Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   


Folk Finders



Large letter Folks Families   201~300


These names are not in Alphabetical order. We add them as we find them.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

201   JOSEPH B. WILLIAMS


Joseph Williams was born August 25, 1841 in Montgomery County, the son of Joseph B. and Adaline T. Bridge Williams, and is of Welsh descent. Joseph Sr. was born in this county in 1808 and died in 1885. He and Adaline had seven children. Joseph Sr. was the son of Septimus Williams of Virginia. He came to Tennessee in 1795, the first of the family to settle in this State; he died in 1844.
Joseph attended county schools, and in 1861 joined the Fourteenth Tennessee Infantry. he was in the principal battles with his regiment.
He returned home and became a farmer. In 1870 he married M.J. Davis, born in 1841 in Montgomery County. They had two children: Neva and Jessie R.
Joseph's farm was about seven miles from Clarksville. He was magistrate in his district and was well-to-do financially.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

202   THOMAS W. WILLIAMS


Thomas Williams was born June 10, 1842 in Montgomery County, the son of William and Julia A. Rochell Williams. William was born in Mississippi in 1812, and Julia was born in Tennessee in 1813.
Thomas married Lucretia Jaiman, born December 19, 1849 in Tennessee, the daughter of Josiah and Nancy Jaiman. Josiah was born in North Carolina in 1813 and Nancy in Kentucky in 1817.
Thomas and Lucretia had nine children: James P., Agnes C., Julia, Dora C., William E., Thomas D., Bulia M. and Emery W.
In 1861 Thomas joined Company B, Fourteenth Tennessee Regiment, and was in all the battles fought in Virginia and never was wounded. He surrendered with Lee in 1865.
He returned home and was in farming and merchandising.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

203   HENRY B. WILLSON


Henry Willson was born February 4, 1852 in Pulaski County, Kentucky, the son of James M. and Elizabeth M. Porch Willson. James was born in 1828 and Elizabeth in 1819, both in Kentucky. James was the son of William Willson of North Carolina.
Henry attended school in Somerset, Kentucky and A. & M. College of the University of Kentucky at Lexington for four years. He then took a course of lectures in the Kentucky School of Medicine and the Louisville Medical College.
In 1876 he went to Philadelphia and was in the boot and shoe business. In late 1876 he moved to Hopkinsville, Kentucky and was in the boot and shoe business for Stribley & Co. until 1879. He then came to Clarksville and formed a partnership with James M. Bowling in a boots, shoes and gents' furnishing goods store. They were one of the leading businesses and one of the leading shoe houses in this part of Tennessee.
On February 21, 1882 he married Susie Dorch, born in 1859 in Clarksville, the daughter of G.C. and Eliza Dorch. They had two children: Henry J. and Eliza M.
Henry was a Mason and Knight Templar, an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

204   ROBERT A. WILSON


Robert Wilson was born May 9, 1836 in Pennsylvania, the son of John and Mary T. Jones Flemming Wilson. John was born in 1805 in Tennessee and died on February 16, 1880; Mary was born in North Carolina in 1801. They were married in 1830 and had four children.
Robert was raised on a farm and attended country schools. In 1855 he began clerking in New Providence for three years. Then he and his brother became partners in a general store until the war broke out.
In 1860 Robert married A.E. Barbee, born 1843 in Tennessee, the daughter of Solomon G. and Nancy Trice Barbee. Solomon was from North Carolina and Nancy was from Kentucky.
Robert and A.E. had six children: Annie M., Nannie G., John H., Susie, Myra and Emma.
In 1861 Robert joined Company A, Forty-ninth Tennessee Regiment, and was elected second-lieutenant. He was taken prisoner at Fort Donelson but exchanged after four months. The company reorganized at Vicksburg and Robert was made first lieutenant. He was in several battles in Mississippi. He was in Atlanta and in Hood's retreat from Tennessee. At Selma, Alabama he was captured but escaped and came home.
In 1866 he was elected constable and appointed deputy sheriff. When making an arrest Robert had his right eye seriously injured.
He began merchandising in New Providence for two years, then sold out and began farming. He bought a farm in 1880.
Robert was a Mason.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

205   SAMUEL E. WILSON


Samuel Wilson was born August 19, 1860 in Fredonia, Montgomery County, the son of Samuel and Eliza W. Hunt Wilson, and was of Scottish-Irish descent. Samuel Sr. was born in 1813 and died in 1871. He married Eliza in 1843. She was born in 1821 in North Carolina, the daughter of John Hunt. They had two children: Mary E. S. and Samuel E.
Samuel attended county schools and Stewart College in Clarksville. He owned 3,500 acres on the Cumberland River and 300 acres in Fredonia. From 1877 to 1883 he lived in Clarksville but always attended to his farm.
On March 7, 1883 he married Flora De Graffenreid, born October 26, 1861 in Williams County, the daughter of Mathew De Graffenreid of Virginia, and of German-French descent. He died in Tennessee in 1868.
Samuel and Flora had one child, Eliza, born December 3, 1883. He was quite wealthy.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

206   ALEXANDER S. WOOD


Alexander Wood was born December 24, 1830 near Franklin, Tennessee, the son of John and Mildred Standfield Wood. John was born in Maryland and came to Tennessee in 1837 and lived near Franklin for four years. Later he lived in Kentucky and in 1838 he died in Hopkinsville. After his death Mildred and her seven children moved back to Montgomery County where she was born. She died in 1839.
Alexander attended country schools . In 1848 he began merchandising at Woodlawn and in 1860 was in the tobacco business. In 1879 he started a grocery business in partnership with Florence F. Abbott.
He married three times: in 1857 to Jennie Frederick who died in 1863; in 1866 to Bettie J. Brown who died in 1871; in 1873 to Edna B. Brown. Bettie's sister.
Alexander was a member of the Masons and K. of H.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

207   JONATHAN FRANKLIN WOOD


Jonathan Wood was born September 11, 1851 in Meigs County, the son of J. and L.E. Brittain Wood, and was of Irish descent. J. was born in 1802 and died in Clarksville in 1877. L.E. was born in 1817.
Jonathan was raised on a farm, and in 1868 the family moved to Chattanooga, where he attended school. He clerked in the hardware store of Wood & Coulter until January, 1872 when he came to Clarksville and bought interest in Kincannon, Wood & Co.
In 1875 he married Bettie M. McReynolds of Clarksville. They had two children: Clara M. and Annie L.
He inherited his father's share and was an equal partner until 1882. He opened his own store selling Hardware, glass, queensware, tin and wood stoves. He had a very substantial business.
Jonathan was a member of the Masons, I.O.O.F., K.T. and K. of P.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

208   J.N. WOODSON


J.N. Woodson October 15, 1843 in Virginia, the son of Jacob C. and Susan Woodard Woodson, and was of English descent. They had ten children. The family came to Montgomery County in 1847 and stayed until 1874, when they moved to Kentucky. Susan died in Tennessee in 1854.
J.N. attended county school and farmed with his father. He married Sarah J. Smith, the daughter of James and Mary Smith. They had six children: George T., William N., Allen B., James A., Margaret J. and Josie E.
J.N. bought a farm and raised tobacco. In 1861 he joined the Fourteenth Regiment Infantry. He was in all the battles with his regiment Cedar Run, Seven Pines, Petersburg, Richmond and Manassas. He was discharged in 1862 for being underage. He was captured at his home and was held prisoner in Nashville, Louisville, Baltimore, Fort Monroe, and Petersburg where he was exchanged in 1863 and returned home.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

209   FRANCIS M. YARBROUGH


Francis Yarbrough was born November 5, 1832 in Montgomery County, the son of John and Mary Vaughn Yarbrough, and was of English descent. John was from Virginia and died 1856, Mary was from Tennessee and died in 1857.
Francis attended county schools and learned blacksmithing and wagon-making.
On May 1, 1856 Francis married C. Davis, born February 13, 1838 in Tennessee, the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Martin Davis, both of Montgomery County. They had eight children: David L., Josiah, John R., William H., Bailey, Louisa, Milton M. and Ada. Bailey died in 1869 and Josiah died in 1882.
Francis worked at his trade and his sons ran the farm. He was also a prominent contractor on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

210   H.C. YOUNG


H. C. Young was born December 30, 1854 in Montgomery County, the son of Col. W.F. and Mary Shelby Young. H.C. was born in Bowling Green, Kentucky in 1830 and came to Tennessee when three years old. He owned a large farm in District 8, where he lived until the war broke out. W.F. and Mary had three children, H.C. and two that died in infancy. Mary died in 1858 and W.F. married Catharine Candle. They had two children: W.B. and L.A. When the war broke out, he joined Company G and was made captain. He was soon promoted to colonel. In the battle of Atlanta he lost an arm.
H.C. attended county schools and Central Point Military Academy. He married Eunice Pruitt in 1877. They had three children: Lena, Gordie and Claud.
He went into the mercantile business in 1880. In 1882 he moved to Dotsonville, and from there to Caskey, Kentucky where he stayed a year; he then came back to Montgomery County and went into the dry goods and grocery business at Sky View, Montgomery County.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

211   GUSTAVUS A. HENRY


Gustavus Henry was born October 8, 1804 in Scott County, Kentucky. His family was from Virginia and he was a descendent of Patrick Henry.
He moved to Christian County when he was fourteen. He attended the best schools and received a classical education, graduating from Transylvania University.
He represented Christian County in the Kentucky Legislature in 1831 and 1832. On February 17, 1833 he married Marion McClure of Clarksville, and moved to Tennessee.
He was the Whig elector for his district in 1840, and ran for Congress in 1842 against Cave Johnson. He was elector at large for the State in 1844, 1848 and 1852. In 1851-52 he was in the Legislature of Tennessee and in 1853 ran for Governor against Andrew Johnson. He was elected the first senator from Tennessee to the Confederate Congress.
Gustavus was greatly distinguished as a lawyer and a great orator. He died September 10, 1880.

Bar dividing text


From: Montgomery County, TN, Biographical Index

212   John Daniel Clardy


A Representative from Kentucky; born in Smith County, Tenn., August 30,1828; moved with his parents to Christian County, Kentucky, in 1831; attended the county schools, and was graduated from Georgetown (Kentucky) College in 1851; taught school one year; studied medicine at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, for one year, and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia in 1851; practiced his profession for a number of years, and then abandoned it to devote his time to scientific agriculture and stock raising; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1890; appointed as one of the State commissioners to the Colombian Exposition at Chicago in 1893; elected as a Democrat to the fifty-fourth and fifty-fifth Congresses
(March 4,1895 - March 3,1899); was not a candidate for renomination in 1898; retired from public life; died at his home, "Oak land." Near Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky, on August 20,1918; interment in Clardy's County Cemetery, Bells, Christian County, Kentucky.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

213   HORACE H. LURTON


Horace Lurton was born February 26, 1844 in Campbell County, Kentucky, the son of Dr. L. and Sarah Harman Lurton. Dr. Lurton was born in 1820 in Scott County, Kentucky and died in Tennessee in 1877. Sarah was born in 1824 in Scott County, the daughter of Zebulon Harman of Virginia, and died in 1881 in Tennessee. Dr. Lurton's father was a leading physician in Kentucky. Zebulon was a minister, he organized the first church and Sunday school in Kentucky.
In 1861 Horace joined Col. Ben Hill's regiment and became sergeant-major, but was discharged in February, 1862, because of ill health. Later that same year he joined the Second Kentucky Regiment, and at the surrender of Ft. Donelson was taken prisoner to Camp Chase, Ohio. He escaped the following April, and two months later joined Company G, Third Kentucky Cavalry of Morgan's Brigade, and in July, 1863 was taken prisoner until the end of the war.
In 1865 he entered the law department of Cumberland University and graduated in 1867. He became a law partner of Hon. G.A. Henry. In 1877 he joined Hon. James Edmund Bailey. He was appointed chancellor in 1875 and re-elected in 1876. He joined C.G. Smith in 1878.
On September 17, 1867 he married Fannie Owen, born in 1845. They had three children: Leon O., Mary and Horace H. Jr.
In 1884 Horace became president of the Farmers and Merchants Bank. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. and Knights of Pythias.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

214   J.G. JOSEPH


J.G. Joseph was born January 2, 1842 in Cincinnati, the son of Joseph and Rachel Wolf Joseph of England, and was of Jewish descent. Joseph was born in Exeter in 1801 and Rachel was born in Plymouth in 1814. Joseph was a jeweler who came to America in 1837 and settled in Clarksville. He died in Cincinnati in in 1873.
J.G. was raised in Ohio. At age 10 he went to live with an uncle in Indianapolis. and attended Northwestern Christian University and the Commercial College in that city.
He clerked for a number of years in his uncle's clothing store and in 1860 went into business for himself. In 1864 to 1869 he was a traveling salesman. Then came to Clarksville and opened a men's clothing store.
In 1872 he married Carrie Rexinger, the sister of Samuel Rexinger, who was postmaster of Clarksville for eighteen years. J.G. and Carrie had three children: Joseph, Ruby and Edith.
He was a Royal Arch Mason and was elected secretary in 1882. He was the first charter member of the K. of P. and in 1874 was elected Past Chancellor. He was the author of the degree of "Wise Men". He was first charter member of Abraham Lodge, I.O.O.B. in Indianapolis and was elected its president in 1866. He was elected representative of District Abraham Lodge, No. 58, I.O.O.B. (which consisted of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee.
J.G. was a delagate to every Democratic State Convention from 1870 until his death.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

215   CLARK FAMILY


Micajah Clark was the founder of the historical Clark family of this county. Of this family came soldiers, governors, legislators and professional men. Among them were Gen. George Rogers Clark; Gov. William Rogers Clark of Missouri ; Merriwether Lewis; Gov. James Clark of Kentucky; Gen. John B. Clark and M.L. Clark of Missouri; and James Clark Dearing of Virginia.
Micajah was born September 16, 1718 and married Judith Adams, born October, 1716. They had twelve children: Christopher, Robert, Mourning, Micajah, John, Edward, Penelope, Judith, Bowling, Elizabeth, James and William.
Micajah owned 40,000 acres in Albemarle County, Virginia. He was a good friend of Thomas Jefferson and laid off large plantations for Thomas and himself in Bedford County, Virginia.
William married Judith Cheadle, the daughter of Col. Tarleton Cheadle, an officer in the English Army who came to Virginia before the Revolutionary War. They had three children: James, who married Margaret Lewis and moved to Missouri; Jacob, who died young; and Micajah. William was a cavalry commander in the Revolutionary War.
Dr. Micajah Clark was a most distinguished physician in Virginia. The AMA has published his biography in their annals. He was born in Richmond on his father's plantation near the Keswick Station on January 28, 1788; he died in Richmond on August 19, 1849.
Micajah studied medicine in Richmond under Dr. Adams. He then entered the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, studying under Dr. Physick. He graduated in April 26, 1811.
He was appointed surgeon in the army in 1812 and served in two enlistments at Craney Island.
On December 29, 1819 he married his second cousin, Caroline Virginia Harris, the daughter of Benjamin James Harris, a wealthy tobacco merchant in Richmond. They had sixteen children: William James, Sarah Ellyson, Mary Elizabeth, Micajah Henry, Caroline Virginia, Ellen Douglas, Henry Auburn, Lewis Rogers, David Branch, Emily Auburn, and six infants that died without being named. Caroline died February 17, 1871.
Micajah Henry married Elizabeth W. Kerr, the daughter of M.M. Kerr of Clarksville. They had two children: Morris K. and a daughter. Micajah was chief clerk of the executive office and was the last acting treasurer of the Confederate States. Jefferson Davis made him a staff officer with the rank of captain and was reportedly the last Confederate officer on duty in November, 1865. He was also in the trenches and helped repel the Dahgren Raid on the city.
Micajah formed a partnership with his brother Lewis Rogers Clark in the tobacco trade in Clarksville, Tennessee.
Lewis joined Company A, Forty-ninth Tennessee Regiment, as a private and was captured at the surrender of Ft. Donelson and was sent to Camp Douglas. He was exchanged and was elected junior captain of the Tenth Tennessee, soon becoming senior captain. In the Battle of Chickamauga, eight of the ten captains were killed or wounded. Lewis was wounded at the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. At the end of the war, he joined his brother in the tobacco business, representing the market of Hopkinsville.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

