Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

My Southern Family

Mary BIRD

ABT 1680 - 1758

ID Number: I77166

  • RESIDENCE: Berks Co. PA and Parsons Creek, VA (1863 WVA)
  • BIRTH: ABT 1680
  • DEATH: 1758, near Parsons Creek, Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2938]

Family 1 : Antoni SANDUSKY SADOWSKI "the Immigrant"
  1. +Andrew SANDUSKY
Family 2 : Thomas PALMER

Notes


"After Antoni's death Mary nee Bird married Thomas Palmer a neighbor, in Christ Church, Philadelphia. They moved to (West) Virginia near Parsons Creek, Virginia where she died in 1758.


MARY PALMER WILL: In the Name of God Amen, the Fifteenth Day of October in the Year of our Lord God 1752.


I Mary Palmer of Patersons Creek in the County of Frederick and Collony of Virginia: being sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, Thanks be to given Unto God, Therefore, Calling to mind the mortallity of my body and knowing that is is Appointed for all men once to die, Do Make and Ordain this My Last Will and Testament: that is to say:
Principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it and for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a Christian-like and decent manner at the discression of my Executors, nothing doubting but at the General Resurrection I shall receive the same again by the Mighty Power of God and as touching such worldly estate: Wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, bequeath and dispose of the same in the following manner and form - Imprimis it is my will and I do order that in the first place all my just debts and funeral charges be paid and satisfied -


Item my will is that my daughter Ann Millar shall have my featherbed bolster and two pillows, three linnen sheets, one blanket and one coverlet and a little spinning wheel, a puter platter and puter bason and two pleats and nomorch button (sic). My wearing appirril which I will to be equally divided between her and my daughter Sofia Jonson -


Item my will is that my son Andrew Sadouski shall have one shilling sterling paid by my Executors -


Item my will is that my daughter Sofia Jonson whom I likewise constitute make and ordain my only and sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament; shall have the great pot and pot racks, a side sadle to be by her possessed and enjoyed, and I do hereby utterly dissalow, revoke, Disannul all and every other former Testaments, Wills and Legaries, Requests and Executors by me in any ways before this time - Named Willed and Bequeathed Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to by My Last Will and Testament in wittness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal.
her
John Douthit Mary X Palmer
Davis Rutter mark


Page 478:


At a Court held for Hampshire County the 14th day of February 1758, This last Will and Testament of Mary Palmer dec'd was presented in Court by Sophia Darlilng the Executrix therein named who made Oath thereto according to Law and the same being proved by the Oath of John Douthit one of the witnesses thereto is Ordered to be Recorded and on the motion of the said Executrix Certificate is granted her for obtaining a Probate thereof in and form giving Security whereupon William Darling her husband of the said Sophia and John Ryan and Luke Collins their securities entered into and acknowledged. Bond in the penalty of One Hundred Pounds for the due Administration of the said decedents Estate and Performance of her Will.


Test.
Gabriel Jones, Co. Clerk (sic)


Will written 15 October 1752
Probated 14 February 1758


Extract can be found in "Early Records of Hampshire Co. VA now WVA" Clara McC. Sage & Laura S. Jones, p 127
Original will housed at County Clerk's office, Hampshire Co. WV
received a copy by correspondence with County Clerk."


Spouse: Mary Bordt

[S2938]

Sources

[S2938]

[S2938]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Sarah CREWS

ABT 1650 - AFT 1680

ID Number: I93087

  • RESIDENCE: England
  • BIRTH: ABT 1650
  • DEATH: AFT 1680
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3399]
Father: Edward CREWS


Family 1 : WHITTINGTON

Notes


In December 1680, a niece Sarah WHITTINGTON, daughter of James' brother Edward CREWS and Matthew CREWS, son of James' brother Francis CREWs, stating that James CREWS left no widow or "lawful" child, filed for and apparently received the residue of his estate. Both lived in England.

