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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

1   SAILOR’S REST


December 26,1874--We went down Saturday on a special train to Mr. P.G. Johnson’s large sale of the I.D. West property.
The West estate was a most magnificent one left by Robert West consisting of several thousand acres of land, much of it fine iron deposit of pipe ore, river and creek bottom of the most fertile kind with the railroad running through the river farm.
Mr. West was a man of great energy, of speculative tendencies and began before the war, largely involved and indebted to parties who had advanced him money-some of them relatives, some at usurious interest. When the war closed, proceedings were begun against him and he filed a bill alleging usury seeking to adjust the liens of his creditors and in fact, to procure alibis. The bill was tenable but in the state of our judiciary at the time, it was maintained. He made a most remarkable fight, finally going to the Supreme Court when a sale of course was ordered and made in 1872.
(13,000 acres, May 15,1872)
A part was sold to other parties, but the great body of land was sold to Mr. West at a very large price and this was ordered sold for the purchase money.
The sale is as follows: River Farm

J.A. Woods Jr.--$14,429 for 855 acres.

A.J. Lyle--two lots at $8.57 per acre.

William Channell--one lot at $4.25 per acre, one lot at $5.00 per acre.

Henry Lyle--one lot at $4.05 per acre, one lot at $4.15 per acre.

W.B. Dunbar--one lot at $.25 per acre, two lots at $.35 per acre, one lot at $2.95 per acre.

Jacob West--one lot at $1.10 per acre.

Dr. J.F. Outlaw--one lot at $.25 per acre, one lot at $1.10 per acre.

Dr. B.W. Ussery--one lot at $8.00 per acre.

James Woods Jr.--mill and 267 acres for $5,800.00.

The aggregate is:
Acres- 4,925 at $28,113.48; average per acre--$5.70
Much of the land is worn out and coaling and about one-half is moderate farming land, one-quarter is good, and one-fifth is the very best.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

2   PALMYRA LIME COMPANY


October 3,1929--Resumption of the grinding of limestone by the Palmyra Lime Company after a lapse of about five years during which the plant at Palmyra was owned and operated by the Southland Lime Company is announced.
The reorganized Palmyra Lime Company is composed of G. Wallace Dinsmore, who was formerly associated with Robert O’Neal and George Fort of this city in its conduct. They sold the plant to the Southland Lime Company which bought a number of other kilns in the western section of Tennessee, but which has recently ceased to operate. Associated with Mr. Dinsmore in the reorganization concern is Att Powers who was operations foreman for the Southland Lime Company.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

3   SOUTHSIDE

March 26,1919--A bank was organized at Southside yesterday which is to be known as the Southside Bank. Charter has been applied for. The capital stock will be $10,000, all of which has been taken.

The bank officers are:
President--G.M. Hunter
Vice-President--W.C. Harris
Cashier--A.M. Durrett
Secretary and Clerk--A.J. Durrett

Directors
A.D. Rye
W.C. Harris
S.E. Neblett
G.M. Hunter
A.J. Durrett
W.L. Weems
G.H. Trotter
George Fort
A.M. Durrett

Executive Committee
W.C. Harris
Will Neblett
A.J. Durrett

The bank hopes to be ready for business by May 1.


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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

4   PALMYRA


March 25,1897--J.H. Harvey, of Palmyra has a patent chicken coop, which is said to be sure protection from all enemies of chickens, such as rats and other “varmints”. W.H. McCauley and J.H. Marable both of this city, are associated with Mr. Harvey in this patent. In this coop it is said that chickens can be raised for very early market. It is to be exhibited at the Centennial.

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From: The Chronicle

5   PALMYRA

January 21,1859--The contractor on the tunnel at Palmyra, Mr. Conelly, is pushing forward vigorously with a day and night shift, so nothing less than two hundred feet in length remains to be done, which will be finished simultaneously with the other work. For the information of the readers, we state the size of the tunnel, which is to be sixteen feet by eighteen feet, and through the hardest species of flint limestone rock.

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From: Clarksville Tobacco Leaf

6   COLLINSVILLE

August 27,1873--This is the name of a young village just springing up in the county, about twelve miles from Clarksville on the south side of the Cumberland River. It has about twenty-five inhabitants, there is a first-rate dry goods and grocery house, conducted by L.S. Collins and Brother. Mr. R.C. Collins is carrying on blacksmithing and wagon-making extensively. Dr. C.A. Wilkins is doing the practice for the neighborhood.
A Post Office has lately been established:
Dr. Wilkes, Post Master;
Mr. L. S. Collins,
Deputy Post Master.
Mr. R.W. Workman has a large brick-yard, and the project of building a church and schoolhouse is now up, and the town promises thrift.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

7   PALMYRA

January 10, 1898--H.H. Buquo of Erin bought the Palmyra Lime Company property, the consideration being $3,000.00. It had been owned and operated by M.M. Hussey.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

8   CLAWHAMMER

January 8,1917--The old-time water mill known as Batson’s is grinding. If flour is out of your reach, we around Rye’s can have good bread--cornbread. Won’t some of you Southsiders over there have your grinding done?

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

9   SOUTHSIDE

May 23,1874--Captain Searcy’s steamer, The Silver Spring, is laid up for the present on account of a lack of business. She will be on hand again whenever business gets brisk.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

10   YELLOW CREEK

August 31,1878--A company of men from the Green River Handle Works have put up and just started a factory on the East Fork of Yellow Creek, three miles from Corbandale, for making ax-handles, etc. Its capacity is to be about 1,500 handles a day, and they say they will pay out $1,500 per week for labor and timber.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

11   SALEM

April 27,1872--John Edmondson, Esquire, has purchased the right to sell the Haynes Patent Brace Fence on the south side of the Cumberland River. It is a good and cheap fence and especially adapted for river bottoms.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

12   MARTHA’S CHAPEL

May 17,1873--We learn that Dr. B.W. Ussery and Rev. Lewis Lowe have opened a store for the sale of dry goods and groceries at Washington Furnace on the old Charlotte Road about nine miles from this city.

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From: The Clarksville Gazette

13   LOUISE

January 2, 1923--Lige Murphy has begun making repairs on his ore washer. The Louise ore fields and washer have been idle for the past two years. The ore is dug, washed and loaded on railcars and shipped to Cumberland Furnace. Expect 50 people to be employed.

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From: Daily Leaf-Chronicle

14   ANTIOCH

May 24, 1822--Dr. Josiah Neblett, having recently returned from Philadelphia where he has been attending a course of medical lectures the past winter, informs his friends and the public that he has settled himself at Mr. Sterling Neblett's on Budd's Creek, Montgomery County, where he may at all times be found, except when absent on professional business.