216   JOHN HARTWELL MARABLE


John Marable was born Nov. 18, 1786 near Lawrenceville, Va., son of Henry Hartwell Marable. Henry was born in 1753 and died in 1833. He was descended from Capt. George Marable of Canterbury, England, who came to Virginia in 1652. His son, Maj. George Marable served as high sheriff and justice of the peace in James Co. and was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses.
John attended the University of Pennsylvania, Medical Department in 1805-06. (There is no record he received a degree.) He moved to Davidson County where he practiced medicine until 1812. He then moved to Clarksville where he practiced medicine in Montgomery, Stewart, Dickson and Humphreys county. He helped organize the first Medical Association in Tennessee.
On June 13, 1808 he married Ann J. (Nancy) Watson, born 1790 in Davidson County, the daughter of Thomas Watson, who came from Prince Edward Island, Virginia.
John's older brother, Benjamin and his wife Lucy Brown moved to Rutherford County, Virginia in 1818.
John was a member of the Clarksville City council, from which he resigned in 1819. He was State senator 1817-1819 and U.S. Congressman from 1824-1828.
In 1820 he moved to his plantation, "Escape", near Sailor's Rest.. He owned a large amount of land and many slaves. He owned interest in an iron furnace.
John died April 11, 1844 and is buried in Marable Cemetery on his plantation. It is located at the end of Hargrove-Marable Road.
One of his sons was Dr. John Hartwell Marable. He married Evelyn Smith and had eight children.
One of his sons was Samuel A., born Nov.2, 1857 and died Oct. 30, 1931. He married Elizabeth Jackson, born May 16, 1863 in Montgomery County and died on May 18, 1906. They had eight children: William H., died May 15, 1906 at age 15; Samuel A.; John Hartwell (Commissioner of Finance in Clarksville); Elizabeth; Mabel; Harding H. (died 1934); Repps C. (lived in Palmyra); Annis (married Isaac Powers of Detroit.
Samuel married Pearl Chambliss on Dec. 4, 1914, the daughter of J.C. and Nannie Allen Chambliss. They had one child, Nancy Elizabeth, who moved in Ashland City.
John Hartwell married Myrna Powers. They had a son, Samuel Addison. Samuel went to Vanderbilt Medical School and moved to Ohio. He died in 1970 and is buried in St. Joseph Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

217   THOMAS ADDISON JOHNSON


On the right as you pass thru the gate into Salem Church Cemetery is a tombstone with the name Thomas A. Johnson, Co A 10th Alabama Infantry, C. S. A. What do we know of this “Johnny Reb”?
He was born in Calhoun County, Alabama, around the year 1837. He enlisted in the Confederate Army on June 4, 1861 at Montgomery Alabama as a member of Co H, 10th Alabama Infantry Regiment. He served until January 1,1865.
Thomas Addison Johnson had two brothers and three sisters being John, Charlie, Jane, Polly, and Sudie.
On January 26,1870, He married Delia Elizabeth Clark, daughter of Thomas Henry Clark and Martha M. Hale Clark. The wedding was performed by J. T. Richardson, Justice of the Peace, and witnessed by H.C. Green and Mrs. Henrietta Harper. The event took place about six miles out from Clarksville. To this union were born ten children; Henry (1871), Martha (1875), Andrew (1877), John (1879), Alvina (1881), Cornelius (1884), Clark (1886), Nancy (1889), David (1891), and Charles Thomas (1893).
Thomas Addison Johnson, died at his home on November 18,1897, near Salem Church in the 17th District, of Consumption. He was about 60 years of age. Reverend Clyde held the funeral at Salem Church.
Delia Elizabeth Johnson applied for a pension allowed to indigent widows of soldiers on April 18,1927. She died on April 15,1930, five son’s served as pallbearers.
Descendants are as follows: Mrs. Nancy Lewis Hodges, daughter of Henry; Mr. Gordon Yarbrough, son of Martha (Mattie); Reverend Lauren Suiter, son of Nancy; Mrs. Mary D. Johnson, widow of Mack Johnson, daughter of Andrew; and Charles Uwren Johnson, son of Cornelius.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

218   GEORGE HATTON WEEMS


Tucked away in the South-East corner of Montgomery County near the Dickson County and Cheatham County lines is a small community that has had many names; Walnut Grove, Turbine, Rye’s Chapel, and Clawhammer. The mailing address now is South-side, Tennessee. Two family names well known in this area, are the Rye’s and Weems.
Joseph Burch Weems married Elizabeth Rye, daughter of Dr. Thomas Hartwell Rye and Martha Ellington (Hagewood) Rye. To this union, one of the children was a boy by the name of George Hatton Weems.
This lad was born on September 27,1891. He attended Southwestern Presbyterian University at Clarksville 1912 - 1913. He received his BS from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) in 1917, in time to serve with the 2nd Division during 1917 - 1919. He was commander of a Machine Gun Company and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for valor. He served as an instructor at the Infantry School 1920 - 1923, graduated in 1923, and served as the Asst Commandant in 1942 - 1945. He was a professor of Military Science and Tactics at Davidson College in North Carolina during 1923 - 1927. He was an Instructor at West Point in 1928 - 1929. He attended the Command and General Staff College in 1928 and the Army War College in 1934. He was the Asst Commandant of the Tactical School in 1929 - 1933. The years 1939 - 1941, he was Chief of U.S. Military Mission to Haiti. He was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General in 1942.
In 1946, he was assigned as U.S. Representation on the Allied Control Commission for Hungary, and in 1947 became Provost Marshal of the European Command. Before retiring at age 60, he served as Chief of the Military District of Georgia. He retired on September 30,1951. General Weems died at Fort Campbell on February 25,1957. His home was Waverly, Tennessee. He was a bachelor and was affectionately referred to as “Daddy Weems”. He was a member of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. Other awards earned included Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Army Occupation Medal, Croix de Guerre, Order of Crown of Italy, Commander Haiti Order of Honor and Merit. He is listed in Who’s Who in America, Volumes 26 - 27 dated 1950 - 1951 and 1052 - 1953.

Bar dividing text


From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

219   ROBERT LOFTON NEWMAN


A plaque on the corner of Main and Sixth reads:
Robert Lofton Newman-1827-1912

Born in Richmond, Virginia, he moved with his family to Clarksville when he was 11. He studied art in New York, England and France. Nationally recognized for his work, over 190 of his paintings have been located. Newman served as a lieutenant in the Confederate Army from 1861 to 1864. Although he traveled extensively, his permanent home was the house which stood at the corner of Main & 6th St. Newman died in New York but was returned to Clarksville for burial.

Bar dividing text


From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

220   THOMAS BATSON


Thomas and Elizabeth Batson came from Halifax County, North Carolina between 1803 and 1806 along with other families such as Samuel Smith, William Sullivan, William Harvey, Randall (or Rudolph) Bull and William Porter. They settled around Barton's Creek on the south side of the river.
Thomas and Elizabeth had 12 or 13 children, most of them also having a dozen or more children.
Batson Cemetery is located behind the Carr-Harvey house which has been in the same family since 1809.
Nearby is Samuel Smith's house which was one of the earliest houses built in Clarksville. It was still being lived in in 1980. This house served as the Post Office of Dogwood, Tennessee and during the Civil War, soldiers were hid in the attic.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

221   WILLIAM CORLEW


The earliest record located of the Corlew family in Montgomery County dates back to the July term of the Court of 1803 of which William Corlew is identified as a bondsman. First deed recorded is in Deed Book B, page 670, which states in part, "William Corlew, deed of 170 acres from Hayden Wells, 20th day of My 1804, both listed as from this county, paid $220; property located on the Southside of Cumberland River and on the waters of Camp Creek." (Near David Hinton's) William Corlew, Sr. was a plantation owner in the Salem area and is listed as the only Corlew family in this county in the 1820 Census. He is listed as having 2 sons and 6 daughters.
In 1841, William Corlew was declared a lunatic and incapable of managing his own affairs with safety to himself and others. His son, John Corlew was appointed Guardian to William Corlew, Sr. At that time, March 24, 1841, he owned 467 acres, two homes, livestock, farm items, and the following slaves: Jacob, Charles, Cary, Abram, David, Cily, Margaret, Peggy, Jane, Decatur, Levi, Martha, Burrel, Jerry, Dilieu, and Princeton.
As of September 10, 1841, William Corlew, Sr. was listed as deceased.
Seven of his eight children are:
Hester R. Corlew, born December 8,1803, died September 30,1881; married John Cocke; buried at Cocke Cemetery on the McClure farm in old Dist. 17.
Mary Jane Corlew, married Nathan Gilbert in 1839.
Sylvia Corlew married John Laughren, a descendant being Mrs. Cathy Turnage, Tulsa, Okalahoma.
Benjamin Corlew, born January 26,1802; married Margaret Young, a descendant being Bruce Corlew, Clarksville, Tennessee.
John Corlew, born around 1808, married L???. (see 1860 census of Dickson, Tennessee.)
Thomas W. Corlew married Susan P. Moore in 1844. Members of Chapel Hill Church in 1850, listed in Humphreys County in 1870.
William Corlew, Jr. born around 1810, died June 3,1881, buried in Salem Cemetery; married Eliza Pritchard in 1842; members of Chapel Hill Church in 1850. Their children :
Rufus M. born 1844, Doctor in Evansville, Mary Catherine, born May 11,1846, died March 25,1906; married Thomas Rogers; buried on Albert Jones farm in Dist. 17; David Lewis, born August 25,1854, died Ju? 16,1900; married Kate H. Lyle in 1892; buried on Albert Jones farm in Dist. 17; William Ervin, born January 1850, died June 25,1927; married Louise Lowe in 1883; buried at Greenwood Cemetery.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

222   WILLIAM CLEMENTS


He immigrated to the United States at the close of the Revolutionary War leaving his parents in Scotland. Their only request was that he receive a liberal and religious education. I do not know when he was born or when he married. His interest in our area first appears around 1804-1805 when he purchased large tracts of land on the waters of Yellow Creek and built a plantation there and named it "Snow Hill".
As early as 1807, William Clements and John H. Hyde (merchants) purchased Lot #69 of the town of Palmyra from Morgan Brown who founded the town. This lot was located on the corner of 2nd St and Main St. He and others later purchased and sold many lots in the town of Palmyra. Two of the lots contained Isaac Morgan's Tavern and Kitchen. On November 2, 1809 he was appointed commissioner for the town of Palmyra.
William Clements was a brother-in-law of Col. George West who was the father of Robert West, a wealthy landowner of Dickson County. Col. George West died in 1810 and is buried in the Dunbar Cemetery.
On October 16,1810, William Clement purchased 320 acres from the estate of Col. George West. The land was located near present day Corbandale adjacent to Wright Outlaw's property and Burrell Bailey's property.
The 1820 census lists his neighbors as William Hankins and James Fentress.
William Clements and his wife Sarah had the following children:
William R. B. Clements...lived in Mecklenburg County, Virginia.
Christopher C. Clements...was the Registrar of Stewart County, Tennessee 1824-36
John H. Clements
Robert Clements
Eliza W. Clements...married Thomas Napiers
Mary C. Clements...married John C. Collier
Arabella L. Clements...married Curtiss Bayliss
Catherine McKenzie Darlett Clements...married J.C. Ingram. She is buried in Dunbar Cemetery, August 12,1810-October 16,1838
William Clements died at his residence on the main fork of Yellow Creek on either 4 or 9 of February 1822. At the time of his death he owned many slaves. Some of the slaves he wanted to keep in the family and not be sold were Andy, George, Nancy, Hannaby, Sophy, Penny and Edward. Other slaves were Henry, Taff, Henry, Anthony, David, Arthur, Alfred, Pollas, Rose and Cytherea.
I believe William Clements and his beloved wife Sara are both buried at Dunbar Cemetery.
The plantation near Corbandale was known as "Richland on Cumberland" and was located across the river from the town of New York, which is now called York Landing.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

223   BARLOW DUNBAR


House,48th Gen. assembly, 1891 - 93. Rep. Mont. co. Democrat. Born in Stewart co. Tenn., ca.1841; son of Elsie Dunbar; wife named Rosa, she was a native of Mayfield, Kentucky, children: Elsie, Dixie, Herman, William, Alice, and Dale. Farmed at Riggins Mill, Montgomery County. In Confederate Army; enlisted as Private, Co. B. 14th Tenn. Inf. at Clarksville, May 17,1861. Member Cumberland Presbyterian Church; Free Accepted Masons. Died at Riggins Mill March 16,187?; buried in Dunbar Family graveyard, Montgomery County. Kinsman of Samuel Cuyler Dunbar, sometime member of Tenn. Gen. Assembly. (Biographical Directory Tenn. Gen. Assembly- Sources, S. Cuyler Dunbar, Woodlawn, House Journal, page798. Con. Service records, roll 174.)

Bar dividing text


From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

224   DR. RAYMOND MARVIN GRAHM


July 24,1933--Lying at rest in the Swift Cemetery off Oak Ridge Road near Palmyra is the remains of Dr. Raymond Marvin Graham. Dr. Graham departed this life at the age of 51. He was a native of Big Sandy, Tennessee. He began his professional career in 1911 as a general practician after becoming a licensed physician from Vanderbilt University. He practiced in Palmyra. January 1917 he married a local lady, Miss Winnie Swift. He decided to specialize in malachies of the eye, ear, nose, and throat and took postgraduate courses in the Universities of St. Louis and Chicago. He completed his studies in 1921. Dr. and Mrs. Graham moved to Clarksville where he established an office and rapidly forged to the front in his profession. He succeeding Dr. George E. Vaughn, who had moved to Louisville. He purchased the former home of John West at 427 Franklin Street, which was also once owned by Mrs. Lewis Gold. It was here that he suffered his last illness. A malignant illness was the cause of his death. Every thing that a devoted wife and concerned fellow physicians and surgeons could do for him was done. Twice he went through the clinic at Vanderbilt Hospital and on July 4 was conveyed to John Hopkins Hospital, but specialists held out no hope for recovery. During the 12 years in which he had lived in Clarksville, Dr. Graham made many friends and was regarded as one of the outstanding specialists in this part of the state. His pleasing personality and modesty made Dr. Graham exceedingly popular and his counsel was highly valued. He was a man of quiet dignity and involuntarily commanded the confidence and respect of the public and loved by his patients. Dr. Graham was a member of Madison Street Methodist Church. He was also a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and a former member of the Kiwanis Club. A keen sportsman, Dr. Graham belonged to the Blue Wing Hunting Club. He was a real sportsman in every sense of the word, and one of his most enjoyable forms of recreation was in bird hunting. He usually possessed one or more purebred bird dogs. He was a past president of the Montgomery County Medical Society of which members were honorary pallbearers:
Dr. J.H. Ledbetter
Dr. Frank J. Runyon
Dr. Bryce Runyon
Dr. John Ross
Dr. M.L. Shelby
Dr. E.B. Ross
Dr. H.H. Edmondson
Dr. R.B. Macon
Dr. H.A. Nesbitt
Dr. L.L. Neblett
Dr. E.M. Rogers
Dr. Maurice Langos Highes
Dr. W.L. Macon
Dr. F.J. Malone
Dr. Irving Emerson Hunt
Dr. W.H. Young
Dr. R.L. Norris
Dr. F.C. Outlaw
Dr. Robert Phinous Frazier
Dr. F.A. Martin.