                                             __
                                            |  
                       _ CREWS _____________|
                      | (1600 - ....)       |
                      |                     |__
                      |                        
 _Edward CREWS _______|
| (1620 - 1680)       |
|                     |                      __
|                     |                     |  
|                     |_____________________|
|                                           |
|                                           |__
|                                              
|
|--Sarah CREWS 
|  (1650 - 1680)
|                                            __
|                                           |  
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |__
|                     |                        
|_____________________|
                      |
                      |                      __
                      |                     |  
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |__
                                               

Sources

[S3399]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Robert PALMER

ABT 1530 - ____

ID Number: I29187

  • RESIDENCE: of Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
  • BIRTH: ABT 1530
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1126]

Family 1 : ANNE TAYLOR

Sources

[S1126]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Hancock TAYLOR

ABT 1740 - ABT 27 Jul 1774

ID Number: I16583

  • OCCUPATION: Surveyor-Killed By Indians In Kentucky
  • RESIDENCE: Orange Co. VA and Colonial KY
  • BIRTH: ABT 1740, Orange Co. VA
  • DEATH: ABT 27 Jul 1774, killed by Indians Near The Site Of Richmond, KY
  • BURIAL: Taylor's Fork Of Silver Creek, KY
  • RESOURCES: See:Notes [S500] [S721] [S952]
Father: Zachary TAYLOR Sr.
Mother: Elizabeth LEE


Notes


Hancock Taylor went West, with his bro. Richard and others; was one of the first americans to descend the Ohio. He continued to N. O., LA returning by sea to VA; Moved to KY 1773, and made the 1st survey of land in KY for Mr. McAfee, near Frankfort, July 16, 1773. He ascended the KY River, July 7, 1773.


In 1774, while surveying land near the mouth of the Ky. R. for Col. Wm. Christian, he was shot by an Indian. Gibson Taylor and Abram Haptonstall (Abraham Hempinstall) tried to remove the ball with a small pocket knife but failed. As his party was fleeing the country under Dunmore's warning sent through Dan'l Boone, the wound proved fatal and Taylor died near the site of Richmond, KY. He was buried on Taylor's Fork of Silver Creek, named for him. In 1803 Richard Taylor went to KY and marked the grave by a pile of stones and a headstone carved by a boy in that section. (Collins KY., I., 526, 764).


"As you well remember, before 1792, there was no Commonwealth of Kentucky.
The lands lie in Virginia and the last county claiming our lands was Fincastle County, Virginia and Kentucky was also known as Kentucky County, Virginia. In April of 1774, a group of surveyors headed out to begin surveying the area that would many years later end up as the original three counties in Kentucky. Some of the Fincastle surveys laid outside of Kentucky, but for the major part, the men appointed were tromping through the wilderness areas seldom seen by the white man. It must have been an awesome task; even more desolate than when settlers started coming into Kentucky en masse after the Revolutionary War. Only a few brave souls had been in our land and the surveyors were met with challenges every step of the way.


Surveyors included John Floyd, Hancock TAYLOR, James Douglas and Jesse Hite who departed from Smithfield, Virginia and began their trek by boat down the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers. At every spot along the way, they sketched out their surveys with the help of their work crew. Can you imagine the excitement, fear and wonder these men experienced? Trees so thick it blotted out the sky. Rivers and creeks so pure that one could see to the bottom? Animals of every variety and always the illusive Native American who might be around the next bend.


The men reached the Falls of the Ohio on the 28th of May, a long trip already. Fatigue must have overcome them at times, but the lure of the new lands pushed them on. Twenty-eight surveys were done after their arrival at the Falls covering 40,000 acres. This would encompass the present-day city of Louisville running south to the Watterson Expressway and east to Anchorage. On June 3rd the surveyors split into two groups - one headed by Hancock Taylor. Taylor surveyed the area around Harrodsburg and then moved over to near Frankfort on the 17th. John Floyd, leader of the second party, rejoined Taylor on July 1st and they camped near present day Midway, KY.


