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My Southern Family

Agnes (Ann Nancy) WARWICK

ABT 1779 - 1845

ID Number: I45331

Father: Jacob WARWICK
Mother: Mary VANCE


Family 1 : Thomas GATEWOOD
  1. +Andrew Matthew GATEWOOD
Family 2 : William Thomas POAGE

Notes


(Nancy on marriage record, Jeremiah Burns min.). 2 Nancy Warwick b: abt 1779 d: 1845 + Thomas Gatewood b: abt 1775 d: 1805 + William Thomas Poage b: 8 Feb 1783 d: 27 May 1827.

[523845]
or b. 9 FEB 1800


                                                 __________________________________
                                                |                                  
                       _William WARWICK ________|
                      | (1716 - 1764)           |
                      |                         |__________________________________
                      |                                                            
 _Jacob WARWICK ______|
| (1747 - 1826) m 1770|
|                     |                          _Alexander DUNLAP "the Immigrant"_+
|                     |                         | (1714 - 1744)                    
|                     |_Elizabeth DUNLAP _______|
|                       (1716 - 1817)           |
|                                               |_Ann MCFARLAND ___________________+
|                                                 (1718 - 1785)                    
|
|--Agnes (Ann Nancy) WARWICK 
|  (1779 - 1845)
|                                                __________________________________
|                                               |                                  
|                      _(RESEARCH QUERY) VANCE _|
|                     |                         |
|                     |                         |__________________________________
|                     |                                                            
|_Mary VANCE _________|
  (1754 - 1823) m 1770|
                      |                          __________________________________
                      |                         |                                  
                      |_________________________|
                                                |
                                                |__________________________________
                                                                                   

Sources

[S125]

[S2453]

[S2853]

[S2853]


INDEX

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Baron JOHN Emerich Edward Dalberg- ACTON 1st of Aldenham

10 Jan 1834 - 19 Jun 1902

ID Number: I104779

  • TITLE: Baron
  • OCCUPATION: English Historian; Professor of Modern History at Cambridge, 1895-1902
  • RESIDENCE: England and Naples, Italy and Bavaria
  • RELIGION: Catholic
  • BIRTH: 10 Jan 1834, Naples, Italy
  • DEATH: 19 Jun 1902, Tegernsee, Bavaria
  • RESOURCES: See: notes [S3766]
Father: Ferdinand RICHARD Edward Dalberg- ACTON 7th Baronet of Aldenham
Mother: MARIE Louise Pelina von DAHLBERG


Family 1 : MARIA Anna Ludmilla Euphrosina von VALLEY of Aldenham

Notes


Lord and Baron John Dalberg Acton 1834-1902) born on Jan 10 English historian. "He was a noted Christian liberal who edited "The Rambler" and planned the "Cambridge Modern History.""


There are two things which cannot be attacked in front: ignorance and narrow-mindedness. They can only be shaken by the simple development of the contrary qualities. They will not bear discussion.


— John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton, Letter (January 23, 1861) published in Lord Acton and his Circle (1906) Letter 74
http://www.knowprose.com/node/1056


Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.
http://www.giga-usa.com/quotes/authors/john_dalberg_acton_a001.ht m


John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton, Baron Acton


Baron Acton, Professor of Modern History at Cambridge, 1895-1902, born at Naples, 10 January, 1834, Where his father, Sir Richard Acton, held an important diplomatic appointment; died at Tegernsee, Bavaria, 19 June, 1902.


