a clue to act upon. The care used to cover up the tracks, said Mr. Welker, indicates the robbers were no amateurs but evidently professionals who understand their business thoroughly.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Chronicle

31   CORBANDALE

October 30, 1875--A negro named Jasper Butler shot and killed another named William Scott near here last Tuesday. From the evidence given at the inquest, Butler was at Pete Eldridge's in bed, and Scott came up and inquired for Butler; on being told he was in a house a few steps off, Scott said he was going to kill him, got Pete's gun and started for him. Butler, hearing the threats, got his pistol and stepped to the door, when Scott fired at him, the shot taking effect in the door facing; Butler fired two shots at Scott, both taking effect and killing him. Butler went and gave himself up to Esquire Elliott, who summoned a jury and held an inquest on the body yesterday morning. The verdict was "killed in self-defense". They made Butler dig the grave and help bury Scott. These two negroes came from Alabama last year and were thought to be bad characters.

November 6,1875--The report of the Butler-Scott murder that I sent last week was correct so far as known then, but a very different light has been thrown on it since. The Negroes, Pete, Letha and Violet Eldridge and Hester Street were implicated with Jasper Butler and all arraigned and tried before Esquire Elliot and found guilty of murder in the 1st degree and sent to jail today. Mrs. Sivels, the main witness, was present at the time of the murder and testified that it was premeditated and cold blooded. The jury of inquest did not know this fact. The evidence the prisoners gave which I reported to you was all false. It was given to hide their guilt. There are 18 or 20 witnesses in the case and the outrageous deed caused a great deal of excitement in this neighborhood.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

32   DISTRICT 13


December 31,1886---William Beard, who lives in District 13, on the south side of the river, is the meanest man in Montgomery County, and we believe that quite a number of other counties would have to be searched before a worse specimen could be found. Beard beat his wife Christmas Day so severely as to break one of her arms and seriously bruise her body in many places. Constable Bob Lyle got out a writ for Beard’s arrest and went to his house Sunday morning to serve it, but Beard drew a knife and swore he would die before any officer should take him in custody and the Constable desisted.
Sunday night, Constable Charles Lowe, of the district, accompanied by Chief Carkuff, of the Clarksville Police Force, George Armstrong and Tom Clark, went to beard’s house and arrested him without difficulty. He put his hands in his pocket when first “commanded to surrender”, but then sudden appearance of officer Carkuff’s pistol made him throw both hands above his head and plead for mercy.
Since his arrest, Beard’s wife has disclosed the fact that he was a fugitive from justice in Hickman County. He broke jail at Centerville, and $50 reward was offered for his capture. The crime he committed in Hickman County is also indicative of his fiendish nature. He was charged with cruelty to his stepchild in holding his feet in the fire until they were badly burned.
Beard waived examination and is now in jail in this place awaiting trial in the Criminal Court
Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

33   GOOLINGHORN

May 10,1907--C.S. Wickham was arrested last night for being drunk and disorderly, and fined $20 in the city court this morning. Wickham came to Clarksville from his home in the country and loaded up on mean whiskey. He became very disorderly, and at a late hour last night he was arrested in the eastern part of the city by Lieut. Alsbrooks. He resisted and acted boisterously on the way to the station, waking up many residents. During the mix-up, Officer Alsbrooks was struck on the head several times by Wickham. This morning he claimed his mind was a complete blank about his lark and he said he remembered nothing about it. But for the fact that Wickham has borne a good reputation and was under the influence of liquor he would have been given the limit in the city court.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

34   BREAK-IN

May 24,1873--Some persons or person broke into the kitchen of H.P. Dorris on the Charlotte Pike last Wednesday night and carried off a barrel of meal, a lot of soap, coffee, buckets, etc. To save the family some trouble, they also milked the cow before leaving.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

35   PALMYRA

July 24,1933--Will Turner, Palmyra Ferryman, was held to the state over a $250 bond as a result of stabbing Wiley Divasier at Palmyra Saturday night following an argument. The hearing was held before Squire W.B. Corlew. Divasier was not seriously hurt it was said. Both men were alleged to have been drunk when the trouble occurred.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

36   AWFUL TRAGEDY


June 26,1849---We are under the painful necessity of chronicling one of those awful tragedies, at the recital of which humanity is shocked. On Tuesday morning last, James Green fell by the hand of Richard E.A. Washington. We have heard different rumors in reference to this lamentable occurrence. All accounts, however, substantially agree in stating that there was not the slightest provocation given by the deceased, which could justify the horrid deed.
Green was a poor, inoffensive old man. He lived near Washington. Some of his pigs, we learn, had committed some depredations on Washington’s wheat, probably Washington shot several of them. Green told him that he would prefer that he (Washington) should be annoyed by them. Washington pronounced this declaration to be false, and with his gun shot Green in the body. Green walked to his humble cabin, some 30 paces distant, and directly expired.
Washington was very much addicted to the use of ardent spirits being nearly always under its influence to a greater o a less extent. We trust that this awful occurrence will speak, trumpet-lounged, to the young-aye, to all-admonishing them to beware how they became habituated to a vice, which so often transforms man, the image of the Most High God, into a fiend incarnate.
On Tuesday last, over Coroner, N.M. Langford, summoned a Jury and held an Inquest over the body of Green. We understand that the facts above stated, were proven before them. Their verdict was, that the deceased was willfully murdered by Washington.
Constable Smith, with a posse, on Tuesday evening went to the house of Washington to arrest him but, as Washington was well armed, and swore he would kill any man that attempted to take him, and in fact fired at the company; and as they had only one or two guns along, they returned to town. Constable Benton and Smith, with a well armed posse again left, on Wednesday, in search of Washington. But when they arrived at his house, Lo! “the bird had flown!” Washington lives in the northern part of our county, within some half of the Kentucky line. We understand that he was seen on Wednesday, over in Logan County, Kentucky.
We regret to add, that Washington is a man of family; and that Green’s widow and orphan children are left in the depths of poverty, to mourn his untimely death.
Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

37   LONE OAK


September 5,1930--Shot through the abdomen during a quarrel in Lone Oak this morning, Douglas Akin, 19-year-old farmer, died at 9:45 this morning at Clarksville Hospital to which he was conveyed immediately after the tragedy.
Joe Castleberry, Lone Oak Blacksmith, alleged to have been the slayer, is in the county jail here to which he was conveyed by Dr. H.C. Guerin, Slayden Physician. He faces a first degree murder charge before W.B. Corlew, Justice of the Peace. Date for the hearing has not been set.
The shooting was said to have grown out of an argument in which the two men engaged about 8:30 this morning. The victim was standing on the front porch of Morgan Brothers, Lone Oak Merchants, when Castleberry approached him from his blacksmith shop across the road.
An eyewitness, Nolen Poole, stated that Castleberry had dared Akin to follow him to his shop. Poole said that Castleberry came out of his shop, armed with a revolver, and began firing at Akin. The witness estimated the blacksmith fired five times. Akin reeled and fell on his face.
The stricken man then arose and walked several yards, with his hands pressed to the wound. Meeting Poole, who had started towards him, Akin asked that he convey him to his wife, Mrs. Jennie Pritchett Akin.
Poole started for his car, but when he returned in it, Percy Morgan had the wounded man is his car ready to convey him to the hospital. This was the last time Poole saw Akin alive.
Castleberry left the scene walking, it was said, after having stated he was going to surrender to Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont. Castleberry was given a ride to Clarksville by Dr. Guerin.
Among the eyewitnesses of the shooting were Herman Huggins, Barney Underwood, and Cecil Pritchett.

September 6,1930--Preliminary hearing for Joe Castleberry, 48-year-old Lone Oak blacksmith, charged with first degree murder in connection with the slaying Friday morning of Douglas Akin, is tentatively set for 10:00 Tuesday morning September 9, it was announced today.
H.B. Stout of the local bar has been retained by Castleberry as counsel. Castleberry remained in jail today, denied bond on the first degree murder charge.
The slaying took place at Lone Oak between Castleberry’s Blacksmith Shop and the general store of Morgan Brothers. Castleberry obtained his .32 caliber Smith & Wesson pistol from his blacksmith shop and shot Akin through and through.
Castleberry rode to Clarksville with Dr. H.C. Guerin of Slayden, and surrendered at the County Jail while Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont was at Lone Oak investigating the circumstances of the killing. “I had no fear of Castleberry becoming a fugitive” said the sheriff, “believing he would come to town to surrender or wait somewhere for me. I merely went to Lone Oak for a preliminary investigation of the case.”

See article #37 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

38   DISTRICT 16

George Talley kills Dr. Brake

November 23,1888--Montgomery and Dickson Counties have never been joined in a deeper tragedy than that enacted at Woods Valley, Dickson County, last Monday evening, the slayer being a resident of this county, and the slain of Dickson County.
Dr. James G. Brake was a physician of that neighborhood. He was 34 years old, a bachelor, a good physician, stood well in his community, and was highly regarded. He was George Talley’s family physician and as such frequently visited his house.
In Talley’s family was a daughter, Miss Ella, 15 years of age, whom Dr. Brake visited professionally and treated last spring and summer. Recently, she was discovered to be enceinte, and she stated that Dr. Brake was the author of her shame, he having accomplished her ruin while attending on her. Last week Dr. Brake was sent for by Mr. Talley. When he reached his house he was ushered into a room in which were Mr. and Mrs. Talley and their daughter. The young woman charged him with her ruin. He did not deny the charge the Talleys say, but asked for time in which to consider the situation. Mr. Talley gave him five days in which to make restitution by marrying his daughter or after that take the consequences. On Saturday, Mr. Talley was in Clarksville and while here, obtained license for the marriage of Dr. Brake and his daughter, Miss Ella.
On Sunday, Lafayette Grigsby of the Charlotte bar, visited the Talley home, commissioned to act for Dr. Brake and to obtain the best compromise of the case possible. Mr. Talley was not at home and Mr. Grigsby’s visit resulted in nothing. On Monday the five days given by Talley to Brake expired.