Now they split into 3 parties with James Douglas and Isaac Hite in the third group. Floyd surveyed the North Fork of Elkhorn; Taylor went along the South Fork of the Elkhorn and Douglas along Jessamine and Hickman Creeks. Sixty-two surveys were completed here for about 113,000 acres.


Remember now, they didn't have the fancy tools that surveyors do today, these were men on foot carrying heavy chains, marking the lines of each survey by cutting slashes in trees to mark the boundaries or piling rocks up with a notation on it. Long, arduous work.


An Indian attack on July 8th stopped any plans of the men reuniting at Harrodsburg and the men started for home by different routes. Two men were lost on the 27th when Indians attacked Taylor's group and killed he and another man. To the remaining surveyors and their crew came to rescue the noted Daniel Boone and Michael Stoner, scouts sent out by Virginia for this very purpose. Floyd and his companions came back by following an Indian trail that led up the North Fork of the Kentucky River and through the Pound Gap. Douglas' group paddled their way home in a small canoe down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and then catching a ride on a ship headed to Virginia.


The weary men who had survived returned to Fincastle County and presented their surveys - likely water soaked, perhaps blood stained and ragged. The survey work did not stop with these four men however; surveyors continued to come into Kentucky during the years 1775 and 1776 until finally over 206,250 acres had been surveyed. These were primarily done on the old military warrants from the central part of the state. Further information can be found in an article entitled: "Fincastle Surveyors in the Bluegrass, 1774" by Neal Hammon, found in the Kentucky Historical Society Register 70, October 1972.


What was involved in these Virginia surveys? Virginia had to do something - after the Revolutionary War, settlers began flooding into the Kentucky County area, primarily since Virginia had paid its soldiers by giving them land there. Many of the surveys were totally inaccurate and were known as "tomahawk surveys" or what Henry Clay called "fireside surveys." It caused problems for Virginia and later Kentucky for many years. The original
surveyors came out of William and Mary College which the guidelines for surveying had been designed. After Kentucky statehood, Kentucky set forth its own rules and regulations for "ascertaining internal land boundaries and property recording and determining the validity of warrants and deeds."


With the 2nd Kentucky Constitution, each county was to submit the names of two proper persons, who, with the consent of the Senate, one was appointed a county surveyor. If no one's name was submitted from a county, the Governor submitted a name and was approved or disproved by the Senate. It was not until January 1814 that the Kentucky General Assembly finally specifically outlined the requirements for surveyors.


To be continued with more details of how the surveys were drawn."
(c) Copyright 15 May 2003, Sandra K Gorin, All Rights Reserved.


From Wm Berry Taylor Bio, #10095: The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Frankfort,Ky. May, 1920, Vol. 18, No. 53. "Spring Hill," Oldham County, Ky. :
"In an account of this home and family, some mention is due old Mr. Abraham Hapstonstall, a splendidly trained surveyor, who was previously for many years associated with Hancock Taylor in vast surveys of early Kentucky. In May, 1774, Hancock Taylor accompanied by his kinsman, Willie Lee, and Abraham Hapstonstall (Abraham Hempinstall), were making surveys in Kentucky, near the present site of Louisville. Governor Dunmore was in what is now Ohio, and finding an Indian war pending, sent expresses of warning to Daniel Boone and the others, but Hancock Taylor delayed too long, and in an encounter,Taylor was severely wounded. One of the party attempted to cut out the ball with his pocket knife, but not succeeding and seeing that the wound was a serious one, Taylor was borne off on a litter by Lee and Hapstonstall, hoping to reach Virginia for proper attention, but he died on the way and was buried by Lee and his faithful friend Hapstonstall, who carved his name on a stone with a tomahawk. He afterwards return and identified the grave.


Hancock Taylor's will, made shortly before dying, left among other bequests to Willis Lee and Hapstonstall, two-thirds of his lands lying on the Western Waters, and the remainder of his vast estates to his two brothers,
Colonel Richard and Captain Zachary Taylor, father and uncle of the President. This will dated the 29th of July, 1774, was the first legal document except surveys ever executed in Kentucky. It was probated in Orange Co., Va. A copy is now in the Kentucky Historical Society rooms,Frankfort, Ky. Many years thereafter, Mr. Hapstonstall came as an assistant to William B. Taylor, where he lived, a valued friend to the end of his days, and was laid to rest in the spacious family burying ground at "Spring Hill.""