Bar dividing text


From: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

225   JAMES B. REYNOLDS


A Representative from Tennessee; born in County Antrim, Ireland, in 1779; attended the common schools; immigrated to the United States and settled in Clarksville, Tennessee; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1804 and practiced; elected as a Republican to the Fourteenth Congress (March 4,1815-March 3,1817); elected to the Eighteenth Congress (March 4,1823-March 3,1825); resumed the practice of law; died in Clarksville, Tennessee, June 10,1851; interment in Riverview Cemetery.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

226   LOUIS RAYMOND POWERS


Louis Powers was born February 5,1892 in Montgomery County, the son of Elijah and Mary Webb Powers of old District 19. His brothers and sisters were: Alpha, Wylie Jerome, Homer, Clay Winstead, Roxie, Dixie and Dora.
During World War I he served in France, in Company G, 323 Infantry, 81st Division.
On June 8,1921, he assisted the American Legion Post #7 in the funeral of Private James Stanley Lisenby in Myers Cemetery, who died during WW1. He served four years as constable of District 19 and six years as a deputy sheriff under Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont.
On June 3,1941, Louis married Mrs. Anna Belle Jones.
He campaigned for Sheriff in the election of August 1946. He defeated Mannie W. Sanderson by 295 votes. The third candidate was Clyde N. Foust, Jr.
He ran for re-election in 1948. Mannie Sanderson defeated Louis by 125 votes. Former sheriff Tom Huggins received 276 votes.
When Lee Wood was elected sheriff in 1954, Louis was appointed and served as his chief deputy until Lee's death in 1959. At that time, the Quarterly Court appointed Louis as interim Sheriff until the next election in 1960.
During the early 60's, he owned and operated Powers Grocery Store in the Tarsus community. He was a member of the Palmyra Masonic Lodge.
Louis Raymond died December 21,1970. He is buried at the Powers Cemetery on Wylie Powers Road.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

227   WALTER FREEMAN SUITER


Walter was born on May 12,1896 and died on April 15,1986. Nellie was born on October 28,1901and died on May 23,1992. Both are buried and have a tombstone together at Fairview Cemetery near Indian Mound in Stewart County. The marriage lasted over 66 years.
Walter Freeman Suiter and Nellie Woolard married in 1919. He was a veteran of World War I. In the 1940’s they went to Michigan and his obituary states he was a retired machinist for General Motors.
J.W. Suiter was born on July 9,1925 and died on the night of August 20,1930 at age 5 years, 1 month, and 11 days. Today, July 26,1999 (69 years later), he remains in an unmarked grave at Antioch Methodist Church Cemetery. I believe he is there next to his grandmother, Julia Suiter, on the back row at the side of the church.
Other known children born to this union were Melvin Bradford, Freeman Patrick, Robert, and Virginia.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

228   SHILOH / ANTIOCH


Letter from Grand Child of Buyde Allen Ussery
January 7,1989--In answer to your question about my grandmother, I’ll try to provide you with additional information. My grandmother, Buyde, remarried; she married Amos Tillman Felts, and the family moved to Leesburg, Virginia. Mr. Felts was the principal of the high school in Leesburg. He died when my mother, Elizabeth Ussery, was still in school. My mother and grandmother moved to East Falls Church, Virginia, and mom graduated from high school at Western High in Washington, D.C. (East Falls Church is a Washington suburb.)
Mom and my grandmother both worked for the federal government. Mom married my father, Frank M. Cole, in 1928. Daddy worked for Magruders, an imported goods grocery store in Washington. I was born in 1938. My parents and I moved to a farm in Puscellville, Va. in 1948, when daddy retired from the store.
I visited relatives in Tennessee frequently with mom. Knowing that my grandfather “Dr. Ben Ussery” graduated from the University of Tennessee, I attended UT and got my degree there in 1960. Mom and daddy continued to live on the farm after daddy retired from farming. I had 3 sons, Tom, Mike, and Jim.
My husband died in 1976, and my father died in 1977. Mother lived alone on the farm until last spring when she was hospitalized. As you know she passed away in November 1988 at the age of 84.
Sincerely,
Ann Cole Hughes


Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

229   PUGH JACKSON-WILLIAMS


Letter from Nancy Tatera, Gurnee, Illinois

June 14,1925-August 14,1992--In the March 96 and April 96 issues of Duck’s Old Time Journal” I wrote of the shooting of Pugh Jackson and the trial of John R. Williams. For the rest of the story I present the following letter from the granddaughter of Pugh Jackson and great-granddaughter of John R. Williams:

The four year old little boy playing in that courtroom was my father, Pugh Jackson, Jr. His grandfather spent his two years in prison, and upon release, took my dad to raise. Pugh Jackson-Williams grew up in the Palmyra/Clarksville communities under his “Pappy’s” guidance. He taught my dad to respect those who gave him respect.
My dad lived his younger years under such a shadow of mystery (the Pugh Jackson killing) and degradation (Fannie & Pugh Jackson never married). Dad told me stories of his youth spent on the streets of Clarksville, living hand-to-mouth by people’s charity. He had minimal vision in one eye caused by malnutrition as a child. My favorite of his stories was about cowboys and Indians. Many deadly battles had been fought in Dad’s front yard-keeping him awake all night. Some mornings he would have to step over bodies on his way to school.
Dad attended Howell School and played baseball with the neighborhood boys behind the Tobacco Factory off of Spring Street. As anyone who lived in those times knows, life was not often easy. In 1945-1946, Dad worked as the floor manager at Lena Brown’s Roller Rink where he taught skating and did repairs. He wore a size seven boot and when he strapped on a pair of roller skates, he was king of the rink. Everyone stopped to watch him perform. He made it look so easy as he got lost in time and skated with the grace of Rudolf Nureyev dancing. He became a skater of almost a professional level and for a bonus; he met and married my mother, Dorothy Duenow from Wisconsin.
Dad delivered coal and ice for the Montgomery County Ice Company depending on the seasons. Dad worked six days a week from sun up till late in the night. In the summer, his tools of the trade were ice tongs, ice pick, a big scoop steel shovel and a strong back. He delivered blocks of ice to every big or little icebox in Palmyra. When his customers did not have the 5 cents to 20 cents to pay for the ice, Pugh left it anyway. In the winter months he delivered coal. He knew everyone by name in these familiar “hills and hollers” of his birth. He held many other jobs, including one at R.B. Lester’s Produce on College Street.
Dad and Mom moved temporarily to Wisconsin in 1947. While there, he worked for the Chicago Northwestern Railroad, Yates American Machine Shop, Mork’s Foundry, and Fairbanks-Morris. I was born there in Wisconsin in 1949.
We returned to Clarksville in 1949. Dad and Mom took work anywhere they could find it. The three of us lived in “Black Bottom:” with Fanny(my Grandmother) and Sam Gill. Nancy Cox (my maternal grandmother) would often take my brother John and I to the First Baptist Chapel on Spring Street. All races lived in the area without any difficulty and our only common denominator was that we were poor. My brother John was born in 1951, sister Janice born and died in 1954, and brother Terry in 1955.
In 1959, the five of us left Clarksville bound for Chicago. With $50.00 and all of our meager belongings packed into a 1950 Plymouth, we made the 450-mile trip without incident. When we arrived, we lived with my maternal grandmother. Dad got a job with Kirscheimer Bag Company within two days of our arrival. By April of 1960, we had our own apartment where our youngest family member Mark was born.
My father found work as a mover/semi-truck driver where he worked 20 hours a day, most times seven days a week. Mom worked the second shift at Motorola. Day by day and month by month things steadily improved for the family.
Dad would take us fishing whenever we had the chance to get out into the “Country”. Mom and Sad bought a home in 1972. Dad taught us all including his five grandchildren to fish, ride bikes, and roller skate. He also taught us to give an honest days work for an honest days pay. He was so very proud that his children were able to have an education.
As a child, Pugh spent many hours watching the cowboy serials at the Roxy Theater in Clarksville. From these hard ridin’ , straight shootin’ heroes, he learned that a man is only as good as his word and that a handshake was the only contract honest men needed. Pugh’s Ten Commandments were stated in four words, “hurt no one intentionally.”
Dad was killed in a work related accident on August 14,1992 at the age of 67. He was returned to Clarksville and laid to rest in Riverview Cemetery because that was his wish.
Nancy Tatera, Gurnee, Illinois

Read about the trial of John R. Williams in Keeping the Peace article #73

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

230   JOSEPH NATHANIEL BLACKFORD


Joseph Nathaniel Blackford (1841-1908) House, 48th General Assembly, 1893-1895; representing Montgomery and Houston Counties; Independent. Born in 22nd Civil District of Montgomery County on January 5,1841; son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Wickham) Blackford. Extent of schooling not determined. Married in Montgomery County on March 6,1861, to Rebecca Maria Matthews, daughter of Thomas and Martha (Batson) Matthews; their fifteen children were: Martha L., Benjamin, Thomas M., John C., Eliza A., Josephus R., Samuel Wickham, William, Kittie, Bertha M., an infant son who died at birth, Richard Aaron, Eliker, Robert Chesterfield, and Nathaniel Baskette Blackford. Engaged in farming and practice of law at McAllister’s Crossroads, Montgomery County. Member county court 1876-1882. Member Methodist Church; charter member McAllister’s Crossroads Lodge, Free and Accepted Mason; member Patrons of Husbandry and overseer of state Grange.

Bar dividing text


From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

231   LEE NESBITT WOOD


This lad was born on October 31,1905 the son of Daniel Mallory Wood and Catherine Eudora Lee Wood. They lived in the Rye’s Chapel Community along with his two sisters, Mary Irene and Beulah Elizabeth, and adopted brother, Ike. He attended Walnut Grove School and graduated from Southside High School, the class of 1926. Lee and Irene went in the buggy the five miles rain or shine to Southside. After graduation, he went to Detroit and worked at Ford Motor Company for a few years, then back home to the Rye’s Chapel Community, where he worked on the farm and did other odd jobs. During the winter months, he worked in tobacco sales. His first job in law enforcement was as a deputy sheriff under Montgomery County Sheriff William Egbert Beaumont during the 1930’s. He served four years as a deputy sheriff. He was a Tennessee State Trooper when he was drafted into the Army on January 20,1943. He first entered serve at Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia and later at Camp Atterbury in Indiana. He served as a Military Policeman. He received an Honorable Discharge from the military service on September 14,1945. His last unit being Headquarters Detachment, Prisoner of War Camp SCU 1570. He was separated as a Private First Class at the Separation Center, Ft. McPherson, Georgia (Drafted age 37).
He returned to the Tennessee Highway Patrol after military service. He had a total of 12 years service with the Highway Patrol, serving both Montgomery and Dickson counties. Lee was shot with a shot gun in his left side under the arm while trying to make an arrest in the Cumberland Heights area. His sister stated “you could hear the shot falling out on the floor at the hospital”.
Lee Nesbitt Wood was elected Sheriff of Montgomery in 1954. There were six candidates in the race: Kenneth Albright (elected sheriff at a later election); Sterling Baggett; Norman Burton; Clyde Foust; J.A. “Booster” Moore,(Chief Deputy and son-in-law of Sheriff Mannie Sanderson), and Lee N. Wood. Wood won 19 of the 21 county precincts. His slogan was “I know how to enforce the laws”.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)

232   WILLIE D. BYARD


Willie D. Byard and Ida M. Hughes were married in 1909. He died on June 25,1928, and is buried in Pleasant View Church Cemetery. He was a member of the Antioch Methodist Church, Woodmen of the World Camp at Antioch, and Jr. Order of United American Mechanics at Hackberry. Kids were Edith, Sarah, Christine, Myrtle, Mina, Dorothy, Edwin, Bradley and Toby.

Bar dividing text


As told by Robert Davidson (Duck’s Journal)
From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle


233   WILLIAM H. DEAN


William H. Dean was born on January 31,1853 and Nora Suiter on December 20,1863. They were married in Clarksville on August 27, 1882 by the late S. A. Caldwell, District 12 Justice of the Peace.
Until 31 years ago, Mr. Dean was engaged in farming. With the establishment of free delivery of mail in the rural districts out of the Clarksville Post Office, Mr. Dean became a substitute carrier. He substituted on the various routs out of the local office for three years and then was appointed carrier on Route 6 through his home community. He held this position for seventeen years, or until he was 67 years of age. He was retired by the post office department with an annuity on August 20,1920. Then he reestablished himself in farming activities and was elected to the quarterly court from District 13. He has been a magistrate for a greater portion of his retirement.
Mr. and Mrs. Dean have an interesting progeny consisting of five daughters and four sons, 17 grandchildren, and 2 great grandchildren. The children are: Percy, Hart, Lillie, and Douglas (all dead); Walter, Fountain, Mrs. J.R. Davidson, Mrs. J.S. Moore Jr., and Mrs. Boyd Trotter.

Bar dividing text


From: As told by Mrs. A.C. Harvey

234   GRANGE HALL COMMUNITY


November 15,1958--During the reconstruction period following the was between the states, there were three families living in Grange Hall Community believed to have been the first settlers here.
They were the McCauleys, Smiths and McCallisters. For vast sums of money loaned the Confederates, McCallister was given large tracts of land in payment for the money loaned.
Without money or slaves to cultivate the land he divided it into large size farms and gave it to his relatives for homesteads.
The Community was called McCallister Cross Roads, and even after a hundred years have passed, people still speak of the McCallister fields and boundary lines.
In the year of 1800, Nancy Smith married Thomas H. Batson and to this union was born a large family of children, they were; Tom, Smith, Willie, Blunt, Alex, Zack, William, Richard, John, Kittie, Bettye, Nancy, and Joan.
Of their descendants who had homes here were; Calvin, Willie II, Sam, Charlie, Bob, Nannie, Ann, Sarah, Mollie, Mildred, Blanch, and their families.
They were children of Tom Batson and Malinda Gillum Batson.
Children of John Batson and Nola Daniel Batson were; Clarence, Walter, Vernon, Ernest, and Delma.
Daughters of Mrs. Jim Edd Neblett (Kittie Batson) were Mrs. Edd E. Rye and Mrs. John Harper.
Children of Mrs. Sim Talley (Bettye Batson) with homes here were; Mrs. Sarah Batson, Gipp Talley, and Mrs. Joe Morrison.
There were other Batson’s related to this family including Carney, Sid, Will, and Millard.
By the year of 1885 the community was almost entirely populated by Batson families.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee

235   ROBERT FRENCH FERGUSON JR.


Ferguson, Robert French Jr., born February 10,1815 in Massachusetts, died May 12,1882 in Montgomery County. He was married to Nancy M. Barker, born November 17,1820, the daughter of John Barker, "the richest man in the county". She died in 1884. They had nine children.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee

236   WILLIAM BRANDEAU


Brandeau, William, born July 3,1833, died Oct. 22,1895. Born in Germany, he came to the U.S. at 19. He married Anna Miller, born January 15,1846 in Germany. He worked in the pig iron industry. He is buried in Montgomery County.

Bar dividing text


From: The River Counties

237   HOWELL V. HOPSON


Howell Hopson was a doctor who wrote a book about Physical Education. He was from Montgomery County and provides insight into medical practices of the Clarksville area in 1836.
He did not provide an in-depth treatment of any topic. Copies are available from Austin Peay State University.

Bar dividing text


From: Daily Tobacco Leaf

238   RICHARD COVINGTON WYATT


Dec. 25, 1891--Dr. Richard Covington Wyatt practiced medicine in New Providence in the late 1800's. He was born August 22,1815, son of Thomas and Priscilla Hardy Wyatt who came to Montgomery County in 1815.
The family settled on Budd's Creek and later on Seven Mile Ferry.
Richard was a member of the Salem Methodist Church. On December 6,1862 he married Nancy Jane Edmondson. They moved to the corner of Beech and E Street. Richard died December 24,1891.

Bar dividing text


From: The River Counties

239   JOHN MILLER


John Miller was "the grape man" in the late 1800's and early 1900's. He pruned and attended to the vineyards of Clarksville. He and his wife Wilhelmina Keller lived at Dahlia Dell which was the garden spot of Clarksville, near where "The Stables Restaurant" was. The Miller Cemetery is on the hillside close to the Stables. There are at least six Millers buried there. Millers still living in Clarksville are descended from John's sister Sophia, who married Henry Newhouse Sr.

Bar dividing text


From: The River Counties

240   MARCELLUS C. RHINEHART


Marcellus C. Rhinehart of Henrietta-Fredonia, died June 7,1984 in Marshfield, Missouri. He was the last surviving member of the Night Riders.
Only a teenager at the time, he took part in several daring escapades against the Tobacco trust, including commandeering a train and using it for a raid on Hopkinsville.

Bar dividing text


From: The Corn Sheller

241   HORACE HARMON LURTON


Horace Lurton was born in 1844 in Newport, Campbell County, Ky. Shortly after, his father, Dr. L.L. Lurton, moved his family to Clarksville and built a home at 625 Madison St.
Horace went to Douglas University in Chicago but left in his sophomore year at age 17 to join the Confederate Army as a trooper under Gen. John H. Morgan.
Three years later, he was captured and interred at Johnson's Island in Lake Erie. His health deteriorated so that his mother made an appeal to Pres. Lincoln for his pardon. Horace was carried half dead in a blanket by a comrade and taken home.
Soon after, he enrolled at Cumberland University in Lebanon, one of a class of eleven who all became prominent. He graduated in 1867.
Horace became the youngest member of the Clarksville Bar Assoc. and practiced twenty years with such men as G.A. Henry, James E. Bailey, Charles G. Smith and Charles W. Tyler.
The home he built on Second Street, facing Madison St., is now used for law offices. He was also a vestryman at the Trinity Episcopal Church.
Horace served as Chancellor of District 1 from 1875 to 1878, then as Justice of the Tennessee Supreme Court in 1886, then as Chief Justice of that court in 1893. In that year Pres. Grover Cleveland appointed him Judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit Court.
He became friends with another judge, William Howard Taft. When Taft assumed the Presidency in 1909, he appointed Horace to the U.S. Supreme Court. He was the fourth confederate soldier to become a member of the Court. His salary was approximately $12,500 per year. He served only four years and died of a heart attack at age 70 on July 13, 1914. He is buried in Greenwood Cemetery.
A classmate at the Cumberland University said of him that he was "a close student of the law, to which he confined his attention almost altogether, rarely reading literature. He possessed an uncommon degree of common sense, with reasoning facilities of high order and a great love and aptitude for legal research. He was not a public speaker or advocate. His temperament was judicial. He was proud, honorable and never known to be guilty of a dishonorable act."