November 23,1888--Dr. Brake lived on his own place at Woods Valley with the family of Wiley Slayden, who looked after his farm and mill. This is six miles from George Talley’s and eight miles from Charlotte. At dark Monday evening Dr. Brake returned from Charlotte. He had put his horse in the stable and fed him and had been at the house only a few minutes when the furious barking of Slayden’s dog attracted attention. Mr. Slayden and the Doctor went out towards the barn to see what was the matter, the former carrying a lantern. Just as they reached the gate between the stable lot and the yard a shot was fired and Brake fell. Slayden retreated, recognizing Talley. Another shot was fired into Brake’s prostrate body, and to make assurance doubly sure his assailant clubbed him brutally with his gun, killing him instantly.
Talley got on his horse and came to Clarksville, arriving here at an early hour Tuesday morning. He at once told what he had done and why he did it, making no effort to conceal anything. On Wednesday, Sheriff Grigsby, of Dickson County, came here after him. He surrendered to the Sheriff Wednesday and yesterday Sheriff Grigsby, Sheriff C.W. Staton, and others carried him to Charlotte for trial.
George Talley is about 50 years old. He is a poor man, though a good citizen and is respected and well connected in this and Dickson Counties. He claims only to have done what every other true man would do-shoot the despoiler of his home on failing to make what restitution was in his power. On the other hand, the friends of Dr. Brake, who also stood well in the community, claim that whatever connection he may have had with the poor, unfortunate girl, there were others implicated and circumstances did not justify his death. It is a terrible affair either way.
The body of Dr. James G. Brake was brought to Clarksville Wednesday evening and shipped to Goodlettsville, Davidson County, yesterday for interment.

November 27,1888--George Talley was brought to Clarksville Saturday and gave bond in the sum of $15,000 for his appearance at the next term of circuit court to be held in March. His bondsmen were John Talley and E.W. Cunningham, W.B. Dunlop, A.H. Abernathy, and G.T. Cunningham. The grand jury of Dickson County has indicted Talley for murder in the first degree.

July 27,1891---George Talley was acquitted at Charlotte Saturday of the murder of Dr. J.G. Brake over two years ago, the details of which are familiar to the public. The jury was out only a few minutes before the verdict was reached. The case has been closely contested, this being the third trial, and the first and second ones resulting in a hung jury. George Talley is buried in Talley-Abernathy Cemetery on Green Lane.
Talley-Abernathy Cemetery


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Star

39   DISTRICT 20


July 1,1924--In the preliminary hearing Saturday afternoon before Wiley J. Smith, Justice of the Peace, Hillman Heggie, District 20 farmer, was held to the state on charges of owning and operating a still.
Heggie was arrested Thursday afternoon by Deputy Sheriffs Joe Stalls and T.B. Rawlings on his farm and is said to admit joint ownership and operation of the still. Between 300 and 400 gallons of mash were found near the still

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle

40   PALMYRA


August 10,1908--Sunday night between 1 and 2 A.M. a group of 50 to 60 masked men came into Palmyra in search of a man by the name of William O'Neal of Drakesboro, Ky, representing himself as an insurance agent.
There are two roads leading to the direction of Shiloh over which telephone wires are strung. The wires were cut on both roads before the party arrived in town. Upon their arrival, they went to the telephone exchange where they found the door unlocked, and entering, they covered the operator, F.N. Gleaves, who was asleep, with guns in the hands of 4 men. He was ordered to put on his shoes, when they took him down to a bridge about 500 yards distant, holding him about 30 minutes during which time the hotel was searched for this man, O'Neal. The latter, however, had left in the direction of Clarksville on the 7 P.M. train the previous evening.
Some of the men were on foot and others on horseback. They came down the two hollows that led into the town. The man for whom they had been hunting had been in Palmyra for several days and had spent a good deal of his time about the store of Isham Davis. The man was thought, it seems, to be a detective.

Bar dividing text

From: The Clarksville Star

41   HEMATITE


August 15,1924--The Ford touring car belonging to Lucian H. Wyatt, which was stolen last August 4 when parked on South Third Street while the owner was shopping, was found Monday in Guthrie, Ky. by Claude Kimbrough, Todd County Sheriff, and restored to the grateful owner. The Ford was in good condition with the exception of a flat tire, which probably brought about recovery as the driver possibly decided that it was easier to take another Ford than to worry about the menial task of changing a tire.

Bar dividing text

From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck's Journal)

42   HACKBERRY


June 29,1888--Last Friday, the Leaf contained a notice of the death of Mrs. Letha Sanders, wife of Robert Finney Sanders, of the 18th District. Mrs. Sanders died suddenly Thursday morning, the 21st, about 2 o’clock. She was a sister to Burrell Owens, merchant of Palmyra.
A sensational sequel to this death occurred Wednesday when the husband of the dead woman was arrested, charged with her murder. He is now in jail without bail, awaiting development in the case.
From what we can learn, Sanders and his wife, who have been married about four years, did not live happily together and at times it was his custom to abuse her.
On Wednesday afternoon before his wife’s death, he went to Dr. Eldridge and giving the symptoms of a foul stomach, asked for medicine for his wife. Dr. Eldridge asked if it was necessary for him to go and see her, but Sanders said not, whereupon the doctor gave him two doses of Calomel and Dover's Powders, with instruction to take one at 6 pm and the other at midnight.
Sanders says he carried the medicine home and delivered it to his wife; that she started to get supper, but he stopped her and cooked the meal himself, and churned; that she took the first dose at the appointed time and they retired to bed early, no one being in the house except himself, wife and two little children. He says about 10 o’clock she woke him, complaining of a pain in the stomach and he gave her a dose of Hoffman’s anodyne for it; they both went to sleep again and in an hour she woke him again, in the meantime having grown alarmingly worse. He rang the farm bell and hallooed for his neighbors but none of them heard him; that his wife declared she was going to die and would not listen to his leaving her to go for a neighbor; that she grew worse, until he saw that death was near at hand, when he left her and ran to the top of the hill, calling to his neighbors, Hunt and Yarbrough, but when they got there she was dead.
The neighbors who assembled at Sanders' found his wife laid on the bed in a neat, clean gown, which he declined to let them change. He was also averse to an examination of the body and refused on the afternoon of the burial to let Dr. Wickham hold a post mortem examination.
For a time, he has been dividing his attentions between his wife and a young woman of the neighborhood, who is now reported to be enceinte by him and we have it on good authority that his wife’s grave was not filled before he and this woman, taking up his two children, left the grave together. His refusal to allow an examination of the body, his careless indifference since, and threats that he is said to have made against his wife’s life, led to the belief of foul play and to his arrest.
Sanders was present Wednesday when her body was exhumed and examined, and a hog would have shown as much feeling as he did under the circumstances.
Mrs. Letha Sanders died on the night of June 20,1888. On June 27,1888 her husband, Robert Finney, was arrested and charged with her murder. The following letter of early March 1888 ws written by her sister, Carrie, to her brother, Burrell, concerning the status of Letha and Robert Finney:
“Tell me how Finnie and Letha are getting along? I hear that people think he and his girl friend will marry soon. If I was Letha, I would leave him so quick it would made his head swim. His going off and leaving her and children by theirselves at nights shows he wants to get rid of her and he will some day, you see if he don’t. Why don’t you and some others disguise yourselves and waylay the road some night when he goes to Thomas Jackson’s and beat him nearly to death. Leave life, only a low life. Rascal! He has destroyed her happiness for life and the sweetness of her children. Why can’t mother take her home to live with her?”

July 3,1888--It has developed that R.F. Sanders charged with wife murder on the night of June 20, bought on June 15, of Askew & Edwards, a bottle of Strychnine, saying that it was for the killing of rats. He gave his name as W.G. Sanders instead of R.F. and his residence as the 16th instead of the 18th District. We understand Dr. Lyan’s analysis so far shows no evidence of poison, though a test has not been made for Strychnine. Indeed, owing to the condition of the woman’s stomach it would be difficult to detect Strychnine were she poisoned with it.

See article #38 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

43   DISTRICT 22


June 26,1926--A forty-gallon capacity copper still on the farm of C.B. Lyle, along with four barrels of mash were seized Thursday afternoon by Deputy Sheriff Joe Stalls in a single-handed raid. The mash was almost fermented and would have been ready for the process of converting it into liquor by today, the deputy believed. No one was about the still, therefore unable to suggest the possible owner.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

44   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS


June 22, 1908--Joe Hogue was seriously cut this morning by his son-in-law, Ed York, in a difficulty at York's home in the 13th District. York was arrested and is in jail awaiting his examining trial which has not been set. He refuses to discuss the trouble. York and Hogue were in the garden at the time of the cutting, which is said to have been about a family affair. After heated words, York pulled his pocket knife and began slashing at Hogue, stabbing him in the back, on the arm, and in the armpit, inflicting serious wounds. Hogue is about 55 years old and York is about 21. The examining trial will not be held until Hogue's condition is determined.

Bar dividing text

From: The Clarksville Star

45   LOUISE


December 21, 1926--Ed York, about 40, lumber worker of the Louise community, was placed in the county jail this morning by Constable H.T. Cook and W.T. Perry on a charge of incest with his 19-year-old daughter. His arrest followed complaints of neighbors.
York, it is said, was dragged from his home about 7:00 Tuesday night by some 15 masked men and at the point of a pistol, whipped with switches until blood was brought from his back.
York will be given a preliminary hearing before J.R. Harper, Justice of the Peace, at 10:00 Monday morning.
The charge, said to be one of the most cruel and deserving of the most severe punishment on the list of statutory offenses, has attached to it upon conviction a time in the penitentiary of not less than three and up to 21 years.
"Nothing is too severe for him" is the sentiment of the people of the Louise community it is said. People complaining to county authorities about the illegal acts of York who is a widower, claimed that he has been living with his daughter as his wife for some time and recently had encouraged the visits of other men to his home, stating to his daughter "we were in need of Christmas money". York was arrested early this morning at the home of his mother in District 13. He denied the charge, claiming he had no idea why he was so "brutally beaten" Tuesday night.