His mother was the heiress of a distinguished Bavarian family, the Dalbergs. The Actons, though of an old English Catholic stock, had long been naturalized in Naples, where Lord Acton's grandfather had been prime minister. The future historian was thus in an extraordinary degree cosmopolitan, and much of his exceptional mastery of historical literature may be ascribed to the fact that the principal languages of Europe were as familiar to him as his native tongue. In 1843 the boy was sent to Oscott College, Birmingham, were Doctor, afterwards Cardinal, Nicholas Wiseman was then president. After five years spent at Oscott, Acton complete his education at Munich, as the pupil of the celebrated historian Döllinger. With Döllinger he visited France, and both there and in Germany lived on terms of intimacy with the most eminent historical scholars of the day. Returning to England, however, in 1859, to settle upon the family estate of Aldenham in Shropshire, he entered parliament as member for an Irish constituency, and retained his seat for six years, voting with the Liberals, but taking little part in the debates. In the meantime he devoted himself to literary work, and upon Newman's retirement, in 1859, succeeded him in the editorship of a Catholic periodical called "The Rambler", which, after 1862, was transformed into a quarterly under the title of "The Home and Foreign Review". The ultra liberal tone of this journal gave offence to ecclesiastical authorities, and Acton eventually judged it necessary to discontinue its publication, in April, 1864, when he wrote, concerning certain tenets of his which had been disapproved of, that "the principles had not ceased to be true, nor the authority which censured them to be legitimate, because the two were in contradiction." The publication of the "Syllabus" by Pius IX in 1864 tended to alienate Acton still further from Ultramontane counsels. He had in the meantime become very intimate with Mr. Gladstone, by whom he was recommended for a peerage in 1869, and at the time of the Vatican Council Lord Acton went to Rome with the express object of organizing a party of resistance to the proposed definition of papal infallibility. The decree, when it came, seems to have had the effect of permanently embittering Acton's feelings towards Roman authority, but he did not, like his friend Döllinger, formally sever his connection with the Church. Indeed in his later years at Cambridge he regularly attended Mass, and he received the last sacraments, at Tegernsee, on his death-bed. The Cambridge Professorship of Modern History was offered to him by Lord Roseberry in 1895, and, besides the lectures which he delivered there, he conceived and partly organized the "Cambridge Modern History", the first volume of which was only to see the light after his death. Lord Acton never produced anything which deserves to be called a book, but he wrote a good many reviews and occasionally an article or a lecture. As an historian he was probably more remarkable for knowledge of detail than for judgment or intuition. The "Letters of Quirinus," published in the Allgemeine Zeitung", at the time of the Vatican Council, and attributed to Lord Acton, as well as other letters addressed to the "Times", in November, 1874, show a mind much warped against the Roman system. The "Letters to Mrs. Drew" (Mr. Gladstone's daughter), which we printed by Mr. Herbert Paul in 1903, are brilliant but often bitter. A pleasanter impression is given by another collection of Lord Acton's private letters (published 1906) under the editorship of Abbot Gasquet. Some of Acton's best work was contributed to the "English Historical Review". His article on "German Schools of History", in the first volume, and on "Döllinger's Historical Work", in the fifth, deserve particular mention.
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01114a.htm


The Acton-Lee Correspondence


Bologna
November 4, 1866


Sir,


The very kind letter which Mrs. Lee wrote to my wife last winter encouraged me to hope that you will forgive my presuming to address you, and that you will not resent as an intrusion a letter from an earnest and passionate lover of the cause whose glory and whose strength you were.


I have been requested to furnish private counsel in American affairs for the guidance of the editors of a weekly Review which is to begin at the New Year, and which will be conducted by men who are followers of Mr. Gladstone. You are aware, no doubt, that Mr. Gladstone was in the minority of Lord Palmerston's cabinet who wished to accept the French Emperor's proposal to mediate in the American war.


The reason of the confidence shown in my advice is simply the fact that I formerly traveled in America, and that I afterwards followed the progress of the four years' contest as closely and as keenly as it was possible to do with the partial and unreliable information that reached us. In the momentous questions which have arisen since you sheathed the sword, I have endeavoured to conform my judgment to your own as well as I could ascertain it from the report of your evidence, from the few English travelers who enjoyed the privilege of speaking with you, and especially from General Beauregard, who spoke, as I understood, your sentiments as well as his own. My travels in America never led me south of Maryland, and the only friends to whom I can look for instruction, are Northerners, mostly of Webster's school.


In my emergency, urged by the importance of the questions at issue in the United States, and by the peril of misguided public opinion between our two countries, I therefore seek to appeal to southern authorities, and venture at once to proceed to Headquarters.


If, Sir, you will consent to entertain my request, and will inform me of the light in which you would wish the current politics of America to be understood, I can pledge myself that the new Review shall follow the course which you prescribe and that any communication with which you may honor me shall be kept in strictest confidence, and highly treasured by me. Even should you dismiss my request as unwarranted, I trust you will remember it only as an attempt to break through the barrier of false reports and false sympathies which encloses the views of my countrymen.


