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Mikell BOCHET

ABT 1775 - ABT 1825

ID Number: I87119

  • RESIDENCE: SC
  • BIRTH: ABT 1775
  • DEATH: ABT 1825
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2816]
Father: Henry BOCHET II
Mother: Judith BONNEAU


Family 1 :
  1. +Elizabeth BOCHET

Notes


Marriage 1 Elizabeth ?.

                                                          _Nicholas BOCHET ______________
                                                         | (.... - 1733)                 
                       _Henry BOCHET ____________________|
                      | (.... - 1780) m 1746             |
                      |                                  |_Marianne VIDEAU ______________+
                      |                                    (1693 - ....)                 
 _Henry BOCHET II_____|
| (1749 - ....) m 1772|
|                     |                                   _______________________________
|                     |                                  |                               
|                     |_Ann JENNINGS ____________________|
|                       (.... - 1764) m 1746             |
|                                                        |_______________________________
|                                                                                        
|
|--Mikell BOCHET 
|  (1775 - 1825)
|                                                         _______________________________
|                                                        |                               
|                      _Anthoine BONNEAU "the Immigrant"_|
|                     | (1680 - ....) m 1702             |
|                     |                                  |_______________________________
|                     |                                                                  
|_Judith BONNEAU _____|
   m 1772             |
                      |                                   _Pierre VIDEAU "the Immigrant"_
                      |                                  | (1668 - ....)                 
                      |_Jeanne Elizabeth VIDEAU _________|
                        (1685 - 1721) m 1702             |
                                                         |_______________________________
                                                                                         

Sources

[S2816]


INDEX

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WILLIAM CALTHORPE Knt.

ABT 1420 - ____

ID Number: I43056

  • RESIDENCE: ENG
  • BIRTH: ABT 1420
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1531]

Family 1 : ELIZABETH STAPLETON
  1. +ANNE CALTHORP

Sources

[S1531]


INDEX

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Hon. Henry CLAY "The Great Compromiser"

12 Apr 1777 - 29 Jun 1852

ID Number: I30452

  • TITLE: Hon.
  • OCCUPATION: Distinghished Orator & Statesman; Senator
  • RESIDENCE: Hanover and Henrico Cos. VA and Lexington, KY
  • BIRTH: 12 Apr 1777, district known as ’the Slashes,’ Hanover Co. Virginia
  • DEATH: 29 Jun 1852, Washington, DC [156977]
  • BURIAL: Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  • RESOURCES: See: Notes [S180] [S1210] [S2644]
Father: John CLAY
Mother: Elizabeth HUDSON


Family 1 : Lucretia HART
  1.  Thomas Hart CLAY
  2.  Susan Hart CLAY
  3. +Ann Brown CLAY
  4. +James Brown CLAY C.S.A.

Notes


Aka: "the Statesman & Orator" "Clay, Henry (1777-1852) -- also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" -- of Lexington, Ky. Brother of Porter Clay; father of Thomas Hart Clay and James Brown Clay; second cousin of Cassius M. Clay; his niece was married to James Reily; grandfather of Henry Clay (1849-1884). Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852. Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C. Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him. (See also his congressional biography.)" http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=C000482


CLAY, Henry, statesman, was born in Hanover county, Va., April 12, 1777; son of the Rev. John and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay, and fourth in descent from Thomas Clay, who, with his brothers Charles and Henry, immigrated to America with Sir Walter Raleigh and settled on the James river.


His father was a Baptist preacher who died in 1781. His mother was a daughter of George Hudson, a man of considerable repute in Virginia, and when she was left a widow with no income, save what could be earned from the cultivation of a small farm, she set out to support and educate her son, sending him to the district school and encouraging him to industry in laboring on the farm and contributing as he could to their support. The neighborhood in which they lived was known as "The Slashes," and the boy's journeying to and from the mill on horseback with corn to be ground into flour, gave him his subsequent sobriquet, "The millboy of the Slashes."