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From: The Clarksville Gazette

15   Old Businesses From 1891

Attorney
109 1/2 South First Street

Barbers
117 Strawberry Alley
117 South First Street
133 Franklin Street
120 North First Street
113 South Second Street
109 Public Square
401 South Spring Street
123 1/2 Franklin Street
76 Franklin Street
91 Strawberry Alley
85 Strawberry Alley
609 Main Street
120 South First Street
206 South First Street

Druggist
1001 Franklin Street

Furniture Stores
122 South First Street
400 Franklin Street
119 South First Street

Grocery Stores
537 Franklin Street
420 Union Street
1011 Franklin Street
93 Strawberry Alley

Hairdresser
133 1/2 Franklin Street

Livery Stable
322,324,326 Commerce Street

Doctor
520 Franklin Street

Saloons
113 South First
322 Commerce Street
97 Strawberry Alley
83 Strawberry Alley

Shoemakers
127 South First Street
106 South First Street
506 Franklin Street
117 North First Street

Cafes
105 South Fifth Street
111 South First Street
125 South First Street
87 Strawberry Alley
124 Strawberry Alley
115 North First Street

Pension Agent
533 Franklin Street

Fishmonger
617 Commerce Street

Carpenters
200 South Third Street
304 Union Street
607 Commerce Street
52 College Street
234 South Tenth Street

Nurse
513 Franklin Street

Engineer
25 Commerce Street

Plasterer
228 Tenth Street

Clerk
122 South First Street

Horseshoers
120 South First Street
206 South Third Street

Bricklayer
304 Union Street

Whitewasher
216 Tenth Street

Undertaker
119 South First Street

Colored School
Corner of Franklin and Tenth

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From: The Clarksville Gazette

16   BRICKLAYING

December 23,1821--Scruggs & Thomas. Having formed a co-partnership in the bricklaying business in the town of Clarksville and its vicinity--they respectfully solicit the patronage of the public and assure it, they will execute their work in a style inferior to none in the western county.

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From: Daily Leaf-Chronicle

17   SAILOR'S REST

December 24, 1896--J.J. Minor, a prominent young planter, reports that the village of Sailor's Rest will be supplied with telephone service by January 15, 1897.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

18   PALMYRA

April 12,1900--M.M. Hussey has been busy for a few days loading cross ties on the barges. There are a large number of ties here, and it will take several days to load them. Isham Davis is digging out a foundation for another house. From where it is located I suppose it will be a business house.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

19   HACKBERRY

February 12,1930--A net profit of $101.36 on the sale of eggs during the month of January was realized by Jarvis Lyle from his flock of 435 fowls after total expenses, including equipment, feed, and miscellaneous purchases, along with the loss of two hens, had been deducted.
Mr. Lyle sold 443½ dozen eggs for $168 and the family ate 25 dozen eggs which were included in the profits. The expenses included a feed bill of $37.50 along with equipment purchased and miscellaneous items which brought the total expenses to $72.70. The number of eggs gathered during January was 6,015, which averaged 13.9 eggs per hen during the month.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

20   MARION

December 2,1897--Our town is still on a boom. Mr. W.W. Wilcox has erected a new sawmill at his place and is sawing timber rapidly.
One of our merchants, Mr. J.P. Weakley, is erecting a handsome dwelling.
Rev. John L. Boaze has just closed a ten day’s result in much good. Prof. J.G. Harper’s school closes Friday next.
Hog killing is engaging some of our farmers’ attention. Rev. W.L. Dangerfield and W.D. Harper killed hogs yesterday.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

21   SALEM

March 3,1911--Edmondson Ferry was opened this morning with a newly equipped power-propelled boat. The ferry has been closed down some time on account of an accident to the boat several weeks ago caused by drift and high water. As now equipped the boat can be operated independent of buoys or cables and will no doubt be a source of considerable satisfaction and convenience to the people living on the south side of the river.
It has been fitted with an improved reversible twin-cylinder engine of the internal combustion type of sufficient power to handle loads of any size on any stage of water. The engine is of 11-horse power, geared to a paddle wheel by means of a steel link chain, the entire transmission of power from the engine to the paddle wheel being by means of this chain, no leather or composition belting being used. This is a new idea and an improvement in installing power in boats of this kind.
The idea of this connection was conceived and worded out by Mr. Louis F. Sickenberger of Clarksville, agent for the Ferro Machine & Foundry Company. The engine is a World's Standard Two Cycle. H.M. Cotton will operate the boat. It was installed at the Clarksville Wharf and attracted considerable attention, hundreds of persons visiting the boat while the work was in progress. The boat left the foot of Commerce Street yesterday afternoon and run without a halt under its own power to Edmondson Ferry against a strong current in one hour and forty minutes.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

22   SEARCY'S FERRY

January 13, 1877--Mr. H.T. Lyle has bought the stock of dry goods and groceries of Armstrong & Bros. Success to you, Henry.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

23   MINERAL RAILROAD

March 6,1888--C.W. Richardson and the gentlemen who have been viewing out the routes between Clarksville and the Northwestern Railroad at Dickson, returned Saturday.
The gentlemen went on horseback over the ground, going out by Frank Mill’s on Budd’s Creek, and contrary points, to the Northwestern, what is known as the ridge route. Returning, they left the Northwestern at Bon Air and came by Charlotte and near Cumberland Furnace, as it was only a viewing party, with no means of ascertaining altitudes except by the barometer. Mr. Richardson declines to express an opinion as to the relative merits of the two routes, preferring that the matter be accurately determined by a regular survey.
Yesterday morning, a Corps of Engineers went to Vernon Furnace for the purpose of beginning survey of the route. There were in the party John Marston of Louisville, division engineer of the L & N, C.W. Richardson, engineer in charge of the party, J.R. Neblett, transet; J.M. Dortch, level; Mr. Marlow, topographer; Paul Wyatt, rodman and a full complement of chainmen, axmen, etc., making seventeen men in all. They will go into camp near Vernon Creek Furnace above Hackberry. Their first work will be to survey the route by Charlotte and then to survey the ridge route. A thorough survey of the section will be made, which will consume several weeks.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

24   CLARKSVILLE

October 29,1889--B.F. Hardin opened up for business yesterday in the building corner of commerce & 3rd Street, opposite the Courthouse. He desires the LEAF to say that, as heretofore he will manufacture carriages and buggies. He is prepared to do work in a superior manner, and asks a share of public patronage. Look out for his advertisement in the LEAF. Hardin says judicious advertising and honest work will tell and he is correct.