Bar dividing text


From: Texas Historical Society

242   JOSEPH P. BAYLISS


Joseph Bayliss of Dotsonville was the only Montgomery Countian killed at the Alamo in 1836.
Age 28; private; single; he came to Texas from Tennessee in 1836, one of Col. Crockett's band. He was the son of John B. and Patience Bayliss. (The name is misspelled Baliess on the Texas Monument)

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

243   IRWIN B. BEAUMONT


William Egbert Beaumont and Erwin Beaumont were both descended from Henry F. Beaumont and Sarah G. Anderson Beaumont who moved to Clarksville in about 1829 from Lynchburg, Virginia.
Another descendant of a Beaumont was married to a sheriff of Montgomery County more recently (Catherine Beaumont Rudolph?? She was still alive in Clarksville a few years ago but her husband, the sheriff had died).
Details of Irwin B. Beaumont, the sheriff : his parents Henry F. Beaumont, born December 31, 1800 in Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died December 1864(?) - living in 1851 at Port Royal, Montgomery County, Tennessee; married in Lynchburg, Virginia. in 1819 to Sarah G. Anderson, born 1802 in Cumberland County, Virginia., the daughter of Captain James P. Anderson (also known as Sam Anderson of Stonewall, Appatomox County, Virginia.) and of Sarah Pierce Anderson, but Sterling G. Anderson was her surety in 1822 (ie. gave consent for the marriage as Sarah was only 17 at the Quaker ceremony), died May 14,1876 in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee.
Adeline R. Beaumont born(?) October 31,1821 in Lynchburg, Virginia(?), died July 15,1842 (possibly in childbirth) buried in Riverview Cemetery, Clarksville, Tennessee; married June 17,1841 in Montgomery Co, Tennessee to Joseph M. Irwin, born August 14,1811, died November 2,1848 in New Orleans of yellow fever; children:
Irwin B. (nickname "Bish?" but middle name probably Boothroyd) W. Beaumont, born October 20,1841 in Montgomery Co, Tennessee [probably named after the Methodist clergyman in Clarksville, Reverend Irwin or after his brother-in-law, Joseph M. Irwin who may have been a son of Rev Irwin].
Irwin B. Beaumont was a 1st Lieutenant, Company H, 14th Tennessee Infantry - the only one of four brothers to survive the Civil War (more details available). He was County Sheriff from 1872-1874, died October 17, 1876 n i - and married(?) Nannie W. McClure, daughter of R. W. McClure (Nannie McClure Beaumont started at White Chapel School, Rossview, Montgomery County in 1851 when it opened), died May 20,1868 near Clarksville, buried in Clarksville; no children [most probably the Mrs Nannie Beaumont mentioned in White Chapel School history and great aunt of Robert Beaumont who was in the graduating class of White Chapel School in 1930 and who interviewed his great aunt in 1930]
A nephew of Irwin B. Beaumont was Irwin Fletcher Beaumont 1881-1917.

Bar dividing text


From: The Clarksville Jeffersonian

244   GUILFORD TALLEY


January 5,1859--He was born in the State of North Carolina. Appointed as a Justice of Peace, and at another time, he was appointed Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court, held in Warrenton, North Carolina. (Warren County)
In 1830, he became united in marriage with Miss Nancy P. Southerland June 11,1830, daughter of James Southerland, of North Carolina. A lady, every way worthy the man, whom she accepted as her companion through life, and by whom he had seven affectionate children, five daughters and two sons; all of whom he lived to see married and settled except three, his youngest daughter and his two sons, the youngest of whom (being the youngest child) was sixteen years old a few days after the sad and melancholy death of his lamented father.
In the year 1842, he moved to Tennessee from North Carolina, as a stranger, unknown, and unacquainted with but few citizens of the state, but he was a man eminently qualified to make friends where ever he went, and died surrounded by as many warm admirers in Tennessee as he could have left in North Carolina.
Having been an exemplary member of the Predestination Baptist Church for forty years, indeed it may be said of him, that he was the rich man’s counselor, the poor man’s friend, and the admiration of those who knew him best.
Jessie Daniel

Children of Guilford and Nancy Talley:
Harriett M. married Dr. Elijah W. Cunningham descendant of
Judge John Talley Cunningham
Rebecca P. married Hugh Dunlop
Emily B. married Gilbert T. Abernathy descendant of Glenn Abernathy
Maria Ann married Theodore Hicks Baxter
married Carvossa B. Plummer descendant of Joel Plummer
Simmon Sullivan married Mary Elizabeth Batson
Sarah E. married Andrew Abernathy brother of Gilbert Abernathy
George F. married Mary Abernathy daughter of Gilbert Abernathy


Bar dividing text


From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

245   JOHN AND ELIZABETH WYATT


January 11,1867--John Wyatt and his wife Elizabeth, the subject of this notice, were born in Lunenburg County, Virginia; the former September 10th 1781, the latter January 30,1785. They were married December 27th 1803. They moved to Montgomery county, Middle Tennessee, in 1816, and settled on Cumberland River at the mouth of Barton’s Creek, and moved to Haywood County, West Tennessee, in 1837, where they resided until they were removed by death to their home above. John Wyatt was quite infirm for two years before his death, and became entirely helpless-not recognizing his most intimate friends for some time before his death, which occurred November 28,1866. After his death, his wife, who had been severely afflicted for 18 months, was moved to her son-in-laws, where she died December 24th, 1866. They professed religion soon after their marriage and joined the Methodist Church, in which they continued acceptable members until their death.
R.A. Neblett near Dancyville, Tennessee

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

246   ABRAHAM BAGGETT


Abraham Baggett was born in North Carolina in 1783, the son of James and Nancy. He married Charlotte before 1806. They had eight children: Sallie, William, James, John Oliver, Benjamin, Martha (Patsy), Josiah and Elizabeth.
Abraham was politically active. He served on the Grand Jury 1805-24.
He owned a large tract of land on Budd's Creek.
He left journals telling of his life. He died about 1851 and was buried in Baggett Cemetery. His grave is marked only by a large fieldstone.

Bar dividing text


From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

247   JOHN BAGGETT (1844 - 1940)


HOUSE, 50th General Assembly; representing Montgomery County; elected to fill vacancy created by disqualification of J.M.H. Graham on January 20,1897, serving to end of term; elected to represent Montgomery County in House of 51st General Assembly, 1899-1901; Democrat. Born on November 2,1844; death certificate shows place of birth Dickson County while other sources name Montgomery County; attended “common schools.” Married in 1863 to Mary M. Underwood, daughter of Jeremiah and Katie Arnold Underwood, of Montgomery County; eight children reaching maturity were: James Bell, L.P., Albert, Luther, Arthur, Alice, Ada Atlanta, and Savannah.
Died February 20, 1940; buried near Hackberry

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Historical Quarterly

248   JAMES EDMUND BAILEY


James was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee on August 15,1822. He attended Clarksville Academy then studied law at the University of Nashville. He was admitted to the Tennessee bar in 1843 and set up practice in Clarksville. He elected to the Tennessee house of representatives in 1853. During the Civil War he served as a colonel in the Confederate Army in the Forty-ninth Tennessee Regiment. In 1874 he was appointed a member of the Court of Arbitration by the Governor of Tennessee. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1877 to fill the vacancy left by Andrew Johnson and served till 1881. He served as chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor then went back to the practice of law. He died in Clarksville December 29,1885 and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery.

Bar dividing text


From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

249   DR. WALTER HARDING DRANE


Dr. Walter Harding Drane married Eliza J. McClure. Their home was once the pride of its day and still stands on Hwy 11-W near Ringgold. He was a civic philanthropist.
He bought $10,000 worth of L&N bonds when the railroad was being built here.
Dr. Drane was the first president of the old Hopkinsville Turnpike Co. which built the Hopkinsville Pike and the Ringgold covered bridge. He advanced $20,000 for the building of the bridge and received only $2,500 back when he sold the bridge to H.C. Merritt. he was an eminent surgeon and physician, but made most of his wealth in the tobacco industry.
Mrs. Drane was descended from the McClure family that was among the early settlers of Clarksville.

Bar dividing text


From: The Cornsheller

250   JOSEPHUS RANDOLPH BLACKFORD


Josephus Randolph Blackford was born April 5,1872. He grew up on Louise Creek, one of 15 children. He worked on his father's farm until going to college. he attended Nashville Medical College and settled in Linton, Kentucky to open his practice.
He was legendary for his strength and agility, in spite of his size. He was 5'7" and seldom weighed less than 300 pounds. Dr. Blackford married Izora Thomas Weakley. She died in 1911. Dr. Blackford died November 9,1914. It is said he died of rabies which he caught from a young patient who had been bitten by a rabid dog. Knowing there was no cure, he drove his buggy to a colleague's home, freed his horse and went off alone to die in a nearby field.

Bar dividing text


From: The Cornsheller

251   IKE D. WEST


Ike D. West was one of the wealthiest and largest land owners in Middle Tennessee. He was born and raised near Sailor's Rest where his father, Robert West, held interest in the iron business. Robert West died in 1850, leaving his $200,000 estate to Ike and his three sisters.
Ike bought out his sisters' shares and assumed management. The estate consisted of a tract of land of 6,000 acres that extended from the mouth of Yellow Creek to Slayden, now part of Houston, Dickson and Montgomery Counties, the "West Furnace", and many slaves. He did a lot of trade and was quite successful at first. Debts accumulated just before the war and when all the slaves were freed it caused him a considerable loss from which he never recovered. Unable to recover, creditors foreclosed.
After bankruptcy, he bought back some of the property at his own sale with two wealthy friends as security in an attempt to recover. This venture also failed and within a few years a second sale was held to pay off the $70,000 mortgage on the land. He was stripped of every dollar and given 100 acres at Sailor's Rest to live on by Col. John F. House and Col. J.G. Bailey.
Ike lived on his land as a hermit for 35 years. He never farmed or raised any animals, not even keeping a dog or cat. He made his living by trapping and was also aided by friends. He never spoke of his misfortunes and was in good spirits. He was finally compelled to go to the County Poor Farm. Ten months after moving there, he suddenly died of paralysis and was buried at the County Farm burying ground.

Bar dividing text


From: Louisiana Politics, 1845-1861

252   SOLOMON WEATHERSBEE DOWNS


Solomon, born in Montgomery County, Tennessee in 1801. He majored in classical studies and was graduated from the Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky in 1823;. He then studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1826 and set up practice in Bayou Sara, Louisiana. He moved to Ouachita, Louisiana, and then to New Orleans in 1845, where he practiced of law and was a successful planter. He was United States attorney for Louisiana 1845-1847 and was a member of the State constitutional convention. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4,1847, to March 3,1853 and became chairman of the Committee on Engrossed Bills and the Committee on Private Land Claims. President Pierce appointed him collector of the Port of New Orleans in 1853. He was mortally wounded in a duel and later died of his wound in Crab Orchard Springs, Kentucky on August 14,1854. He was buried on the family plantation but his body was later moved to Riverview Cemetery in Monroe, Louisiana.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Historical Magazine

253   JAMES B. REYNOLDS


James was born in County Antrim in Northern Ireland, in 1779. He attended the common schools in Ireland. He came to the United States and settled in Clarksville. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1804. He was elected to the Fourteenth Congress in 1815 and the Eighteenth Congress in 1823. He then resumed his law practice. He died in Clarksville June 10,1851 and was buried in Riverview Cemetery.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Historical Magazine

254   THOMAS JENNINGS BAILEY


Thomas was born June 6,1867 in Nashville, Tennessee. He had a law practice in Clarksville in 1890 and again in 1896-1900. He had a long, illustrious career in law and politics including a Federal judgeship. He died January 9,1963 in Washington, DC.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Historical Magazine

255   HENRY HUNTER BRYAN


Henry born in Martin County, North Carolina on February 23,1786. He attended common schools then moved to Tennessee and held several local offices. He was elected to the Sixteenth Congress (1819-1821) and had been reelected to the Seventeenth Congress but did not qualify. He died in Montgomery County May 7,1835. Place of burial is unknown.

Bar dividing text


From: The Leaf Chronicle

256   SAMUEL R. SMITH

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIER

August 13,1975---Born in North Carolina about 1760, and fought in the Revolutionary War. He was later given 1000 acres of Montgomery County as a pension. While in his 70's, he moved his entire family to Tennessee. During the Bicentennial, the Army and the Girl Scouts created a memorial to him on what is now Ft. Campbell.
The attachments include stories about the memorial and the trees he brought from North Carolina.
Dedication of Samuel Smith Memorial Park August 12, 1976
Fort Campbell, Kentucky
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
FORT CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY 42223
MEMORIALIZATION

From this date on the cemetery located at coordinates DR 468535, Fort Campbell Kentucky, are designated as the SAMUEL SMITH MEMORIAL PARK in honor of Private Samuel Smith, a soldier in the Army of the United States during the American Revolution.
Samuel Smith was born in Warren County, North Carolina. He enlisted in the Army of the United States in 1778 in Warren County, North Carolina and, again, in 1779 with Captains Allen and Hopkins and Colonels Lytle and Green. He participated in the Battle of Briar Creek with great distinction. He later retired with private pension file number 7560. Samuel Smith died January 16, 1837 in Montgomery County, Tennessee and is interred in the cemetery in this park named in his honor.

Inscription on Bronze Plaque at Entrance to Samuel Smith Memorial Park Entrance to Bicentennial Memorial to Samuel Smith, a Revolutionary War Soldier and Tennessee Pioneer. He was born in Bute County (now Warren County), North Carolina, in 1762. He died in Montgomery County, Tennessee, on January 16, 1837.

Inscription on Bronze Plaque at Entrance to Cemetery Samuel Smith 1762-1837 During the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War, Samuel Smith fought in the Battle of Brier Creek. Brigadier General John Ashe, with 1,200 militia, including Samuel Smith, and some 200 North Carolina Continentals, organized into a light infantry detachment under Lieutenant Anthony Lytle and moved down to Brier Creek south of Augusta, Georgia. The British, under Lieutenant Colonel Mark Provost attacked and defeated the Americans at Brier Creek.
In later years, Samuel Smith led groups of settlers from North Carolina into Tennessee. In 1833 he brought his family and settled here. Samuel Smith also brought some pine trees from North Carolina. The large pine tree near his grave is possibly one of those trees.