See article #39 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck's Journal)

46   ANTIOCH


June 2, 1903--Suit has been filed in the Circuit Court of this county against Dr. Ben R. Ussery by Miss Maggie Lyle for breach of promise, claiming damages to the amount of $10,000. The suit will prove somewhat of a sensation on account of the prominence of the parties concerned, who are highly respected citizens of this county. Dr. Ussery came to Clarksville on the evening of Thursday, May 21, and was married to Miss Buyde Allen, daughter of William Carney Allen, a well-known merchant at Shiloh, at the Cumberland Presbyterian parsonage, the Reverend A.M. Williams officiating.
The announcement of the wedding was a great surprise to the friends of the contracting parties all over the county, for invitations had already been issued to the marriage of Dr. Ussery and Miss Maggie Lyle, daughter of Henry Lyle of Antioch. The announcement of the approaching marriage has been announced in the local papers, the bridesmaids and attendants had been selected and were preparing for the marriage which was being looked forward to as one of the social events of the season. Legal papers in the case have been issued and are being served by Deputy Sheriff R.L. Black. The declaration of the suit has not been filed and will probably not be until a few days before the time of convening the next term of the Circuit Court.
(Mrs. Buyde Allen Ussery remained a widow for 7 1/2 years. On Christmas Day 1912, she married A.T. Felts. They moved to Washington, D.C. The child, Elizabeth, later married Frank Cole and lived around Washington, D.C. also.
Maggie Lyle never married. At the age of 68 (1937), she was buried at Antioch also.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

47   NEAR PALMYRA


June 18,1903--A sensation has been created at Cumberland City over the alleged elopement of Dr. Douglas Lewis, a practicing physician and a man of family, with Miss Myrtle Harris, the 16-year-old daughter of E. Powers of near Palmyra of this county. A warrant has been sworn out for the arrest of Dr. Lewis on the charge of abduction. The elopement took place about June 2nd, but an effort was made to keep the affair a secret and the particulars have just leaked out. The girl was employed at Dr. Lewis’s home to assist his wife in her domestic duties when the elopement took place.
It is understood that Dr. Lewis returned to Cumberland City Tuesday night and after having some words with his brother-in-law, left for parts unknown. A warrant was then issued for his arrest. He is a member of one of the most prominent families in Stewart County.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

48   PALMYRA


June 5,1913--An unsuccessful attempt was made to rob the safe in the general store of Swift & Ussery at Palmyra Tuesday night. The thieves succeeded in entering the building, but were unable to open the safe. It was badly damaged with the exterior part of the lock and hinges knocked off. Explosives were not used, presumably because the building was near a residence in which several persons were asleep. Tools with which the robbers entered the store and attempted to open the safe with, were secured from Alex Parker’s Blacksmith Shop which was first broken open. If anything was taken from the stock, it cannot be missed.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

49   LOUISE


February 24,1906--Sheriff White of Wayne County arrived here yesterday from Allen’s Creek for Ed Murphy, who was arrested at Louise on a warrant from that county, where he is wanted on the charge of robbery.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

50   SAILOR’S REST


February 18,1915--Judge Charles W. Tyler has summoned a special grand jury, which will convene Friday to investigate the recent night-rider raids in the lower end of the county. Doc Davidson, an alleged member of the night rider band that has been operating along the borders of Stewart County, is now in jail. It is expected that the investigation of the grand jury will result in important developments.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

51    CLARKSVILLE


June 8,1853---Yesterday at Munford’s Stable, two of the sovereigns became suddenly enraged, and concluded to hurt one another. A furious combat ensued -- Whereupon one of the parties from the force of a blow received in the region of the stomach ingloriously bit the dust. His antagonist was too honorable to take advantage of his prostrate enemy and -- “that’s all we know about the fight.”

Bar dividing text

From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

52   CHICKEN THIEVES


October 31,1893--Three men are in jail, and from the evidence now in hand it appears that they will remain there some time. The arrest of Charles Mixon and Bob Rainwater, by Officers Robinson and Rollow, on suspicion of carrying concealed weapons resulted in finding a pistol on the person of the latter. The three men, Rainwater, and Charles and Burrell Mixon came to the city together, and when Burrell Mixon saw that his companion had been arrested he took on a big scare and started up the river, making tracks for home. He was overhauled, however, near the pumping station by Officer Walker. The trio arrested had some 20 chickens with them, and the officers believed they had been stolen.
When Burrell Mixon was arrested he gave the whole thing away and said he, in company with the others, stole the fowls from Ben Davis last night on Budd’s Creek. The chickens are in the hands of the officers and the two Mixons are being held until Davis can come to town.
An effort was made this morning to find out the history of the men and it was partially successful. They live in the neighborhood of old Vernon Furnace, on Budd’s Creek. Rainwater is said to be a pretty hard citizen, but the Mixons bear fair reputation for honesty. Burrell Mixon is said by people who have known him all his life, to be nearly crazy. This is the first time, however, either one of them has been arrested so far as the reporter could ascertain.
When arrested, Rainwater had two circular clocks and a fairly good gold watch on his person and the police are of the opinion that they were stole. The men will all be held until the matter is thoroughly sifted.

Bar dividing text

From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

53   LONE OAK


November 14,1893--Duff Castleberry was killed Saturday evening near Lone Oak, on the southside, by Richard (Dick) Dickson, son of T.Y. Dickson of that locality. The particulars as received here lead to the conclusion that the killing was done in self-defense. It seems that Castleberry had rented a tract of land from Dickson’s sister and that she had an interest in a lot of corn grown on the place. Castleberry was engaged during the week gathering corn. He was putting it up, it is said , so it was exposed to the weather. Dickson went to the place one day last week and told Castleberry that he should put the corn up so it would not be damaged. The men had a few words over the matter, and during this conversation, it is said, that Castleberry intimated that if Dickson interfered with him he would get hurt. Matters went on smoothly until Saturday evening, when Dickson went back to the place, again remonstrating with Castleberry about the way he was putting up the corn. One word brought on another when finally Castleberry picked up a hind-gate of the wagon, a heavy plank, and struck Dickson over the head, knocking him down. The plank flew out of Castleberry’s hand with the force of the lick and fell to the ground with Dickson. The latter picked it up and dealt his adversary a heavy blow on the head, felling him to the ground. Castleberry never recovered consciousness, dying from the effects of the blow Sunday morning about 1:00. Dickson gave himself up to an officer and came to the city Sunday evening to consult an attorney. He has engaged C.V. Lyle to conduct his defense and he will have his trial today (Tuesday) before the local Justice of the Peace.
Dickson is about 27 years old, while Castleberry was about 22 at the time of his death. He is reported as a quiet, inoffensive young man and was thought well of in the community. Neither of the men had married. Up to the time of the difficulty they were fast friends.

November 17,1892--Richard Dickson, was brought to the city this morning by Constable James Harper. It is highly probable that an indictment for murder in the second degree will be found against Dickson.
Dickson was seen by a reporter this morning and he talked confidently about his case.
He says that after he had knocked Castleberry down the wagon ran over him which he thinks may have had something to do with his death.
The public is at a loss to know why some people call the murdered man Walker and others Castleberry. His true name is Walker, but he was known by the name of Castleberry on the southside, from the fact that his father died many years ago and his mother afterward married Castleberry, and the boy being reared by his stepfather was generally given that name. More people knew him as Castleberry than did as Walker.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

54   MARION


September 4,1939--Burglars took approximately $60 in cash and a carton and a half of cigarettes from the general mercantile store of W.M. Suggs at Marion some time during Sunday night.
The money was taken from a cash drawer. A number of checks and a pistol were left.
The intruders entered the store through a front window. Several large oil barrels were moved. The heavy screen wire was ripped open and the iron bars over the window were spread apart.
Discovering the robbery when he opened his store early this morning, Mr. Suggs found where the burglars apparently made an unsuccessful attempt to enter a back window which was some five feet above the ground. The screen was torn off but when the robbers found the window barred they abandoned the attempt, going to the front window.
The merchants’ wife said today that the burglars were careful not to leave any clues by which they might be identified. Local officers investigated the bread-in.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

55   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS


November 9,1908--John Meadows, Thomas Patterson, and Ed Huff were arrested Sunday on warrants charging them with shooting with intent to kill. The charge was preferred by Claude Suiter of District 18. It is alleged that the men went to Suiter’s house and threatened his life and shot at him several times with birdshot taking effect in his back. Their bond was fixed at $1,000 each, which was furnished by Meadows, the others remained in jail pending their examining trial.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

56   ROUND POND


October 22,1901--News of an early morning tragedy has been received in this city. The particulars however, are very meager as there were no eye-witnesses to the affair. Ben Fletcher, a darky who had been employed by H.L. Johnson who lives on the Cumberland River between 7-Mile and Armstrong Ferries was killed instantly this morning about 5:00 near James E. Thompson’s farm in District 17. The particulars as learned are that words passed between Mr. Johnson and the darky about something the latter had done. Mr. Johnson was getting ready to make molasses and when the Negro appeared for work, the trouble was renewed and Johnson picked up an ax and struck Fletcher in the side, killing him instantly.
Further particulars of the trouble could not be learned. The officers were notified and Deputy Sheriff Black and Coroner John Straton went out to the scene of the killing. They had not returned to the city at press time.