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From: Clarksville Gazette

25   YELLOW CREEK

January 29, 1820--The subscriber wishes to engage a first rate distiller, one who can come well-recommended, will meet with liberal encouragement, by applying to our stillhouse on Yellow Creek. Samuel Craft and Nathan Peeples.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

26   TOBACCO

August 2,1889--J.R. Channel, of the Palmyra neighborhood, a good tobacco handler, has been selling good tobacco with I.H. & W.A. Shelby this season and has some of his best with that old reliable firm now.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

27   LOUISE

September 25,1909--A deed of trust was filed in the county registers office Friday afternoon by Burney Batson, a merchant of Louise, to satisfy liabilities aggregating about $4,500. Dancey Fort is named as trustee. In the transfer is a stock of general merchandise at Louise and accounts estimated at $1,500 and two houses and lots in Louise. Mr. Fort is authorized to take immediate possession of the property and sell same to the best advantage and apply the proceeds to the payment of the creditors who are named as follows:
Hurst Boillin & Co. - $250
Murrell Dibrell & Co. - $600
Kroman, Sawyer & Co. - $300
Harris-Davis & Co. of Nashville - $900
Elder-Conroy Co. - $100
Askew, Coulter-Owen Drug Co. - $100
W.A. Chambers & Co. - $500
Clarksville Ice & Coal Co. - $20
House Hat Co. - $85
Mrs. Agnes Batson - $1500
A.R. Mann - $45

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From: County Court Minutes

28   PUBLIC FERRY

March 1806--Henry Small gives bond to Stephen Cocke and John Marshall, his securities bound in sum of $2000 for keeping a public ferry across the Cumberland River at Clarksville.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

29   FARMERS’ ASSOCIATION

January 7,1908--A roll call was made of the districts and the following reports obtained:

District 13---Getting along well and all Hillbilly tobacco has been sold and delivered. Hillbillies are anxious to get in when books are opened.

District 17---Nothing new to report, tobacco stripping is slow.

District 18---Nothing new, Hillbillies have finished delivering.

District 19---One crop reported sold, but nothing definite.

District 20---No tobacco being sold. Mr. Joe Baggett reported that it had been reported that he had sold his tobacco which was untrue, that his son, who did not belong to the association, sold his crop in order that he could leave for another state.

District 22---Everything all right in this district.


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From:Account book of Hugh Allen

30   SHILOH

Hugh C, Allen's Account Book for Undertaking business for 1903
January
01--Wash Lewis
08--Charles Ferrell
11--Shad Martin
February
05--James Taylor
28--Jonathan Colton (or Cotton) ordered by J.M. Broome
March
02--J.A. Morgan
04--Bill (or Bell) Davis
April
03--Mr. Hayes
05--M.M. Hussey
May
09--Sam Jones (colored)
July
20--Marvin Sanders, paid by Cullom Harris
August
04--H.E. Allen
September
18--Tom Riley, paid by W.R. Bowers
November
7-- John Sykes
11--Tom Underwood
18--William Mickle heirs, paid by B.L. Weaver
December
06--Griff Schmittou
16--Thomas Mitchel
17--George Bryant

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

31   SAILORS’ REST

July 19,1887--On account of ill health, Major Minor has retired from the firm of Minor and Co. at Sailors’ Rest and the firm is now McFall and Lewis, gentlemen who are competent and will give the people around Sailors’ Rest a good stock of goods to select from.

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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

32   LONE OAK

October 6,1893--Rice Orgain has purchased the interest of the Southside Mercantile Company in the store at Lone Oak and is now sole owner of that business. Just about a year ago, he went to Lone Oak. He has built a nice cottage residence and otherwise improving this station on the Mineral.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

33   PALMYRA

June 19,1901--Swift & Ussery have finished work on their store house and have commenced to open their stock of goods. This will make five stores for Palmyra.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

34   MERCHANTS

May 17,1907--Merchants from south of the river attending the opening of W.A. Chambers & Co., a wholesale grocery, yesterday were:
S.I. Edmondson, Palmyra
R.H. Edmondson, Sailor's Rest
T.C. Harris, Hackberry
H.T. Hodges, Hackberry
Allen McCurstar, Hackberry
T.T. Harvey, Marion
Albert Harvey, Lone Oak
Schmittou Brothers, Shiloh
W.C. Harris Shiloh
R.L. Bailey, Marion
S.E. Neblett, Southside
J.M. Neblett, Southside
L.A. Dickson, Hackberry
J.D. Wall, Louise
R.N. McCaslin, Southside
C.F. Grant, Liverworth
A.P. Davis, Palmyra
I.K. Powers, Palmyra
E.L. Weakley, Palmyra
J.O. Myers, Palmyra
J.T. Weakley, Palmyra
Isham Baggett, Palmyra
W.R. Bowers, Palmyra
M.M. Hussey, Palmyra
Allen Baggett, Palmyra
Schmittou Brothers, Palmyra
H.C. Lyle, Southside

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

35   SOUTHSIDE

October 4,1900--A drug store will be started in Southside shortly by Drs. Neblett of that place and Vaughan of Louise. Dr. Vaughan will remove from Louise to Southside in the near future.

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From: Weekly Chronicle

36   ORGAIN’S CROSSROADS

July 26,1873--Messrs. Wesley Orgain and A.J. Allen have a building nearly completed for the purpose of engaging in the dry goods and grocery business, located about seven miles from the city, on the Searcy’s Ferry Road, at the point known as the Cross Roads. It is expected that a wagon and blacksmith shop will be erected there soon. It is also a good location for a tobacco factory, as nearly all the tobacco grown in the southern part of this county and that of Dickson County, passes to market by this point. Some of the citizens of that neighborhood believe that quite a village can be built up there. Success to all enterprise and improvement of this kind.

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From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

37   Businesses in Clarksville, 1886

Groceries--
C.M. Barker
E. Cross
Crusman & Howard
Cunningham Bros.
Dixon & Martin
Dority & Herndon
W.C. Hester
Hurst & Co.
A. Jackson
Keesee & Northington
Mrs. J.M. Kelty
T.V. Kilgore
G.W. Leigh
M. Matill
J.R. Sensing
E.H. Wilkinson
Wood & Abbott
Dry Goods--
Bloch Bros.
R.S. Broaddus
Coulter Bros.
Gerhart's
E. Glick
A.R. Hall & Son
Simon Katz
P. Sieber
R.W. Roach
S. Shyer
C.D. White
General Stores--
G. Eleazar
M. Gorham
J.W. Wade
Boots and Shoes--
Bowling & Wilson
A.R. Hall & Son
J.G. Joseph
Pitman & Lewis
China and Glass--
G.W. Hendrick
Kincannon, Son & Co.
J.F. Wood
Drugstores--
Lockert & Reynolds
S.B. Stewart
Owen Moore
Hardware--
J.S. Elder
Fox & Smith
Coal and Wood--
Bringhurst & Stacker
F.P. Gracey & Bro.(Mathew)
Millinery--
A.R. Hall & Son
Hodgeson & McGuire
The Misses McAllister
Mrs. W. Rosenfield
Harnessmakers--
George Washington Cooper
M.L. Joslin
John Young
Tobacco Salesmen--
Herndon, Young & Co.
Kendrick, Pettus & Co.
Warehouses--
Bailey
Central
Elephant
Gracey
Grange
People's
Smith & Anderson
Jewelers--
C.L. Cooke
L. Gauchat
T. Rohner
Mills--
Anchor
LaFayette
Meriwether & Gilmer
T.J. Munford
Planing Mills--
Smith, Clark & CO.
G.B. Wilson
Clarksville
Manufacturers--
Whitfield, Bates & CO.
I. Alward
J.B. Jarrell
Tailor--
A.B. Pugh
Furniture--
Qunitus Cincinnatus Atkinson
J.F. Couts
Photographers--
H.E. Dibble
J.W. McCormac
Blacksmiths--
C. Dinneen
W.M. Frazier
E. Gaisser & Son
M. Gorham
J. Henry
J. MacDonald
Steamboat Agents--
F.P. Gracey & Bro.
Physicians--
C.W. Bailey
N.L. Carney
B.N. Herring
T.D. Johnson
J.M. Larkin
C.E.L. McCauley
T.H.Marable
W.G. Patrick
A.M. Trawick
D.F. Wright