MEMORIAL SPEECH
We honor today the memory of another soldier of the Revolution who lies buried in Montgomery County.
Samuel R. Smith was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1762. He enlisted as a private in Warren County, North Carolina in 1778 and served three months as Captain Charles Allert's Company in the Regiment Commanded by Colonel Lytel. And again in 1779 we find him serving in the Company Commanded by Captain Hopkins in the Regiment Commanded by Colonel Green.
He came to Montgomery County in 1832 and settled in what is now District 4 on Piney Fork. The Creek. The land on which Asbury Church now stands was given by him for the purposes of establishing a church. The first church was of logs and served as church & school house. This is the third church to be built on the same spot, on destroyed by lightning, the last by fire.
The trip from North Carolina was a long and arduous one. They came thru the Cumberland Gaps and at the season of the year when streams were the lowest. They came in ox-carts, many of the men walked most of the way. They were detained for a week by a stork party - a baby girl was born, a granddaughter of the subject. An advance party was sent ahead to blaze the trail by cutting the bark off the trees with hatchets. That was called "blazing the trail." There were some three hundred and fifty people in this particularly Calvary - this included the slaves & their families. Among them were people whose names are well known in Montgomery and surrounding counties today. There were families by the names of Southall, Rives, Gold, Oldham, Smith, Turner, Moss and others.
Samuel R. Smith was twice married. First to Miss Sallie Williams and then to a Miss Dobson.
To the first union were born four sons and one daughter, namely, Harry, Elizabeth (Betsy) Charles, John and Wiley. By his second marriage there were three children. Mary, Samuel R. Jr., and Sarah Long. He has many descendants living in Clarksville, Montgomery and Christian Counties.
Samuel R. Smith died at the old homestead in 1837 and was buried at this cite selected by him for a burial ground. On this cite today stands three giant pine trees which he bought as seedlings in his saddle bags from our mother state. In the shadows of these majestic pines he sleeps the dreamless sleep as the gentle summer breezes move among their leaves and a soft plaintive requiem to his honored memory.
P.S. The old gentleman was my great grandfather.
Myrtle Draper

Army, Ancestors Dedicate Grave of Revolutionary War Soldier
By Richard Wordon, City Editor
May 31,1992---Say what you will about the Army. The federal government.
The undergrowth has been cleared, and Samuel Smith’s headstone feels the sun.
Samuel Smith was a revolutionary War soldier. He came to Montgomery County in 1833, at the age of 71, after the young government awarded him 1,000 acres of land for his service in the war.
He died four years later, on January 16, 1837, but not before he convinced his wife to move from her beloved North Carolina to a wilderness where the only familiar aspect was the North Carolina pine trees her husband had planted.
Of the seven pine seedlings he brought in his saddlebag to the area that is now Ft. Campbell, some have flourished. One - believed to be the largest on the military reservation - is within a few feet of Smith’s grave, close enough to blanket it with pine needles.
Until last May, Smith’s headstone - along with those of five relatives - as obscured by undergrowth miles from the Post Headquarters. With the approach of the Bicentennial celebration, however, funds became available to the Army to use on an appropriate project.
John Klose, then a colonel in charge of the post’s public information office, and Ursula Beach, Montgomery County’s historian, got their heads together. With the help of the Girl Scouts of America and the 20th Engineer Battalion at Ft. Campbell, the gravesite was cleared. Work began May 11, according to Capt. Jack Morrison of "A" Co., 20th Engineers, and ended Wednesday of this week. It took 3,500 man-hours, 500 equipment-hours, and about $5,000 worth of materials, he said. The result was "unveiled" Thursday before more than 100 onlookers. The original granite headstones have all been propped up again, all the undergrowth has been cleared away, and the area has been landscaped, including a long graveled pathway to the area from Engineers Road.
On hand Thursday were Mrs. Rosalie Coppedge, Pvt. Samuel Smith’s great-great-granddaughter, and Mrs. Hattie Wooten, her mother and great-granddaughter of Smith. Her ancestor, who fought in the Battle of Briar Creek in Georgia, was a "courageous, rugged individual," Mrs. Coppedge, a teacher who is taking a year’s leave, told the gathering, which included her husband, Erle Coppedge, of the Austin Peay State University business office.
Mrs. Coppedge voiced her appreciation to the Army, and to the Girl Scouts who had helped clear the land, and who researched information used on the historical marker, adding, "I really thank you from the bottom of my heart."
Mrs. Beach called it "a most glorious occasion." The park, she said, was symbolic of "God’s world, enhanced by man."
Brig. Gen. Charles Bagnal described it as "one of the most beautiful and peaceful spots at Ft. Campbell." He said Smith was "a veteran, a pioneer and a man who gave of himself" for his country.


159-Year-Old Pine Tree Guards Family Cemetery
By THERESA LACEY
Museums and monuments pay homage to the history of Fort Campbell, but none so well as the 159-year-old pine tree that now stands guard over a family cemetery.
Samuel Smith, a Revolutionary War hero who fought at the battle of Brier Creek in Georgia, brought the seedling from North Carolina in 1833.
It was no small task for the 71-year-old man, who finally convinced his wife to join him on the trek to wild country now called Fort Campbell, Ky. Smith carried seven seedlings in his saddlebags. Only one survived. Eventually, Smith and five other family members were laid to rest at its roots.
The old pine weathered many seasons, and age eventually began to take its toll. But the decaying family plot where the tree stands was given a facelift in 1976.
At that time, Col. James Klose of Fort Campbell’s Public Affairs office and Montgomery County historian Ursula Beach decided to make renovating the cemetery a bicentennial celebration project. Girl Scouts and members of the 20th Engineer Battalion cleared the grave sites, working for three months to finish the job.
On August 13, 1976, the spot was dedicated as Samuel Smith Park. Befitting a family event, one of the speakers on hand to help with the ceremonies was Smith’s great-great-granddaughter and Clarksville resident Rosalie Coppedge.
Now more than 100 feet tall, the pine tree continues to flourish. In fact, it’s grown so large that helicopter pilots use it as a landmark.
Visitors are welcome, but must register with the Hunting and Fishing office, because the area is often used for training exercises. For more information, call 798-2175.

Bar dividing text


From: Montgomery County Genealogical Journal

257   ALBERT L. JONES


For some years Albert L. Jones was in the tobacco trade business in Clarksville, as well as being a landowner and merchant at Garrettsburg, Kentucky He married Miss Hardin T. Wills, daughter of George Wills, a prominent planter of those days at Garrettsburg. They had no children.
Perrin's History of Christian County, Kentucky tells of the time in October 1867 when Albert L. Jones and Dr. J.C. Metcalfe of Garrettsburg shot each other in the road in front of the Jones' Store at Garrettsburg. Dr. Metcalfe wasn't wounded badly and recovered, but Mr. Jones died on the spot. Some say that Mrs. Jones spent quite a sum to build that vault at Riverview Cemetery in which she buried her husband.
In August 1869, she married Thomas J. Munford Sr. of Clarksville and he died the next spring. Some years later, she moved to New Providence and died there in 1889. She was buried in the vault by her first husband and Mr. Munford was buried by his first wife Ann, in the same cemetery in 1871.
Mary Ann Munford was a daughter of Whitfield Killebrew of Montgomery County and married first George Whitfield and then Thomas J. Munford. They had a son, Thomas Jr., who was a long time resident of Clarksville and prominent in the city government.

Bar dividing text


From: Genealogical Journal of Montgomery County

258   G.E. EDLIN


G.E. Edlin in 1922 lived in Guthrie, Kentucky. He was 76. He was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee, and served as a Confederate soldier in Co. C, 2nd Ky Cavalry under general Forest.
His father, James Edlin, was a boot and shoe maker born in Ireland. His mother was Sarah Francisco, daughter of John Francisco and his wife, Nancy. The family lived at New Providence, Tennessee. Before the war his father owned 150 acres of land valued at $1500 and eight slaves. They lived in a five room farm house. As a young man, he did all kinds of work--plowed, hoed, carpenter, trad., fishing.
He attended pay schools for 8 years, traveling from 1/2 to 4 miles to school. These public schools ten for 10 months a year and had men teachers. The boys and girls attended school together.
He enlisted in service at Riggins Hill on September 22,1862 and went into battle at Riggins Hill the same day. Afterwards the company went to Hopkinsville and then to Murfreesboro. They were in the Battle of Lookout Mountain; Atlanta, Georgia; and Fort Worth, Texas. He was discharged at Washington, Georgia. The "yanks took our passes. walked home and begged for a little to eat". After he came home, he went to school for 1 session. He then served three years learning the carriage trade.
He notes that Jeff Davis gave up and took the oath in the same town he did (Washington, Georgia, May 9,1865).

Bar dividing text


From: Genealogical Journal of Montgomery County

259   ROBERT MORRISON


Robert Morrison in May 1922 lived at St. Bethlehem, Tennessee. He was 77 years old on September 11,1921. He was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee, and served as a Confederate soldier in the 13th Kentucky Reg., commanded by Col. Lee Sypret of Hopkinsville, Kentucky
His father, James Morrison was a farmer, born in Southside, Montgomery County, Tennessee. His mother was Mary Hale, daughter of ??? and Sallie Hale of Southside. His parents owned a farm of about 75 to 80 acres which they bought for $900 before the war. they lived in a three room log house.
Robert attended a private rural school (the only school in his home district) during his boyhood and for 50 days after the war. The school, for which he had to pay, ran 5 or 6 months a yr., usually in the summer time. He had both men and women teachers. He walked about 21 m to school.
He enlisted in service in September 1864 with a recruiting officer who came to his house. After enlistment his company was sent to Johnsonville, Tennessee (Obion Co. - Ed.) In less than a month after enlistment he engaged in his first battle at Johnsonville, at burning of the town and routing of Union forces.
After the battle at Johnsonville, he was put into a scouting troop and went to Danville, Tennessee (Original name of Woodbury, Cannon Co. - Ed) From there they went to Cumberland City on the Cumberland River where they captured and burned a number of steamboats. They then continued scouting through sections of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Alabama. He was captured near Whitesburg Alabama, January 15,1865. He saw little of Camp life and practically no supplies were issued to him during his service.
He took the oath and was released at Camp Chase?, Ohio four months after his capture. He returned by train to Clarksville, the nearest railroad station to his home.
In the spring of 1866 he resumed farming after having attended school and recuperated from prison camp exposure and discomforts.
He married in December 1865, Miss Mary Katherine Harris. They reared 8 children, 3 girls and 5 boys. Seven of the children were living in 1922. He continued farming exclusively until "about 14 yrs. ago". (about 1908)

Bar dividing text


From: Montgomery County War Records

260   ROBERT SAUNDERS PAYNE


Captain Robert Sounders Payne was born on October 12,1823, in Davidson County, Tennessee and died on March 15,1916 in Jordan Springs, Tennessee. He married Susan Gold on October 24,1853. He married Frances Narcissa Bryant on February 19,1875
Robert S. Payne was enlisted in Nashville, Tennessee May 28.1846. He served in COL William Bowen Campbell's First Tennessee Volunteers under General Taylor and saw action in Monterey, Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo. The unit earned recognition as "The Bloody First". At the storming of Monterey, Campbell's command, "Boys, follow me", later became the slogan for the Whig party of 1851. ( NOTE: Captain Payne is now buried on Fort Campbell named for the same Campbell) Robert was discharged in New Orleans May 23.1847. Sources of dates: Tennesseans in the War with Mexico, Volume 2

From: The Clarksville Chronicle
NEW COMPANIES

October 12,1861--Captain R. S. Payne, R. L. Johnson and Rice Oldham are raising a volunteer company, under our Governor's recent proclamation. They want about forty more men. They expect to go into camp very soon at Jordan Springs, in District 4. Parties desiring to join may address either of the gentlemen named, at Woodlawn. (This assignment was considered "Captain of the Home Guard")
NOTE: Fort Donelson is only 30 or so miles away and it fell in February 1862.

From: Red River Settlers
Was in the battles of Shiloh, Vicksburg and Baton Rouge.

From: Goodspeed Histories of Montgomery County 1886
During the late civil war he was appointed captain of the Home Guards, and was in the battles of Shiloh, Vicksburg and Baton Rouge.

From: Confederate Patriot Index 1924-1978, Volume II:
Robert S. Payne, Captain, Tennessee Home Guards, born 12 October 1823 in Montgomery County, Tennessee, died there on 15 March 1916. Married to Susan Gold in 1853 in Montgomery County, Tennessee. She was born in 1830 in Montgomery County, Tennessee and died there in 1871.
He was a Justice of the Peace from 1882 -- ?? in District 4, Montgomery County.

From: Goodspeed Histories of Montgomery County 1886
He has been school commissioner since the passage of the act.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

261   JANE CULTON ATKINS


Jane Atkins was born June 27,1805 in Robertson County, the daughter of James Thompson and Margaret Patterson Atkins. Both parents were born in Wythe County, Virginia. Jane married James Hamlett on August 13,1823 in Robertson County. She died October 4,1824 in Port Royal, Montgomery County, Tennessee.
Her son: James Joseph Hamlett, born October 4,1824 near Port Royal. He died May 29, 1902 in Clarksville. He married Susan Elizabeth Morrison on February 1,1855 in Salem, Montgomery County, Tennessee.
His son: James Morrison Hamlett, born July 31,1864 in Clarksville. He died August 27, 1948 in Kingsport, Tennessee. He married Maude Clifton on June 4,1901 in South Clarksville. They had four children: Clara, C. Clifton, Elizabeth and James Jr.
His daughter Clara Hamlett, born August 21,1907 in Clarksville. She married Judson Hall Robertson on May 16,1930 in Kingsport.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

262   JOSIAH MORRISON


Josiah Morrison was born June, 1788 in North Carolina and died April 1,1868 in Salem, Montgomery County, Tennessee. He married Nancy Wells in 1807 in Montgomery County. They had six children: Nancy, Robert R., William, James, Sarah and Henry.
His daughter Nancy Morrison, born in 1809 in Salem. She died in 1838. She married Jesse Morrison, he cousin, in 1830 in Salem.
Her daughter Susan Elizabeth Morrison, born 1838 in Salem. She died August 27,1900 in Clarksville. She married James Joseph Hamlett on February 1,1855 in Salem.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

263   MARGARET PATTERSON


Margaret Patterson was born in 1777 in Montgomery County, Virginia. She died June 25,1855 in Robertson County. She married James Thompson Atkins on February 14,1797 in Wythe County, Virginia. She was the daughter of William and Jane Culton Patterson. William was born in Augusta County, Virginia and Jane was born near Tinkling Springs, Virginia. They had eleven children: Jackson, Joseph, William, Jane, Andrew, Hugh G., Mary, Isabella Eliza, Margaret Ann, James Thompson II and Harriet A.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

264   HAYDON WELLS


Haydon Wells was born September 9,1744 in Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia, the son of Charles and Mary Edwards Wells. He died in 1819 in Alabama. He married Margaret Drury. They had three children: Robert, Archelaus and Benjamin Drury.
His son: Robert Wells was born between 1760-1764 and died between 1832-1840 in Montgomery County. He married Ann Beaty.
His daughter: Ann Wells was born 1794 in Salem and died in 1868 in Clarksville. She married Josiah Morrison at age 13 in 1807.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

265   JOHN BURTON


John Burton was born about 1755, the son of William Burton, and died about 1838 in Montgomery County. He married Nancy. They had three children: Hilary, James and John Jr.
His son: Hilary Burton was born in 1792 in North Carolina. He died in 1871 in Montgomery County. He married Nancy R.
His daughter: Elizabeth Burton was born in 1818 in Montgomery County and died in 1864 in Montgomery County. She married Andrew Jackson Thorn.
Her son: Willis Hargrove Thorn was born March 31,1853 in Montgomery County and died June 29,1894 in West, McLennon County, Texas. He married Lucretia C. York in Independence County, Arkansas.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

266   ANDREW JACKSON THORN


Andrew Jackson Thorn was born in 1816 in Tennessee and died between 1870-1880 in Independence County, Arkansas. He married Elizabeth Burton. They had twelve children: Tennessee, 1831; Nancy, 1836; Hilary Jr., 1837; John Thomas, 1838; Sarah A., 1842; James, 1843; David, 1846; Caroline, 1849; Andrew J., 1851; Willis Hargrove, 1853; Robin D., 1859; and Alexander, 1859. All born in Tennessee.
His son: Willis Hargrove Thorn.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

267   JOHN HOGAN


John Hogan was born in 1745 in Virginia, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Hogan. He died in April of 1810. He married Mary Lloyd in 1770. They had six children: Thomas, 1771; John, 1773; William, 1774; Margaret Lloyd, 1776; Alexander, 1778; and James, 1780. All were born in North Carolina.
His son: John Hogan II was born February 27,1773 in North Carolina. He died on November 1, 1818 in Hickory Point, Montgomery County, Tennessee. He married Martha Ann King on December 3, 1792 in North Carolina.
His son: John Hogan III was born July 31,1815 in Hickory Point. He died October 27, 1903 in Fredonia, Montgomery County. He married Caroline Melinda Holt on February 25,1836.
His son: Franklin LaFayette Hogan was born January 10,1860 in Fredonia and died January 21,1941. He married Louetta Nicholson on March 23,1881 and married Josephine Minerva Craig on April 4,1900 in Sango.
His son: Byron Gordon Hogan was born June 14,1905 in Fredonia. He married Latha Belle Haynes on March 9,1929 in Clarksville.
His son: Cleo Greer Hogan was born March 31,1946 in Clarksville. He married Donna Louise Bankey Cesta on October 1,1976 in Omaha, Nebraska.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

268   ARTHUR N. POWERS


Arthur Powers was born in 1790 in North Carolina. He died in 1874 in Houston County. He married three times. He married Lucy and had five children: Robert C., March 26,1823; Mastin Crawford, May 25,1830; Fannie, 1832; Martha E., 1835; and Wilson, 1840. He married E.A. Allen on February 6, 1842 in Montgomery County. They had one child: Everline, 1843. He married L.L.T. Dowdy on December 30, 1845 in Stewart County. He had three Stepchildren: Watson Thompson Dowdy, 1834; Fannie Rebecca Dowdy, 1836; and George William Dowdy, 1838.
His son: Robert C. Powers died September 2,1860 in Montgomery County. He married Elizabeth F. Martin on December 17,1850.
His second son: Mastin Cornelius Powers was born October 23,1851 in Stewart County and died August 10,1904 in Houston County. He married Mary Frances Boone in Houston County.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

269   DANIEL CLEMENT


Daniel Clement was born in 1784 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia , the son of Isaac and Ann Denram Clement. Isaac was born in Amelia County, Virginia and Ann was born in Wales. Daniel died before 1845 in Henry County (?), Tennessee. He married Wilmoth Irby on May 14,1807 in Pittsylvania County. They had seven children: Nathan Glenn, 1808; Elizabeth, 1810; Isaac, 1812; Aaron, February 14,1814; Stephen, 1816; Abraham; Rachel.
His son: Nathan Glenn Clement was born April 22, 1808 in Manleyville, Tennessee. He died on May 11,1872. He married Nancy Allen in 1831. They had one child: Thomas Daniel, 1832. He married Catherine Mathewson in 1838. They had two children: John Mathewson, 1840; James Justice, 1850.
His son: Thomas Daniel Clement was born August 31,1832 in Henry County, Tennessee. He died on June 30,1891 in Weakley County, Tennessee. He married Jane Jackson and had two children: Jackson Glen, 1858; Allen McKnight, 1861.
His son: Allen McKnight Clement was born August 13,1861 in Henry County. He died August 25,1903. He married Mary Susan "Mollie" Allman on August 14,1883. They had two children: Albert Breese, 1884 and John Winfield, 1895.
His son: John Winfield Clement was born July 5,1895 in Weakley County, Tennessee. He died December 16,1954 in Knoxville, Tennessee. He married Ivy Mae Chambers on September 7,1916 in Huntingdon, Tennessee. They had five children: Dorothy Ellanor, Robert Winfield, George McKnight, Elizabeth Ruth and Ivy Anne.
His son: Robert Winfield was born December 5,1919 in Huntingdon. He married Frances Lee Sanders on May 6, 1941 in Clarksville.