October 23,1901--H.L. Johnson who killed Ben Fletcher in District 17 early yesterday morning, came in last night and gave himself up to the proper authorities. He was locked up in the county jail and his examining trial will be held this afternoon. Mr. Johnson was seen by a Leaf-Chronicle representative at the jail this morning and gave out the following statement as to how the killing occurred. He said that Fletcher came to James E. Thompson's place near Round Pond early in the morning where he was making molasses. He was boisterous and began threatening the life of a farm hand, Will Garrard, who was employed by me. He carried an ax and by his threats compelled Garrard to quit work. He turned around then and started at me with the ax and at the same time his son Lewis came toward me from behind striking me in the face with a rock. As Fletcher started toward me I picked up an ax lying near and struck him in the breast with the pole of the weapon which resulted in almost instant death.
There were two eye-witnesses to the affair, James Thompson and Will Garrard. Mr. Johnson has a bruise on the left side of his face which bears out the statement as to the attack made on him. He came to the city yesterday prepared to make bond for his appearance at the next term of the Circuit court, but was informed that it could not be fixed until a preliminary trial was held.

October 24,1901--The examining trial of H.L. Johnson who was charged with the murder of Ben Fletcher Tuesday morning on James E. Thompson’s place near Round Pond was held yesterday afternoon before Squire Smith.
The testimony introduced clearly showed that Fletcher had started towards Johnson with an axe that had been raised above his head and that the darky was in the act of striking Mr. Johnson when he received the death blow.
He was released from custody and left last night for his home. Attorney T.F. Martin acted as prosecutor and Gilbert & Gilbert represented the defense.
In speaking of the case after the trial, Mr. Martin said that he had never heard of another case in which the proof showed as clear a case of self defense.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

57   STOLLEN


November 2,1853---Some villainous wretch, or wretches, feloniously entered Dr. D.T. Donoho’s stable last Wednesday night, and carried off two horses. As yet all efforts to learn the whereabouts of the theives and their booty have been in vain, but we trust the scoundrels may be overtaken and a just punishment meted out to them. The county is full of horse theives, and nothing but vigilance to detect the offfenders and a strict enforcement of the law can rid us of the evil.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

58   CLARKSVILLE


November 2,1853---Seven or eight negros marched down Franklin Street last Monday, joined together by a heavy log chain. Two of them, apparently perfectly contented with their situation, discoursed sweet music from two old dirty looking violins, as they marched along. The spectacle would have delighted Mr. Uncle Tom Stowe, and drawn tears from the eyes of the tender harted abolitionist.

Bar dividing text

From: Semi-Weekly Leaf Chronicle

59   MARION


August 2,1898--Late yesterday afternoon, Sheriff Collier received a telegram from Marion, Tennessee, on the Mineral Road, telling him to come at once with a posse and bloodhounds, that a rape had been committed. The telegram was signed by R.B. Stone. Soon afterwards, Sheriff Collier and Officers Paul Marable, W.C. Willis and Charles Staton left for the scene of the crime.
Yesterday morning abut 8:00, Mrs. Riley Slaydon, who resides on Barton's Creek and Mrs. Miller, her neighbor, as was their custom, went to a nearby spring to attend to their milk, the two keeping their milk in the same cave. While there, Tillman Brake, who was at work a couple of hundred yards on the opposite side of the house from the spring, came down to get some water in a jug and returned, after having a short conversation with the ladies.
About 11:00, Mrs. Slaydon returned home and as she entered the house a horrible sight greeted her eyes. On a feather bed upon the floor lay the form of her daughter, Mrs. Florence Floyd, covered with blood from her head to her feet and her skull crushed. Mrs. Slaydon screamed, and this brought young Brake, who was at work in the tobacco patch. Brake rushed for a doctor and told the wounded woman’s daughter and sister, who were at school. Suspicion was aroused by the peculiar actions of Brake and it was thought he had something to do with the crime. Later he was arrested and was kept in the company of the officers from this city. Finally this morning, Collier got him off to one side and by telling him that the particulars of the crime were known and that nothing could be gained by holding back, he confessed all. Brake was in love with Mrs. Floyd, who is a widow, and had asked her repeatedly to be his wife but always being refused. Recently, Mrs. Floyd had been receiving the attention of another young man in the neighborhood and it is believed that jealousy caused the crime. Brake went by the house on his way back from the spring and asked her once more to marry him. She did not encourage him and said that she never expected to marry. That angered him and he committed the crime.

August 2,1898--A large crowd was present when the officers had Brake in their company and if they had known the intentions of the officers, there is little doubt that Brake would have been mobbed. Collier and Willis got in a buggy with Brake and told the crowd that they were going to a certain point up the road to get the testimony of some negroes and that they would soon return, leaving officers Marable and C.W. Staton with the crowd. As soon as the Sheriff and his prisoner were out of sight, they drove at break-neck speed in the direction of Clarksville, where they landed about 1:00 this afternoon, placing their man in jail.
In the meantime, the crowd became restless and suspicious. Finally Marable and Staton told them that the prisoner was then on his way to Charlotte. The latest reports say that the mob has gone in the direction of Charlotte after the men.
Mrs. Floyd is terribly disfigured and there is no chance of recovery. She is the daughter of Riley Slaydon and is a widow with one child.
Tillman Brake is a brother of Dr. Brake, is 27, and is a good looking man. All of the parties stand high in that community and are well connected.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

60   ARRESTED


February 15,1854---A negro man was arrested at this place on Saturday morning last, on a charge of having murdered a slave belonging to a Mr. Dawson, of Paris. The homicide was owned by Mr. Kennedy, of this place. Before taken, four pistol shots were discharged at him from a distance of less than twenty paces, by a gentleman reputed to be a good marksman, but, strange to say not one of the balls took effect. He was taken to Stewart County for trial.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

61   HACKBERRY


April 3,1929--Pleading guilty to assault and battery with intent to commit voluntary manslaughter, Oll Davis, farmer of District 18, was given a sentence of from 1 to 5 years in the State Pen by a Montgomery County Criminal Court jury Monday. Davis' son, John Davis, an L&N engineer living in Paris, Tennessee, was acquitted on the same charge but he was fined $50 and costs by the jury on an indictment of unlawfully carrying a pistol to which he pleaded guilty.
The two defendants were indicted for an alleged assault upon Lewis Mixon on the night of March 8, 1928, when it was said, they drove to Mixon's house and after he had been called from the residence, opened fire on him. Mixon was seriously wounded.
The men then barricaded themselves against officers and were only arrested after tear bombs had been shot into the house in which they had sought refuge.
The alleged assault was said to have been the aftermath of a lawsuit involving the land of Oll Davis' late brother which had been deeded by the deceased to the Mixon family.

September 9,1929--Notice of the escape of Oll Davis, Palmyra farmer, from the penitentiary to which he was sentenced to not less than one year and not more than five years for assault and battery with intent to kill on Lewis Mixon in April of 1928, has been received from Warden A.A. McCorkle by Sheriff George S. Abernathy and Chief of Police J.E. Robinson. The warden offers a reward of $25 for the capture of Davis.
Davis with his son, J.P. Davis of Paris, were indicted by the Montgomery County grand jury May 8,1928, on a charge of attempting to kill Lewis Mixon on the latter’s farm near Palmyra. The men were said to have lain in wait for Mixon and attempted to ambush him when he returned home in his car. They were also said to have fired into Mixon’s home.
Davis and his son barricaded themselves in an old house and were captured by Sheriff Herschel Walker and other officers only after tear gas had been fired into the building. In the trial, April 2,1929, the younger Davis was dismissed on the assault and battery case, but the father was given from one to five years in prison. He began his sentence some four weeks later and had completed approximately four months of his term when he made his escape.
Sheriff Abernathy said this morning that it is unlikely that Davis is in this section yet, but he expects him to return within a short while.

July 16,1931--After being at liberty under a parole since April, Oll Davis, District 18 farmer, was ordered taken up on his parole and Thursday night began another hitch in the state penitentiary to which he was sentenced more than a year ago for shooting Lewis Mixon, also of District 18.
Davis was given a sentence of from one to five years and after completing almost a year of it he escaped. Davis returned to the prison and voluntarily gave himself up. He served the minimum of his sentence and then he was paroled and ordered to go to Henry County. Davis stayed a part of the time in Henry County, but of late was residing almost all his time in this county. He was alleged to have threatened Mixon’s life again and created a disturbance in District 18.
Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont was ordered to arrest him and Davis was taken into custody. Because of having violated his parole, Davis will be compelled to serve the remaining four years of his sentence.