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From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

38   First National Bank of Clarksville

First stockholders:
George H. Warfield
Theodore Cobb
S.W. Dawson
Thomas F. Pettus
S.F. Beaumont
Joseph W. Edwards
Mrs. M.C. Allen
Benjamin Caudle
Henry Frech
W.P. Hume
J.P.Y. Whitfield

First board of directors:
S.F. Beaumont..president
George H. Warfield
Joseph W. Edwards
Guy W. Wines
Thomas F. Pettus

Cashier:
W.P. Hume

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From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

39   Franklin Bank

First stockholders:
T.F. Pettus
V.A. Garnett
P.C.Hambaugh
W.S. Poindexter

First board of directors:
T.F. Pettus
P.C. Hambaugh
W.S. Poindexter
V.A. Garnett

Cashier:
W.S. Poindexter

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From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

40   Clarksville National Bank

First stockholders:
B.O. Keesee
H.C. Merritt
John F. House
C.G. Smith
R.H. Williams

President:
B.O.Keesee, then H.C. Merritt

Cashier:
Joseph E. Broadus, then A. Howell

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From: History of Tennessee Illustrated

41   Farmers and Merchants Bank

First board of directors:
H.H. Lurton..president
James H. Smith..vice-president
John W. Faxon..cashier
T. Herndon
R.Y. Johnson
B.F. Gill
T.J. Edwards
C.T. Young
G.W. Jessup
J.J. Garrott
Frank T. Hodgson..bookkeeper

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From: Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

42   SALEM

October 26,1891--Wiley Rose of the Seven-Mile Island Ferry has launched his new ferry boat. It is of the best, if not the very best, boat of the kind ever built on the Cumberland River. He has spared neither time nor expense on it and has introduced important improvements in its construction which will not only add to its strength, but will add greatly to its durability. He has got what he wanted by the liberal use of putty, white lead, red paint, coal tar, spike nails, and iron fenders on the gunnels. As soon as he can get the deck on and the machinery in he will run it.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

43   MCALLISTER’S CROSSROADS

February 6,1883--Mr. T.H. Batson of Batson's Store was in the city yesterday and made us a pleasant call. Mr. Batson has recently bought out his partner, Mr. Dillon, in the mercantile business and is now going it alone. He keeps a good stock, deals justly by his customers and as a natural consequence is in a flourishing condition.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

44   SAILOR’S REST

December 5,1913--The L&N commenced the construction of 500 feet more of side track at Sailor's Rest today. The new track has been surveyed at the south end of the siding already there. The grading will be done by contractor Bob Nance, who is on the ground today with a large number of scrapers and mules.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

45   CORBANDALE

December 31,1906--N. R. Parchman and B. J. Corban will put in a ferry at Corbandale within the next few days. There has never been a public ferry at this point, notwithstanding a public highway comes into the river from both sides at this point. The boats will be first class and large enough to carry the heaviest wagons and teams.

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From: The Corn Sheller

46   BOARDING HOUSES

Some boarding houses in Clarksville in 1859:
E.C. Collins on Franklin St.
L. Eddings on the corner of
Commerce and Second St.
Michael Woods
Mrs. James Grant
William H. May
M. Wilburn
W.B. Settle
Mrs. May

1884 boarding houses:
Mrs. Guinn
Mrs. Majors
Mrs. Hughes

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From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

47   PATENT

The Clarksville Fire Escape was patented Feb. 9, 1909 by Pasquale Nigro of Clarksville, Tennessee.

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From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

48   CLARKSVILLE

Leonardo and Vincent Nigro were confectioners at Nigro Bros., 2216 Franklin Street in 1898.

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From: Memorabilia of Montgomery County

49   TOBACCO

Zorn's Directory of Clarksville, 1895-96 lists Meriwether & Co., Tobacco Manufacturers,, 216 N. Front St. This company was made up of Will D. & Charles E. Meriwether and J.H. & E. P. Turnley.
Will D. Meriwether and family were living in a house on the corner of Commerce & Fifth Street, 103 S. Fifth.

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From: County Court Minutes

50   PUBLIC FERRY

June 24,1806 It is ordered that John Mosely have a license to keep a ferry across the Cumberland River at the mouth of Half-Pone Creek and that a road be cleared and kept up crossing at said ferry leading to Col. R.C. Napier's new furnace. And that John Stewart, Andrew Stewart, Isaac Weakley, Mathew Ryborn, Fendel Whitworth, Allen Hunter and Philman Whitworth view and mark the road.

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From: The River Counties

51   DENTIST

October 24,1863--H.M. Acree, Surgeon Dentist of Clarksville, Tennessee. Tenders his services to the citizens of the city and vicinity in the different branches of his profession. Office at his residence, near the Baptist Church.

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From: The River Counties

52   TRADE

July 1, 1820--I forewarn all persons from trading for a note I gave William Allen for one hundred and sixty dollars payable about the first of January next and executed about the first of April last. The consideration of the note has failed and I am determined not to pay the same.
John P. Epps.

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From: The Corn Sheller

53   TAVERNS

One of the first taverns in Clarksville was in the home of Samuel Stout in 1790. Another was Joseph Patton's Stillhouse in District 6 near the Red River. It was a very popular place. In 1801, he sold his business to John Edmondson.
In 1810 Henry Small and Maj. Bailey operated a house of entertainment with bond of $5000 with influential citizens Theodore F. Bradford, James Elder and James B. Reynolds as securities.
In 1818, Martin and Napier operated a tavern where plays were alsopresented.
In 1821, the Clarksville Inn was in operation where Mr. J. Sauder's dancing school was held.

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From: The Corn Sheller

54   HOTELS

There was a hotel on the north side of Public Square, built around 1825 and owned by P. Gibson. In 1836 it was sold to G.A. Davie and Marion Hambrough. In 1857 it was sold to S.R. Moore, formerly of Russellville. He renovated it according to plans designed by W.D. Churchill, an architect and builder in Clarksville.

The Northington House was where the Leaf-Chronicle building now stands. It was owned by Samuel Northington.

The Arlington House was built in 1888 and owned by Bennett W. Searcy.

The Magnolia House was at 306 Franklin St. Owned by Mrs. M.A. Leigh, Dr. Slayden had his office in a small building on the lawn.

The European Hotel was on Franklin St., owned by Samuel Hodgson.

The Harris Hotel was on the south side of Franklin St. Owned by George Harris and managed by his son, Arthur. The desk clerk was H.R. Whitfield.