Bar dividing text


From: Tennessee Settlers and Their Descendants

270   THOMAS CONYERS


Thomas Conyers was born in 1757 in Pennsylvania and died in 1846 in Haywood County, Tennessee. He married Jane Wills on September 10,1787 in Sumner County, Tennessee. They had two children: Thomas Jr. and John A.
His son: John A. Conyers was born March, 1788 in Sumner County and died in March, 1874 in Sumner County. He married Susannah Spradlin on October 3,1818 in Wilson County.
His son: Joseph C. Conyers was born in 1832 and died in 1866. He married Elizabeth A. Austin on October 30,1851.
His son: William Addison Conyers was born November 25,1856 and died October 24,1919 in Sumner County. He married Eliza Jane Moore on May 31,1885 in Sumner County.
His son: Joseph Benton Conyers was born February 19,1887 in Bowling Green, Kentucky. He died June 2,1961. He married Edna Lucille Jones in September, 1922 in Clarksville.

Bar dividing text


From: The Chronicle

271   COL. GIL T. ABERNATHY


August 19, 1882--Born and reared in Giles County, in this state, he came to this county in early manhood and engaged in the iron business with the older Baxters. He soon married a daughter of Robert Baxter Sr. and became fully identified with the iron interest, at the time the leading feature of the country. On the death of the older members, he and his partners, Jackson, McKiernan & Co., succeeded to the business which they carried on extensively and successfully up to the breaking out of the war, at which time they were known as amongst the largest iron-mongers in the state. However, in common with men of their class, their property was swept away by the vicissitudes of the war. When peace returned, Mr. Abernathy found himself reduced to poverty with a large and helpless family dependent upon him for support; fully appreciating the situation, he set himself to work to make the best of this new state of things. The better to do this and to give his own children the advantages of an education, he opened a school at Antioch, and has by his efficiency and capacity made a reputation as an educator second to none in the country. He has fitted several of his sons for schoolteachers as well as sending many pupils from his schools prepared to battle successfully with graduates from colleges and institutes. Nature was in a liberal mood when she made Gil Abernathy of a noble and commending appearance. He is a splendid speciman of physical manhood and will attract attention in any crowd. He is one of the most genial and warmhearted of men, has a ready flow of language, the courtesy and polish of a gentleman of the ancient regime, he is always posted on the current topics of the day. These with an inexhaustible fund of anecdote and his hearty good nature make him one of the most entertaining conversationalists it has ever been my good fortune to meet. During the war, being intensely patriotic and hospitable to last degree, his house was a home and refuge for any Confederate soldier so long as they chose, and frequently presented the aspect more of a barracks than a private residence in consequence. Col. Abernathy is a ripe scholar, a close reader and while no spread eagle orator, is a good debater and convincing reasoner, he is well posted in the past and present politics of the state and is a staunch state credit Democrat. He has often been solicited to allow his name to be used for public office, but has heretofore refused; if he will make this canvas, he will sweep things before him, for there are few men more generally as favorably known in the county.
(Note: Col. G.T. Abernathy accepted the offer to allow his name to be offered to the good people of Montgomery County as one of their representatives in the next general assembly.)

Bar dividing text


From: WPA Bible And Tombstone Records

272   HENRY W. BAGGETT


May 17,1938---H. W. Baggett was born November 12,1853 in Montgomery County. In 1878 he married Virginia Stack of Cheatham County, to this union were born seventeen children, fourteen of whom are now living. A son, Samuel Baggett, died while he was serving as Sheriff of Cheatham County. The Baggett family were all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and were Democrats.

Bar dividing text


From: The Leaf Chronicle

273   WICKHAM STATUES


April, 1964--Driving down country roads can offer many unusual experiences, especially if you happen to be on one such road near Palmyra. Rounding a bend and topping a hill, a stranger is often surprised at what he finds. There, about 11 miles from Clarksville, are a group of statues lining both sides of the road.
Brightly painted and illuminated with lights these statues are the work of E.T. Wickham. They represent many famous people of Tennessee and the nation, and stand in testimonial to the will and industriousness of this 82-year-old man. At an age when most men are content to rest on their laurals and live off the land, Mr. Wickham labors day after day on his statues.
He was 72 when he began to build the concrete statues and when asked why he did so he said he wasn’t quite sure but it was something he had always wanted to do.
A farmer most of his life, Mr. Wickham lives on ground that is rich in history. That district of Montgomery County has produced many doctors and famous personages. Many of these Mr. Wickham commemorates in his statues.
The elderly man lives in a brightly painted house made of logs that he hewed by hand when he was 15-years-old. The logs were used in a stable which he tore down about 1952 to build the house. He wanted to be near his work, he said, and the old Wickham homestead was too far from the road.
The first statue he made stands in the yard of his present home. It is of the Virgin Mary, symbolizing Mr. Wickham’s Catholic religion. The statue serves another purpose than merely the edification of the Virgin however. Around the base of the realistic-looking tree upon which it is mounted is a concrete wall about four inches high. Upon this is marked the time of the day. The statue caste a shadow upon this wall forming a sundial which was accurate to within two minutes, and this reporter suspects that it was the testing watch that was off then.
This statue and sundial was constructed in 1952 when Mr. Wickham was 72-years-old It was followed by an Indian and later by statues of Andrew Jackson, Estes Kefaufer, John F. Kennedy, a bull to commemorate Montgomery County doctors, and equestrian statue of Mr. Wickham’s brother, Dr. John William Wickham and among others a statue of Governor Austin Peay.
On the base of most of the statues is a brief summation of the services of these men to their country and often a quotation of some of their most famous statements.
For a man who quit school after the sixth grade, Mr. Wickham is amazingly well read in the history of his country, state and county.
Mr. Wickham has had visitors from Canada to Key West, Florida, including such notables as the late Sen. Estes Kefauver and General William C. Westmoreland, both of whom arrived in a helicopter for the dedication of one of Mr. Wickham‘s statues.
General Westmoreland commissioned Mr. Wickham to make a war memorial statue for Ft. Campbell which now stands on the post. The general had the statue delivered on a military vehicle to the post, and had Mr. Wickham flown to Ft. Campbell by helicopter for the dedication.
Mr. Wickham mixes all of his concrete and mounts the heavy statues himself. He said it takes about six weeks to complete one of the large ones.
Mr. Wickham plans to make allowance in his will for the statues. He said he wanted them to remain where they are and not be scattered after his death. Probably from all over the nation people will come to visit the statues, and while they may not be the product of a Michelangelo, found in the hills of Tennessee, they are most unusual.

You can find out more information about E.T. Wickham and his statues at this link.

Wickham Angel


Bar dividing text


From: Daily Tobacco Leaf-Chronicle

274   CAPTAIN THOMAS H. SMITH


July 10,1893--Captain Thomas H. Smith was born in Louisa County, Virginia on August 22,1831, and died June 8,1893 in Clarksville. He was a Confederate soldier, serving as Pvt. in Co. A 49th Tennessee Infantry in Captain James E. Bailey's co. Ranked as Captain at close of war. Wounded at Battle of Franklin (Tennessee). Prisoner. Came to Trenton, Kentucky (Todd County) in 1837, where he was in the mercantile business. He was connected with Fox and Smith Hardware until he sold out in 1892 to Buford and Bowling. Elected Mayor of Clarksville to fill unexpired term of deceased Mayor G. A. Ligon. Member of Forbes Bivouac. President of State Association of Confederate Veterans. Member of Knights of Honor. Christian religion. Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville.

Bar dividing text


From: The Cornsheller

275   NEBLETT FAMILY


For many years researchers have believed Sarah Vance Brunson was the first wife of John Neblett, Jr., son of Reverend John Neblett Sr., an early settler of Montgomery County, Tennessee. It was also erroneously believed that she, as first wife of John Neblett Jr., was the mother of John E. Neblett. Sarah Vance Brunson Neblett's grave is near the Palmyra Road on the Andrew Z. Lyle farm. Her tombstone reads:

Sarah Vance Neblett
Born March 19, 1790
Married Sept. 5, 1816
Died February 22, 1820

Plagued with a marriage date of September 5,1816 on Sarah Vance Neblett's tombstone and a consistent age for John E. Neblett on the U.S. Census records of 39 in 1850, 49 in 1860 and 59 in 1870 (thus a birth date of 1811 for John E. Neblett), Richard and Bristol Gannaway finally solved the problem. John Neblett Jr. was first married to a Miss Adams, who was the mother of John E. Neblett. This is proven by the following facts:
(1) Sally Brunson was appointed administrator of Asbel Brunson's estate in July 1815 (Montgomery County Will Book E, p. 177)
(2) In a "love and affection" deed, John Neblett Sr. and William Adams to John E. Neblett--a slave, Rose, and her three children. In this deed, John Neblett and William Adams agreed that if John E. Neblett should die before reaching 21 years, the property would revert to the owners.
In pursuit of the identity of William Adams, the Gannaways were lead to Robertson County, Tennessee, Will Book 6, p. 147-148 for his will. Item 3 of this will reads, "I give and bequeath to my son-in-law, John Neblett one dollar in cash, having heretofore given him all I ever intended to give him...". This will is dated August 8,1827.
The Clarksville Gazette of September 9,1820 reports the marriage of John Neblett Jr. to Miss Rebecca H. Roberts with rites by Reuben Ross.
Thus John Neblett Jr. was married to:
(1) a Miss Adams
(2) Sarah Vance Brunson
(3) Rebecca H. Roberts.

Bar dividing text


From: The Life and Time of Reuben Ross

276   REUBEN ROSS


Reuben was born May 9, 1776 in Williamston, Martin County, North Carolina, son of William and Mary Griffin Ross. William was born August 9,1731 and married in 1756.
William's father came to this country from Scotland and settled in Roanoke, Virginia and was also named William.
William, the younger, moved to North Carolina and raised ten children. The Ross family was of dark complexion and were fervent Calvinist Baptists. The children were John, born September 3,1757, died in Tennessee; William, born January 17,1760, died in Missouri; Martin, born November 27,1762, died in North Carolina; Winifred, March 9,1765, died in Tennessee; Nannie, March 26,1767, died in Tennessee; James, March 19,1769, died in North Carolina; Mary, February 11,1771, died in North Carolina; Nathan, November 2,1773, died at Saline Creek, Stewart County, Tennessee; Reuben, born May 9,1776, died in Tennessee; and Elizabeth, born May 3,1779, died in North Carolina.
William owned many parcels of rich farmland and timber lands. He grew quite wealthy from sales of farm goods and fish from the river that flowed through the lands. They held elegant balls with costly food and wine. He died December 21,1801, his wife soon after.
Reuben attended school only when he wanted to, a few weeks or months at a time for a total of twelve months. He worked on his father's farm. Reuben was almost six feet tall, weighed 145 pounds, gray eyes, dark brown hair, dark complexion and a fine singing voice.
When he was twenty-two he married Mildred Yarrell on September 30,1798. She was the daughter of Matthew and Mary Wheatly Yarrell of Halifax County, North Carolina and very pretty. Reuben and Mildred had four children, Nancy, Polly, James and Mildred. Matthew Yarrell was said to be quite handsome and at one time owned a large estate but lost it due to politics and gambling. He made his living making trunks and tanning deer hides. They were Episcopalian.
The Wheatlys had many relatives living in Montgomery County, Tennessee. Matthew is buried at Cedar Hill in Montgomery County, near his daughter, Mary. His other children, Thomas, Garrard, Rosa (who married Charles Cherry) and Mary (who was called Polly, never married). Thomas died and is buried in Alabama. Garrard and Rosa are buried in Tennessee. Polly is buried in the area of Ft. Donelson.
Two of Reuben's brothers became preachers. Martin in Edenton, Perquimons County, N.C. and James in Bertie County, N.C., both much loved by their congregations. Reuben was ordained as a minister on May 6,1807.

After the deaths of his parents, Reuben decided to move to Tennessee. He arrived in Port Royal on July 4,1807. It being too late in the year to plant crops, Reuben opened a school and also began preaching. He traveled throughout Montgomery, Stewart and Robertson Counties in Tennessee and Todd, Logan and Christian Counties in Kentucky. He started many churches and his lifetime.
In November, little Mildred, about three and a half years old, died of burns when she was enveloped by flames while throwing leaves on a fire. She was buried near the crossroads of the road from Port Royal to Graysville and the road from Clarksville to Keysburg.
In 1808 Reuben moved to Stewart County. He bought property there but lost it for not having a deed. In 1812, he bought a 300-acre farm northwest of Clarksville on the Kentucky State line, a little less than two miles west of the Clarksville-Hopkinsville Road.
On June 2,1847 Reuben's wife Mildred died after a lengthy illness of the stomach. She was also bedridden for some years by severe rheumatism and was in extreme pain from it. The funeral was preached by Elder Samuel Baker of Hopkinsville.
In 1852 Reuben resigned from the Bethel Association and in 1857 moved from his home to live with a relative, John Morrison, to avoid loneliness. Towards the end of 1859 he suffered greatly from dysury. On January 19,1860 he arose from his bed and suddenly fell on the hearth and afterward could not move his legs. He never recovered from this fall and died within a few days. He was in extreme pain and utterly helpless until his death on January 28. He was taken back to his old homestead and buried at Cedar Hill (Ross Cemetery) beside his wife.
Reuben Ross was much loved by many people and deeply missed as shown by his tombstone which has tributes written on all four sides.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