September 16,1931--For the second time this summer, Oll Davis, former resident of District 18, has been taken into custody, charged with violating his prison parole. Davis was arrested this morning under instructions of Attorney-General Matt G. Lyle.
About two months ago he was given parole, having served a portion of his sentence in prison for shooting with intent to kill following an attack on Lewis Mixon. Under the terms of his parole, he was not to return to this county. Davis returned but was taken back to prison.
After a while, he was released upon condition he would not return to Montgomery County; but, again, he took up his abode in District 18.
Davis was arrested this morning and placed in the county jail to be transported back to the prison in a day or so.
Oll Davis family cemetery


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

62   SAILOR’S REST


November 4,1913--Edgar Steely has been landed in the county jail for bootlegging. This is the second time he has been charged. Operations were in the vicinity of Sailor’s Rest. Complaints from that section resulted in an investigation by the grand jury last week and the finding of an indictment.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

63   STOLEN


November 2,1853---Some villainous wretch, or wretches, feloniously entered Dr. T.J. Donoho’s stable last Wednesday night, and carried off two horses. As yet all efforts to learn the whereabouts of the thieves and their booty have been in vain, but we trust the scoundrels may be overtaken and a just punishment meted out to him. The country is full of horse thieves, and nothing but vigilance to detect the offenders and a strict enforcement of the law can rid us of the evil.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Tobacco Leaf

64   SALEM


January 7, 1874--Monday night, Bill Waller was lying drunk at the Seven Mile Ferry and several friends were trying to get him on the ferry, when Bud Grey came up to help drag him on the boat. Waller stabbed him, it is thought fatally, in the side, and also in the face. Grey is still living, but we understand that Dr. Swift thinks the wound is probably mortal. Grey is a noted character in this county. Before, he was the most out breaking man in the county, but he has been more peaceable lately. He was under indictment for killing Tinsley. Waller also appears to have been cut.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

65   HEMATITE


December 24,1906--Claude Davis, a young white man from Hematite, was arrested today on a warrant charging him with the theft of $13.50 from Bertie Hencliff. The money was recovered and Davis was taken before Squire Jarrell and bound over to the criminal court. He was unable to give bond and was sent to jail.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

66   DISTRICT 22


September 26,1908--Miss Kate Swift entered suit today in court for $10,000 damages against P.R. Neblett and A.J. Abernathy. The suit grows out of alleged remarks derogatory to the plaintiff’s character, which prevented her from securing a school in District 22. All of the parties reside in that district. Savage and Fort represent the complainant.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

67   DISTRICT 22


March 30,1909--A deplorable affair, the outcome of family trouble, took place Sunday afternoon at 4 p.m. in District 22, on what is known as the Biter farm. Will Hayes fatally stabbed his brother-in-law, Wesley Schmittou, who lived only a few minutes after the assault. Hayes claimed self defense.
Soon after the killing, he left home and has not been seen. He told his family to tell all who asked that he did it and would return to give himself up.
A reporter learned that Hayes, who lives about one mile from his wife’s mother, Mrs. Bettie Schmittou, went to the latter’s home, and after a heated argument over some family affair, struck Mrs. Schmittou with a chair, inflicting several bruises. When Mrs. Schmittou’s husband come home and learned of the assault, he went in search of a magistrate to swear out a warrant for Hayes' arrest. Soon after Mr. Schmittou departed, his son, Wesley, returned home. The latter, upon being informed of the assault, went to Hayes’ home and called him out of the house to the public road, a distance of about 150 yards, where the trouble took place. Schmittou is said to have gotten after Hayes about a knife trade and they agreed to exchange knives. It is claimed Hayes took Schmittou’s knife and used the weapon on him, stabbing him thru the heart and in the left shoulder.
After Hayes stabbed Schmittou, he is said to have held the latter’s head in his lap until he expired, a few minutes later, when he called his aunt to close the dead man’s eyes. He then made his escape.
The knife used by Hayes on Schmittou was an ordinary pocket knife with about a three inch blade. Hayes struck with great force and tore the flesh in a frightful manner.
Schmittou was about 22 years old and unmarried. Hayes is abut 30 and has a wife and two children.

See article #61 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Semi Weekly Leaf Chronicle

68   RYE’S CHAPEL


June 27,1899--From Rye’s Chapel in District 16, about three miles beyond Collinsville and remote from telephone or telegraphic communications, comes the information this morning of a bloody riot that is alleged to have taken place at a barbeque and general social gathering.
The row started, it is alleged, at a lemonade stand presided over by Dave Proctor and W.N. Reynolds. The principal aggressors named are Anutie Collins, Tom Monroe, Red Groves, and Pert Johnson.
Collins drew a knife and made an attack on Reynolds, whereupon the fight became pretty general. Three of the participants were rather seriously hurt, namely, Collins, Monroe, and Reynolds. Collins received several cuts about the face, and his head was fearfully bruised by blows from sticks and beer bottles. Monroe's head was badly cut and bruised from the same cause, and he is reported to be in very serious condition. Reynolds is said to be cut all to pieces; his arms and breast as fearfully hacked up and his throat dangerously slit with a knife.
Groves and Johnson, it is claimed, deserted their pals as soon as the fight became dangerous and escaped without injury. Collins was just in the act of making another desperate attempt on the life of Reynolds, who seems to have been the particular object of the attack, when he was prevented by assistance arriving on the scene and knocking him off.
This morning, Sheriff A.C. Stafford received a complainant and started out to the scene of the trouble to investigate it and make the necessary arrest. While you’ve read what is one side of the story, the only thing clear is there has been a bloody fracas and that some one is likely to do time for it.

July 4,1899--Collins and Reynolds were both reported dead from their wounds.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

69   HACKBERRY


April 24,1899--Word has just reached this office that in District 18 of this county on Saturday evening, there occurred a desperate fight between two 19-year-old boys, both of whom ought to have been in better business. Arthur Baggett, a son of Representative Baggett, was working in a field near the road. Jim Weaver was riding a horse past the field when it is alleged Baggett went to the fence saying that it was a good time to settle old grudges. It appears that the two boys have been enemies since their early school days.
Baggett, it is said, jumped the fence, seized the bridle of Weaver’s horse, and jerked it in such a way as to throw the animal to the ground. While Weaver was trying to get up, Baggett threw a couple of rocks at him without hitting him.
Then, the story goes, Weaver drew his pocket knife and began to carve. He slashed Baggett no less than eight times, cutting him painfully but not dangerously; once in the region of the heart. Had his knife been a more formidable weapon, the chances are that young Baggett would not have lived to tell about it.
Both parties were promptly arrested and will be tried before Squire Broom in the morning. It is to be hoped a severe penalty will be meted out. This matter of fighting with weapons that endanger life, or fighting at all, for the matter, is becoming all too common.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

70   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS


February 22,1909--A serious cutting affray in which one of the participants, Henry Arms, may have been fatally wounded, took place this morning about 10 o'clock between Arms and Sim Phipps, on the city ferry. The trouble started over chickens that had strayed into Phipps field, and the latter, it is said, last night ran them off with a dog. The dog got hold of one of the chickens and feathers were made to fly. Last night one of the chickens failed to show up and this morning about 8 o'clock Phipps crossed the ferry on route to the city with a load of hay. Arms, it is said, spoke to him about the missing chicken, and Phipps told him he would pay for it. Phipps came to town, delivered his hay and boarded the ferry on his return. Phipps, it is said offered to pay for the chicken at that time. The two exchanged words and soon came together. The men it is said, fought all over the boat, and Phipps was badly punished by Arms, who is much the larger man. Just before the boat landed, Phipps succeeded in pulling out his knife and cutting Arms across the abdomen, exposing his entrails and inflicting a wound which may cause his death. Arms, after being cut, went to his house on top of the Cumberland River Bank, about one hundred yards away, procured his gun and started after Phipps. He succeeded in getting to his gate, when he fell exhausted and was carried back into the house. Phipps continued on his way home. The latter is badly bruised up, but not seriously hurt. Ed Harris, with his wife and child, and Moody Hogue, were on the boat at the time. Hogue says he never saw the beginning of the fight and had no idea the men would come together until he looked around and saw them fighting. Both men live in District 13, where Phipps is a well known farmer. Arms is the city ferryman.
Drs. Runyon, Maurice Langos Hughes, and Macon were called to attend Arms, and he is said to be in a critical condition, with the chances for his recovery against him. Deputy Sheriff’s Black and Welker arrested Phipps and he was committed to jail about 1 o’clock this afternoon. He declines to make any statement in connection with the affair.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

71   NEW PROVIDENCE


March 8,1854---We learn that a difficulty occurred at New Providence on Saturday last between S.O.W. Brandon and R.A. Basham, in which the latter was so severly wounded by a blow from a stick in the hands of the former, that his recovering was considered doubtful. We know nothing of the circumstances which brought about the difficulty.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

72   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS


June 30,1928--With the arrest of Johnnie Finch, tenant on the farm of Finis Hunter, District 13 farmer, early this morning, officers believe that a clue has been found whereby all the members of a gang of thieves, possibly six in number, who have been operating in this district in the last month or so may be apprehended. Finch is held in the county jail under a $1000 bond on a charge of grand larceny and awaits trial Monday afternoon at 1:00 before W.B. Corlew, J.P.
Bloodhounds were brought from Nashville this morning before dawn when Mr. Hunter discovered the loss of his meat--two hams and two middlings. The dogs galloped straight to Finch’s home and he was arrested. Finch denied any knowledge of the meat and Constable Will T. Perry returned to the hunt for the stolen goods and run down any other clues which might lead to the arrest of others who may have been connected with the theft.
The dogs were secured at a cost of $50 with Mr. Hunter paying $40 and W.R. Fain, magistrate and neighbor who had also suffered from the meat house raids a month prior, paying the remaining $10. The meat was valued possibly $15. Others raided are D.W. Nipper, and Mrs. Howard Manning.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

73   PALMYRA


August 8,1929--J.R. (Robinson) Williams, farmer of the Palmyra Community, is in the county jail charged with first degree murder and Pugh Jackson, about 32 yeas of age, member of a section crew on the L & N Railroad at Palmyra, is dead as a result of a shooting episode which took place about 8 A.M. today in front of Williams’ home on a farm operated by Hardin Wickham.
A warrant was sworn out against Williams charging him with shooting with intent to kill and he was committed to jail without bond this morning, pending the outcome of Jackson’s wounds. The warrant now will be amended charging first degree murder. The date of Williams’ preliminary hearing has not been set, but it will be before W.B. Corlew, Justice of the Peace.
Jackson was shot about 8:00 and he was conveyed to the Clarksville Hospital by J.B. Tarpley. The wounded man’s condition was regarded as critical from the first and he died at 2:00, some three hours after arriving at the hospital. He was shot with a #12 single-barrel shotgun and it is presumed with #6 shot, this being the size of a shell found with the gun which Williams surrendered to Sheriff George S. Abernathy.
Soon after the shooting, Williams went to the home of Will Hayes nearby and called Sheriff Abernathy that he had shot Jackson and was ready to surrender. Shortly after the sheriff’s arrival, Williams, true to his promise, entered Mr. Hayes home and surrendered.
It was not clear what caused the shooting but it is understood that it occurred as a result of Williams having repeatedly warned Jackson to cease paying attention to his daughter, Miss Fannie Williams. It seemed that the dead man had persisted upon being a suitor of Miss Williams against her father’s wishes. This morning the two men met in front of Williams’ residence and the altercation was renewed resulting in Williams seizing his gun and emptying one barrel into Jackson’s right side. The shot penetrated his abdomen, side, and badly shattered his right arm.
Jackson was the son of W.M. Jackson, who died about five years ago, and Mrs. Nannie Jackson, whose death occurred last spring. He is survived by a brother, Frank Jackson, Palmyra, and a sister Mrs. James Lyle, of Hackberry, and two half-brothers, W.L. Jackson, flagman on the Mineral train from Dickson to Clarksville, and R.R. Jackson of Tarsus, Tn. The body this afternoon was taken to the T.E. McReynolds & Son funeral home and no arrangements have been made for burial.