The Royal York was owned by Howard Gossett.

The Idaho Springs Hotel at Dunbar Cave was built in 1858 and owned by Prof. J.A. Tate. In 1884 it was sold to Col. A.G. Goodlett and H.C. Merritt.

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From: The River Counties

55   TANNING AND CURRYING

May 27, 1820--Matthew Dougherty has just commenced the tanning and curing business, three miles east of Clarksville at the place where Joseph Talkington formerly carried on trade.

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From: County Court Minutes

56   FIRST RECORDED TAVERN

The first recorded tavern in Clarksville--Henry Small and John Locke gave security bond with Stephen Locke and Edward Leech in the sum of $500.

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From: Tennessee Watchman

57   FERRY ACROSS THE CUMBERLAND

March 25, 1806---Absolom Tribble is allowed to keep a ferry across the Cumberland River at the place formerly known as Merrick's Ferry. He gives Isham Trotter and David Prichard his securities bound in the sum of $2000.

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From: Clarksville Jeffersonian

58   IRON WORKS FOR SALE

January 8,1853--Pursuant to a decree of the Chancery Court at Charlotte, at September Term, 1852, in the case ex-parte the executors and devisees of Robert West deceased, the undersigned will sell to the highest bidder at Sailor's Rest Furnace, on the 3rd day of November next, the Sailor's Rest Furnace & Jackson Forge, together with the lands attached thereto consisting of about 15,000 acres. These iron works are situated on Yellow Creek in Dickson and Montgomery Counties in the state of Tennessee, and have attached to them at both places saw and grist mills, the whole having been recently refitted, and now in complete order for operation. Both furnace and forge are propelled by waterpower, which is sufficient to blow the furnace the year round and the forge at least two thirds of the year. They are situated about three miles apart and about eight or ten miles from the Cumberland River.
This property will be sold on a credit one, two, three, four, and five years, in equal annual installments and notes with approved security will be required and a lien retained to secure the purchase money. The object of the sale is a distribution among those interested.
John C. Collier, Commissioner

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From: The River Counties

59   DENTIST

January 1864--Dr. D. G. Simmons proffers his professional services to the citizens of the city and vicinity of Clarksville. Office on Franklin Street, over S.M. Parker's store. Residence on Franklin Street on the same side and two doors west of the Methodist Church.

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From: The River Counties

60   TAILOR SHOP

February 28,1839--J. T. and J. Conley have removed their tailor shop to Achey's old stand, a few doors up the square and nearly opposite the courthouse.

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From: The River Counties

61   RETURNING DOCTOR

January 30, 1840--Dr. Cooper, having returned to Clarksville, offers his professional services to its citizens and those of the vicinity. His residence is on Franklin Street, next door above the Masonic Hall; his office nearly opposite the residence of Dr. Lewis King.

From: The 83rd Illinoisan
March 17, 1865--Dr. Cooper, Post Surgeon, has been severely afflicted for some weeks past. We are pleased to learn this morning that he is convalescing and trust he will soon regain his wonted health and be able to discharge the numerous and weighty duties of his position.

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From: The Corn Sheller

62   BANKS

Planters Bank opened in 1835
President: Henry F. Beaumont
Cashier: John C. Miller
after his death:
A.A. McLean; in 1842, William Hume

Stockholders:
H.F. Beaumont
James B. Reynolds
John Poston
Charles Minor
Andrew Vance
William Gray

A branch was opened in 1859 on Franklin and Public Square.
Directors:
H.F. Beaumont
William Broaddus
Samuel B. Seat
William M. Stewart
R.S. Moore
Thomas McCulloch
W.T. Dortch
John G. McKoin
John F. House
William B. Munford

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Bank of Tennessee opened in 1838