His mother was married to Captain Henry Watkins of Richmond and removed to Kentucky about 1792. The stepfather had previously secured for Henry a situation in a store in Richmond, Va., but before leaving the boy dependent upon his own resources found for him more congenial employment in the office of the clerk of the high court of chancery, then filled by Peter Tinsley. The attention of Chancellor Wythe was attracted to the boy and he made him his private secretary and directed his efforts toward improving his education. His progress was rapid and in 1796 he entered, as a law student, the office of Robert Brooke, attorney-general of Virginia. Upon being admitted to practice in 1797, by the Virginia court of appeals, he removed to Lexington, Ky., in November, where he opened a law office and continued a practice of debating, begun in Richmond, by joining a class of the young barristers of Lexington, of which club he soon became the acknowledged leader. His law practice included capital criminal cases and numerous land claim suits. His eloquence directed public attention to him as an available political leader, and his advocacy of gradual emancipation as a feature of the proposed state constitution, and his denunciation of the alien and sedition laws commanded immediate attention.


He was married in April, 1799, to Lucretia, daughter of Col. Thomas Hart, a prominent Kentuckian, and made for himself a home on 600 acres of land near Lexington, thereafter known as "Ashland." His fortune grew with his popularity as a lawyer and advocate, and in 1803 he was elected a member of the lower house of the state legislature, where his eloquence attracted general attention, it being said that when Clay spoke in the house the senate became empty. He further distinguished himself by fighting a duel with Colonel [p.244] Davies, U.S. attorney for Kentucky.


In 1806 Aaron Burr was arrested in Kentucky and employed Mr. Clay to defend him before the courts, which Clay did so effectually as to secure his release. This, however, brought no credit to the young barrister and he afterward acknowledged his mistake, claiming to have supposed Burr a persecuted and innocent man, at the time he undertook his defence.


In December, 1806, upon the resignation of John Adair as U.S. senator, Mr. Clay was appointed to fill the unexpired term, and took his seat in the senate December 29, although constitutionally ineligible by reason of nonage. He became prominent in debate, in the committee rooms, and as the champion of important legislative measures. His two months in the senate demonstrated his ability as a statesman, and his advocacy of internal improvements, especially of a bridge across the Potomac at Washington, and a canal around the falls of the Ohio at Louisville, made for him many friends. Upon his return home after March 3, 1807, he was returned to the state legislature and elected speaker of the house. When a bill was introduced to prohibit the use of British decisions and jurisprudence authorities in the Kentucky courts, he defeated the act, and in the same legislature defended the embargo measures of President Jefferson. He also introduced a measure forbidding legislators to wear any clothes not the product of domestic manufactures. The debate on this measure led to a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both combatants were slightly wounded.


In December, 1809, Mr. Clay was again appointed a U.S. senator, this time to fill the unexpired term of Buckner Thurston, who had resigned his seat. In the senate he continued his advocacy of internal improvements, the encouragement of home industries, the right of preemption to purchasers of public lands, and the preservation of peace with the Indians, through trade and intercourse. He sustained the occupation of West Florida in a powerful speech, and opposed the re-charter of the United States bank, on constitutional grounds. After the expiration of his senatorial term, on March 3, 1811, he was elected a representative in the 12th congress and took his seat Nov. 4, 1811. He was at once made speaker of the house, and contrary to precedent, often left the chair to take part in the general debate. He was the leader of the war party and advocated the enlistment of a volunteer army and the building of an efficient navy. Although opposed by the conservative administration the young Americans, under the leadership of Clay, so fanned the war spark that in June, 1812, war was declared against Great Britain. Despite the want of success in the prosecution of the war, Clay vigorously sustained the administration, and his speeches, which were widely circulated, kept alive the war spirit, despite the opposition of the Federalists.


