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Rev. JAMES BACON of Friston Hall

1575 - 9 Nov 1649

ID Number: I58880

  • TITLE: Rev.
  • OCCUPATION: rector of Burgate, Suffolk, England
  • RESIDENCE: Suffolk Co. England
  • BIRTH: 1575, Friston Hall, England
  • DEATH: 9 Nov 1649, Burgatt, Suffolk, England [285465]
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1898] [S2128] [S2698]
Father: JAMES BACON Knt.
Mother: ELIZABETH BACON


Family 1 : MARTHA WOODARD
  1. +Nathaniel BACON of King's Creek
  2. +Martha BACON

Notes


Children
Thomas BACON b: 1615 d: 1656 + Elizabeth ?
Nathaniel BACON b: 1620 d: 16 Mar 1691/92
William BACON b: ABT. 1632
Elizabeth BACON b: ABT. 1634 + Thomas BURROWES
Martha BACON b: 1634 + Anthony SMITH d: 1667
Anne BACON b: ABT. 1636 + ? WILKINSON


Americans of Royal Descent Virginia State Archives, Richmond, VA
Ancestors of American Presidents Author: Gary Boyd Roberts Publication: 1989



[S1898]

[285465]
d. 25 Aug 1670


                                                  _ROBERT BACON __________+
                                                 | (1479 - 1548) m 1504   
                       _JAMES BACON _____________|
                      | (1516 - 1573) m 1538     |
                      |                          |_ISABELLE ELEANOR CAGE _
                      |                            (1478 - ....) m 1504   
 _JAMES BACON Knt.____|
| (1543 - 1617) m 1590|
|                     |                           ________________________
|                     |                          |                        
|                     |_MARGARET RAWLINGS _______|
|                       (1518 - 1545) m 1538     |
|                                                |________________________
|                                                                         
|
|--JAMES BACON of Friston Hall
|  (1575 - 1649)
|                                                 _THOMAS BACON __________+
|                                                | (1470 - 1547) m 1514   
|                      _FRANCIS BACON of Hessett_|
|                     | (1522 - 1595)            |
|                     |                          |_ANN ROUS ______________
|                     |                            (1483 - ....) m 1514   
|_ELIZABETH BACON ____|
  (1573 - 1580) m 1590|
                      |                           ________________________
                      |                          |                        
                      |_ANNE DRURY ______________|
                        (1531 - ....)            |
                                                 |________________________
                                                                          

Sources

[S1898]

[S2128]

[S2698]

[S1898]


INDEX

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Dr. Thomas BARBOUR

ABT 1800 - 1849

ID Number: I50255

  • TITLE: Dr.
  • RESIDENCE: Orange Co. VA and St. Louis, MO
  • BIRTH: ABT 1800
  • DEATH: 1849, St. Louis, Missouri [241959]
  • RESOURCES: See: [S747] [S2530]
Father: Philip Pendleton BARBOUR Judge
Mother: Frances Todd JOHNSON


Family 1 : Sarah Catherine STROTHER

Notes


Msg From: "Paul Mullett" mullettpe@msn.com To: jbass@digital.net


Subject: Dr. Thomas Barbour Date: Thu, 30 Sep 2004


"Found your address on "My Southern Family Home Page". I have a letter from French Strother to Dr. Thomas Barbour dated Oct 19, 1833 dealing w/administration of his brother's estate and discussing contacting Governor's office. Also, discusses Negroes being sold and other family matters. Would you know of anyone having any interest in this information?


another letter I have is from Thomas BARBOUR (I had it "Burbon"). In that letter, dated 3/26/1832) Thomas addresses Miss Sarah Catherine STROTHER discussing their upcoming marrage and living arraingements. He mentiones Misses Elizabeth Buckner and Ashby. Also, mentiones a Major Lightfoot."