President: Thomas W. Barksdale
Cashier: E.B. Roche

In 1844:
President: John H. Poston
Cashier: Thomas W. Barksdale

In 1859:
President: R.W. Humphreys
Cashier: Benjamin H. Wisdom
Directors:
R.W. Humphreys
Joshua Elder
J.T. Johnson
R.F. Ferguson
Oliver M. Blackman
Thomas J. Munford
T.B. Garin
J.M. Scarbrough
R. McNeilly
Joshua Elder
W.B. Munford
David N. Kennedy

~~~~~~~~~~

Bank of America opened in 1856
President: Col. Montgomery D. Davie
Cashier: John F. Barnes; also at one time Charles M. Hite
Stockholders:
John Barnes
S. Philpott
James A. Trice
C.D. West
William A. Mason
Dr. Walter Drane
G. A. Henry
James F. Quarles
James H. Williams

In 1859:
Col. Davie, President
Capt. R.Y. Johnson

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Northern Bank of Tennessee opened in 1854 on Public Square

President: David N. Kennedy
Cashier: James L. Glenn
After the Civil War, John W. Faxon, Assistant Cashier


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From: The Corn Sheller

63   LOCAL WRITER

Martin Van Buren Ingram was founder and publisher of The Clarksville Tobacco Leaf in 1869 and of The Clarksville Democrat in 1882. He wrote the book "Tales of the Bell Witch". The Ingram family tombstone in Greenwood has for many years been the victim of bizarre mishaps, knocking the top off. Each time it is put back in place, something knocks it off again.

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From: The Corn Sheller

64   GRACE CHAPEL

In the community of Grace Chapel there was a store owned by L.C. Darnell and Tom Nichols, later by Cecil Senseney. A blacksmith shop owned by Horace Foster and a store owned by C.C. Cornell.
Grace Chapel was on the Kentucky state line on what is now Ft. Campbell. It was east of Piney Fork Creek, north of West Creek on the Bridgewater Mill Road.

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From: The Corn Sheller

65   CLARENCE SAUNDERS

Clarence Saunders, supermarket genius, came from Hackberry during the early 1900's with only 5 years of schooling. He was employed by Hurst-Boillin as a traveling salesman. In 1916 he went to Memphis and opened the first Piggly-Wiggly.

PALMYRA
From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

February 20,1925--A Palmyra landmark to which more of less interest has been attached in connection with the financial and business experience of Clarence Saunders, inventor of the Piggly Wiggly merchandising system and now owner and operator of the “Clarence Saunders” systems, is passing. The old frame store building known as the Albritton Storehouse, in which Saunders had his first mercantile experience as a county lad of fifteen, is being razed by its present owner, G.W. Dinsmore, a member of the Montgomery County Court and part owner in the Palmyra Lime Works. The ground on which the historical building stands will be part of a community park site, which the citizens of Palmyra propose to equip.
It is said that Saunders began in the grocery business in the building, which was occupied by Burrell W. Owens. His salary to start was $1 per week. After about eight years on this job, he accepted a position with Hurst-Boillin Company, Wholesalers of this city, which he held until his family moved to Memphis, where he secured another grocery position. Later he became manager and then owner of the Memphis store. It was still later that he put the Piggly Wiggly system into operation.

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From: The Corn Sheller

66   MICAJAH HENRY CLARK

Micajah Henry Clark, tobacconist, lived on Madison St. near the site of the Post Office. He was a Captain, a confidential clerk to President Jefferson Davis during the last days of the war. He was responsible for the gold supply and was the last acting Treasurer of the Confederacy. He is buried in Greenwood Cemetery.

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From: The Corn Sheller

67   GRACEY STREET

Gracey Street was named after the Gracey Brothers, Frank and Matt, who had a wide reputation on the Cumberland, known for their wharf boat business. They also operated a steamboat named "Julian Gracey" after Frank's son.

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From: Memorabilia of Clarksville

68   First Doctor and Lawyer in Clarksville

In 1806, Dr. Maxwell Sharp was the first licensed physician in Clarksville. In 1810, George Simpson was the first practicing attorney in Clarksville that had completed law school.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

69   SOUTHSIDE

February 25,1919--Mr. L.S. Batson spent several days at Louise last week invoicing the stock of merchandise of Harris and Batson.

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From: Evening Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

70   THE SOUTH SIDE

April 25, 1891---John R. Ussery speaks encouragingly for the south side. The people are growing more hopeful and are looking to a very bright future. He speaks of the unknown mineral wealth in those hills, and the fine forest timber that is coming into market, besides the value of the farming lands that have never been appreciated. These lands properly managed produce the finest quality of tobacco. Bluegrass is a natural growth and covers every hillside; if let alone, it makes the finest, healthiest sheep range in the world.
The people over there want a bridge over Cumberland River, and Mr. Ussery thinks one located near Searcy's Ferry would about accommodate the whole south side. He says the people over there pay at least $6000 a years tolls to get to Clarksville, and many things that would be marketed are lost because it will not justify the toll expenses. The tolls paid by the south side people alone would more than pay the interest on the cost of a bridge. They are tired of paying tolls and would prefer paying interest in the shape of taxes a while. The bridge question is going to be a live one; the people all over the county are coming around in favor of freeing all bridges and spanning the Cumberland.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

71   PALMYRA

January 11,1867--The co-partnership herefore existing between W.B. Russell & Son is this day dissolved by mutual consent. Hereafter, I will act as agent for William G. Russell, also as general agent for R. Eldridge & Co. I now offer shingles, lumber, and whiskey at greatly reduced prices, for cash. I will pay cash for 2,000 to 5,000 bushels of corn, delivered to Palmyra, Tennessee, within a very short time.
W.B. Russell, Agent

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

72   BRIDGES

March 24,1917--A meeting of Montgomery Countians, Southsiders to a large extent, was held at the court house this afternoon at 2:00 for the purpose of further discussing and arousing interest in the movement to construct two bridges across the Cumberland River. Esquire Jim Broome of Hackberry presided. Among those present were a number of Clarksville merchants, who gave their endorsement to provide better transportation facilities across the Cumberland River.

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From: Montgomery County Records

73   DISTRICT 12

1836 Tax List of District 12
Robert Baxter........................5,582 ac.......10 slaves
Baxter & Hicks......................................32 slaves
Ballum Bull...........................128 ac........
William C. & C. Batson................333 ac.........2 slaves
Thomas & C. Batson....................333 ac.........3 slaves
Biler Bowe............................311 ac.........
William L. Brown.......................40 ac.........
Anthony Collins.......................217 ac.........3 slaves
Samuel Crain...........................78 ac.........
James Crockett, Sr..................1,636 ac.........9 slaves
W.L. Dawson Heirs....................................4 slaves
Joseph Dickson........................730 ac.........3 slaves
Levi Eliazer..........................130 ac.........1 slave
Catharine Eliazer......................84 ac.........2 slaves
Olive Hodges..........................250 ac.........5 slaves
Isham Harris..........................100 ac.........
Simon Holmes...........................25½ ac........
Elizabeth Henry................... ...200 ac.........
Jessee R. Harris......................240 ac.........
Bedee Harrison................... ....116 ac.........2 slaves
Cary Harrison.........................489 ac.........7 slaves
James D. Harrison....................................2 slaves
Mary Harrison.........................430 ac.........7 slaves
Nancy Harrison.........................22 ac.........2 slaves
Polly Hightower......................................2 slaves
David Jones...........................512 ac.........1 slave
Drury Mathis..........................332 ac.........3 slaves
Thomas Mathis.........................111½ ac.......
John McCauley, Sr.....................540 ac.........5 slaves
Mathew McCauley.......................160 ac.........
Washington McLaughlan..................85 ac.........
Edward Mosely........................100 ac..........2 slaves
John S. Mosely.....................1,216 ac.........16 slaves
Jordan Neblett.......................200 ac.........
N.H. Nichols.........................150 ac..........2 slaves
John W. Porter........................30 ac..........
Soloman D. Ramey.....................359 ac..........
Samuel Smith.......................1,560 ac.........17 slaves
James Southerlin...................2,500 ac........
Samuel & John Stacker..............1,085............32 slaves
Stewart & Dick.....................4,286 ac..........3 slaves
Mitchel Trotter......................160 ac..........