In 1813 he was returned to the 13th congress and was again elected speaker May 23, 1814, on the meeting of the congress in extra session to take measures for the vigorous prosecution of the war. He resigned the speakership, Jan. 19, 1814, in order that he might accompany John Quincy Adams, James A. Bayard, Jonathan Russell and Albert Gallatin to Ghent to meet the commissioners of Great Britain, with a view to negotiating for peace. During the five months of conference Mr. Clay persistently opposed granting to the British the right to navigate the Mississippi river, and interfering with the rights of the Indians on U.S. territory. The treaty was signed Dec. 24, 1814, and the American commissioners repaired to Paris whence, after they had learned of the victory of Gen. Jackson at New Orleans, Clay, Adams and Gallatin went to London and negotiated a treaty of commerce.


President Monroe, on organizing his administration, offered to Mr. Clay the position of U.S. minister to Russia, which he declined as he also did the war portfolio. During his absence in Europe his constituents had re-elected him a representative in congress and he was again elected speaker of the house, Dec. 4, 1815. Throughout the 14th congress he was the leader of the new Republican party and favored the continuation of direct taxation, as imposed during the war, the building of public roads and canals, and the protection of home industries by a tariff. His opposition to the United States bank in 1811 he now controverted by advocating the establishment of one as a fiscal agent of the government, which measure he now declared to be both expedient and constitutional. His advocacy of an increase in the pay of representatives almost cost him the support of his constituents. He was, however, returned to the 15th congress by a small [p.245] majority.


On Dec. 1, 1817, he was again elected to the speakership by an almost unanimous vote. President Monroe's veto of the internal improvement appropriation bill incurred the opposition of Mr. Clay, whose charges against the administration were attributed by some to disappointment at not receiving the portfolio of state. In 1818 he interested himself in behalf of the South American nations, then contending for independence, and in congress he demanded that the neutrality law of 1817 be repealed, and a minister be sent to the united provinces of Rio de la Plata, rather than commissioners, as proposed by the President. He criticized General Jackson's conduct of the Florida war, and in a strong speech in the house denounced as inhuman Jackson's wholesale execution of Indians. This had the effect of making a bitter enemy of Jackson, who was the nation's military hero, and marks the beginning of the decline in Clay's popularity.


In 1819 he was returned to congress and to the speakership and in this, the 16th congress, continued his aggressive warfare against the administration, censuring it for giving up Texas, which he claimed to belong to the United States by reason of the Louisiana purchase; and further urging the recognition of the independence of the South American republics. He supported Senator Thomas's Missouri compromise, which provided for the admission of the state with slavery but excluded slavery from all territory acquired by the Louisiana purchase north of 36°, 30'. When Missouri asked for admittance with a constitution which should recognize slavery and also prevent free negroes and mulattoes from coming into the state, the house of representatives, on motion of Mr. Clay, referred the subject to a committee of which he was made chairman. This committee, conjointly with one from the senate, reported a resolution, conditioning the admission of the state on a provision that no law be made preventing settlers of any description from coming into the state who might then or thereafter become citizens of the United States. This was Mr. Clay's part in the Missouri compromise, which gained for him the cognomen, "the great pacificator." Mr. Clay, on retiring from congress at the close of the first session, May 15, 1820, announced that his financial affairs demanded his presence in Kentucky, and when congress reassembled, Nov. 13, 1820, Representative John W. Taylor of New York was elected speaker ad interim. Mr. Clay took the chair Jan. 16, 1821, and at the adjournment of congress, March 3, 1821, he resumed his law practice and his duties as counsel in Ohio and Kentucky for the United States bank.