                                                   _James I TAYLOR _____________+
                                                  | (1635 - 1698) m 1667        
                       _James TAYLOR II___________|
                      | (1675 - 1730) m 1699      |
                      |                           |_Frances WALKER? ____________
                      |                             (1645 - 1680) m 1667        
 _Zachary TAYLOR Sr.__|
| (1707 - 1768) m 1737|
|                     |                            _William or Roger THOMPSON __+
|                     |                           | (1630 - ....) m 1659        
|                     |_Martha THOMPSON __________|
|                       (1679 - 1762) m 1699      |
|                                                 |_Ellen MONTAGUE _____________+
|                                                   (1633 - 1659) m 1659        
|
|--Hancock TAYLOR 
|  (1740 - 1774)
|                                                  _Richard LEE "the immigrant"_+
|                                                 | (1613 - 1664) m 1641        
|                      _Hancock LEE of Ditchley___|
|                     | (1653 - 1709) m 1700      |
|                     |                           |_Anne CONSTABLE OWEN? _______+
|                     |                             (1615 - 1706) m 1641        
|_Elizabeth LEE ______|
  (1709 - 1745) m 1737|
                      |                            _Isaac ALLERTON II___________+
                      |                           | (1628 - 1702) m 1662        
                      |_Sarah Elizabeth ALLERTON _|
                        (1670 - 1731) m 1700      |
                                                  |_Elizabeth WILLOUGHBY _______+
                                                    (1630 - 1672) m 1662        

Sources

[S500]

[S721]

[S952]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Rev. John TURNER

20 Sep 1789 - 20 May 1874

ID Number: I64562

Father: William TURNER
Mother: Jane HUNTER


Family 1 : Nancy BURNETT
  1.  William TURNER
  2.  Nancy Tate TURNER

Notes


married Nancy BURNETT b: 15 Aug 1788 d: 14 Nov 1871. Marriages of Patrick Co., VA (1791-1850) by Lela C. Adams of Bassett, VA.


A Primitive Baptist preacher Posted by Nyla Creed from writings of William Turner, Huntington, West Va., Sept., 1914, titled "In Memoriam Of My Grand Parents."


"The subject of this sketch, Rev. John Turner, was the third son of Wm. Turner of Franklin country, Va.; was born Sept. 21, 1779, and married Nancy, a daughter of John Burnett, of Patrick county, Va., in 1804. She was born Aug. 15, 1787. To this union there were born 13 children, 7 sons, 6 daughters. He resided in Henry country, Va., where all their children were born save their youngest, on the waters of Town creek.


They sold their holdings in Henry country to a kinsman, Stephen Turner, and removed to Patrick county about 1820, and owned and occupied a farm of 433 acres on a branch of Goblin Town creek, a tributary of Smith's river. The farm adjoined that of his father-in-law, John Burnet, aforesaid postoffice address, Elamsville, Va.


They owned 10 or 12 colored servants. He and his good wife recognized the fact that they were human beings and accountable to God for the deeds done in the body, therefore, they were kind and indulgent to their colored servants, sharing liberally with them products of the farm such as food and substantial clothing. They wre not tasked, nor spurred by threats of whip or lash.


He was not a classical scholar, but had a practical education during "the war of 1812" he served a term as a soldier in defense of his country, and held the honored rank of "ensign." Was stationed at Norfolk, Va., and received honorable discharge immediately after the battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815."