It cannot have escaped you that much of the good will felt in England towards the South, so far as it was not simply the tribute of astonishment and admiration won by your campaigns, was neither unselfish nor sincere. It sprang partly from an exultant belief in the hope that America would be weakened by the separation, and from terror at the remote prospect of Farragut appearing in the channel and Sherman landing in Ireland.


I am anxious that you should distinguish the feeling which drew me aware toward your cause and your career, and which now guides my pen, from that thankless and unworthy sympathy.


Without presuming to decide the purely legal question, on which it seems evident to me from Madison's and Hamilton's papers that the Fathers of the Constitution were not agreed, I saw in State Rights the only availing check upon the absolutism of the sovereign will, and secession filled me with hope, not as the destruction but as the redemption of Democracy. The institutions of your Republic have not exercised on the old world the salutary and liberating influence which ought to have belonged to them, by reason of those defects and abuses of principle which the Confederate Constitution was expressly and wisely calculated to remedy. I believed that the example of that great Reform would have blessed all the races of mankind by establishing true freedom purged of the native dangers and disorders of Republics. Therefore I deemed that you were fighting the battles of our liberty, our progress, and our civilization; and I mourn for the stake which was lost at Richmond more deeply than I rejoice over that which was saved at Waterloo.


General Beauregard confirmed to me a report which was in the papers, that you are preparing a narrative of your campaigns. I sincerely trust that it is true, and that the loss you were said to have sustained at the evacuation of Richmond has not deprived you of the requisite materials. European writers are trying to construct that terrible history with the information derived from one side only. I have before me an elaborate work by a Prussian officer named Sander. It is hardly possible that future publications can be more honorable to the reputation of your army and your own. His feelings are strongly Federal, his figures, especially in estimating your forces, are derived from Northern journals, and yet his book ends by becoming an enthusiastic panegyric on your military skill. It will impress you favourably towards the writer to know that he dwells with particular detail and pleasure on your operations against Meade when Longstreet was absent, in the autumn of 1863.


But I have heard the best Prussian military critics regret that they had not the exact data necessary for a scientific appreciation of your strategy, and certainly the credit due to the officers who served under you can be distributed and justified by no hand but your own.


If you will do me the honor to write to me, letters will reach me addressed Sir J. Acton, Hotel [Serry?], Rome. Meantime I remain, with sentiments stronger than respect, Sir,