Paul E. Mullett
Louisville, KY

[241959]
of cholera


                                                                _James BARBOUR II____+
                                                               | (1707 - 1775) m 1733
                                  _Thomas BARBOUR _____________|
                                 | (1735 - 1825)               |
                                 |                             |_Sarah TODD _________+
                                 |                               (1717 - 1781) m 1733
 _Philip Pendleton BARBOUR Judge_|
| (1783 - 1842)                  |
|                                |                              _Joseph THOMAS ______+
|                                |                             | (1705 - 1773)       
|                                |_Mary Pendleton THOMAS ______|
|                                  (1735 - 1825)               |
|                                                              |_Sarah PENDLETON ____+
|                                                                (1711 - 1794)       
|
|--Thomas BARBOUR 
|  (1800 - 1849)
|                                                               _____________________
|                                                              |                     
|                                 _Benjamin JOHNSON ___________|
|                                | (1740 - ....)               |
|                                |                             |_____________________
|                                |                                                   
|_Frances Todd JOHNSON __________|
  (1787 - 1872)                  |
                                 |                              _James BARBOUR II____+
                                 |                             | (1707 - 1775) m 1733
                                 |_Elizabeth "Bettie" BARBOUR _|
                                   (1740 - ....)               |
                                                               |_Sarah TODD _________+
                                                                 (1717 - 1781) m 1733

Sources

[S747]

[S2530]


INDEX

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Elizabeth BUCKNER

18 Dec 1808 - Feb 1809

ID Number: I96688

  • BIRTH: 18 Dec 1808
  • DEATH: Feb 1809
Father: William Thomas BUCKNER Sr.
Mother: Mary Monroe BUCKNER


Notes


Elizabeth Buckner b. 18 Dec 1808 in probably, Bourbon, Kentucky

                                                    _Thomas BUCKNER __________+
                                                   | (1728 - 1795) m 1749     
                              _Thomas BUCKNER _____|
                             | (1755 - 1805)       |
                             |                     |_Judith Presley THORNTON _+
                             |                       (1731 - 1757) m 1749     
 _William Thomas BUCKNER Sr._|
| (1786 - 1849) m 1807       |
|                            |                      _Samuel HAWES Jr._________+
|                            |                     | (1727 - 1794) m 1751     
|                            |_Elizabeth HAWES ____|
|                              (1759 - 1836)       |
|                                                  |_Ann WALKER ______________+
|                                                    (1730 - 1805) m 1751     
|
|--Elizabeth BUCKNER 
|  (1808 - 1809)
|                                                   _Thomas BUCKNER __________+
|                                                  | (1728 - 1795) m 1749     
|                             _William BUCKNER ____|
|                            | (1753 - 1800) m 1773|
|                            |                     |_Judith Presley THORNTON _+
|                            |                       (1731 - 1757) m 1749     
|_Mary Monroe BUCKNER _______|
  (1791 - 1817) m 1807       |
                             |                      _Spence MONROE Sr.________+
                             |                     | (1727 - 1774) m 1752     
                             |_Elizabeth MONROE ___|
                               (1754 - 1812) m 1773|
                                                   |_Elizabeth "Eliza" JONES _+
                                                     (1729 - ....) m 1752     

Sources


INDEX

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FITZGERALD

____ - ____

ID Number: I17814

  • RESIDENCE: Pike Co. MS
  • RESOURCES: See: [S478]

Family 1 :
  1. +Emma Ethel FITZGERALD
  2.  Alex FITZGERALD
  3.   FITZGERALD

Sources

[S478]


INDEX

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Benjamin HOLLADAY

ABT 1720 - 21 Mar 1785

ID Number: I21730

Father: John Marshall HOLLADAY II
Mother: Ann Elizabeth LEWIS


Family 1 : Susannah
Family 2 : Susannah HICKMAN
  1. +Agnes HOLLADAY
  2.  Mary (HOLLIDAY) HOLLADAY
Family 3 : Fanny Susanna JOHNSON

Notes


CONFLICT: other records show his brother John Marshall m. Tabitha Collins in 1777.
Benjamin Holloday 3rd, (son of John 2nd, senior, Thomas 1st.) Deed p. 176.
October 4th, 1747, Benjamin Holloday and Susanna, his wife, (first,) of Spts. County, to Zachary Lewis of same, 295 1/2 acres in said County, devised said Benjamin by last will and testament of his father, John Holloday, deceased, married 2nd, Mary, widow of Isaac Scott.