In 1822 he was again elected representative in congress and on the assembling of the 18th congress, Dec. 1, 1823, he was chosen speaker. He advocated a tariff law, internal improvements and a liberal construction of constitutional power, even going so far as to advocate the sending of a commissioner to the struggling people of Greece. In 1824 he was the candidate of the new Republican party for president and in the electoral college he received thirty-seven votes for president and two for vice-president. The election being thrown into the house of representatives, Mr. Clay gave his influence to John Quincy Adams, who was elected. In making up his cabinet, Mr. Adams made Clay his secretary of state and this led to the charge of "bargain and corruption," by the supporters of Jackson and Crawford. The controversy led to a bloodless duel between Clay and John Randolph, April 8, 1826. As secretary of state he arranged favorable treaties with Great Britain and the various European and South American governments, and at the close of the administration, March 3, 1829, he retired to his farm at Ashland and visited several southern and western states, where he addressed the people on current political questions.


In 1831 he was elected to the United States senate for a full term and took his seat in the 22nd congress, Dec. 5, 1831. During the same month he was nominated by the Republican National convention as its candidate for the presidency, with John Sergeant of Pennsylvania for vice-president. In the senate Mr. Clay supported the "American system" of tariff for protection, in spite of the general opinion that the rapid reduction of the public debt justified a radical reduction in the tariff. He favored distributing the proceeds from the sale of public lands among the states, and pressed the bill renewing the charter of the United States bank through both houses, but it was vetoed by the President.


In the election of November, 1832, Mr. Clay was defeated, receiving only forty-nine electoral votes against 219 for Jackson. On Feb. 12, 1833, he introduced in the senate a compromise bill providing for a gradual reduction of the tariff, which passed both houses and was signed by the President. On the passage of the bill South Carolina repealed her act of 1832, which had declared the tariff laws null and void.


When the President ordered the removal of the government deposits from the United States bank, Mr. Clay presented to the senate resolutions censuring him for "assuming a power not conferred by the constitution and laws." These resolutions, with a few modifications, were adopted and called from the President an indignant protest, which was met by a forcible denunciation from Mr. Clay of the President's course, and the resolutions were sustained.


In the 23rd congress, Senator Clay continued his attacks on the measures of the administration; prevented the President from making reprisals upon French property because of the non-payment by that government of indemnity due the United States; and employed every means to restrict the removals from office for political reasons and to repeal the Presidential tenure of office act.


In the 24th congress he favored the reception of anti-slavery petitions against the exclusion of anti-slavery literature from the mails, but opposed the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia. He was chairman of the committee on foreign affairs, and when Texas applied for admission as a state he delayed action.


The 25th congress met in extra session, Sept. 4, 1837, to provide some relief to the country from the existing financial crisis, and upon the introduction of President Van Buren's sub-treasury plan Mr. Clay opposed it as calculated to "unite the power of the purse with the power of the sword," and urged the restoration of the United States bank. He succeeded in putting off the adoption of the measure for three sessions.


In 1840 he was disappointed at not receiving the nomination to the presidency and upon the election of General Harrison he declined the portfolio of state. Upon the accession of John Tyler to the presidency Clay opposed his administration, and in the 27th congress secured the repeal of the sub-treasury act and caused to be passed two bills providing for the incorporation of a new United States bank, which were vetoed by the President. He offered three amendments to the constitution, one limiting the veto power of the President, another providing for the appointment of the secretary of the treasury and the U.S. treasurer by congress, and a third forbidding the appointment of members of congress, when in office, to executive positions.


On March 31, 1842, he resigned his seat in the senate, eleven months before the end of his term, and was succeeded by John J. Crittenden. He at once made a tour of the states and was received by his admirers with great enthusiasm. His appearance before the people and his eloquent speeches won for him the Whig nomination in 1844. He had written a letter declaring his opposition to the admission of Texas, and the Democratic party, in nominating James K. Polk, made the Texas question an issue. This brought from Mr. Clay another letter stating that he had no personal objection to its admission, but New York refused her support and Clay was again defeated, receiving 105 electoral votes to 170 for Polk. His favorite son had been killed in the war with Mexico, falling at Buena Vista, and this, added to financial troubles, greatly embittered his life. Mr. Clay had previously warned the country against the danger of giving place to the ambition of conquest, and now declared that the war had been waged only to fix the boundaries of Texas, and not to acquire foreign territory for the purpose of the propagation of slavery.


