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FAMILY OF HIRAM ESTES AND LUCY RICHARDSON

HIRAM M. ESTES, SENIOR was born about 1797 in Virginia, and died about November 1854 in Navarro County, Texas. He married LUCY RICHARDSON April 15, 1819 in Franklin County, Missouri, daughter of DANIEL RICHARDSON and NANCY ESTES. She was born about 1799 in Madison County, Kentucky, and died July 17, 1845 in Bowie/Cass County, Texas-per daughter Lucinda's Bible could be 1847 or 1849.

Notes for HIRAM M. ESTES, SENIOR:

FROM OLD NORTHWEST TEXAS-HISTORICAL-STATISTICAL-BIOGRAPHICAL, VOLUME I-B NAVARRO COUNTY 1846-1860 COMPILED BY NANCY SAMUELS AND BARBARA KNOX, PUBLISHED BY THE FORT WORTH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

"Arrived in Texas 1846-1847 from Missouri; registered his brand April 1847 in Navarro County, Texas; appears on the NCTxR1 1847; not found on 1846 Texas TxR1. Was born about 1797 in Virginia; is said to have been in Missouri by 1820. One source states that Hiram Estes married his first wife Lucy who was born about 1800-1810, and may have married his second wife, Penina Farmer in 1837, and that on the 1830 census of Franklin County, Missouri he had 4 sons and 5 daughters. If his age is correct (per 1850 census) and wife #1 was born about 1800, they would have had to hurry to have 9 children by 1830! He died November 1854 in Navarro County, Texas. 187 acres of his 3rd Class certificate was patented September 12, 1856, probably by his heirs northeast of Spring Hill, in a corner of the Thomas Wright survey. Known probable, possible children (an analysis):

 

Aaron Estes

George H. Estes

Fannie Estes Margaret H. Estes
Annie J. Estes Ellen W. Estes
(Son)? Estes Serena/Lerena/Larenia? Estes
(This is where I believe M. Lucinda fits in) Teresa Sebasta Estes
Unisa? Estes Edward B. Estes

 

ADDITIONAL CHILDREN AND DATES FROM FAMILY GROUP SHEET SENT TO BY NEWTON COUNTY, MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY.   SOURCES LISTED:

1. Franklin County, MO marriage records.

2. Newton County, MO marriage records

3. 1830 census of Franklin County, MO; 1840 of Newton County, MO census; censuses of Kendall, Hays, Kerr, Navarro and Hill Counties, TX of 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880

4. Death certificate of Ellen W. Estes Crain

5. Widow pension of Missouri Estes Patton

6. Estate record of Hiram M. Estes, Senior, Navarro County, TX

7. Letters of Aaron D. Estes to Elizabeth Wilson Estes, his wife.

8. Will of Daniel Richardson, Franklin County, MO

9. Bible record of M. Lucinda Estes Howard

Located in the Estes-Williams papers at the Texas Collection, Carroll Library located at Baylor University in Folder 7 of 7, is receipt for taxes paid by Hiram Estes in 1836 for Barry County, Mo.

ACCORDING TO INFORMATION SENT TO ANITA ADLER BY DESCENDANT OF SERENA ESTES

Hiram and Lucy were married by R.H. Randolph, Elder C.C. (Church of Christ or Christian Church). Copy was obtained by Mrs. Ferguson from the Recorder of Deeds, Union, Franklin County, Missouri. Listed in Book A, p. 1 of Deed records?

CHILDREN OF HIRAM ESTES AND LUCY RICHARDSON

 

HIRAM S. ESTES

Notes for HIRAM S. ESTES, JUNIOR:

Only an affidavit filed in Hill County, Texas to clear up a title to land that Narcissus Jane Estes (daughter of Aaron) and her husband Leonard H. Williams, Jr. wished to sell names this child of Hiram's.  This child is not named in Hiram Estes' probate, which is on file at the Navarro County, Texas courthouse.

 Other references to this Hiram Junior is in "Pioneers of the Six Bulls" by the Newton County, Missouri Historical Society.  In that series of volumes there is a family record said to be that of Hiram, born 1797 Virginia, which lists a Hiram Junior.  It was submitted by Li Ann Carter.