"November 19th, 1778, Benjamin Holloday and Mary, his wife," Sons, Joseph and Benjamin, not mentioned in will.


Will of Benjamin Holloday, p. 42. Berkley Parish, Spts. County, died March 18th, 1785. Witness, Joseph Holloday, junior, Stephen Holloday and William Holloday. Ex. Son-in-Law, Joseph Pulliam. Leg. my wife (Mary) grandson, Benjamin Hclloday (son of Joseph) and daughter Susanna Holloday, daughter Agnes Holloday, married Joseph Holloday, junior, Martha Holloday, daughter Mary Holloday, married Austin Sandridge, daughter Nancy Holloday, married John Rawlings, daughter Elizabeth Holloday, married Joseph Pulliam.


Children by first wife: 1st, Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Pulliam. 2nd, Joseph, born 1747, died 1783, married 1780, Mrs. Fannie Johnson, had, 1st, Benjamin, born 1781. 2nd, Fanny, born 1783. 3rd, Susanna. 4th, Agnes, born 1750, died 1792, married Joseph Holliday, junior. 5th, Sarah, born 1752, died 1800. 6th, Mary, born 1756. 7th, Martha, born 1757. 8th, Benjamin, born 1758.


By second wife. 9th, Mary, born 1760, died 1830, married Austin Sandridge. 10th, Nancy, born 1762, died 1800, married John Rawlings.



[S1286]


                                                                      __
                                                                     |  
                             _Thomas I (HOLLIDAY\HALLIDAY) HOLLADAY _|
                            | (1648 - 1701) m 1670                   |
                            |                                        |__
                            |                                           
 _John Marshall HOLLADAY II_|
| (1676 - 1742)             |
|                           |                                         __
|                           |                                        |  
|                           |_Elizabeth SEVILLE _____________________|
|                             (1650 - ....) m 1670                   |
|                                                                    |__
|                                                                       
|
|--Benjamin HOLLADAY 
|  (1720 - 1785)
|                                                                     __
|                                                                    |  
|                            ________________________________________|
|                           |                                        |
|                           |                                        |__
|                           |                                           
|_Ann Elizabeth LEWIS ______|
  (1688 - ....)             |
                            |                                         __
                            |                                        |  
                            |________________________________________|
                                                                     |
                                                                     |__
                                                                        

Sources

[S725]

[S894]

[S938]

[S1286]

[S3748]

[S1286]


INDEX

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Joannie MARLOWE

25 Nov 1861 - 23 Oct 1928

ID Number: I94318

  • RESIDENCE: of Hamilton Co.TX and Shawnee, OK
  • BIRTH: 25 Nov 1861, Texas
  • DEATH: 23 Oct 1928, Shawnee, Pottawatomie Co. Oklahoma
  • BURIAL: Fairview Cem, Shawnee, Ok
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS [S3471]
Father: Joseph "Joe" MARLOWE


Family 1 : Joseph Clayton LUCAS
  1. +Joseph Lee LUCAS

                                               _____________________
                                              |                     
                         _Allen MARLOWE ______|
                        | (1771 - ....) m 1797|
                        |                     |_____________________
                        |                                           
 _Joseph "Joe" MARLOWE _|
| (1828 - 1862)         |
|                       |                      _George ASBURY ______+
|                       |                     | (1756 - 1819) m 1780
|                       |_Jane Jean ASBURY ___|
|                         (1782 - ....) m 1797|
|                                             |_Mary Ann TAYLOR ____
|                                               (1758 - ....) m 1780
|
|--Joannie MARLOWE 
|  (1861 - 1928)
|                                              _____________________
|                                             |                     
|                        _____________________|
|                       |                     |
|                       |                     |_____________________
|                       |                                           
|_______________________|
                        |
                        |                      _____________________
                        |                     |                     
                        |_____________________|
                                              |
                                              |_____________________
                                                                    