In 1848 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the Whig nomination and his disappointment prevented his taking any part in the campaign. In December, 1848, he was unanimously re-elected to the U.S. senate and took his seat, Dec. 3, 1849. He recommended to the state convention, which met to amend the constitution of Kentucky, a provision for the gradual emancipation of the slaves. On Jan. 29, 1850, Senator Clay proposed his "comprehensive scheme of compromise," which resulted in the compromise of 1850. This gave him renown as a statesman and for a time restored quiet to the country, but it failed to satisfy the demands of the radicals, north or south. To make the measure more effective, forty-four senators and representatives, led by Senator Clay, issued a manifesto in January, 1851, declaring that they would not support any man for political office who would not pledge himself against disturbing the matters settled by the compromise. In February, 1851, the capture of Burns, the fugitive slave, in Boston, called from Mr. Clay a proposition to confer upon the President extraordinary powers in order that the fugitive slave law could be enforced.


After the adjournment of the 31st congress, Mr. Clay's health began to fail. He journeyed to Cuba and on his return to Ashland importuned his friends not to present his name as a presidential candidate at the coming convention. He went to Washington to take his seat in the senate, Dec. 1, 1851, but his illness prevented and only once during the session of the 32nd congress was he in his seat, and then only for a short time. He received Kossuth in his room and made a short speech to the patriot. Before his death he learned that both great political parties had accepted at their national conventions in 1852, his compromise measure of 1850 as the final settlement of the slavery question. George D. Prentice wrote a "Life of Henry Clay" (1831). His speeches were collected and published by R. Chambers in 1842. James B. Swain published "Life and Speeches of Henry Clay" (1843); Epes Sargent's "Life of Henry Clay," published in 1843, was edited and completed by Horace Greeley in 1852; D. Mallery wrote "Life and Speeches of Henry Clay," 1844: new edition 1857; the Rev. Calvin Colton prepared "Life and Times of Henry Clay," published in six volumes and including his speeches and correspondence (1846-57). This work was revised in 1864. His name was given a place in the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, in October, 1900, in Class M, with John Adams, Franklin, Jefferson, Lincoln, Washington and Webster. He died in Washington, D. C., June 29, 1852.[p.247]
Children:
2 Henrietta CLAY
2 Theodore Wythe CLAY b: 1802
2 Thomas Hart CLAY b: 22 SEP 1803 d: 18 MAR 1871 + Marie MENTELLE
2 Susan Hart CLAY b: 1805 + Martin DURALDE
2 Ann Brown CLAY b: 7 APR 1807 d: 1835 + James ERWIN
2 Lucretia Hart CLAY b: 1809
2 Henry CLAY b: 1811 d: 22 FEB 1847 + Julia PRATHER b: 16 MAY 1814 d: 13 FEB 1840
2 Eliza CLAY b: 1815 d: 1825
2 Laura CLAY b: 1815
2 James Brown CLAY b: NOV 1817 d: 25 JAN 1864 + Susanna Maria JACOB
2 John Morrison CLAY b: 1821 d: 1887 + Josephine RUSSELL








[S1210]