Children:
2 George Washington Turner b: 15 June 1805 d: 1852-1853 + Lucy Thomas b: 16 June 1806 + Unknown Davenport
2 Crawford Turner b: 5 May 1807 d: 17 Jul 1865 + Susannah Ross b: 14 Sep 1817 d: 4 Mar 1888
2 William Turner b: 23 December 1808 + Martha Philpott
2 Judith Turner b: 6 January 1811 d: Abt 1900 + Constant Martin
2 Ruth Turner b: 5 April 1812 d: 14 March 1844 + John Lackey
2 Permelia Turner b: 19 April 1814 d: 15 March 1898
2 John Burnett Turner b: 28 Feb 1816 d: 9 May 1897 + Naomi Angeline Exoney Via b: 6 Sep 1821 d: 11 Dec 1898
2 Nancy Tate Turner b: 17 Jan 1818 d: 1904 + Edward Philpott b: Abt 1805
2 Adelphia Turner b: 24 Jan 1821 d: 11 March 1900 + John Young d: 23 Jan 1901
2 Elkanah B. Turner b: 6 January 1823 d: Abt 1899
2 Elizabeth Jane Turner b: 23 Aug 1825 d: 1906 + George Woody b: Abt 1800 d: 15 Feb 1856 + Addison L. Jarrett d: 1913
2 Stephen Hubbard Turner b: 8 Dec 1826 d: 23 Jan 1905 + Malissa Ruth Turner b: 2 May 1831 d: 9 Feb 1904
2 James Cornelius Turner b: 10 May 1829 d: July 1862 + Elizabeth Bright [S1613]

[319396]
or b. 21 Sep 1779


                                             _John TURNER Sr.______+
                                            | (1690 - 1742) m 1718 
                       _Shadrack TURNER ____|
                      | (1725 - 1784) m 1745|
                      |                     |_Elizabeth BRASHEARS _+
                      |                       (1699 - 1744) m 1718 
 _William TURNER _____|
| (1753 - 1845) m 1773|
|                     |                      ______________________
|                     |                     |                      
|                     |_Anne Pollard HILL __|
|                       (1724 - 1811) m 1745|
|                                           |______________________
|                                                                  
|
|--John TURNER 
|  (1789 - 1874)
|                                            _Andrew HUNTER Sr.____
|                                           | (1702 - 1764) m 1725 
|                      _William HUNTER Sr.__|
|                     | (1738 - 1813) m 1758|
|                     |                     |_Jane_________________
|                     |                       (1713 - ....) m 1725 
|_Jane HUNTER ________|
  (1758 - 1851) m 1773|
                      |                      ______________________
                      |                     |                      
                      |_Charity LOFTIS _____|
                        (1738 - 1810) m 1758|
                                            |______________________
                                                                   

Sources

[S1613]

[S2753]

[S1613]

[S2045]

[S2447]

[S2753]

[S2849]

[S1613]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Amer Pierre VIA "the Immigrant"

ABT 1663 - 1725

ID Number: I41787

  • OCCUPATION: Huguenot
  • RESIDENCE: of France and Manakintown and Blisland (St. Peter's) Parish, Kent Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1663, France
  • DEATH: 1725, New Kent Co. Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1525] [S2914]

Family 1 : Margaret SPENCER
  1.  Gideon VIA
  2.  Josias VIA
  3.  Naomi VIA
  4.  Judith VIA
  5.  Robert VIA
  6. +William VIA Sr.
  7.  David VIA
  8. +Margaret VIA
  9.  Mary VIA

Notes


Aka: The name VIA changed to VIAR, VIARS, VIRES, VIER, VIERS.
Excerpt: "four known sons but strong suspicion that there was a fifth. The four known were William, Robert, Gideon and Josias but I am almost positive that there was another named David who was but a baby when they struck out on their own. How they followed the Chickohominy river northward and then overland about twenty miles to New Castle Ferry on the Pamunkey River and settled slightly westward on what was to be a site for a church. At this time, this territory was listed under Blisland Parish but before the first of four daughters were born, this was changed to St. Peter's Parish where the recording of the death of Naomi occured on March 26, 1688. The birth of the other daughters followed, Judeth on April 11, 1688, Margaret on August 3, 1701, and Mary on Feb. 27, 1703. We were able to trace most of these children, one back to Williamsburg when Margaret married Gabriel DeMaupin in 1720".