Sources

[S3471]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Charles MILLS III

ABT 1745 - 1828

ID Number: I73030

  • RESIDENCE: Hanover Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1745
  • DEATH: 1828
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2321]
Father: Charles MILLS II
Mother: Ann JACKSON


Notes


Charles MILLS III, b. ca. 1740s; d. 1828

                                             _Nicholas MILLS Jr. "The Immigrant"_+
                                            | (1675 - 1741)                      
                       _Charles MILLS I_____|
                      | (1700 - ....)       |
                      |                     |_Ann CLOPTON _______________________+
                      |                       (1680 - 1754)                      
 _Charles MILLS II____|
| (1720 - 1782) m 1740|
|                     |                      _(RESEARCH QUERY) THOMPSON _________
|                     |                     |                                    
|                     |_Ann THOMPSON _______|
|                       (1700 - ....)       |
|                                           |____________________________________
|                                                                                
|
|--Charles MILLS III
|  (1745 - 1828)
|                                            ____________________________________
|                                           |                                    
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |____________________________________
|                     |                                                          
|_Ann JACKSON ________|
  (1720 - ....) m 1740|
                      |                      ____________________________________
                      |                     |                                    
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |____________________________________
                                                                                 

Sources

[S2321]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Elizabeth SCHINKINGH

ABT 1670 - ____

ID Number: I69114

  • RESIDENCE: SC
  • BIRTH: ABT 1670
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: HQSS-SX)

Family 1 : William SMITH
  1. +Thomas SMITH

Sources


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Gen. Richard TAYLOR C.S.A.

27 Jan 1826 - 12 Apr 1879

ID Number: I4265

  • TITLE: Gen.
  • OCCUPATION: CSA Commander OF LA; Author "Destruction And Reconstruct"; Fashion Plantation, St Charles Parish, Louisiana
  • RESIDENCE: of Louisville, KY and St. James Parish, LA and VA and New York, NY
  • BIRTH: 27 Jan 1826, Springfield, near Louisville, Kentucky
  • DEATH: 12 Apr 1879, at Barlow's home in New York City, New York
  • BURIAL: Gordon Tomb, Metairie, Louisiana
  • RESOURCES: See: [S176] [S500] [S554] [S721] [S765]
Father: Zachary "Old Rough and Ready" TAYLOR 12th PRESIDENT
Mother: Margaret Mackall "Peggy" SMITH 1st Lady of the USA


Family 1 : Louisa Marie Myrthe BRINGIER of "White Hall"
  1.  Louise Margaret TAYLOR
  2.  Elizabeth Betty M. TAYLOR
  3.  Zachary TAYLOR
  4.  Richard TAYLOR Jr.
  5.  Myrthe Bianca TAYLOR

Notes


"General Dick" Taylor, educated at Harvard and Yale; Lt-Gen CSA (Commanding Officer of Louisiana); helped administer western Confederacy after the fall of Vicksburg on 4 July 1863; won victory of Sabine Crossroads over union forces under Gen N.P. Banks on 8 Apr 1864; succeeded John B. Hood as Gen Commanding Confederate Army of Tennessee on 22 Jan 1865);
author of Destruction and Reconstruction (1879).


Following the course of the Red River in LA, the Union Army and Navy progressed with little opposition through Alexandria and reached Natchitoches by early April, 1864. At Natchitoches the Army veered away from the Red River, going toward Shreveport by way of Mansfield, which left them without the support of the Navy. This and other tactical blunders on the part of General Banks and a series of successful maneuvers by Maj. Gen. Richard Taylor (son of President Zachary Taylor), who commanded the Confederate forces, were decisive factors leading to the final outcome of the battle.


Confederate Victory at Mansfield


On May 18, 1864, the Union forces crossed the Atchafalaya River, ending the disastrous Red River campaign. By turning back these large Union forces, the Confederates were able to prevent complete Union control of Louisiana and to stop progression of the war into Texas.


Mansfield State Commemorative Area, Route 2, Box 459, Mansfield, La. 71052.
(318) 872-1474. The park is located in DeSoto Parish, four miles south of the town of Mansfield on Louisiana Highway 175. The 118-acre park has a museum exhibiting Civil War weapons, arms, uniforms, letters, diaries, documents and other related artifacts. An interpretive trail, named in honor of Gen. Mouton, winds throughout the site. In 1973, this state commemorative area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places, an honorary designation for significant historic sites.