~ Your faithful servant
John Dalberg Acton


Lexington, Vir.,
15 Dec. 1866


Sir,


Although your letter of the 4th ulto. has been before me some days unanswered, I hope you will not attribute it to a want of interest in the subject, but to my inability to keep pace with my correspondence. As a citizen of the South I feel deeply indebted to you for the sympathy you have evinced in its cause, and am conscious that I owe your kind consideration of myself to my connection with it. The influence of current opinion in Europe upon the current politics of America must always be salutary; and the importance of the questions now at issue the United States, involving not only constitutional freedom and constitutional government in this country, but the progress of universal liberty and civilization, invests your proposition with peculiar value, and will add to the obligation which every true American must owe you for your efforts to guide that opinion aright. Amid the conflicting statements and sentiments in both countries, it will be no easy task to discover the truth, or to relieve it from the mass of prejudice and passion, with which it has been covered by party spirit. I am conscious the compliment conveyed in your request for my opinion as to the light in which American politics should be viewed, and had I the ability, I have not the time to enter upon a discussion, which was commenced by the founders of the constitution and has been continued to the present day. I can only say that while I have considered the preservation of the constitutional power of the General Government to be the foundation of our peace and safety at home and abroad, I yet believe that the maintenance of the rights and authority reserved to the states and to the people, not only essential to the adjustment and balance of the general system, but the safeguard to the continuance of a free government. I consider it as the chief source of stability to our political system, whereas the consolidation of the states into one vast republic, sure to be aggressive abroad and despotic at home, will be the certain precursor of that ruin which has overwhelmed all those that have preceded it. I need not refer one so well acquainted as you are with American history, to the State papers of Washington and Jefferson, the representatives of the federal and democratic parties, denouncing consolidation and centralization of power, as tending to the subversion of State Governments, and to despotism. The New England states, whose citizens are the fiercest opponents of the Southern states, did not always avow the opinions they now advocate. Upon the purchase of Louisiana by Mr. Jefferson, they virtually asserted the right of secession through their prominent men; and in the convention which assembled at Hartford in 1814, they threatened the disruption of the Union unless the war should be discontinued. The assertion of this right has been repeatedly made by their politicians when their party was weak, and Massachusetts, the leading state in hostility to the South, declares in the preamble to her constitution, that the people of that commonwealth "have the sole and exclusive right of governing themselves as a free sovereign and independent state, and do, and forever hereafter shall, exercise and enjoy every power, jurisdiction, and right which is not, or may hereafter be by them expressly delegated to the United States of America in congress assembled." Such has been in substance the language of other State governments, and such the doctrine advocated by the leading men of the country for the last seventy years. Judge Chase, the present Chief Justice of the U.S., as late as 1850, is reported to have stated in the Senate, of which he was a member, that he "knew of no remedy in case of the refusal of a state to perform its stipulations," thereby acknowledging the sovereignty and independence of state action. But I will not weary you with this unprofitable discussion. Unprofitable because the judgment of reason has been displaced by the arbitrament of war, waged for the purpose as avowed of maintaining the union of the states. If, therefore, the result of the war is to be considered as having decided that the union of the states is inviolable and perpetual under the constitution, it naturally follows that it is as incompetent for the general government to impair its integrity by the exclusion of a state, as for the states to do so by secession; and that the existence and rights of a state by the constitution are as indestructible as the union itself. The legitimate consequence then must be the perfect equality of rights of all the states; the exclusive right of each to regulate its internal affairs under rules established by the Constitution, and the right of each state to prescribe for itself the qualifications of suffrage. The South has contended only for the supremacy of the constitution, and the just administration of the laws made in pursuance to it. Virginia to the last made great efforts to save the union, and urged harmony and compromise. Senator Douglass, in his remarks upon the compromise bill recommended by the committee of thirteen in 1861, stated that every member from the South, including Messrs. Toombs and Davis, expressed their willingness to accept the proposition of Senator Crittenden from Kentucky, as a final settlement of the controversy, if sustained by the republican party, and that the only difficulty in the way of an amicable adjustment was with the republican party. Who then is responsible for the war? Although the South would have preferred any honorable compromise to the fratricidal war which has taken place, she now accepts in good faith its constitutional results, and receives without reserve the amendment which has already been made to the constitution for the extinction of slavery. That is an event that has been long sought, though in a different way, and by none has it been more earnestly desired than by citizens of Virginia. In other respects I trust that the constitution may undergo no change, but that it may be handed down to succeeding generations in the form we received it from our forefathers. The desire I feel that the Southern states should possess the good opinion of one whom I esteem as highly as yourself, has caused me to extend my remarks farther than I intended, and I fear it has led me to exhaust your patience. If what I have said should serve to give any information as regards American politics, and enable you to enlighten public opinion as to the true interests of this distracted country, I hope you will pardon its prolixity.


In regard to your inquiry as to my being engaged in preparing a narrative of the campaigns in Virginia, I regret to state that I progress slowly in the collection of the necessary documents for its completion. I particularly feel the loss of the official returns showing the small numbers with which the battles were fought. I have not seen the work by the Prussian officer you mention and therefore cannot speak of his accuracy in this respect.– With sentiments of great respect, I remain your obt. servant,


~ R.E. Lee
http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/acton-lee.html


http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/John_Acton


Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty: Founded in 1990, the Acton Institute is named in honor of John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton, first Baron Acton of Aldenham (1834-1902), the historian of freedom. The mission of the Institute is to promote a free society characterized by individual l


Children of Maria Anna Ludmilla Euphrosina von und zu Arco auf Valley and Sir John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton of Aldenham:


Hon. Mary Elizabeth Anne Dalberg-Acton b. 15 Aug 1866, d. 9 Jan 1955 She married Lt.-Col. Edward Bleiddian Herbert
Hon. Annie Mary Catherine Georgiana Dalberg-Acton b. 26 Sep 1868, d. 30 Sep 1917 unmarried.
Sir Richard Maximilian Lyon-Dalberg-Acton, 2nd Baron Acton of Aldenham+ b. 7 Aug 1870, d. 16 Jun 1924
Hon. John Dalberg Dalberg-Acton b. 30 May 1872, d. 16 Apr 1873
Hon. Elizabeth Mary Catherine Dalberg-Acton b. 21 Apr 1874, d. 1 Oct 1881
Hon. Jeanne Marie Dalberg-Acton b. 12 Mar 1876, d. 18 May 1919



Citations
1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 55. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
2. [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 28. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
3. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 10. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.