The Via Family in Early America Author: Michael M. Via
Publisher: The Via Genealogical Committee, http://members.aol.com/ssprad25/ViaPages/VIAEarlyAmerica.html


Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National
Author: Arthur Louis Finnell, Registrar General, National Huguenot Society
Publisher: National Huguenot Society, Bloomington, MN, 1995
Call Number: E 184 .H9F3 1995


Huguenot source says he died after 1712. May have been a Huguenot. May have come from Boulogne, France. Probably settled first in Manakintown, VA, a town with many Huguenots in it. Huguenot Society says he emmigrated by 1698.
"The VIA Family in Early America"
by Michael M. Via Co-Chairman The VIA Genealogical Committee
Introduction:
This report was prepared by Michael M. Via, Co-Chairman of The Via Genealogical Committee. The Committee has its headquarters at Grottoes, Virginia. There is also an office in Tacoma, Washington. The other co-chairman is Arnold L. Via.
The Committee has spent many years digging into the history and family tree of the Via Family. This report will center on the Via family in early America. Information was found at the Albemarle County (VA) Courthouse, the Tacoma Branch Genealogical Library, the Alderman Library (University of Virginia), the Waynesboro (VA) Public Library, the Library of the College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA), and a number of other sources
You may never have thought about your family's background before. Upon reading this report, I am sure that you will want to become more aware of your heritage.
Sincerely,
Michael M. Via
THE HUGUENOT REPORT
The Vias are believed to have been "Huguenots." The Huguenots were a group of Protestants who became the center of religious and political difficulties in France in the 1500's and 1600's. The Huguenots followed the teachings of John Calvin and were members of The Reformed Church. The French Roman Catholics gave them the name "Huguenots". The name may have come from that of Besancon Hugues, a Swiss religious leader.
During the reign of Henry II (1547-1559), the Huguenots became a large and influential power in the political system of France. The stronger they grew, the more the Catholic controlled government persecuted them.
The Guise family led the Catholic group. The Guises influenced Henry's son King Francis II, against the Huguenots. After the death of Francis, Charles IX became king; then the Queen Mother, Catherine de Medicis, controlled France. Catherine allied with the Guise family, and carried out The Massacre of Saint Bartholomew's Day on August 24, 1572. Thousands of Huguenots were brutally murdered in the streets of France.
But then, the political limelight pointed in the other direction. Henry III feared the popularity of the Guise family and had the Duke of Guise and his brother assassinated. These murders aroused public opinion against Henry III. So he allied himself with Henry of Navarre and the Huguenots. Soon after, Henry III was assassinated, and Henry of Navarre became king.
Most of France was Catholic, so Henry of Navarre decided he must become a Catholic to be a successful king. But he still remembered the Huguenots, and issued "The Edict of Nantes". This new law gave Huguenots freedom of worship in about 75 towns where Calvinism prevailed. They also got complete political freedom.
The Huguenots lost their political freedom during the reign of Louis XIII. But they were still allowed freedom of worship. They did not lose this until 1685, when Louis XIV repealed The Edict of Nantes. Hundreds of thousands of Huguenots fled France to new homes in England, Prussia, The Netherlands, and America. Many settled and prospered in Virginia, South Carolina, New York and Massachusetts. Charleston, SC was founded and settled by Huguenots.
The largest Huguenot settlement in Virginia was at Manakintown. By 1700 over 600 Huguenots were living there. Manakintown is where Amer Via is believed to have settled originally, in about 1685.
Origin of the VIA Name
Since the name appears to be of French origin, we must use it in the sense of the French language. ""Via means the same thing in French as it does in English: "By way of". Most likely it was followed by a locational phrase; such as "le Pont de Bolgne". Translated into English, it is "By way of the Bridge of Bologne". So someone named "Pierre Via le Pont de Bologne", would be: "Pierre, who lived across the Bologne Bridge". As time passed, the name was shortened to just Via. (This is merely an example to explain how the name may have originated.)
We believe that the Via Coat of Arms was granted in Bologne, France. Bologne is located on the Marne River, in the Haure-Marne Department. (Five miles north of Chaumont, France.)
Amer Via and Robert Via
Amer Via was the first, and perhaps only Via known to have come over from France. Records of his existence are in New Kent County (VA) records. Later, Amer's sons were listed as living in Hanover County, Virginia. Hanover County was created from a portion of New Kent County, in about 1725. Therefore, we conclude that Amer lived in the part of New Kent County that later became Hanover County, Virginia.
The Hanover County line is only a few miles from Manakintown, Manakintown was a large Huguenot settlement at that time. Since we believe that Amer was a Huguenot, it is logical that he originally settled at Manakintown. But he later moved to what became Hanover County, Virginia.
The wife of Amer is completely unknown. It appears that she was of English descent, because all of their children had English names. The children were: Mary, Margaret, Judith, Robert and William. Judith died in 1688. But because her brothers lived until the 1780's she must have died an infant. Thus putting Amer's birthdate at about 1663. He most likely arrived from France about 1680 or 1685.