 Also, Hiram Junior is mentioned in Navarro County, Texas court records naming the men appointed to work in the county roads in 1848-1850.  This information was obtained from "Old Northwest Texas, 1846-1860, Statistical-Historical-Biographical, Navarro County, Texas" compiled by Nancy Timmons Samuels and Barbara Knox, published by Fort Worth Genealogical Society, 1980.

 Apparently this Hiram did exist, as per Lucinda Estes Reed's Bible - gives death of Hiram S. Estes appears to be 1849.  The ink is very dim on the date and therefore difficult to ascertain absolutely.

 

FAMILY OF AARON R. ESTES AND ELIZABETH L. WILSON

 

AARON R. ESTES was born May 10, 1820 in Boueff, Franklin County, Missouri and died shortly after September 01, 1864. He was severely wounded in the right breast at Jonesboro, Clayton County, Georgia and is likely buried in an unmarked grave at the Pat Cleburne Cemetery in downtown Jonesboro. He has a memorial C.S.A. marker at Mt. Antioch Cemetery in Limestone County, Texas. He married ELIZABETH LUCRETIA/LUCY WILSON November 01, 1838 in Morgan County, Missouri, daughter of JAMES WILSON and ELIZABETH FOX. (Her parents havenít been proven.) She was born July 24, 1822 in Alabama. Her middle name is per a tavern receipt in Estes papers at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. She died September 10, 1878 in Old Mt. Calm, Limestone County, Texas and is buried at Mt. Antioch Cemetery in Limestone County, Texas

Notes for AARON R. ESTES:

TAKEN FROM OLD NORTHWEST TEXAS-HISTORICAL-STATISTICAL-BIOGRAPHICAL, VOLUME I-B NAVARRO COUNTY TEXAS 1846-1860 COMPILED BY NANCY SAMUELS AND BARBARA KNOX, PUBLISHED BY THE FORT NORTH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY.

"Aaron Estes joined the Confederate States of America army during the Civil War and died September 1, 1864 at Jonesboro, Georgia in the Battle of Atlanta. They lived in Navarro County in 1850, in Hill County in 1860; Elizabeth and the children lived in Hill County-Precinct 5 in 1870."

It is sad to say that Aaron survived the most of the Civil War, only to die on the next of last day of the Battle of Atlanta (the entire campaign having lasted from May through September 2, 1864 - this was Sherman's march to the sea.)

There is at least a government marker in the Mt. Antioch Cemetery, Limestone County, three miles from the Hill/Limestone County line. He initially enlisted in the Volunteer Company of Mounted Men, Beat 8, organized August 10, 1861, 28th Brigade. His Confederate rank was Sergeant and his regiment was Company B, 10th Regiment, Texas Infantry, CSA, which became a part of Gen. Hiram Granburyís Brigade.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM LIMESTONE COUNTY CEMETERY SURVEYS PUBLISHED BY THE LIMESTONE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

TAKEN FROM THE HANDBOOK OF WACO AND McLENNAN COUNTY, TEXAS EDITED BY DAYTON KELLEY, 1972 PRINTED BY TEXIAN PRESS IN WACO.

"Aaron Estes, son of Hiram Estes, was born in Franklin County, Tennessee (sic), in 1820. He migrated to Newton County, Missouri, and later married Elizabeth Wilson of Alabama. They were the parents of nine children. In 1840, they moved to Texas in an ox-drawn wagon, traveling on the 'Texas Trail' through Indian Territory, and settled in Navarro County. They located near Sardis in McLennan County on 640 acres of land in 1848.

Estes helped to organize the first public school in the county and in 1854 was elected a trustee of District No. 4 in the first school election. He moved his family to Hill County in 1860 and joined the Confederate Army under R.Q. Mills in 1861. Captured in Arkansas Post on January 11, 1863, he was imprisoned at Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois, and exchanged at City Point, Virginia, on April 7, 1863. He joined Johnson's Army of Tennessee and participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Shiloh, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Atlanta and Jonesboro, where he was killed in infantry charge in 1864. He was buried at Jonesboro, Georgia."

BIBLIOGRAPHY: McLennan County Court Records; Bounty Records (MS., General Land Office); Service Records of Aaron Estes (National Archives, Washington, D.C.); Masonic Records, Waco, Texas. By Dan Williams

WRITTEN BY NANCY R. McKINLEY - GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER

LOAD YOUR WAGONS! WE'RE GOING TO TEXAS! AND EVERYONE'S INVITED!