(Information herein is drawn from a public document issued by the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, Office of State Parks.)


Name TAYLOR, Richard
Born January 27 1826, nr Louisville KY
Died April 12 1879, New York NY
Pre-War Profession Military secretary to his father in Mexican War, planter, politician.
War Service 1861 Col. of 9th Louisiana, October 1861 Brig. Gen., Jackson's Shenandoah Valley campaign, Seven Days, July 1862 Maj. Gen., command of Dist. of West Louisiana, Red River campaign, Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, April 1864
Lt. Gen. in command of Dept. of Alabama and Mississippi, held out at Mobile.
Post War Career Wrote memoirs
Notes Son of President Zachary Taylor, and brother-in-law of President Davis.
Further reading Parrish, T. Michael Richard Taylor, soldier prince of Dixie Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press 1992 Taylor, Richard Destruction and reconstruction : personal experiences of the late war Alexandria VA, Time-Life Books 1983.


THE TAYLORS: Union Brig. Gen. Joseph P. Taylor was the uncle of Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor, son of the late President Zachary Taylor, who was the brother-in-law of Confederate Brig. Gen. Allen Thomas, and of Jefferson Davis by his first marriage, while the Confederate Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws was a nephew through marriage of the late president, and hence a cousin of Dick Taylor.


Command KENTUCKY
Marcellus J. (Sue Mundy) Clarke's
Kentucky Guerrilla Command
Dick Taylor's Guerrilla Command
******
Lieutenant-General Richard Taylor, the only son of General Zachary Taylor, twelfth president of the United States, was born near Louisville, Ky., January 27, 1826. He was liberally educated at Edinburgh, in France, and at Yale college, and after his graduation in 1845 he served for a time as the secretary of his father, then in command of the army on the Rio Grande. During the succeeding period of peace he lived upon his extensive estate in St. Charles Parish, La., devoting himself to the management of the plantation and to political and scientific studies ; in the enjoyment of a loving family, wealth and friends, and typifying the flower of the social development of that period. He served in the senate of the State from 1858 to 1861, and was a delegate to the Charleston and Baltimore national conventions of 1860. As chairman of the committee on Federal Relations of the Louisiana senate of 1861, he secured the passage of an act calling a State convention, and in that latter body held the chairmanship of the Military and Defense committee.


After the passage of the ordinance of secession he visited General Bragg at Pensacola, until called back to assume command of the Ninth Louisiana regiment of infantry and hasten with it to Richmond. Reaching Manassas after the battle he was assigned to Walker's brigade, which also included the Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Louisiana regiments. On Walker's transfer to another command, Taylor, though once refusing promotion, was persuaded by the insistence of the senior colonels and President Davis, to accept the command of the brigade and the rank of brigadier-general. With this gallant brigade, in the division of Richard S. Ewell, he participated in the battles of Front Royal, Cross Keys, Winchester and Port Republic, of Jackson's campaign in the Shenandoah valley.


At Port Republic, General Taylor and his Louisiana were assigned to attack the enemy's left, and their intrepid conduct was especially commended by their great commander. The Federal batteries finally left in their hands by the defeat of the enemy were presented to the brigade. Soon after the close of the Seven Days' battles before Richmond, Taylor was promoted major-general upon the recommendation of Stonewall Jackson, and was assigned to the command of the district of Louisiana; embracing all of that State west of the Mississippi. Here he encountered the most arduous duty. Confederate authority had ceased to exist since the fail of New Orleans; fortifications at Barataria, Berwick's Bay, and other points, had been abandoned ; industry was paralyzed, and soldiers, arms, munitions and money were
alike wanting.