277   CAROLINE H. MOORE


Caroline H. Moore was the daughter of Thomas Capper Moore and Henrietta Barbee Moore. Thomas Capper Moore was born in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, June 3,1785 and died May 29,1836. Henrietta Moore was born in Orange County, North Carolina, May 20,1787 and died October 11,1845. They married in 1805 and had ten children. After Thomas Moore’s death, Henrietta Moore married James Fletcher. Thomas Moore and Henrietta Moore Fletcher are buried in the Haynes Cemetery off Lake Road in the Dotsonville community.
In 1844, Caroline Moore married William O’Neal, who was born August 7,1819. O’Neal built the Moorland house in 1844 upon land that John Moore had received for his services during the Revolutionary War. John Moore served as a private in the Companies of Captain Hogg and Captain Hall, 10th North Carolina Continental Line, with Colonel Abraham Shepard commanding. The state of North Carolina granted John Moore land in Tennessee on October 23,1782, for his military service. John Moore was Thomas Capper Moore’s father.
John Moore was born March 14,1757 and died December 28,1815. He was the son of William Moore, a Scotch-Irishman who was one of the first settlers of North Carolina. John Moore married Nancy Capper who was born June 17,1765. She was the daughter of Thomas Capper. John and Nancy Moore had nine children.
Thomas Capper Moore III purchased Mooreland from Caroline Moore O’Neal and family in 1888. Thomas Capper Moore III was the son of Samuel A. Moore and Sarah Polk Ferguson Moore. Samuel Moore, who was born in 1825, was the son of Thomas and Henrietta Moore. Samuel Moore and Sarah Ferguson were married in 1845 in Columbia, Tennessee. After Sarah Moore’s death, Samuel Moore married Ann Eliza Brookshire in April 1855. Samuel Moore was a business partner with Nathan Bedford Forrest. Samuel Moore died near Memphis in 1881.
Thomas Capper Moore III was born May 31,1846. He married twice, first to Emma Teresa Green and they had four children. She died of yellow fever in Memphis. Thomas then married Catherine Isabella Rosie on December 13,1881.
Catherine Rosie was the daughter of John Rosie who was born in 1824 in Kirkwall, Orkney Islands. John Rosie emigrated to Canada and married Elizabeth Laughton, who was born in Hamilton, Ontario. The had nine children. Catherine Rosie was born in Watertown, Ontario, November 3,1859. For nearly thirty years, John Rosie was Station Master of the Grand Trunk Railroad in Beamsville/St. Catherine, Ontario. He moved from Watertown, Ontario, to Beamsville, Ontario, in 1868. In 1894, he moved from Beamsville to Chicago, where he died in October 1896.
In 1888, Thomas Capper Moore III was in the mercantile business in Chicago but, due to health reasons, had to leave Chicago. Thomas Moore hired Mr. Bayliss to manage the farm he had purchased until he and his family could come to Tennessee.
Upon their arrival, Thomas's wife, Catherine Rosie Moore, was appalled at the condition of the house. Thomas C. Moore paid D.M. Buck $23.35 for shingles, for weatherboard installation, for steps and for sealing the portico overhead. Over the years, Thomas Moore raised thoroughbred horses, ran a dairy, dealt in real estate and farmed. He and his wife lived there the remainder of their lives. Catherine Moore died May 23,1923.
Thomas Rosie Moore was the son of Thomas Capper Moore III and Catherine Rosie Moore. He was born November 13,1884. He inherited Mooreland and he and his family lived here many years. At one time there was a swimming pool for all the children to enjoy. Thomas Rosie Moore died in 1960 and today his grandson, Ronnie McKinney, owns the property.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

278   JOHN G. BURNEY


John G. Burney was born June 4,1844 and died February 18,1924. He was the son of W.L. and Mary Burney. W.L. Burney who was a carpenter was born ca 1801 in Tennessee. His wife, Mary, was born in North Carolina ca 1824.
John G. Burney married Mary Dillon who was born in 1849 and died in 1946. She was the daughter of Patrick Dillon who was born in Tennessee ca 1824. Her mother was Prudence Dillon, born in Tennessee ca 1830. It is thought Patrick Dillon was the son of Joshua Dillon born in South Carolina ca 1785. John G. Burney and his wife Mary are buried in the Burney Cemetery, south of Canaan Baptist Church, in District 19.
J.G. and Mary Burney’s son was John D. Burney. He was born October 18,1886 and died November 12,1962. His wife, Mary, was born October 19,1889 and died December 2,1960. They are buried in the Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery in District 20.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

279   GEORGE H. ELLIOTT


George H. Elliott was born March 22,1819 and died on July 5,1907. His wife Judith was born July 5,1824 and died on August 7,1891. The are buried in the Elliott Cemetery, District 5. Judith Elliott was the daughter of Geraldus and Mary M. Marshall Pickering. Mary M. Pickering was born September 24,1790 and died September 28,1865 at the home of her son, William G. Pickering.
Being a cabinetmaker, Elliott probably built his house himself. It was said that all furniture in the house had been built by him or his sons. This occupation he combined with farming.
There were ten children born to the Elliotts. The children were introduced to musical instruments at an early age. Members of the community would gather at the home on Saturday night and on special occasions to share the music.
One of their sons, Dr. Lee Elliott, a dentist, lived at home until his death in 1934. His dental office was located on the premises.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

280   JOHN WALTON BARKER


John Walton Barker was born August 19,1793 in Virginia and died in Montgomery County January 16,1867. His wife Mary Minor, was born February 1798 and died March 3,1831. They are buried in the Barker Cemetery on Cloverland Farm, District 2.
Before the Civil War, John W. Barker was a pioneer in the tobacco industry in Clarksville. He was one of the first in Clarksville to establish a tobacco stemmery. In 1838 he was among the individuals appointed by the Montgomery County Court to mark the route for the Clarksville and Russellville Turnpike. These men were to determine the need for a new bridge at any point between Barker’s ferry and the mouth of West Fork of Red River if the present bridge was not on the chosen route.
Nancy Barker, daughter of John Walton and Mary Barker, married Robert Ferguson who was born in Massachusetts on February 10,1815. Robert Ferguson was a lawyer who served in the Tennessee State Legislature from 1872 until 1874. He died May 12,1882 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery. His wife, Nancy died September 9,1884 her home, built by her father, which was called Summertrees.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

281   P.C. (PHID) COLLINS


P.C. (Phid) Collins is believed to be a brother of Leonidas (Ont) Collins who gave Southside its first name--that of Collinsville. Ont was the son of Anthony and Elizabeth Collins. Elizabeth Collins died March 11,1886 at the age of 84 in Collinsville. Her husband died at the age of 64 on December 5,1860 in Cheatham County, Tennessee.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

282   WILLIAM JAMES LYLE


William James Lyle was born in Tennessee July 21,1836 and was the son of James and Sallie Ann McCorkle Lyle.
James Lyle was born March 29,1809 and died September 28,1885. He married Sallie Ann McCorkle on December 4,1833. She was born March 14,1814 and died November 12,1888. They had twelve children.
James Lyle was the son of Jordan L. and Ann Lyle, Jordan L. Lyle came from North Carolina to Tennessee in 1806. He was married three times, all in North Carolina. First he married Lyla Powell and they had no children. Next he married Mary Yarbrough and they had one daughter. He then married Ann Bailey Bumpass and they had eight children.
Jordan Lyle was the oldest son of Thomas and Hannah Lyle. Thomas Lyle, at the age of 18, emigrated from Scotland to North Carolina ca 1740. In North Carolina, he married Hannah Sims and they had six children.
William James Lyle married Elizabeth Mabry Batson on November 22,1860. They had eleven children. Elizabeth Batson Lyle was born September 6,1842. William J. Lyle died February 5,1910 and his wife, Elizabeth, died April 26,1910.
Elizabeth Batson Lyle was the daughter of Stephen Carney Batson and Armin Maria Williams Batson who married December 11,1840. Stephen Carney Batson was born March 10,1811 and died September 9,1889. His wife, Armin Maria, was born June 28,1821 and died June 2,1906. She was the daughter of William Williams and Sicily Mabry Tisdale.
William Williams and Sicily Tisdale were married March 20,1810 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. The came to Tennessee ca 1825. They had eight children. William Williams was born May 6,1786 and died September 11,1854. His wife, Sicily was born March 14,1789 and died September 7,1854. William Williams was the son of Nicholas Williams and Alice Armin Love Williams of Virginia.
William J. Lyle operated a general store in the Southside community and served as Southside Postmaster from 1874 to 1908. William Lyle was postmaster on March 25,1880 when the village of Collinsville was renamed Southside. This was done to prevent a mix-up in mail delivery with other towns by the names of Colliersville and Collinwood in Tennessee. He died on February 5,1910 and his wife Elizabeth died April 26,1910.
Carney Batson Lyle, son of William J. Lyle, was born July 21,1865 and died September 3,1938. He married Minnie Boyd Herndon on April 5,1894. C.B. was an attorney in Clarksville, Tennessee.
Another son of W.J. Lyle, Matt G. Lyle, served as Attorney General of Montgomery County for many years.
Lewis Lyle was born January 4,1880 and died May 20,1971. He married Susan Angelina (Angie) Pennington on January 15,1902. She was born October 2,1880 and died April 27,1966. They had five children, Harry, William R., Phillip, Edwin and Robert. Susan was the daughter of John Robert and Eliza Patrick Pennington. Lewis Lyle was an officer in the Southside precinct in every election from 1914 to 1950.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

283   WILLIAM WYATT THOMPSON


William Wyatt Thompson was born in 1809 in Lynchburg, Virginia. Thompson first came to Haywood County, Tennessee, where he married Harriett Martin and together they came to Montgomery County. Harriett Martin was born ca 1818.
William Wyatt Thompson died December 13,1876 and his wife died August 31,1878. They are buried in the Antioch Methodist Church Cemetery.
William and Harriett had two sons, Wyatt Jr. who was born in 1837 and James Edward who was born in 1839. Both sons fought in the Civil War and Wyatt Jr., was killed at Fort Donelson. James Edward Thompson served with the 9th Tennessee Infantry and was wounded three times. He was a member of Forbes Bivouac.
James Edward married Sarah Fessey and they had six children. He died February 25,1917 and is buried in the Antioch Methodist Church Cemetery.
James Edward and Sarah Thompson’s son, Samuel Erwin Thompson, married Nannie Roland. Their descendants live in the community today.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

284   JOHN R. GOWER


John R. Gower was born in 1844 in Robertson County, Tennessee. He was the son of James W. Gower who married Amelia Head on November 16,1841 in Robertson County. James Gower, born in 1821, was the son of Wilson L. and Charlotte Baird Gower. The Gowers were among the earliest settlers of Tennessee. Some settlers came with the overland group led by James Robertson and some with the flotilla headed by John Donelson in 1779.
John R. Gower married Martha Ruffin Woodruff. She was born in 1847 and was the daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth Woodruff who came to Tennessee circa 1835. John Gower lived in the Mt. Carmel community prior to moving to Port Royal. At Mt. Carmel, he and George Winters operated a profitable tobacco factory. After retiring from the tobacco business, John Gower bought a farm in the Port Royal community and built his home.
John Gower was a founder of the Olivet Freewill Baptist Church. In a church publication of 1894, the church is referred to as Gower’s Church. He was president of the Bank of Adams, Tennessee, and a director of the Northern Bank of Tennessee in Clarksville. John and Martha Gower were the parents of six children. John and Martha Gower died in 1925 and are buried in the Trenton, Kentucky Cemetery.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

285   ALEXANDER SMITH


Dr. Alexander Smith, Sr. a son of John Smith, was born in Pennsylvania in 1788. Dr. Smith fought in the Creek and Seminole War. In 1804 he went to North Carolina where he married Peggy Rudolph. They had ten children. Around 1810 he came to Tennessee where he died on April 15,1856. Mrs. Smith died on December 5,1862.
Alexander Smith Jr., was also a doctor. He was born in North Carolina on January 3,1806. In 1834 Alexander Jr. went to Arkansas where he served as a constable and deputy sheriff. In 1840, he moved to Texas and in 1842 he returned to Montgomery County. Here he taught school for some time and then attended medical colleges in Philadelphia and Nashville. He began his medical practice in Montgomery County in 1854 in the McAdoo community. In 1857 he married Paralee E. Rudolph who was born in Montgomery County.
Alexander and Paralee Smith had three sons; John, born in 1858; James Peter, born in 1862; and Alexander T. born in 1869. Dr. Alexander (Sandy) Smith Jr., died June 5,1900, at the age of 94, at Guthrie, Kentucky.
James Peter Smith served many years as a magistrate on the Montgomery County Court.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

286   RICHARD WASHINGTON WORKMAN


Richard Washington Workman was born in Weakley County, Tennessee, on August 2,1844. He was the son of Allen Ruffin and Jane Hammond Lee Workman. In 1850 Washington Workman lived with his mother Jane in Montgomery County. Jane Workman was born circa 1813.
Washington Workman was married twice. First, he married Arbina Pearl Hunter on July 1,1874. Arbina Pearl Hunter was born April 14,1854 and died April 17,1891. Arbina Hunter Workman is buried in the Southside Cemetery. She was the daughter of Drury and Nancy Ann Dean Hunter. Washington and Arbina Workman had five children.
Next, Washington Workman married Addie Sue Harris on January 25,1893, and they had five children. Washington died on August 10,1917.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

287   STERLING WYATT


Sterling Wyatt was the son of John William Wyatt. J.W. (Billy) Wyatt was born in 1865 and died in 1928. He married Molly Daniel who was born in 1870 and died in 1935. They had seven children. Billy Wyatt was the first rural mail carrier for the Collinsville Post Office, later to be the Southside Post Office.
Billy Wyatt was the son of James Allen Wyatt and Elizabeth Matthews Wyatt. James A. Wyatt was born in 1837 and died in 1899. Elizabeth Wyatt was born in 1845 and died in 1895. James A. Wyatt was the son of William Robert Wyatt and Betsy Ann Williams. William R. Wyatt was born in 1808 and died in 1866. William R. Wyatt was the son of John William Wyatt, born in Virginia in 1781. John William Wyatt married Elizabeth Williams who was born in 1785. John William Wyatt came to Montgomery County in 1812 and moved to Haywood County, Tennessee, in 1837. John William Wyatt and his wife, Elizabeth, both died in 1866.
Sterling Wyatt married Sadie Harvey, who was the daughter of John Harvey.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

288   WILLIAM FRANKLIN JOHNSTON


Dr. William Franklin Johnston married Lucy Evans and they had one child, Annie Laurie. Annie L. Johnston was born August 15,1861 and died March 13,1911. She married Peter Barker, son of Chiles T. and Mary Hutchinson Barker. Peter Barker was born March 13,1859 and died December 21,1942. Chiles T. Barker was born May 22,1816 and died on August 22,1895. Mary H. Barker was born May 9,1823. Chiles T. Barker was the son of John Walton Barker and Mary Minor Barker.
John Walton Barker was born August 19,1793 in Virginia and died in Montgomery County January 16,1867. His wife Mary Minor Barker was born February 2,1798 and died March 3,1831. Chiles Barker and wife and John Walton Barker and wife are buried in the Barker Cemetery on Cloverland Farm in District 2.
Before the Civil War, J.W. Barker was a pioneer in the tobacco industry in Clarksville. He was one of the first in Clarksville to establish a tobacco stemmery. In 1838 he was among the individuals who were appointed by the Montgomery County Court to mark the route for the Clarksville and Russellville Turnpike. These men were to determine the need for a new bridge at any point between Barker’s Ferry and the mouth of West Fork of Red River if the present bridge was not on the chosen route.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

289   SOLOMON D. RAIMEY


Solomon D. Raimey was born November 29,1811 in North Carolina and came to Tennessee when quite young. He married Eliza Ann McAlister who was born in Virginia on September 24,1816. Solomon Raimey died on February 28,1891 and his wife died on October 21,1859. Both are buried on the McAlister Cemetery located at the intersection of Old Highway 48 and Thompson Road.
Solomon Raimey’s son James Kittrell Raimey was born August 19,1841. James K. Raimey married Louella H. Black who was born September 15,1853. He served in the Confederate Army as a lieutenant in A Company, 50th Infantry. J.K. Raimey served as a member of the Montgomery County Court for many years. James K. Raimey died January 22,1918 and his wife died May 16,1914. They are buried in the Raimey Cemetery in District 22, Montgomery County.
Their daughter, Eliza Ann Raimey, was born in 1881. In 1900 she married Elijah Murphy who was born in 1872. Their daughter, Earlene Murphy married C.A. Bridgers. Mrs. Bridgers was a teacher n the Montgomery County school system for many years.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

290   SAMUEL TURNER HALLIBURTON


Samuel Turner Halliburton was the son of George Coffee Halliburton and Mary Grant Halliburton. George Halliburton was born February 29,1816 and died May 1,1878. His wife, Mary, was born August 6,1820 and died March 16,1870. George Halliburton came to this area from Dickson County around 1836. He purchased land on which there was a log house from the Jett family and Sango had its beginning. He enlarged the log house and created a plantation home.
As more settlers arrived George Halliburton built a general store on his farm at the intersection of McAdoo and Clarksville Roads. He also donated two acres of land for a cemetery across from the store after one of his grandchildren died while visiting his home. Several other children also died, probably of diphtheria, and a cemetery was needed.
After George’s death his son, Samuel, operated the store and farmed.
Samuel Halliburton married Maggie Rudolph and they had three children; Troy, Margie and Josephine. Samuel Halliburton was born October 16,1853 and died July 24,1901. His wife, Maggie, was born June 4,1860 and died December 10,1953.
In addition to managing the store and farm, Samuel Halliburton was an artist, a furniture maker and photographer. He had a photographer’s studio adjacent to the store. Photographs made by Samuel Halliburton as well as furniture made by him are still in existence. He was a very progressive man. He had a windmill for his house that pumped water from a reservoir.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