John Walker..........................................2 slaves
Daniel Waller........................................4 slaves
Robert Waller........................306 ac.........10 slaves
Robert Weakley.......................212 ac........
William Williams.....................244 ac..........9 slaves
William R. Wyatt.....................145 ac..........3 slaves


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

74   CORBANDALE

January 26,1905--There is a prospect for a canning factory here. Some local stock and a lot have been subscribed and an expert will canvass the adjacent vicinity, and if sufficient contracts for produce can be made, the canning factory will be built.
Humphrey Woodenjaw

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From: Montgomery County Records

75   DISTRICT 12

1836 Tax List--White Polls District 12
Henry Austin,
Abraham Alley
Alexander Baxter
Robert B. Black
Jacob Bowe
Levi Bull
James Brock
John Brown
Jessee Bumpass
William Burger
David Burney
William L. Cannon
A. Cooper
John W. Costlow
William Crocket
James, Jr. Cunningham
Thomas Dennington
James H. Dick
David Dickson
John Dickson
William Ellis
Miles Fain
Daniel Fore
C.J. Furguson
Benjamin Good
Edward Green
James B. Green
Joseph Grimes
Daniel Hargrove
John D. Harper
David Henry
Daniel Hightower
James Hoages
Maximillion Hogg
James Hollis
Martin Jones
Benjamin W. Jones
Thomas Lee
Henry Lofland
James S. Lynch
John Marlow
Luke Marshall
William H. Mathews
James H. Mathis
Buckner Mathis
William McCauley
William Sr. McCauley
William Jr. Milon
Thomas Mockbee
H.H. Moore,
Benjamin Nichols
William H. Page
Gay Powel
Eaton Robertson
George Sly
Jefferson Smith
Issac Tiley
J. Wallis
John Weakley
John M. Wickham
William Williams
Hinnow Williams
John William
Roderrich P. Woodward


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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

76   RURAL SECTIONS WILL GET POWER

April 8,1930--Furnishing of electric current to Palmyra, Dotsonville, Sailor’s Rest, Corbandale, Hackberry, Shiloh, Marion, Hematite, and other rural community town is to be the business of the Palmyra Power Company, Inc., headed by L.E. Stone of Erin and G. Wallace Dinsmore of Palmyra.
Permission for the construction of poles and lines along county highways was granted the concern by the quarterly court Monday and it will now make application to the state railroad and public utilities commission for further permits.
The power generating plant is to be constructed at Palmyra.
The same concern constructed the Erin and Dover light plants and it now operates the Erin Waterworks systems.

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From: Historical Sketches of Port Royal

77   PORT ROYAL SAWMILL

By 1802, there was a sawmill in Port Royal owned by Joseph Woolfolk. He sold half interest in it to Cordal Norfleet who retained his interest until his death in 1834.
Norfleet's 1/2 interest was sold to Ephraim Watkins and Milton Bourne. Grain was being ground there at that time and it was called "Woolfolk & Norfleet's Mill".
Joseph Woolfolk died and his 1/2 interest was sold to Cave Johnson and Dr. George B. Hopson, who also bought part of Woolfolk's estate which they later sold to Bourne & Watkins in 1835.
Ephraim Watkins sold his portion of the mill to Milton Bourne in December, 1838. Bourne mortgaged it to Peter Peacher who transferred the property to the Bank of Tennessee in 1844.
In later years it was owned by William Weatherford and Jacob Thomas Darden.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

78   PALMYRA

March 8,1899--Mr. West Wilson, our accommodating ferryman, has put in a new boat and is now prepared to cross the people in safety.

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From: Historical Sketches of Port Royal

79   PORT ROYAL

In 1904 the Cumberland Telephone Co. opened an exchange in Cotter's Store in Port Royal. Manager was C.A. Lindsey Day operator, Ella D. Gaines Night operator, J. Mallory Sawyer, also the service man. Switchboard installed by John Trenholm.

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From: Clarksville Weekly Chronicle

80   SALEM

April 12,1873--On last Monday the County Clerk granted Mr. William Edmondson the right to put in a ferry boat on the Cumberland River between Searcy’s and the Seven-Mile Ferry and also to open a road to the same. The road runs near the residence of Mr. W.M. Stewart and through the McReynolds bottom crossing the river about 3/4 of a mile below the Seven-Mile Island. From the river on the south side there is a gradual ascent leading to the top of the ridge from which point a ridge route may be taken in almost any direction avoiding all heavy hills. This road, when opened, will prove a great convenience to the Southsiders, particularly in delivery of their tobacco during the winter season, as the river can be crossed at this point when so high as to make it impossible to cross at anywhere else in this vicinity.

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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

81   SHILOH

March 18,1892--Will Shannon with a team has gone to Hopkinsville to work on the Ohio Valley.

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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

82   SHILOH

August 18,1892--W.W. Williamson gave Cumberland City a business visit this week.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

83   SOUTHSIDE

June 11,1889--Carney Lyle returned several days ago from the Lebanon Law School where he graduated, being one of a class of 26 graduates. After a rest from his arduous studies, he proposes to hang out his shingle and devote himself to the practice of law.

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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf

84   ORE

April 13,1892--Ben Harris brought in a sample of needle ore from his ore bank on the south side. Mr. Harris has a small mountain of this ore, some 150 to 200 feet high, about 300 yards wide and a half mile long. The ore is said to consist of 90% pr pure metal in all size lumps and one can’t stick a pick into the bank without striking ore. This bank is directly on the Mineral Railroad, near the big cut, and only ten miles from town. Mr. Harris is making arrangements to commence mining if he can find sale for the ore.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

85   PALMYRA

August 2,1939--S.W. Ellis, of near Palmyra, has invented a treatment for dark tobacco which he claims will prevent suckers from growing, add some 50% to the weight of the crop and make a much finer quality of leaf. He has applied for a patent.
Ellis told a Leaf Chronicle reporter this morning, that after some study and trials, he, in 1938, invented a “medicine” which stopped the growth of suckers on dark tobacco. He reported he used it last year on a few plants of tobacco with startling results. The liquid, he said, not only stopped the growth of suckers, but hastened the maturity of the plant and prevented wildfire. The tobacco weighed some 400 more pounds per acre more than that on which the liquid was not used.
This year Mr. Ellis is demonstrating on half an acre of dark tobacco grown by Erwin Coleman on the farm of Sidney Shannon. The farm is located on the Palmyra-Cumberland City road near the Stewart County line. He invites farmers and tobacconists interested in the experiment to visit the field.
The treatment, according to the inventor, is applied by a spray which he also invented. The medicine is shot over the suckers and the plant food goes to the leaf, he said.
Speaking of the demonstration tobacco, Mr. Ellis said it would be ready to cut in about ten days or much earlier than the remainder of the tobacco.
The application does not help burley. Mr. Ellis said, since it makes the leaf too heavy for cigarette use.
Mr. Ellis refused to divulge the formula he used in making the liquid, saying he had applied for a patent and would not even “give away a spoonful” of it until the patent is received.

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From: Evening Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

86   MINERAL RAILROAD

November 3,1890--Masters Munday and McTighe, contractors on the Mineral Road, were in the city this morning on business. They are pushing the work of construction with all possible energy. They have 250 teams and 500 men employed on the Dickson end, working this way, and 150 teams and 400 men on this end.
The grading on the Dickson end will be completed to Cumberland Furnace in about 20 days, when all the force will be brought to this end. The ties and rails will be laid on the far end and the cars running to Cumberland Furnace by January 1, hauling out ore from the Cumberland Furnace banks for the Southern Iron Company at Nashville. The road will be finished from this end to Louise by April 1, and to the county line by May 1. By that time, the Gracey-Woodward Furnace will be ready to receive ore and commence operations.

November 18,1890--Paul Wyatt returned from a trip to Illinois, where he went to employ tie men for work on the mineral railroad, bringing with him some 12 or 15 hewers.
It takes 108,000 ties for the road, and the work of laying ties and also placing the iron has commenced.
Twenty-five more good working days will finish the road from Dickson to the Cumberland Furnace property, where the Southern Iron Company will begin hauling out 175 tons of washed ore per day. This ore will go to Chattanooga to be made into steel.