                                                                                                                       _EDWARD ACTON _____________________
                                                                                                                      | (1709 - ....)                     
                                                                   _JOHN Francis Edward ACTON 6th Baronet of Aldenham_|
                                                                  | (1736 - 1811) m 1800                              |
                                                                  |                                                   |_CATHERINE de GRAY ________________
                                                                  |                                                     (1715 - ....)                     
 _Ferdinand RICHARD Edward Dalberg- ACTON 7th Baronet of Aldenham_|
| (1801 - 1837) m 1832                                            |
|                                                                 |                                                    _JOSEPH Edward ACTON ______________+
|                                                                 |                                                   | (1737 - 1830)                     
|                                                                 |_MARY Anne ACTON __________________________________|
|                                                                   (1784 - 1873) m 1800                              |
|                                                                                                                     |_ELEANORE Gräfin Berghe von TRIPS _
|                                                                                                                       (1740 - ....)                     
|
|--JOHN Emerich Edward Dalberg- ACTON 1st of Aldenham
|  (1834 - 1902)
|                                                                                                                      ___________________________________
|                                                                                                                     |                                   
|                                                                  ___________________________________________________|
|                                                                 |                                                   |
|                                                                 |                                                   |___________________________________
|                                                                 |                                                                                       
|_MARIE Louise Pelina von DAHLBERG _______________________________|
  (1812 - 1860) m 1832                                            |
                                                                  |                                                    ___________________________________
                                                                  |                                                   |                                   
                                                                  |___________________________________________________|
                                                                                                                      |
                                                                                                                      |___________________________________
                                                                                                                                                          

Sources

[S3766]


INDEX

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Matilda BONDURANT

30 Nov 1798 - ____

ID Number: I83139

  • RESIDENCE: Madison Co. KY
  • BIRTH: 30 Nov 1798
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3101]
Father: Edward BONDURANT
Mother: Nancy MARTIN


Notes


Henry Newman (Husband)





                                                      _Jean (John Peter) Pierre BONDURANT Jr._+
                                                     | (1710 - ....) m 1735                   
                       _Jean (John Peter) BONDURANT _|
                      | (1737 - ....)                |
                      |                              |_Elizabeth DARBY _______________________
                      |                                (1716 - ....) m 1735                   
 _Edward BONDURANT ___|
| (1768 - 1855)       |
|                     |                               ________________________________________
|                     |                              |                                        
|                     |_Pauline Marshall ALLEN ______|
|                       (1741 - ....)                |
|                                                    |________________________________________
|                                                                                             
|
|--Matilda BONDURANT 
|  (1798 - ....)
|                                                     ________________________________________
|                                                    |                                        
|                      ______________________________|
|                     |                              |
|                     |                              |________________________________________
|                     |                                                                       
|_Nancy MARTIN _______|
  (1776 - ....)       |
                      |                               ________________________________________
                      |                              |                                        
                      |______________________________|
                                                     |
                                                     |________________________________________
                                                                                              

Sources

[S3101]


INDEX

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Lemuel Moye CHERRY

ABT 1690 - ABT 1754

ID Number: I22556

  • RESIDENCE: Beaufort Co. NC
  • BIRTH: ABT 1690
  • DEATH: ABT 1754
  • RESOURCES: See: Possible son? NOT PROVEN [S799] [S984]
Father: Samuel M. CHERRY
Mother: Frances BALLENTINE


Family 1 : Frances BALLENTINE
  1. +Rebecca CHERRY

Notes


Several Hodges married daughters of Cherrys; I think Lemuel Cherry, Sr, had two or three sons-in-law named Hodges. For example, John Hodges, Sr married Rebecca Cherry in about 1747. This John Hodges had a brother named Henry who was said to have married a Mary Cherry. And a Howell Hodges married an Elizabeth Cherry. I think this was Elizabeth Cherry b. abt 1727 Beaufort Co., NC, a daughter of Lemuel Cherry, Sr and his 2nd wife Gatsey Ann Llewellyn.