[156977]
funeral services held in the Chamber of the Senate


                                             _Henry I CLAY ___________+
                                            | (1672 - 1760) m 1707    
                       _John CLAY __________|
                      | (1718 - 1761) m 1740|
                      |                     |_Mary MITCHELL __________+
                      |                       (1693 - 1777) m 1707    
 _John CLAY __________|
| (1742 - 1781) m 1765|
|                     |                      _Edward WATKINS Sr.______+
|                     |                     | (1676 - ....) m 1723    
|                     |_Sarah WATKINS ______|
|                       (1726 - 1750) m 1740|
|                                           |_Mary Bishop TAYLOR _____+
|                                             (1688 - 1770) m 1723    
|
|--Henry CLAY "The Great Compromiser"
|  (1777 - 1852)
|                                            _John HUDSON ____________
|                                           | (1690 - 1732) m 1714    
|                      _George HUDSON ______|
|                     | (1712 - 1772) m 1745|
|                     |                     |_Elizabeth L. HARRIS ____+
|                     |                       (1698 - 1758) m 1714    
|_Elizabeth HUDSON ___|
  (1748 - 1829) m 1765|
                      |                      _William Henry JENNINGS _
                      |                     | (1702 - 1782) m 1723    
                      |_Elizabeth JENNINGS _|
                        (1729 - 1782) m 1745|
                                            |_Mary Jane PULLIAM ______
                                              (1705 - ....) m 1723    

Sources

[S180]

[S1210]

[S2644]

[S1210]


INDEX

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Robert HARRIS

ABT 1795 - ____

ID Number: I101022

  • RESIDENCE: Buckingham now Appottomax Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1795
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3645]
Father: HARRIS
Mother: PENDLETON


Notes


Robert Harris, married, lived and died in Appomattox Co.


                                                     __
                                                    |  
                       _____________________________|
                      |                             |
                      |                             |__
                      |                                
 _ HARRIS ____________|
| (1770 - ....)       |
|                     |                              __
|                     |                             |  
|                     |_____________________________|
|                                                   |
|                                                   |__
|                                                      
|
|--Robert HARRIS 
|  (1795 - ....)
|                                                    __
|                                                   |  
|                      _(RESEARCH QUERY) PENDLETON _|
|                     |                             |
|                     |                             |__
|                     |                                
|_ PENDLETON _________|
  (1770 - ....)       |
                      |                              __
                      |                             |  
                      |_____________________________|
                                                    |
                                                    |__
                                                       

Sources

[S3645]


INDEX

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Nathaniel HICKMAN "the Immigrant"

ABT 1600 - ABT 1656

ID Number: I103392

  • RESIDENCE: England and of Northumberland Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1600, England
  • DEATH: ABT 1656
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3748]

Family 1 : Avis
  1.  Nathaniel HICKMAN
  2.  Nathaniel HICKMAN
  3. +Thomas HICKMAN
  4.  Dinah HICKMAN

Notes


Thomas Barrett-VA-ca 1661 Rappahannock Posted by: Maureen Hyde Date: March 28, 2000. Nathaniel Hickman (and wife Avis) who patented land in Northumberland Co., VA in 1653 and whose will was proved Jan. 20, 1656.


Also See: "Genealogy of the Hickman Families of Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana and Texas" by Clarence N. Hickman, publ. in New York in 1967. It goes into some detail about Col. James Hickman's forbears.

Sources

[S3748]


INDEX

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Hannah HICKS

ABT 1780 - ____

ID Number: I99660

  • RESIDENCE: Marlborough Co. SC
  • BIRTH: ABT 1780
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3616]
Father: Benjamin HICKS Sr.
Mother: Mary Catherine SAUNDERS



                                                              _George HICKS (HIX) Gent. Sr._
                                                             | (1695 - 1762)                
                            _Robert HICKS ___________________|
                           | (1730 - 1765)                   |
                           |                                 |______________________________
                           |                                                                
 _Benjamin HICKS Sr._______|
| (1750 - 1814) m 1775     |
|                          |                                  ______________________________
|                          |                                 |                              
|                          |_Mary PEGUES ____________________|
|                            (1730 - ....)                   |
|                                                            |______________________________
|                                                                                           
|
|--Hannah HICKS 
|  (1780 - ....)
|                                                             ______________________________
|                                                            |                              
|                           _George SAUNDERS "the Immigrant"_|
|                          | (1709 - 1753)                   |
|                          |                                 |______________________________
|                          |                                                                
|_Mary Catherine SAUNDERS _|
  (1749 - 1827) m 1775     |
                           |                                  ______________________________
                           |                                 |                              
                           |_Hannah GIBSON __________________|
                             (1719 - 1773)                   |
                                                             |______________________________
                                                                                            