Amer's son Robert lived his entire life in Hanover County, Virginia. His wife is also completely unknown. Some of Robert's children may have been: Gideon, Robert Jr., Abigail and Littleberry.
Amer's occupation is totally unknown. Robert was probably a farmer. Amer probably died around 1725.
In the French language, the word AMER, means "bitter". Perhaps this was a reflection of the Huguenot feeling at that particular time.
William Via, Sr. and William Via, Jr.
William Via, Sr. was the son of Amer. He was born about 1698 or 1700. He lived in Hanover County, Virginia until about 1730, when he moved to Albemarle County, Virginia. Among William Sr.'s children were: Sarah and William Jr.
Both William Sr. and William Jr. lived about 5 miles north of the city of Charlottesville, Virginia (seat of Albemarle County). In 1769, William Jr. purchased 100 acres on the Rivanna River and Ivy Creek. Then in 1773, William Sr. and William Jr. sold a tract of land in the same vicinity, amounting to about 101 acres.
William Jr. was born about 1730. He died about 1775. His father lived until 1783. Both William Sr. and William Jr. were most likely farmers.
Among William Jr.'s children were Micajah and William III.
William Via III
William Via III (the son of William Jr.) was born in 1761, in Albemarle County, Virginia. He is the only Via on record to have served in the Revolutionary War. His service was from March 20, 1781, to November 1, 1782. He held the rank of private in the company commanded by Captain Roy, of the regiment commanded by Colonel Posey.
Late in 1784, William III married Mary Craig. He bought 65 acres of land on a branch of Moormans River soon thereafter. Among the children of William III and Mary were: Sally, Nancy, Rueben, Anna, Jonathon, Mary, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Eliza, and probably Thomas.
In 1828, William III began receiving a pension for his duty in the Revolution. He died in 1836. Since widows were eligible to collect their husband's pension, William's widow Marry applied for it soon after his death.
William Via III was believed to have spent most of his life in the "Browns Cove" area of Albemarle County, Virginia. He was probably a farmer.
Micajah Via, Clifton Via, Brightberry Via, and Jonathon Via
William Via III had a brother named Micajah. Micajah was born around 1760 in Albemarle County, VA. In 1779, he bought 68 acres on Mechums River and Spring Creek for 25 pounds (Colonial money). Later in life, he owned a large amount of land on Rocky Run and Current Mountain. He owned two plantations in that particular region.
Micajah married Mary Mills in 1789. Among their children were Brightberry and Clifton. Micajah died in 1849.
Micajah's son Clifton was born in Albemarle County in 1795. He and his brother Brightberry inherited all of their father's real estate. Clifton married Judith Sandridge, March 17, 1816. Among their children was Ira, who was born in Albemarle County in 1819.
Jonathan Via was the son of William III. He was born in Albemarle County in 1798. On December 18, 1821, he married Mary Elizabeth Via (probably a distant cousin). Their children were: John A., James B., Mary E., Henry O., Adam L., George A., Samuel M., Thomas D., Merke P., Frances Anne, and Jonathan Jr. Jonathan Sr. died about 1890.
Micajah, Clifton, Jonathan, and Brightberry were all farmers.
First U.S. Census
1782-1783
All Via Households in Virginia
Hanover County:
Robert Via ------------------------------------- 4 white ---------------------- 7 slaves
Gideon Via ------------------------------------ 10 white --------------------- 8 slaves
Littleberry Via --------------------------------- 9 white ---------------------- 0 slaves
Abigal Via -------------------------------------- 6 white ---------------------- 4 slaves
Amherst County:
Giddeon Via ---------------------------------- 10 white ---------------------- 0 slaves
Rockingham County:
Gidion Viah ---------------------------------- 4 white ----------------------- ? slaves
Albemarle County:
Micajah Via ---------------------------------- 11 white
William Via ----------------------------------- 2 white
Each person listed was The head of each Via Household in Virginia
Searching Your Own Family Tree
Some of the names already mentioned in this report are probably your own ancestors. Therefore, all that you must do is connect your own family tree with one of the people in the report. To do this, first ask older relatives, such as parents, grandparents, etc., about the family. From their information, you may need to look in the public records. These are available at the courthouse of the county that they resided. At many genealogical libraries, you may send for microfilm of the specific county.
Very helpful, are U.S. Census records. These are available from the National Archives, and many libraries, on microfilm.
All in all, you will find that tracing your ancestors is interesting, exciting, fun and most of all: rewarding!
Conclusion
This report contains many hard hours of research into the history of the Via family. But this is obviously only a small fraction of the information to be found. In fact, the whole story can never be told, because each day, the history acquires additional chapters.
It is our conclusion that the Via family originated in France. The first Via known to have come to America was Amer Via. The early Vias lived in Virginia. Most Vias in America today, can trace their ancestors back to Virginia. William Via III was a private in the Revolutionary War.
The Via Genealogical Committee shall continue to research the Via family, and the family tree. We hope that you have found this report interesting, and that you will do some research into your particular Via line. Thank you very much! [S1525]