Lemuel Cherry, Sr. made his Will in Beaufort County on 14 July 1754 and recorded 9 son's and 6 daughter's, including daughter, Rebecca Hodges. His eldest son, John Cherry was executor. This indicated to me that Rebecca was the only married daughter, doubtless, the daughters were each rather young and she was probably only recently married to John Hodges, Sr.? [S899]


                                               _John CHERRY Sr. "the Immigrant"_+
                                              | (1619 - 1699)                   
                       _John CHERRY Jr._______|
                      | (1641 - ....) m 1662  |
                      |                       |_Elizabeth FAITHFUL _____________
                      |                         (1625 - 1672)                   
 _Samuel M. CHERRY ___|
| (1663 - 1734) m 1684|
|                     |                        _________________________________
|                     |                       |                                 
|                     |_Rebecca MAUND ________|
|                       (1647 - ....) m 1662  |
|                                             |_________________________________
|                                                                               
|
|--Lemuel Moye CHERRY 
|  (1690 - 1754)
|                                              _George BALLENTINE Sr.___________
|                                             | (1635 - 1702) m 1662            
|                      _George BALLENTINE Jr._|
|                     | (1663 - 1733)         |
|                     |                       |_Frances YATES __________________+
|                     |                         (1630 - 1702) m 1662            
|_Frances BALLENTINE _|
  (1660 - ....) m 1684|
                      |                        _________________________________
                      |                       |                                 
                      |_______________________|
                                              |
                                              |_________________________________
                                                                                

Sources

[S799]

[S984]

[S899]


INDEX

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Elihue Zachariah CURTIS

6 Feb 1846 - 22 Sep 1867

ID Number: I93310

  • RESIDENCE: Pike Co. MS
  • BIRTH: 6 Feb 1846
  • DEATH: 22 Sep 1867
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2140]
Father: Jacob CURTIS
Mother: Jane Riah REEVES


Notes


2 Elihue Zachariah Curtis b: 6 FEB 1846 d: 22 SEP 1867

                                             _Richard CURTIS III Jr._+
                                            | (1755 - 1811)          
                       _Richard CURTIS IV___|
                      | (1786 - 1841) m 1809|
                      |                     |_Patsey JONES __________
                      |                       (1759 - 1819)          
 _Jacob CURTIS _______|
| (1813 - 1877) m 1843|
|                     |                      ________________________
|                     |                     |                        
|                     |_Nancy Ann CARTER ___|
|                       (1786 - 1847) m 1809|
|                                           |________________________
|                                                                    
|
|--Elihue Zachariah CURTIS 
|  (1846 - 1867)
|                                            _Lazarus REEVES ________+
|                                           | (1752 - 1827) m 1775   
|                      _Zachariah REEVES ___|
|                     | (1799 - 1871)       |
|                     |                     |_Elizabeth MASSEY ______+
|                     |                       (1750 - 1827) m 1775   
|_Jane Riah REEVES ___|
  (1822 - 1894) m 1843|
                      |                      _Nathaniel WELLS _______+
                      |                     | (1781 - 1843) m 1800   
                      |_Anna "Annie" WELLS _|
                        (1803 - 1866)       |
                                            |_Elizabeth SIMMONS _____+
                                              (1782 - 1835) m 1800   

Sources

[S2140]


INDEX

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DANIEL

ABT 1700 - ____

ID Number: I102409

  • RESIDENCE: VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1700
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3707]

Family 1 :
  1. +Jane DANIEL
  2.  James DANIEL

Sources

[S3707]


INDEX

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Walter Lee GUERRANT

25 Nov 1853 - 22 Oct 1918

ID Number: I31839

  • RESIDENCE: Gilliam, Salina Co. MO and Umatilla Co. OR
  • BIRTH: 25 Nov 1853, Gilliam, Salina Co. Missouri
  • DEATH: 22 Oct 1918, Pendleton, Umatilla Co. Oregon
  • BURIAL: 26 Oct 1918, Holdman Cemetary Holdman, Umatilla Co. Or.
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1105]
Father: Robert Floyd GUERRANT
Mother: Zarilda Ann HILL


Family 1 : Margaret Missouri HEAZLE
  1. +Phillip Floyd GUERRANT
  2. +Ray Abigale or Abigail GUERRANT
  3.  Eunice GUERRANT
  4.  Kyle GUERRANT
  5. +Wade "Doc" GUERRANT
  6. +Anna Belle GUERRANT
  7.  Unknown GUERRANT
  8.  Zerilda GUERRANT