291   ERWIN CORLEW


Erwin Corlew was born in January 1850 and married Louise Lowe in 1883. Erwin Corlew died June 25,1927 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery.
Erwin Corlew was the son of William and Ellen Pritchard Corlew, who married in 1842. Ellen Pritchard’s father settled here in 1801.
William E. Corlew was a tobacconist, connected with many of the leading tobacco firms in Clarksville. William Corlew, who was born ca 1810 died June 3,1881 and was buried in Salem Cemetery.
Erwin Corlew was a farmer of diversified crops and raised cattle and horses. Realizing the importance of education, he donated land for the construction of Mount Pleasant School which no longer exists.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

292   BURRELL CORBAN


The community of Corbandale was named for Burrell Corban. He also served as Corbandal’s first postmaster from July 31,1866 until his death. He also supervised the construction of the railroad beds for the Memphis, Clarksville and St. Louis Railroad.
Burrell Corban was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee, on September 11,1801. He was the son of Charnal Corban who was born ca 1770 and died ca 1822.
Charnal Corban married Celia Elizabeth Barnes. Charnal Corban first appeared on Montgomery tax records in 1801. He came to this area as a stone mason. He supervised the construction of iron furnace stacks for Robert Jordan West and others in the area.
Burrell Corban married three times. First, to Elizabeth Batson and they had two daughters. After her death in 1844, he married Martha Finley. Upon her death, he married Sarah Ann Barnes Andrews. She was born in Virginia on February 12,1818. Burrell Corban died February 11,1883 and his wife, Sarah, died December 27,1895. The are buried in the Corban Cemetery in District 19.
Burrell Joseph Corban, was the elder of the two children of Burrell and Sarah Corban. He was born April 6,1853 in Montgomery County, Tennessee. B.J. Corban married Maria Catherine Batson in 1874 and they lived and raised their family in Corbandale. Maria Batson was born June 16,1853 and was the eighth of eleven children born to Stephen Carney and A. Maria Batson. Stephen Carney Batson was born in Tennessee in 1811 and died before 1906. His wife, A. Maria Batson, was born in Virginia in 1824 and died June 2,1906.
B.J. Corban served as the telegraph operator for the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Station that was located at Corbandale. In 1882 B.J. Corban was elected to serve on the Montgomery County Court where he represented the 19th District for many years. He served two terms in the Tennessee House of Representatives in the 45th General Assembly.
B.J. served as postmaster of Corbandale from July 15,1893 to July 31,1915. The Corbandale Post Office began with a Corban as postmaster and ended with a Corban as postmaster. Mary Corban Vickers, granddaughter of Burrell Corban, the first postmaster, was the last postmaster at Corbandale. B.J. Corban died June 1,1920 and his wife, Maria, died June 21,1937. They are buried in the Corban Cemetery in District 19.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

293   DEWITT C. ELLIOTT


Dewitt C. Elliott was born March 27,1835 and died August 15,1912. His wife, Elizabeth Caroline Elliott, was born September 1,1835 and died February 12,1912. They are buried in the Elliott-Murphy Cemetery. Dewitt Elliott is said to have owned a great many slaves.
Dewitt Elliott’s son, Herbert D. Elliott was born October 16,1867 and died February 16,1934. He married Mary Gower who was born March 10,1867 and died June 20,1914.
Mary Gower was the daughter of John R. and Martha Woodruff Gower. Martha Woodruff, who was born in 1847 in Robertson County, was the daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth Woodruff. Matthew Woodruff was born in North Carolina in 1812 and Elizabeth in North Carolina in 1816. The Woodruffs came to Tennessee ca 1835. John R. Gower was born in 1844 and died in 1925.
John R. Gower was the son of James W. Gower who was born in 1821. James W. Gower married Amelia Head on November 16,1841. James W. Gower was the son of Wilson L. Gower and Charlotte Baird. Wilson L. Gower was born November 19,1793 in Davidson County, Tennessee. He married Charlotte Baird in 1812. He served in the War of 1812.
Wilson L. Gower was the son of Russell Gower who came with his father Abel Gower to the Davidson County area in 1779. Abel Gower and his family came with the first settlers led by James Robertson and John Donelson. Russell and Abel Gower along with other settlers signed a petition in 1780 asking North Carolina to give them protection from the Indians. Later, Abel Gower and his son, Abel Jr., were in a canoe attempting to bring corn to Nashborough from the mouth of Stone’s River when they were killed by Indians.
Russell Gower settled at Gower’s Island in the Cumberland River in what was to become Cheatham County just west of the Davidson County line.
John R. Gower came to Montgomery County and first settled in the Mount Carmel community. Here he operated a tobacco factory with George Winters. John Gower later moved to the Port Royal community and built a house there, now know as the Gaines home.
Martha Elliott, daughter of Herbert and Mary Gower Elliott, married John B. Murphy. John B. Murphy was the son of George Edward and Mattie Darden Murphy. George E. Murphy was born in Robertson County, Tennessee, and moved ca 1908 to the Port Royal and Saddlersville area. John B. Murphy died in 1991.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

294   JOHN BEAUREGARD


John Beauregard Booth was born in the New Providence area, Montgomery County, Tennessee, May 27,1861. He married Nannie Ligon in 1885. She was the daughter of Joseph Ligon and Susan Johnson Ligon who married in 1837. Joseph Ligon, who was born in 1807, was a schoolteacher. He was the son of Matthew and Julia Pleasants Ligon.
Matthew Ligon was the son of Joseph Ligon who was born in Halifax County, Virginia in 1755. Joseph Ligon joined the Revolutionary Army in 1779/80. On March 15, 1781, he was seriously wounded at the Battle of Guilford in North Carolilna. As a result of these injuries, he had a lame right arm of the remainder of his life. On June 16,1784, he married the widow of David Sims, Jr., who had three children. She died April 23,1787. Their son, Matthew, was born May 2,1785. In 1814, Joseph Ligon came to Tennessee with Matthew Ligon and his wife Judith, and children. Joseph Ligon died September 21,1842 and was buried in the Ligon Cemetery, Rossview Road, District 6.
John and Nannie Booth’s daughter, Cecil, married Norman C. Young, Sr.
Norman C. Young, Sr., was the son of William B. Young and Mary Norman Coleman Young. William B. Young was born March 26,1830, and was a prominent grocer in Clarksville in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. He was the son of Colonel William Franklin Young and Kathleen A. Caudle.
William F. Young married Mary B. Shelby on December 1,1853. They had two children, Mary Zelia Young, who died at an early age, and a son, Harvey C. Young. He next married Kathleen A. Caudle on December 20,1859. Kathleen Caudle was born February 5,1836. They had two children, Susan Ora, who died young, and William B. Young.
Colonel William F. Young served in the Confederate Army, Company G, 49th Tennessee Regiment. He was seriously wounded at the Battle of Atlanta. William F. Young died January 12,1899 and his wife, Kathleen, died July 1,1900. They are buried in the Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church Cemetery, District 8.
William F. Young was the son of Elliott Young and Martha Kidd Young. Elliott Young was born June 13,1791 near Petersburg, Virginia. He died July 5,1865. Martha Kidd was born November 17,1792 near Petersburg, Virginia and died January 23,1872. Elliott and Martha Young are buried in the Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church Cemetery, District 8.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

295   JOHN WILLIAM (BILLY) WYATT


John William (Billy) Wyatt was born in 1865 and died in 1928. He married Molly Daniel who was born in 1870 and died in 1935. They had seven children.
J.W. (Billy) Wyatt was the son of James A. Wyatt who married Elizabeth Matthews Wyatt. James A. Wyatt was born in 1837 and died in 1899. Elizabeth Wyatt was born in 1845 and died in 1895. James A. Wyatt was the son of William Robert Wyatt and Betsy Ann Williams. William R. Wyatt was born in 1808 and died in 1866. William R. Wyatt was the son of John William Wyatt, born in Virginia in 1781.
John William Wyatt married Elizabeth William who was born in 1785. John William Wyatt came to Montgomery County in 1812 and moved to Haywood County, Tennessee, in 1837. John William Wyatt and his wife, Elizabeth both died in 1866. Elizabeth Williams was the daughter of Nicholas Williams and Alice Armin Love Williams of Virginia.
Billy Wyatt was the first rural mail carrier from the Collinsville Post Office, later to be the Southside Post Office. In the early days of the postal service, men who delivered mail on horseback carried meat scraps to toss to the wild animals in case of attack.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

296   THOMAS CAPPER MOORE


Thomas Capper Moore came to Montgomery County, Tennessee, from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 1811. He was the son of John and Nancy Capper Moore from North Carolina.
John Moore was born March 14,1757 and died December 28,1815. He was the son of William Moore, a Scotch-Irishman who was one of the first settlers of North Carolina. John Moore married Nancy Capper who was born June 17,1765 and they had nine children. She was the daughter of Thomas Capper.
On October 23,1782 the State of North Carolina granted John Moore land in Tennessee for his military service in the state’s Continental Lines during the Revolutionary War. John Moore served as a private in the Companies of Captain Hogg and Captain Hall, 10th North Carolina Continental Line, with Colonel Abraham Shepard commanding.
In 1810 John Moore of Orange County, North Carolina, deeded Thomas Moore of Montgomery County 180 acres in Montgomery County on the middle fork of Blooming Grove Creek. At John Moore’s death in 1815, Thomas inherited half a tract of land situated on Blooming Grove Creek in Montgomery County, Tennessee, upon which Thomas then lived. The will referred to improvements already made on this land by Thomas.
Thomas Capper Moore was born in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on June 3,1785 and died May 29,1836. In 1805, he married Henrietta Barbee who was born in Orange County, North Carolina, on May 20,1787. After Thomas Moore’s death, Henrietta Moore married James Fletcher. Henrietta Moore Fletcher died October 11,1845. She and Thomas Moore are buried in the Haynes Cemetery off Lake Road, in the Dotsonville community.
Samuel A. Moore, son of Thomas and Henrietta Moore, was born in 1825 and married Sarah Polk Ferguson in 1845 in Columbia, Tennessee. After Sara Moore’s death, Samuel Moore married Ann Eliza Brookshire in April 1855. Samuel was a business partner with Nathan Bedford Forrest. Samuel Moore died near Memphis in 1881.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

297   JAMES W. MORRISON


James W. Morrison was born in 1807 in Virginia and his Wife, Rosanna, was born ca 1814 in Tennessee.
James Morrison tragically died by hanging himself in one of the upstairs rooms of his home.
In 1854 spiritualism or spirit rapping became popular and spirit parties were held in various homes. Several such parties were held in the Morrison home. The spirits are said to have shaken young Miss Morrison until she was blue in the face. At another party, Morrison is said to have spoken in favor of spirit rapping and this upset some of those present. When the spirits were offended, they were said to rock Morrison’s house until the foundation cracked.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

298   GEORGE DUGGEN MIMMS


George Duggen Mimms was a stockholder in the Clarksville Female Academy in 1846. George D. Mimms was born August 7,1819 and died November 30,1896. He married Sally Ann Judson Wisdom, who was born November 3,1828 and died March 30,1919. They are buried in the Mimms Cemetery.
The oldest daughter of George and Sally Mimms, Nannie, married John Carter Rawlins. Nannie Minor Mimms was born November 29,1850 and died January 11,1913. John Carter Rawlins was born March 15,1841 and died January 13,1891. They are buried in the Mimms Cemetery.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

299   WILLIAM ISHAM HARPER


Professor William Isham Harper, a prominent educator, was born on December 28,1856. His father David Harrison Harper, was born in Montgomery County January 18,1835. David Harper married Elizabeth W. Harris on December 22,1853 and they had seven children. David Harper was the son of Whitman Harper from Virginia and Elizabeth Cocke.
Elizabeth Harris Harper was born February 10,1831 and died April 16,1890. David Harper died November 4,1904. David and Elizabeth Harper are buried in the Batson-Blackford Cemetery, Southside, Tennessee. Elizabeth Harris Harper was the daughter of Isham Harris and Elizabeth Jones Harris.
Professor Harper was educated at Central Point High School near the Montgomery and Dickson County lines. Here he received a classical education. He then taught school, teaching four years at Collinsville (now Southside). Here, on December 25,1881, he married Sallie Maria Lyle, daughter of William James and Elizabeth Mabry Batson Lyle. Sallie Maria was born November 21,1861 and died January 17 1946. Professor Harper died December 8,1910. The Harpers had 11 children.
In 1884, Professor Harper and family moved to Pleasant View, Tennessee, where he was principal of Pleasant View High School. Later the Harpers returned to Southside where he became principal of the Southside Preparatory School. Professor Harper also taught at Clarksville High School.
The School at Collinsville had its beginning on August 27,1889 when five acres of land were deeded to the Collinsville School Directors. These directors were G.M. Hunter, T.J. Rye, and W.C. Harris. The school had a log building but when a stock company was formed a new building was planned. In 1890 a new school building was erected. Male students boarded at Professor William Isham Harper’s home and female students boarded at Professor W.M. McKee’s home. A certificate of graduation from this school permitted entrance to the University of Tennessee without further examination. Board was $7.00 to $10.00 a month and tuition was $2.00 - $4.00 a month. An incidental fee of $1.00 per year was charged. Board and room was furnished at $8.00 a month, washing $1.00; library fee $1.00 and diploma fee $5.00.
In 1901, the brochure for Southside Preparatory School was published by Titus Publishers, Clarksville, Tennessee. The school offered academic, music, business and art courses. It could accommodate 200 students. The school offered two degrees. Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts, and Teachers’ Certificates were awarded.
The officers were J.M. Dickson, president; W.C. Harris, vice-president; J. Wyatt, secretary; and D.R. Hunter, treasurer. The directors were W.C. Harris, J.M. Neblett, R.W. Workman, J. McCormac, G.M. Hunter, S.E. Neblett and H.C. Lyle. Professor W.I. Harper and Professor W.M. McKee were principals of the school. Professor Harper instructed in Mathematics, Latin, Creek, Natural Sciences and History. Professor McKee taught French, English, Mathematics, and Pedagogy. He also taught Bookkeeping, Business Forms and Commercial Law in the Business Department. Mrs. McKee taught in the Art Department and Miss Millie Barker taught Piano, Harmony and Musical History in the Music Department. Also taught in the Music Department were Mandolin and Guitar. Lecturers were Dr. J.R. Felts on Anatomy; Dr. S.E. Neblett on Physiology and Dr. Vaughn on Hygiene. The fall term began on August 29,1901 and graduation ceremonies were held on June 6,1902.
On July 30,1906 H.C. Lyle and wife, Minnie, and E.A. Hudgens and wife, Rosa, deeded nearly 11 acres to the Southside Preparatory School for $272.00.
Some of the early graduates were E.E. Pennington, S.W. Corban, C.N. Bumpus, W.H. Brame, J.R. Lyle, S.E. Harper, Lizzie Batson, Fannie Stewart, Eva Harper, and F.H. Crow.

Bar dividing text


From: Cabins to Castles

300   THOMAS A. HAYNES


Thomas A. Haynes was born August 21,1823. He married Mary J. Elliott who was born April 2,1832. Thomas Haynes and his wife Mary both died on September 20,1902, his wife preceding him in death by twenty hours. The are buried in the Haynes Cemetery. Their son Ed married Sally Moore.



home       back    1~100    101~200    201~300    301~400   

Folk Finders Guestbook        email

     Montgomery County Cemeteries     Death Notices     Men Folk     Women Folk     Folks Name Index    

     Neighborhood Folks     Local Sports     Folks Families     The Courthouse Square     Historical Notes    

     Keeping the Peace     Public Folks     Remembrances of Our Past     Birth Announcements     Old Time Religion    

     Marriages     Society Folks     Lodge Brothers     Front Porch Memories     Down on the Farm    

     Business Folks     Old School Days     Funeral Home Records     The Village Post Office     Separate Ways    

     Folks Reunions     Folks Anniversaries     Immigrant Ships Index     Native_Folk     Wills of the Past    

     The Old Home Place     Time Machine     Villages in Montgomery County     Old Time Medical Terms    

     Montgomery County Death Index (1908 - 1912)     Montgomery County Death Index (1914)





Sets by Web Concoctions