Amidst these discouraging conditions General Taylor set about the task of restoring confidence, reviving enthusiasm and creating an army. In an incredible short time his courage and resolute energy had changed the aspect of the State. Regiments began to form, then brigades and divisions, shops and depots of supplies were established, ordnance was gathered, and river boats were transformed into an armed navy. The army so greatly due to his organizing ability and enthusiasm afterward won its triumphs and had its glories as well as the armies of Tennessee and Northern Virginia. The Federal post Bayou des Allemands was captured, Weitzel's imposing advance down the Lafourche was checked by the determined fighting of 500 men, the "Indianola" was destroyed in naval combat, and at Berwick's Bay the Federals were forced to turn over to General Taylor 1,700 prisoners, 12 guns and vast military stores. But his operations for the relief of New Orleans were rendered futile by the fall of Vicksburg.


In the spring of 1864 he was called upon to encounter the formidable invasion of the Red river country, composed of nineteen gunboats under Admiral Porter, 28,000 men under Banks, and 7,000 from Arkansas under Steele. General Taylor was able to give battle at Mansfield with a force of 8,800 men and won a glorious victory, driving the enemy four miles, and capturing 2,500 prisoners and twenty pieces of artillery. On the next day, April 9th, he struck the enemy a second staggering blow at Pleasant Hill, and a month later the Federal army crossed the, Atchafalaya, leaving Taylor in undisturbed possession of his department.


He then sought relief from duty, but was soon called to assume command of the department of Alabama and Mississippi, with promotion to the rank of lieutenant-general. Here he did all that could be hoped in the closing months of the struggle, until after Johnston's capitulation, when having concentrated the forces of Maury and Forrest at Meridian, he surrendered to General Canby, at Citronelle, May 8, 1865, all the remaining forces of the Confederacy east of the Mississippi. By order of General Canby his corps commanders conformed the movement of their troops to the advice of General Taylor, and entire confidence existed between the Northern and Southern soldiers.


In the troublous years which followed he was active in the interest of the South and was able to exert an important influence through his remarkable tact; charm of manner and strength of character. He visited Mr. Davis at Fortress Monroe, spent some time at Washington in efforts for the release of the distinguished captive, appealed to Johnson and Grant for a lenient administration of reconstruction laws, and was instrumental in securing the relieving of Sheridan by Hancock at New Orleans. In 1873 he visited Europe and was the recipient of a continuous social ovation. His principal literary works, "A Statesman of the Colonial Era," and "Destruction and Reconstruction," attracted wide attention. But his later years were clouded, not only by the loss of wealth, but by the death of his two young sons during the war, and his sorrow was intensified by the death of his wife, Myrthe Bringier, in 1875. After that he survived but four years, a period he passed in Virginia. He died at New York, April 17, 1879.


***
General Richard Taylor headed LA troops that came to join Stonewall in the Valley in 1862. There is a story that Taylor thought to impress Stonewall by having his troops march in smartly without stragglers and then go into a dance. Stonewall, of course, pretended not to be impressed, but he put the LA troops in crucial spots in ensuing battles. His Valley boys were awe struck by the ability of Taylor's troops to respond correctly to orders given in French.


July 1861 Col. of 9th Louisiana
October 1861 Brig. Gen., commanded a brigade under Ewell in Jackson's Shenandoah Valley campaign
July 1862 Maj. Gen., command of Dist. of West Louisiana, fought in Red River Campaign, Mansfield, Pleasant Hill
April 1864 Lt. Gen. in command of Dept. of East Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi, held out at Mobile
May 1865 surrendered all remaining Confederate forces east of the Mississippi River


Taylor's Surrender


A meeting was schedule for the last day of April, 1865 between Gen. Richard Taylor, CSA and General E.R.S. Canby U.S.A about 12 miles up the railroad from Mobile, AL.


The place was called Magee's Farm. Canby was waiting at the scheduled time beside the tracks with a full brigade drawn up as guard of honor, a band, and a brassy array of staffers. They all turned out in their best dress.


Taylor and an aide who's uniform was as weathered and battered as his own arrived on a handcart from Meridian, MS that was "pumped" down the tracks by two Negroes. Taylor and Canby retired to a room that was prepared in a nearby house. They agreed to a truce while they awaited ratification by their two governments of terms given to Johnston twelve days earlier by Sherman. Copies had been forwarded to both of them. This being done, they went into the yard and shared a luncheon that included several bottles of champagne. Taylor commented "these were the first agreeable explosive sounds I had heard for years." The musicians began playing "Hail, Columbia" and "Dixie."