"Young Aaron Estes and his wife, Elizabeth Wilson, heard this call and answered. Aaron hitched his oxen on the wagon. Elizabeth settled herself and small Narcissus on the wagon seat. Aaron walked along beside to guide them into their place in the wagon train, as they started down the open road to their great adventure. Aaron was thinking about Texas...about the free land...a new beginning...the challenge...the promise...

They traveled on the Texas Trail. Although it went through Indian Territory, it was reported to be the best and safest trail to Texas. It was known there was a trading post along the way owned by an Indian who was friendly to the emigrants and helped them along the way.

Aaron and Elizabeth settled on the rolling black land in the north central part of Navarro County in the Mercer Grant...built their first cabin home and covered it with buffalo hides. It was in this cabin that second son was born to them. Elisha Hamilton and they called him "Lish". Other children born to Aaron and Elizabeth were William Pembroke (affectionately known as Tobe), Ephraim Wilson (always called Tant), Sallie, Green Berry, Fredonia and Sanders Walker.

Aaron Estes was born May 10, 1820 on land settled by his father, Hiram Estes, in Franklin County, Missouri. Elizabeth Wilson was born July 21, 1822 in Missouri. They were married in Newton County, Missouri on November 1, 1838. Elizabeth was a marvelous type of frontier mother. She shared all the dangers of a remote frontier with her young husband in building a home for their family. Aaron was a large man of remarkable physical strength and unusual mental alertness and foresight as evidenced by the fact that he spoke several Indian languages, thus serving his community and the Republic of Texas as an interpreter. He met and became friends with Sam Houston. It is family legend that one time at a public meeting where President Sam Houston was speaking, a man sitting next to Aaron made a highly derogatory remark about Houston, where upon Aaron gave him his best right-handed shot, closing at least one of his eyes for some time.

In 1848, the Estesís located on 640 acres in Sardis on the Brazos River in central McLennan County. Here the deer were fat and there was wild turkey and silver fish from the pure sweet water of the Brazos. Aaron tended to his growing herd of cattle and horses, always caring for his growing family as well. He now concerned himself with the education in the community and helped organize the first public school in the county. In 1854, he was elected a trustee of District 4 in the first school election.

In 1860, he made another move. This time to Hill County. Tobe was old enough to help now and little Lish, though younger, was an eager worker. Aaron branded with the Cross H, a brand he started in 1850 and ran until his death. From that time, the brand was run by his wife until her death in 1878. From that time, the brand was run by the youngest son, Sanders Walker Estes.

In 1861, Aaron joined the Confederate Army under R.Q. Mills. He was captured at the Arkansas Post on January 11, 1863, and imprisoned at Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois. He was exchanged at City Point, Virginia on April 7, 1863, joined Johnson's Army of Tennessee and participated in the Battles of Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Atlanta and Jonesboro, where he was killed in an infantry charge on Sept. 1, 1864. He was 44 years old. Between battles and all free times, he 'took pen in hand' to write to his wife, always addressing his letters to 'Dere Wife and Children'. From the ditches near Marietta, Georgia, on June 22, 1864, he penned what may have been his last letter: 'Now, Mother, if we boath live I hope that wee will meete again. I am going to beg to git a ferlough and if I can't git it I have only got ten months to serve. Now Boys, I want you to take good care of the maires and let them have all the coalts they can, and git all the cattle that you can and I want you to reede your books all you can and learn to rite and learn to bee as wise as the serpent and harmless as the dove. Conduct yourselves rite in your young days and you will be happy when you git old. To my blessed little girls, I liken you unto an eggshell, when it is broken it can never be mended. So girls cant bee to cautious.....so no more onely remaines your un deserving but affectionate husband until death Aaron Estes'.

Aaron Estes came from Missouri to Texas and settled in Navarro County in the early 1840s. He spoke several Indian tongues and served the Republic of Texas in a civil capacity. (Reference "Texas" by Clarence R. Wharton, Vol. 5, p. 209) The records in the General Land Office show that Aaron Estes was awarded 640 acres of land. He located 290 acres, partly in Hill County and partly in McLennan County. "

 

CHILDREN OF AARON ESTES AND ELIZABETH WILSON

 

 

      

 

© L.L. Kight 2002