Sources

[S3616]


INDEX

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Grover Jay HIGGINBOTHAM

4 Nov 1888 - 4 Apr 1954

ID Number: I35819

  • RESIDENCE: Amherst Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 4 Nov 1888, Buena Vista, Rockbridge Co. VA
  • DEATH: 4 Apr 1954
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1300] [S1384] [S1697]
Father: Aaron Lewis HIGGINBOTHAM
Mother: Josephine Temperance PATTERSON


Family 1 : Christine Elizabeth MAYS
  1. +Willard Lewis HIGGINBOTHAM Sr.

                                                               _Aaron HIGGINBOTHAM II_+
                                                              | (1752 - 1794) m 1775  
                                   _Absolom HIGGINBOTHAM _____|
                                  | (1781 - 1866) m 1806      |
                                  |                           |_Nancy CROXTON ________+
                                  |                             (1756 - 1823) m 1775  
 _Aaron Lewis HIGGINBOTHAM _______|
| (1826 - 1906) m 1885            |
|                                 |                            _Benjamin SANDIDGE ____+
|                                 |                           | (1758 - 1829) m 1783  
|                                 |_Mary C. "Polly" SANDIDGE _|
|                                   (1789 - 1871) m 1806      |
|                                                             |_Elizabeth CHILDRESS __+
|                                                               (1765 - 1845) m 1783  
|
|--Grover Jay HIGGINBOTHAM 
|  (1888 - 1954)
|                                                              _______________________
|                                                             |                       
|                                  ___________________________|
|                                 |                           |
|                                 |                           |_______________________
|                                 |                                                   
|_Josephine Temperance PATTERSON _|
  (1860 - 1924) m 1885            |
                                  |                            _______________________
                                  |                           |                       
                                  |___________________________|
                                                              |
                                                              |_______________________
                                                                                      

Sources

[S1300]

[S1384]

[S1697]


INDEX

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Sir THOMAS KER of Ferniehirst

____ - ____

ID Number: I91035

  • TITLE: Sir
  • RESIDENCE: Scotland
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3377]

Family 1 :
  1.  MARGARET KER

Sources

[S3377]


INDEX

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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Mary Lane LATHAM

ABT 1760 - ____

ID Number: I49311

  • RESIDENCE: VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1760
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1759]

Family 1 : Frazier OTEY

Sources

[S1759]


INDEX

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Josiah LOCKETT

ABT 1770 - ____

ID Number: I74515

  • RESIDENCE: Chesterfield Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1770, Chesterfield Co. Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: 1532-4JX)
Father: Richard LOCKETT
Mother: Mary LOGWOOD


Family 1 : Jency JETER

                                                        _(RESEARCH QUERY) LOCKETT\LOCKHART of Chesterfield Co. VA_
                                                       |                                                          
                       _Benjamin LOCKETT ______________|
                      | (1698 - ....)                  |
                      |                                |__________________________________________________________
                      |                                                                                           
 _Richard LOCKETT ____|
| (1727 - ....) m 1759|
|                     |                                 __________________________________________________________
|                     |                                |                                                          
|                     |________________________________|
|                                                      |
|                                                      |__________________________________________________________
|                                                                                                                 
|
|--Josiah LOCKETT 
|  (1770 - ....)
|                                                       _(RESEARCH QUERY) LOGWOOD Old Virginia____________________
|                                                      |                                                          
|                      _Edmund LOGWOOD "the Immigrant"_|
|                     | (1695 - 1775) m 1719           |
|                     |                                |__________________________________________________________
|                     |                                                                                           
|_Mary LOGWOOD _______|
  (1730 - ....) m 1759|
                      |                                 __________________________________________________________
                      |                                |                                                          
                      |_Jane EKE ______________________|
                        (1702 - ....) m 1719           |
                                                       |__________________________________________________________
                                                                                                                  