See article #45 in The Courthouse Square


Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

74   HACKBERRY


February 28,1874--Mr. George R. Harris arrested William Lane and George Ross Lane at Clark Furnace in Stewart County on Tuesday last and lodged them in jail at this place that evening. They are charged with shooting John Dawson at Mt. Vernon Furnace in this county in October or November last. A reward of $100 each had been offered for their arrest.

Bar dividing text

From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

75   HACKBERRY


November 29,1915--About noon today, Charles Baggett shot and probably fatally wounded Dr. John William Wickham at Hackberry. The shooting took place as Dr. Wickham was preparing to board a train. Three shots were fired, two taking effect, one in the mouth, the other in the hip, while not necessarily fatal, either of the wounds are said to be dangerous.
From the best information obtainable it seems that until quite recently Baggett and Wickham had been friends but only a short time ago had had a misunderstanding. This morning, it is said, they met at Hackberry and the matter was again brought up heated words preceding the shooting.
Immediately after the shooting medical attention was given Dr. Wickham and physicians from Clarksville were called for consultation with the local physicians.
Sheriff Welker went immediately to the scene of the shooting in an auto, but at this writing, Baggett had not been located. However, it is said that after the shooting he remained in Hackberry for some time.
Both parties are well known. Especially is that so of Dr. Wickham, who is known throughout the county.
Dr. Wickham was brought to Nashville this afternoon. He was on a cot is the baggage car. An ambulance from the city hospital met the train, but the wounded man was lost in the car. The ambulance returned to the hospital and had to return, on receiving a message from the railroad people to the effect that the injured man had been found. He is shot twice in the mouth and once in the hip. His condition is serious.

November 30,1915--Dr. John W. Wickham, who was shot Monday at Hackberry by Charles Baggett, died at 9:30 this morning in a Nashville hospital, where he was taken last evening in an effort to save his life. His body will be shipped to Palmyra this evening on the train which passes through Clarksville at 8:47, and taken to his home, where the funeral will be conducted by the Masons Wednesday afternoon.
Dr. John W. Wickham was born and reared in Montgomery County, was about 55 years of age, educated in the common schools of the 19th District, and was a graduate of Vanderbilt University. He was the son of Robert Wickham.
Charles Baggett who shot Dr. Wickham at Hackberry Monday, came to Clarksville Monday afternoon and gave himself up to Sheriff Welker. Calmly he told Mr. Welker what had happened, stating that he considered the shooting a justifiable one; that Dr. Wickham had a Winchester rifle in his hand and that he ordered the doctor to drop it, and when he did not, fired three times, two shots taking effect in the mouth, the other in the hip. It was at first stated that only two shots took effect, but it was later discovered that instead of one, two took effect in the mouth.
The weapon used by Baggett was a .38 caliber Smith & Wesson six-shooter special, with a Colt’s grip.
When Baggett came to town last evening he brought with him the rifle which, it is said, Dr. Wickham was carrying when shot. Baggett claims to have lost his revolver in a chase through the hills immediately following the shooting.
Those who are acquainted with the details are inclined to be nonconversant, and it is with difficulty that each additional fact is brought out.
Baggett had not applied for bail this morning and seemed to be contented in the county jail. He states that he will defend himself and not employ counsel

Note by the editor --
February 19,1917--After nearly 68 hours of deliberation, the jury was discharged this morning by Judge Charles W. Tyler without arriving at a verdict. The vote stood 8 for acquittal and 4 for conviction.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

76   CUMBERLAND HEIGHTS


May 4, 1900--Yesterday afternoon at about 2:30 in the sitting room of Squire Armstrong's residence, Harry Johnson of the 13th District was shot by Bailey Felts with the same pistol with which Gus Moody killed Bud Riggins in this city about a year ago. Three bullets were fired; one taking effect in the center of the forehead, one in the right side, and one in the right hand. All were mere flesh wounds, the balls glancing from the bones, and there is believed to be no danger of fatal results now. Mr. Felts is a constable living in the 17th District and a son-in-law of Gus Moody. Squire Armstrong was an eyewitness to the shooting.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

77   HACKBERRY


August 2,1895--One more recruit has been brought in to swell the army of evildoers now quartered in the Montgomery County Jail.
Some two months ago, it will be remembered an attempt was made to ditch a train on the Mineral road by placing rocks on the track. Suspicion pointed to William Beard, and he has been missing since that time and detectives have been working on the case. Last Saturday Ex-Sheriff Staton and O.L. Davis captured Beard in the 18th District on the farm of Frank Norris where he was working, and he was brought here and lodged in jail.

See article #206 in Remembrances of Our Past


Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

78   SALEM


December 13,1912--Esquire R.H. Edmondson of District 17 was in the city today. He reported the catching of two Negroes, who live near him, upon the charge of stealing calves and yearlings from him and his brother. Several were taken and sold to Wallace Lyle and his brother who killed them and sold them for beef, not knowing that they were stolen. The calves were stolen out of the field where they had been running on pasture. The Negroes are now confined in jail.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

79   HACKBERRY


November 23,1920--Clothing and foodstuffs of a undetermined value comprised the loot of J. F. Timmons' General Store at Hackberry Monday night. So far as is known no cash was taken. The thief or thieves, it is said, entered by tearing away a screen and breaking a pane in a rear window. Officers in several counties have been notified, but have been unable to identify the guilty parties.
According to J. F. Timmons, robbers obtained probably $100 worth of food and clothing, mostly food, when they entered his store at Hackberry Monday night. No trace of the robbers has been found.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

80   RAID ON HIGHWAY 48


January 15,1936--A man is under bond and 100 pints of government bonded whiskey, 20 pints of brandy and gin, 2 gallons of moonshine and 78 packages of cigarettes without the state revenue stamp were confiscated Tuesday afternoon in a raid by state and county officers here.
Ed Hand, about 55, operator of a pigstand on Hwy. 48, in District 13, was scheduled to face preliminary trial at 2:00 this afternoon on a charge of possession of intoxicating liquors under his bed at the pigstand which was also used by Hand, it is said, as his residence. He is under a $250 bond pending the hearing.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

81   HEMATITE


May 11,1908--The plant beds of Hadley and Loew Allen and Charley Jackson were destroyed by being scraped. No clue is had of the perpetrators of the outrage.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

82   PALMYRA


January 18,1908--Walter Wickham was shot and seriously wounded Friday by John Hodges, at the latter's home near Palmyra. Wickham came to this city on the evening train and went to the Magnolia House, where he is under treatment of a physician Hodges used a shotgun and about twenty-five shots lodged in Wickham's shoulder and arm.
There had been bad feeling between the two for several years, which grew out of a crop raised by them. Since that time, it is said, they have had several words. Yesterday Wickham was drinking and went to Hodges' home, it is said, and threatened Hodges. According to the latter, Wickham went to his home twice and threatened his life. The second time Hodges pulled his shotgun and fired on him.
Wickham was seen by a reporter this morning. He said he was drinking and went to Hodges' home to purchase a chicken. Wickham rode up to the gate and Hodges was in the yard, having come out of the house. Wickham says Hodges turned from him and went into the house and swore at him. Hodges picked up his gun in the house, came to the door and fired at him while he was standing in the door. Wickham says he was unarmed and after the shooting continued on down the road. One tooth was shot out and his eyes are badly inflamed, but it is not thought he will lose his eyesight. Several shot took effect in the face and head.
Hodges surrendered to the Constable at Palmyra and gave bond for his appearance in court.