See? This ore naturally should come to Clarksville, where it could be worked much cheaper and would find cheaper transportation to market after being made into steel. But for Captain F.P. Gracey’s prompt and timely action in purchasing a large body of iron land on the south side, the iron industry would have been lost to Clarksville. As matters stand, we have 100 years’ supply of rich ore to run several furnaces, and it is a plain case if the Southern Iron Company can make money hauling it to Chattanooga, we can make more money manufacturing it here.

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From: The Chronicle

87   EDMONDSON FERRY

July 4,1874--Mr. William Edmondson is having a new horse-power ferry boat built and will soon have it ready for use. His ferry is located about 1/2 mile below the Seven Mile Island. To reach this point from the city, you will go by the farms of William M. Stewart, W.O. McReynolds and that of the late John Stacker. It is an accessible route at all times and will doubtless secure a great amount of travel.

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From: Historical Sketches of Port Royal

88   BUSINESS IN PORT ROYAL

Robert Edmonston built a mill at the mouth of Parson's Creek (now Passenger Creek).
Dr. George B. Hopson built a mill on Sulphur Fork about 1/4 mi. from Red River.
R.L. Reding had a broom factory. He won a Gold Medal at the World's Fair in St. Louis in 1904 for his brooms. He became known nationwide. He employed his family and Frank and Dude Ford.
Milton Bourne owned a furniture and coffin factory.
Tom Dortch was a shoemaker in 1877.
Mr. Harden ran a tanyard in 1816.
Pray Whipple had a blacksmith shop in 1816.
Dr. George B. Hopson ran the ferry.

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From: Daily Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

89   PALMYRA

June 29,1893--People are prone to grumble about hard times but when the bare facts are known, the times are not as hard as they are described in the country. Sam Wickham, the well-known market man from the Palmyra country, came to town this morning with a great big load of spring chickens. He had over 200 on his wagon and said it was an average load. He makes a trip of this kind every week in the year and allowing him 200 chickens to the load and averaging them at $2 per dozen, it will be seen that in the course of a year he scatters over $1,500 over this county for chickens. There are a dozen or more market men who do just as good business in this line and when the egg and butter money is added, it will be seen that several thousand dollars are paid out to the people in this way. Mr. Wickham says he finds more money in the country now everywhere he goes than he has seen for several years and that the people are not starving.

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From: Evening Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

90   THE SOUTH SIDE

April 25, 1891---The work on the Mineral Railroad is moving ahead now with a rush. With good weather and no mishaps, Capt. Cobb says the whole line will be pushed through to Dickson by the first of July, when the hills over there will be full of miners with their picks digging out the valuable metal and the Gracey-Woodard Furnace will start up. putting new life into everything about Clarksville. The switch to Cumberland Furnace will be finished within the next thirty or forty days when the Southern Iron Company will commence hauling out ore over the Dickson end of the road for the Nashville Furnace, and will also commence building a new furnace on the modern plans on the old Cumberland site. Indeed things begin to look promising for a boom and the people of Clarksville should be getting in readiness for it.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

91   SOUTHSIDE

December 6,1919--Well, we must hand a bouquet to the Christian-Todd Telephone Company for the installation of a new and up-to-date switchboard in the Southside local office which has greatly improved the service at this place. Our general manager, Mr. S.E. Williams, is very much elated over the fact that he can serve his patrons more satisfactorily with the nice equipment than was possible with the old mightily worn out board that should have been in the trash pile years ago. There is room for more improvement in the office as to the appearance and sanitary conditions as well as accommodations. The furniture consists of a box or nail keg for a patron to sit on while waiting on a long distance call. The telephone company has commenced a move in the right direction in the new equipment and we hope they don’t stop until they improve the interior appearance of the office and equip with up-to-date furniture so it will cease to have the appearance of a country sawmill office. Your correspondent has had occasions recently to visit several sub-exchanges in this as well as other counties. He found these offices more presentable and better equipped than the Southside office.

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From: Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf Chronicle

92   PALMYRA

March 21,1893--Palmyra has been trying for a long time to get there and stay there, but so far has failed to do either, and now she is to make another effort in the way of inventions. It may not be known to the world at large, but such is the fact that Palmyra can boast of several inventions. First came Mr. Harvey with perpetual motion, Col. Brewster with a car coupler, and Irvin Davis with combination plow. If these gentlemen succeed in their efforts it will greatly increase the business and financial standing of Palmyra.
The failure of some of our business men have crippled the prosperity of our town, and wrought hardships for those employed in the works here. But I am glad to see that arrangements have been made and the lime works are in operation again.
Mr. William Lee has taken interest in Dr. Eldridge’s mill and shingle factory. The new firm has put in additional machinery and are turning out shingles by the thousands every day. One business and one dwelling house has been built lately and business is improving as spring opens.
By: C.A. Barns

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

93   MEDICAL EXPERIMENT
August 16,1889--Dr. T.H. Marable made a test of the Brown-Sequard ???? on James Solomon, Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Solomon has been paralyzed on one side for more than a year. Taking the glands of a young lamb Dr. Marable extracted the fluid here from by triturating. The first injection, consisting of one drachma was thrown into the upper arm on the paralyzed side. In fifteen minutes another drachma was thrown into the arm, and in fifteen minutes more a drachma was thrown into the leg. The first two injections were not noticed by the patient. The last produced a ???? sensation of pain. Thursday morning there was a warmth and glow noticed on the paralyzed side, whereas it had remained cold before. No further effect was noted.

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From: Cabins To Castles

94   MT. CARMEL

Jack Gardner used to operate a general store at Mt. Carmel. His father was Alfred W. Gardner who lived April 4, 1868 to January 3, 1942.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

95   SOUTHSIDE

July 14,1904--The charter of the Bank of Southside Montgomery County, was registered by the Secretary of State Morton today. The capital stock is $8,000 and the incorporators are G.M. Hunter, Edgar Orgain, H.A. Nesbitt, H.C. Lyle, G.E. Vaughn, and J.B. Trotter.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

96   PALMYRA

July 3,1899--Some ore banks have been discovered on the farm belonging to Dr. Eldridge near Palmyra. The extent of the banks is not yet fully known, but it is believed they contain iron ore of fine quality in great quantities. A dozen men are now opening the beds. The ore will be shipped to the Helen Furnace.

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From: Clarksville Leaf Chronicle

97   ANTIOCH

August 3,1905--R.E. Chambers, who for some while has been running a saw mill near Antioch, has taken down his mill and shipped it last night together with all his livestock to Georgia where he will cut a big lot of timber. Mr. Chambers and family will follow tomorrow.

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From: Clarksville Semi-Weekly Tobacco Leaf

98   SHILOH

May 21,1880--Mr. John W. Davenport, of Shiloh, in District 20 of this county, has obtained a patent on a Shingle Machine of his own invention, and now has the machine on exhibition at the Nashville Centennial.

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From: The Chronicle

99   TURNPIKE MEETING

July 15,1859--We understand that there is to be a turnpike meeting and barbecue at Slayden’s Store, in Dickson County, on Saturday the 23rd for the purpose of getting up stock to build a turnpike from Charlotte to this place and from a point of intersection to Palmyra. This is one of the most important roads that we could build and we hope the people will go to work and build it at once.
The following gentlemen are expected to make speeches on the occasion:
William A. Quarles
J.O. Shakleford
N.H. Allen
Mrs. McNeily
Mrs. Collier
Messrs. McNeily and Collier are from Charlotte.

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From: Daily Leaf Chronicle

100   SOUTHSIDE

December 23,1910--A committee of citizens from the progressive little town of Southside are in Clarksville today at conference with Judge Tyler of the County Court concerning a free ferry at Shelton’s landing to be owned and operated jointly by Montgomery County and the Tennessee Central Railroad.




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