[523776]
maybe New Kent

Sources

[S1525]

[S2914]

[S1525]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Elizabeth B. WEAVER

ABT 1810 - 1862

ID Number: I14213

  • RESIDENCE: Campbell and Carroll Cos. GA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1810
  • DEATH: 1862, Caroll Co. Georgia
  • RESOURCES: See: [S345]
Father: Samuel L. WEAVER
Mother: Mary PATMAN


Family 1 : Thomas J. CHEEVES

                                              _Samuel III WEAVER __+
                                             | (1690 - 1769) m 1737
                       _David WEAVER ________|
                      | (1745 - 1813) m 1769 |
                      |                      |_Françoise L'ORANGE _+
                      |                        (1700 - 1769) m 1737
 _Samuel L. WEAVER ___|
| (1779 - 1850) m 1800|
|                     |                       _____________________
|                     |                      |                     
|                     |_Masinbird SHOEMAKER _|
|                       (1745 - 1825) m 1769 |
|                                            |_____________________
|                                                                  
|
|--Elizabeth B. WEAVER 
|  (1810 - 1862)
|                                             _____________________
|                                            |                     
|                      _William PATMAN ______|
|                     | (1760 - ....)        |
|                     |                      |_____________________
|                     |                                            
|_Mary PATMAN ________|
  (1784 - 1863) m 1800|
                      |                       _____________________
                      |                      |                     
                      |_Susannah BIGGERS ____|
                        (1760 - ....)        |
                                             |_____________________
                                                                   

Sources

[S345]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


John WHEAT

1755 - 1842

ID Number: I69929

  • RESIDENCE: Frederick Co. MD; Marion Co. MS
  • BIRTH: 1755, Frederick Co. Maryland
  • DEATH: 1842, Marion Co. Mississippi
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1497]

Sources

[S1497]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.