Bar dividing text

From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

83   INHUMAN WRETCHES


April 22,1890--A horrible and unnatural crime has been committed near here on the Cumberland River above the Seven Mile Ferry. Some inhuman wretch has killed a child, a little girl baby, and ruthlessly consigned its body to the muddy Cumberland River for a grave. The thought is so revolting that humanity stands dumbfounded contemplating the depravity and meanness of such a wretch.
At the Seven Mile Ferry, only a few miles from the city, last evening, Mrs. Sanderson, wife of the ferryman, noticed some object fastened in a pile of drift. She at first thought it some kind of animal that had been drowned and had been washed into the brush by the waves. Criosity prompted her to walk down the bank and examine the object. To her surprise, and horror, she found it to be a little white baby girl.
The men at the ferry were notified of the find and took the body from the drift and laid it on the bank. A plain, white cloth was wrapped about its head and shoulders. This is the only clue that might be used to trace out the guilty party or parties. The child was evidently only a few days old. It would have weighed perhaps ten pounds. Decomposition had not set up to any extent. The head and face were somewhat disfigured, but the body was perfect.
Coroner John Staton was notified and held an inquest. It was the general opinion that the child had been consigned to the water to cover up shame. The body may have been on the river bank above high water mark. The utmost power should be executed to bring the guilty parties to account for their inhuman act. A murder so terrible should not be allowed to go unpunished.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

84   BRYANT HOLLOW


October 4,1887--Intelligence was received in this city Saturday morning of a foul murder committed at 2 o'clock the previous afternoon. The victim was John T. Nolen, a resident of the 20th District of this county. Joe Trotter, a neighbor of the murdered man, made the following statement to a reporter of the Leaf.
The scene of the tragedy was a blacksmith shop, owned by Nolen. He had gone there to superintend some work being done for him by Harpeth Jordan and his helper, Allen McCullum. The shop is within 200 yards of Nolen's house. Nolen, after explaining how he wanted the work done, sat down in the doorway of the shop and leaned his head against the facing of the door to take a nap. He sat there for half an hour, when he got up and requested Jordan to clear away some rubbish on a work bench, saying he needed rest, having slept none the night before. Jordan did as he was requested and returned to his forge just as Nolen was in the act of getting on the bench. At that moment, the sharp report of a pistol was heard and Nolen staggered toward the blacksmith and exclaimed,"I'm shot!". Jordan took hold of him and eased him to the floor. Those were the only words he uttered, and he expired in five minutes. The ball entered three inches below the left nipple and ranging upward, lodged in the spine.
This is the statement made before the jury of inquest, and believing that some enemy of Nolen's had slipped upon him from the dense thicket in the rear of the shop and fired the fatal shot through an augur hole, the jury rendered its verdict in accordance with these facts. This statement was improbable however, and on Saturday Allen McCullum was told that if he would make a clean breast of the entire transaction if he would be protected; whereupon he said that Harpeth Jordan fired the fatal shot, with the expectation of getting money from Mr. Nolen's person. Both were arrested Saturday night, and brought to the jail in this city Sunday.
Yesterday morning both Harpeth Jordan and Allen McCullum were seen by a Leaf man. They are in separate cells and on different floors. McCullum, the striker, is a young man, 20 or 22 years old, tall and has not a bad face. He talked very freely of the murder. His statement was practically as follows:
He was gathering corn in the morning when Nolen told him to help Jordan at the shop after dinner. He had been with Jordan only a short time when Jordan said he was going to do something that he must not tell. He replied that he had nothing to do with Jordan's business. Jordan replied that a certain man had a nightly habit of pulling out money and he was going to see if he had it that evening.
Pretty soon, Mr. Nolin came in and after helping them on a kilth, sat down in the door and took a nap of half an hour. Arousing from the nap, he said he was sleepy and Jordan removed some things from the work bench and Nolin got upon it, lying on his back with his left side near the wall. Jordan offered him a coal sack to put under his head, but seeing its condition he declined it.
After Mr. Nolin had gone to sleep, and while McCullum was at the bellows, Jordan went to a drawer in the shop and taking out a double-barreled pistol approached the bench on which Nolin lay, and standing near the foot, on the right side of the man, he extended his hand over him and fired the fatal shot. Mr. Nolin arose, and staggering to Jordan said, "I'm shot." Jordan eased him to the floor and sent McCullum out to run around the house and mislead anyone who might have heard the shot. Then Jordan ran out and mounted the fence, looked all around, then the two ran to the house and told that Mr. Nolin was shot.
McCullum has lived on Mr. Nolin's place since he was a child and says he was a good man to work for.
Jordan's statement nearly corresponds with that given at the inquest. Mr. Nolin, he says, was standing up when the shot was fired. McCullum was at the bellows. While he had his hand on the iron, something went "pop" like a cap. He looked to see if it was McCullum when Nolin says, "Oh, Lordy, I'm shot!" He eased Nolin to the floor and asked him who shot him. He did not again speak but looked at the augur hole in the back of the shop as if to say it was from there.
Jordan is disposed to throw the murder upon an accomplice of McCullum's. He says that McCullum and Will Huff were going to leave the neighborhood Saturday night. Friday night after the killing, he stayed at McCullum's and Huff was also there. The two talked long and confidentially. He heard McCullum say to Huff, "..that what we was talking about is done." McCullum was arrested Saturday, which he says prevented their departure Saturday night.
The murder has caused intense excitement in the neighborhood. John Nolin was known as a very determined man, loyal to his friends and implacable to his enemies. He was well known in this city. He had operated a distillery in the 20th District near O. K. Furnace for a number of years. He had given up the business within the past year, however, and gone to farming. He was about 55 years old. He was a Mason and his remains received a Masonic burial. He accumulated considerable property.

December 4,1888--The case of Harper Jordan on trial for the murder of John Nolin in September, 1887, was given to the jury on Wednesday night and on Friday morning a verdict of "guilty of murder in the first degree" was brought in. On Saturday, Judge Charles W. Tyler sentenced Jordan to be hanged on Friday, January 11,1889. An appeal will be taken to the Supreme Court.

Bar dividing text

From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

85   NIGHT RIDERS


Dr. Amos organized the Night Riders at LaFayette, Montgomery Co., Tennessee.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

86   CORBANDALE


May 4,1888--Coon Elliott, a very tough white boy from Corbandale, is in jail here for the third time, serving out a sentence. This time he was fined $19.65 by Squire Corban for riding a horse almost to death.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

87   DISTRICT 17


December 29,1908--Aleck Majors, a white man living in District 17 on the farm of Henry Coke, is in jail on the charge of wife-beating, and his wife is said to be in serious condition from the effects of a severe nervous shock and bruises received at her husband's hands. Majors is said to have been beastly drunk and today says he has no recollection of what occurred last night.
Sheriff C.W. Staton received the telephone message last night about 10:00 that Majors had beaten his wife and she was supposed to be dead. Being unable to cross the river at that hour, Sheriff C.W. Staton telephoned Deputy Black, who lives on the other side of the river and he went to Majors home and placed him under arrest. He was taken to the river which was crossed in a skiff at Edmondson Ferry where Sheriff C.W. Staton was waiting and Majors was brought to the county jail. Mrs. Majors was visited by a physician this morning.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

88   RELIGIOUS INSANITY


May 15,1880--A shocking case of murder under the influence of mental derangement occurred on the south side last week. A family of Negroes, consisting of Dan Lyle, his wife and his sister Susan Coleman, had been attending some of the tumultuary revivals so common among the colored race, and symptoms of insanity were developed out of the excitement fostered at these meetings. They would gain possession of churches, driving out the regular congregations and then keep up their ravings for hours.
For some time they refused admission to their house to anyone, and at last one of the children escaping from the house gave such an alarming account that constables Ramey and Saunders were dispatched to arrest the parties. The Negro struck at Saunders with an axe, fortunately striking him only with the handle; but he was weakened with the blow so as to be compelled to retire. It was soon found that the arrest could not be made without a serious conflict, which, under the circumstances, it was deemed best to avoid, and they retired. They then sent for Sheriff Mosely and police officer Morrison, who made the arrest. The Negro had been slightly wounded in the previous conflict. On entering the cabin, the two younger children, (aged respectfully three and seven) were found dead with their necks broken. The Negroes are now confined in jail, and, we presume, will shortly become inmates of the lunatic asylum.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle Family

89   FEUD


October 3,1910---John Yarbrough, Jr. shot and painfully wounded Ernest Hall in this city about 10 o'clock this morning. The shooting occurred at the corner of Commerce and 3rd Street as The Ringling Brothers Circus parade was passing that point. Two shots were fired, both of which struck Hall, one passing through the right arm between the shoulder and elbow, and the other taking affect in the back.
It is stated that Yarbrough was sitting in a buggy viewing the parade when Hall came up and struck him. Yarbrough either fell or jumped from the buggy after which he pulled his pistol and fired. The men are brothers-in-law and it is alleged the trouble grew out of family differences.
Yarbrough lives in Stringtown in the 13th District. Hall works on W.J. Manning's farm two miles south of the city. After the shooting, Hall was taken to Dr. Hughes' office in the Masonic Building where his wounds were dressed.
Yarbrough made his escape through Batson's Grocery on 3rd Street.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Newspaper

90   ESCAPEES


August 1820--On the night of the 3rd of August, Joseph Brown, Mr. Claud and a negro by the name of William Freeman, escaped from the jail of the county. This Joseph Brown was committed on a charge for having attempted to pass counterfeit money; he is dark complected, black hair and large black whiskers; between 5'11 and 6' high; he says by occupation, he is a house carpenter, but from what I have seen of him while he was in confinement, I am convinced to think that he was a much greater genius at cards.
This William Freeman was committed as a runaway, but from the best information which I have received concerning him, I am inclined to think that he was originally free--but owing to some of his improper conduct was lately sold out of the jail of Davidson County for the term of four years and eight months to Mr. Dickson of Nashville. He is about the same size as Brown and much the same age.
W.J. Lynes, jailor, Clarksville.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

91   TWO STORES IN COUNTY ROBBED


January 7,1933--Between $200 and $300 in currency and merchandise and about $250 in checks were taken from two stores in two communities Friday night by thieves who evidently used an automobile or truck, and made their get-a-way without leaving any tangible clues which might lead to their early arrest. The stores entered and robbed were that of W.G. Russell at Hackberry and Morgan Brothers of Lone Oak.
Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont, who with deputies has spent most of the day investigating the robberies, believes two separate gangs were at work.
Entering the Morgan Brothers Store between 9:00 p.m. Friday and 5:00 a.m. today, by breaking the lock on the front door, and prizing it open, thieves took between $50 and $75 in currency, about $250 in checks, eight or ten cartons of cigarettes, cigars, and sack tobacco, and then apparently left by the rear door, which had been propped from the inside.
The bandits blasted the safe open in order to get the money. Percy Morgan, junior member of the firm, said today “the safe was totally wrecked by an explosion apparently of nitroglycerin”. No one, in the community could be found this morning, who had heard the explosion. The thieves apparently drilled a hole in the door of the safe, after having broken the combination, and then set off the nitroglycerin.
Between 8:30 p.m. Friday and 6:30 a.m. today, thieves broke in the front door of the W.G. Russell Store and looted the cash register of about $20 of money which belonged to the Hackberry Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. The cash register had been left open and was not damaged. The thieves helped themselves to a double barrel shotgun, shells, and quantity of meat, clothing, cigarettes, and other tobaccos. The total value, of which Mr. Russell estimated, at $75 or more.
They also broke the lock of the gas pump and got at least eight gallons of gas, possibly more.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