Back in Meridian the next day, Taylor had heard from Canby that the Sherman-Johnston agreement had been disavowed; fighting would resume in forty-eight hours unless he surrendered on the terms accorded Lee three weeks earlier. Taylor had neither the means nor the inclination to continue the struggle on his own. On May 2, 1865 he accepted Canby's scaled-down offer. Two days later on May 4, they met again, this time in Citronelle, AL also on the Mobile-Ohio Railroad, twenty miles north of Magee's farm. Taylor delivered as he put it "the epilogue of the great drama in which I had played a humble part."


In Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, as had already been done in Virginia, Georgia, North and South Carolina; all survivors were to lay down their arms in exchange for assurance by the victors that they were not to be "disturbed" by the U.S. government "so long as they continue to observe the conditions of their parole and the laws in force where they reside."


A historical marker marks the spot on Celeste Road in Citronelle.
This marker is in Citronelle, AL on Celeste Road. Just across from it is Boy Scout Camp Pushmatahah where the actual surrender took place under an oak tree called Surrender Oak. This oak tree was destroyed durring a hurricane in 1952, but one has been planted in its place.


Children:
Zachary TAYLOR b: 1855
Betty M. TAYLOR
Louise Margaret TAYLOR
Richard TAYLOR
Myrthe Bianca TAYLOR b: 1864 + Isaac Hull STAUFFER b: Bet. 1860 - 1865


"General Richard Taylor, in one of the best Confederate memoirs, Destruction and Reconstruction, related what happened as he surrendered the last Confederate troops east of the Mississippi in 1865. A German, wearing the uniform of a Yankee general and speaking in heavily accented English, lectured him that now that the war was over, Southerners would be taught "the true American principles." Taylor replied, sardonically, that he regretted that his grandfather, an officer in the Revolution, and his father, President of the United States, had not passed on to him true American principles. Yankeeism was triumphant."
For the whole article from whence this comes visit:
Why we hate Yankees: http://www.lewrockwell.com/wilson/wilson12.html


Lords of the Valley by Dale Gallon


Richard Taylor, Confederate general, only son of Margaret Mackall (Smith) and Gen. Zachary Taylor, was born at the Taylor family home, Springfield, near Louisville, Kentucky, on January 27, 1826, and named for his grandfather, a Virginian who had served as a Revolutionary War officer. He attended private schools in Kentucky and Massachusetts before being admitted to Yale College in 1843. He graduated two years later, having merited no scholastic honors but instead concentrated on reading widely in classical and military history. He agreed to manage the family cotton plantation in Jefferson County, Mississippi, and in 1850 he persuaded his father (now President Taylor by virtue of his election in 1848) to purchase Fashion, a large sugar plantation in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana.


After Zachary Taylor's untimely death in July 1850, Taylor inherited Fashion. Steadily he increased its acreage, improved its sugar works (at considerable expense), and expanded its labor force to nearly 200 slaves, making him one of the richest men in Louisiana. But the freeze of 1856 ruined his crop, forcing him into heavy debt with a large mortgage on Fashion, a fragile condition underwritten largely by his generous mother­in­law Aglae Bringier, a wealthy French Creole matriarch whose daughter, Myrthe, Taylor had married in 1851. (They eventually had two sons and three daughters.) Yet he still projected an image of aristocratic affluence by racing thoroughbred horses at the famous Metairie Track and appearing at the gaming tables of the exclusive Boston Club in New Orleans.