                                                    _Peter (Pierre) GUERRANT (GUERIN) Jr._______+
                                                   | (1737 - 1819) m 1756                       
                          _Stephen GUERRANT _______|
                         | (1766 - 1847) m 1805    |
                         |                         |_Mary PERROW (PERAULT) _____________________+
                         |                           (1739 - 1805) m 1756                       
 _Robert Floyd GUERRANT _|
| (1826 - 1900) m 1853   |
|                        |                          _(RESEARCH QUERY-VA) HARRIS of Old Virginia_
|                        |                         |                                            
|                        |_Salley "Sallie" HARRIS _|
|                          (1770 - ....) m 1805    |
|                                                  |____________________________________________
|                                                                                               
|
|--Walter Lee GUERRANT 
|  (1853 - 1918)
|                                                   ____________________________________________
|                                                  |                                            
|                         _________________________|
|                        |                         |
|                        |                         |____________________________________________
|                        |                                                                      
|_Zarilda Ann HILL ______|
  (1836 - 1874) m 1853   |
                         |                          ____________________________________________
                         |                         |                                            
                         |_________________________|
                                                   |
                                                   |____________________________________________
                                                                                                

Sources

[S1105]


INDEX

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Eleanor Warner LEWIS

ABT 1800 - ____

ID Number: I70535

  • RESIDENCE: Charles City Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1800
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2693] [S3098]
Father: Fielding LEWIS of Weyanoke
Mother: Agnes HARWOOD


Family 1 : Robert DOUTHAT Sr. of Weyanoke
  1.  Robert DOUTHAT Jr.
  2.  Jane DOUTHAT
  3.  Agnes DOUTHAT
  4.  Fielding Lewis DOUTHAT

Notes


V. Eleanor Warner Lewis((5)) (Fielding((4)), Warner((3)), John((2)), Robert((1))), daughter of Fielding Lewis and Agnes Harwood, his wife. Married Robert Douthat, of Weyanoke. Issue: [S2693]

                                                       _Fielding LEWIS Sr. of Warner Hall_+
                                                      | (1725 - 1781) m 1746              
                              _John LEWIS of Kinmore__|
                             | (1747 - 1825) m 1773   |
                             |                        |_Catherine WASHINGTON _____________+
                             |                          (1723 - 1749) m 1746              
 _Fielding LEWIS of Weyanoke_|
| (1774 - ....)              |
|                            |                         _Gabriel JONES ____________________+
|                            |                        | (1724 - 1806) m 1749              
|                            |_Elizabeth Bates JONES _|
|                              (1753 - 1783) m 1773   |
|                                                     |_Margaret Madison STROTHER ________+
|                                                       (1726 - 1822) m 1749              
|
|--Eleanor Warner LEWIS 
|  (1800 - ....)
|                                                      ___________________________________
|                                                     |                                   
|                             ________________________|
|                            |                        |
|                            |                        |___________________________________
|                            |                                                            
|_Agnes HARWOOD _____________|
  (1775 - ....)              |
                             |                         ___________________________________
                             |                        |                                   
                             |________________________|
                                                      |
                                                      |___________________________________
                                                                                          

Sources

[S2693]

[S3098]

[S2693]


INDEX

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Betty RUCKS

ABT 1760 - ____

ID Number: I68989

  • RESIDENCE: Chesterfield Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1760
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2631] [S2632]
Father: William RUCKS
Mother: Elizabeth PAYNE?


Notes


2 Bettie Rucks

                          __
                         |  
                       __|
                      |  |
                      |  |__
                      |     
 _William RUCKS ______|
| (1720 - 1777) m 1742|
|                     |   __
|                     |  |  
|                     |__|
|                        |
|                        |__
|                           
|
|--Betty RUCKS 
|  (1760 - ....)
|                         __
|                        |  
|                      __|
|                     |  |
|                     |  |__
|                     |     
|_Elizabeth PAYNE? ___|
  (1720 - ....) m 1742|
                      |   __
                      |  |  
                      |__|
                         |
                         |__
                            

Sources

[S2631]

[S2632]


INDEX

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William Henry WHITE

1836 - 31 May 1862

ID Number: I95680

  • RESIDENCE: Bedford Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 1836
  • DEATH: 31 May 1862
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: HXSM-32)

Family 1 : Lucy Davis WHEAT

Sources


INDEX

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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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