Sources


INDEX

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Margaret Eva MOSS

15 Oct 1880 - ____

ID Number: I76885

  • RESIDENCE: Buckingham Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 15 Oct 1880, Buckingham, Dielwyn, Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1615]
Father: Philip Edward MOSS
Mother: Margaret Elizabeth PENDLETON


Notes


Margaret Eva Moss Birth: 15 October 1880-- Buckingham, Dielwyn, VA
Death: -- Spouse: Margaret Eva Moss
Parents: Phillip Edward Moss, Margaret Elizabeth Pendleton


                                                       _________________________
                                                      |                         
                                 _____________________|
                                |                     |
                                |                     |_________________________
                                |                                               
 _Philip Edward MOSS ___________|
| (1848 - 1931)                 |
|                               |                      _________________________
|                               |                     |                         
|                               |_____________________|
|                                                     |
|                                                     |_________________________
|                                                                               
|
|--Margaret Eva MOSS 
|  (1880 - ....)
|                                                      _________________________
|                                                     |                         
|                                _Jake PENDLETON _____|
|                               | (1821 - ....)       |
|                               |                     |_________________________
|                               |                                               
|_Margaret Elizabeth PENDLETON _|
  (1847 - 1931)                 |
                                |                      _Creed Taylor PENDLETON _+
                                |                     | (1795 - 1835) m 1820    
                                |_Mary PENDLETON _____|
                                  (1822 - 1896)       |
                                                      |_Lucinda WALKER _________+
                                                        (1800 - 1873) m 1820    

Sources

[S1615]


INDEX

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ROBERT SEMPHILL 3rd Lord

ABT 1505 - by 1576

ID Number: I89489

  • RESIDENCE: Scotland
  • BIRTH: ABT 1505
  • DEATH: by 1576
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3183] [S3324]
Father: WILLIAM SEMPHILL 2nd Lord
Mother: MARIOT or MARGARET MONTGOMERY


Family 1 : ISABEL HAMILTON

Notes


((i)) Robert Sempill, 3rd Lord (b c1505, d before 17.01.1575-6) .. m. Isabel Hamilton (dau of Sir William Hamilton of Sanquhar) ..


                                                                      __________________________________
                                                                     |                                  
                                  _JOHN SEMPHILL 1st Lord____________|
                                 | (.... - 1513)                     |
                                 |                                   |__________________________________
                                 |                                                                      
 _WILLIAM SEMPHILL 2nd Lord______|
| (.... - 1552) m 1517           |
|                                |                                    _ROBERT COLVILLE of Ochiltree_____
|                                |                                   | (1430 - ....)                    
|                                |_MARGARET COLVILLE ________________|
|                                  (.... - 1504)                     |
|                                                                    |__________________________________
|                                                                                                       
|
|--ROBERT SEMPHILL 3rd Lord
|  (1505 - ....)
|                                                                     _ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY 2nd Lord____+
|                                                                    | (1455 - ....) m 1459             
|                                 _HUGH MONTGOMERY 1st Earl of Eglin_|
|                                | (1460 - 1525)                     |
|                                |                                   |_KATHERINE KENNEDY _______________+
|                                |                                     (1441 - ....) m 1459             
|_MARIOT or MARGARET MONTGOMERY _|
   m 1517                        |
                                 |                                    _COLIN CAMPBELL 1st Earl of Argyl_+
                                 |                                   | (1431 - 1493) m 1455             
                                 |_HELEN CAMPBELL ___________________|
                                   (1460 - ....)                     |
                                                                     |_ISOBEL (Elizabeth) STEWART ______+
                                                                       (1437 - 1510) m 1455             

Sources

[S3183]

[S3324]


INDEX

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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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