92   STABBED TO DEATH


January 3,1890--For several years bad blood has existed between John Hawkins and Jonathan & Nathan Dill, of the Oakwood neighborhood, and several altercations are placed against them.
On Thursday of last week they met at Woodlawn and a fight ensued. They were separated, but later in the day, near their home, John Hawkins and the Dills came together, and John Dill knocked Hawkins down. Tucker Hawkins, a brother of John, went to his assistance, and in the fracas that followed Nathan Dill approached Tucker Hawkins from the rear and plunged a long bladed knife into his right side. The knife entered between the ribs and the hip bone, penetrated the cavity and produced a wound that caused Tucker’s death on Tuesday night. After the cutting young Dill, who is only about 18 years old, disappeared and so far has evaded arrest.
On Wednesday Sheriff Charles W. Staton, arrested John Dill as an accessory to the murder, and in default of bail placed him in jail.
Tucker, the unfortunate man who lost his life, had been married to Miss Ellis Crowder just one week the day he was stabbed. He was a quiet, good citizen, and was not concerned in the row except to protect his brother. The other parties to the affray were drinking.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

93   MINERAL ROILROAD



April 21, 1891---It is reported here that Charles W. Staton, son of Deputy Sheriff John Staton, shot a Negro on the Mineral Railroad yesterday. No one, however, has been able to learn the full particulars leading to the difficulty. Staton is engaged on the roadwork as boss or manager of a squad of men and had some trouble with one of the men, who leveled a shotgun at him.
Since the above was put in type, it is learned that the shooting occurred in McTige & Co.'s commissary store. Charles Staton, it seems, had had some trouble with the Negro on the line in regard to work and perhaps some hard words were passed between the two. Staton, however, thought nothing more of it until the Negro entered the store with a double-barreled shotgun and directed an insulting remark at him. The Negro was told to shut his mouth, where upon, without warning, he leveled the gun at Staton and pulled the trigger. The gun failed to fire and Staton whipped a pistol from his pocket and fired, the ball striking the Negro in the center of the forehead, but failed to penetrate the skull. The Negro was alive this morning, but it is thought now that his case is more serious than anticipated at first and that he may die. Every account of the trouble construes that shooting as a clear case of self-defense.

June 9, 1891---The Mineral Railroad was the scene of a shooting scrape yesterday, the details of which are somewhat meager.
A Negro laborer came to the city Sunday and returned to the road too late in the day yesterday to put in full time. Mr. Saunders, one of the overseers, ordered the Negro to work. The order was disobeyed, the Negro saying that he would prefer not going to work until this morning. A war of words is said to have been used and later in the engagement, Saunders drew a pistol and shot the Negro five times. Three of the balls entered the arm, one entered the breast, and the other the head.
Saunders is said to have left the road with the intention of coming to the city and surrendering himself to the proper authorities, but if he ever reached here, no one has seen him.
The Negro's wounds are regarded as fatal, though he was alive and resting comparatively well this morning.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

94   ROBBERY


August 10,1923--Officers in this section will likely secure bloodhounds from Erin today to use in connection with the robbery Thursday night of a storage house belonging to E.F. Gannaway. A large number of watermelons were taken from the home but no clue is available as to the guilty party.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

95   CORBANDALE


March 10,1892--White caps or masqueraders made a visit to Israel Robinson in this neighborhood Friday night and handled him pretty roughly, and advised him to get further or fare worse. His staying at a wrong house, to the neglect of his own family, is supposed to have been the cause of the whipping.

Bar dividing text

From: Evening Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

96   BRUTAL TREATMENT


November 4,1890--William Cook and wife of the south side brought to the city this morning a little girl only six years old who tell a pitiful story of brutal treatment at the hands of Charles Arms. The child has given her name as Callie Pulley, and say that her mother lived in Vinegar Bottom and ran off and left her.
The story as related to a Leaf Chronicle reporter by Mr. Cook is to the effect that the child was bound out to Buck Arms by the County Court; that Charles Arms, a grown son of Buck Arms, whipped her until she ran away and took refuge at the residence of Mr. Cook. The child’s arms and body were covered with stripes, bruises which she said had been inflicted by Charles Arms, her brutal prosecutor. Mr. Cook came to the city to put the case before the authorities. He says he will keep the child unless ordered to give her up.

Bar dividing text

From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

97   PALMYRA


January 28,1907--A man giving his name as Oliver Clay Rockler was arrested Sunday near Palmyra on the charge of vagrancy and brought to the city. He will be detained at the county jail pending an investigation. He is about 35 years of age and is fairly well educated. When placed under arrest he had on three suits of clothes and was living under a tent in the woods. He had no bed clothing and slept on leaves; did his own cooking and appeared perfectly contented, although he admitted having gotten cold during the past few nights. The man’s appearance frightened the people of that vicinity, who made complaint against him. He had $18 in money, and purchased his food from the store at Palmyra. When questioned by an officer this morning he said that he changed his name every few minutes and was arrested every two or three days. He did not mind that, however, as he had to put in time someway, and so long as he was getting something to eat he didn’t any more mind being in jail than out. He claimed to have at one time been a stenographer, and had several note books containing songs which he had written. He said he cooked enough grub to last a week at a time. He claimed to have been hoboing for the past fifteen years, and said he was strung up on the side of a wall for refusing to beat rock. The only weapon he had among his effects when arrested was an old razor which he used to shave himself. He also had a steel saw and file.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

98   SOUTHSIDE


August 2,1893--James Harper, constable in District 16, shot Obe Proctor in the leg yesterday, while the latter was resisting arrest. The wound is not regarded as serious, but it will lay Proctor up for a few days. Proctor went to a picnic at Collinsville Saturday and created a disturbance by flourishing a pistol and indulging in loud cursing. Harper arrested him and had a trial before a magistrate. He was bound over to appear at the next term of the Criminal Court. Failing to make the bond, the magistrate ordered him sent to jail. Harper was interested in the picnic and could not leave. Constable Jones, however, of District 17 agreed to take him to town. Harper turned him over to Jones, but the officer had not gone far before Proctor made a break for liberty and got away. Monday morning, Harper learned that Proctor was still in the country, and Tuesday morning he went on a search for him.
He found him at the residence of his father-in-law, William Walton. It was early in the morning and when Harper approached the house he saw his man feeding the stock at the stable. Proctor had his head in the crib door and was not looking for an officer.
Harper slipped up on him and caught him by the arm. Proctor was thunderstruck and made a break for freedom. Harper held on and saved a portion of the shirt sleeve, but Proctor took to his heels. Harper soon found that he could not catch him, and called on him to halt. He paid no attention to this command only increasing his speed. Harper pulled his pistol and fired on him bringing him down by a shot in the leg. The ball entered the fleshy part of the thigh, glanced around the bone and came out in front. Harper started to town with him, but soon found that he was unable to come on account of the loss of blood. He was left at the residence of Mr. Walton, and is there now.

Bar dividing text

From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

99   A ROW AT CHURCH


July 14,1893--Much excitement was created Tuesday night at Lone Oak Church on the south side by Burrell Black shooting at Dock Bass with a pistol. About a year ago, Black was passing the residence of Bass, and as he passed he pulled a pistol from his pocket and began firing at the house. A hound dog ran out to see what was the matter and caught a pistol ball between his eyes for his trouble. This angered Bass very much, and when he came home and was told what had been done he carefully loaded a shot gun and went in search of Black. He failed to find him, and by the next time they met Bass had repented, and did not thirst for Black’s gore. He said to him that when he found his dog had been shot he went in search of the man who did the shooting, and if he had found him, he would have done him the same way he (Black) had treated the dog. This got Black’s fighting blood up and he tried, so the Leaf Chronicle is informed, to raise a row with Bass. The latter, however told him he was done with it and wanted no trouble over it.
Tuesday night, however, when Bass reached the church mentioned above, where a protracted meeting was in progress, Black planted himself in front of him and told him he was ready to settle that old score. Black had his hand in his hip pocket and was talking if shooting, when Bass reached down and picked up a rock from mother earth. Black in the meantime, drew his pistol and fired at Bass, missing him. Bass let drive at his assailant with the rock and caught him under the eye, and was getting another one when Black turned and ran off. A crowd came out of the church at this time and gave chase. When Black saw them coming he wheeled and fired two or three shots at the crowd, one of which struck the church pretty close, it is said, to the preacher’s head. Black made his escape, and has not been captured. A warrant, however, is out for his arrest.

Bar dividing text

From:

100   






  back           home
  BACK                       HOME

   1~100    101~200    201~300   

Folk Finders Guestbook        email

     Montgomery County Cemeteries     Death Notices     Men Folk     Women Folk     Folks Name Index    

     Neighborhood Folks     Local Sports     Folks Families     The Courthouse Square     Historical Notes    

     Keeping the Peace     Public Folks     Remembrances of Our Past     Birth Announcements     Old Time Religion    

     Marriages     Society Folks     Lodge Brothers     Front Porch Memories     Down on the Farm    

     Business Folks     Old School Days     Funeral Home Records     The Village Post Office     Separate Ways    

     Folks Reunions     Folks Anniversaries     Immigrant Ships Index     Native_Folk     Wills of the Past    

     The Old Home Place     Time Machine     Villages in Montgomery County     Old Time Medical Terms    

     Montgomery County Death Index (1908 - 1912)     Montgomery County Death Index (1914)










silverhair's graphics         J.O.D.clipart













"
Search billions of records on Ancestry.com