Taylor was elected to the Louisiana Senate in 1855; he was affiliated first with the Whig party, then the American (Know-Nothing) party, and finally the Democratic party,qv veering cautiously toward a strong anti­Republican yet reluctant proslavery position. His sense of nationalistic, Whiggish conservatism, although thoroughly laced with a Southern disdain for agitating abolitionists, also made him distrustful of demagogic Southern fire­eaters' demands for disunion. Both of these volatile expressions of the nation's expansive democracy Taylor found repulsive and ultimately tragic. As a rueful delegate from Louisiana to the 1860 national Democratic Convention in Charleston, he witnessed the party's fatal splintering along sectional lines. There he attempted, but failed, to forge a less radical course for the South, arguing for a compromise between stunned moderates and implacable secessionists. Now viewing war as inevitable, Taylor willingly served as a delegate to the Louisiana secession convention in January 1861 and voted with the convention's majority for immediate secession. Yet his prophetic pleas to protect the state from military invasion went largely unheeded by overconfident fellow secessionists. He retired in disgust to his plantation, recognizing the Confederacy's fundamental lack of unity and even predicting eventual defeat, but he remained willing to serve if called. He was elected colonel of the Ninth Louisiana Infantry, assumed command in July, and took the regiment to Virginia. Surprisingly, in late October he received promotion to brigadier general by order of President Jefferson Davis (his brother­in­law by Davis's first marriage to one of Taylor's sisters). Although devoid of formal military training or combat experience, Taylor enjoyed his brigade's strong respect along with a reputation as a consummate student of military history, strategy, and tactics. "Dick Taylor was a born soldier," asserted a close friend. "Probably no civilian of his time was more deeply versed in the annals of war." Taylor was placed in command of the Louisiana Brigade, which included Maj. Chatham Roberdeau Wheat's notorious battalion of "Louisiana Tigers," and proved vital to Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's brilliant Shenandoah Valley campaign during the spring of 1862. Jackson used Taylor's brigade as an elite strike force that set a crippling marching pace and dealt swift flanking attacks. At Front Royal on May 23, again at Winchester on May 25, and finally at the climactic battle of Port Republic on June 9, he led the Louisianans in timely assaults against strong enemy positions. He was promoted to major general on July 25, 1862, at thirty­six years of age the youngest Confederate officer to attain such rank to date. He suffered terribly from chronic rheumatoid arthritis, however, and so was given command of the District of West Louisiana and charged with reviving his home state's severely deteriorated war effort. Almost from the start he feuded with his superior, Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith, qv commander of the Trans­Mississippi Department, mainly regarding Taylor's desperate need for troops to defend Louisiana's civilian population against destructive federal forays. Smith also thwarted Taylor's desire to free New Orleans from federal occupation, a goal that received strong, although temporary, approval and encouragement from Secretary of War George Wythe Randolph and President Davis. During 1863 Taylor directed an effective series of clashes with Union forces over control of lower Louisiana, most notably at Fort Bisland and Franklin (April 13-14), Brashear City (June 23), and Bayou Bourbeau (November 3).


In the early spring of 1864, after withdrawing up the Red River Valley in the face of Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks's invasion force of more than 25,000 men, Taylor became appalled at the devastation inflicted by the enemy upon Louisiana's heartland. On April 8, with an army of no more than 9,000 men, mostly Louisianans and Texans, he ignored Smith's explicit instructions to delay, instead attacking Banks's disorganized column a few miles below Mansfield near Sabine Crossroads. The Confederates swept the terror­stricken Yankees through the thick pine forest and then pursued them southward to Pleasant Hill. There, the next day, the federals withstood Taylor's assaults, forcing him to retire from the field. But Banks's generals compelled him to withdraw to Alexandria on the Red River. Taylor was outraged when Smith abruptly detached Walker's Texas Division for fighting in Arkansas, and he was left with only 5,000 men to lay siege to Alexandria. Taylor repeatedly demanded Walker's Division in order to crush Banks and liberate New Orleans, but Smith stubbornly refused. Finally Banks's army escaped from Alexandria on May 13. Convinced of Smith's arrogant ambition and incompetence, Taylor exploded with a series of insulting, insubordinate diatribes against Smith and submitted his resignation. Although unwilling to admit his strategic blunder in failing to allow Taylor to keep Walker's Division, Smith harbored no personal grudge. Taylor, however, never forgave Smith. Despite his heroic status for having saved most of Louisiana and virtually all of Texas from military conquest, Taylor viewed the Red River Campaign as a profound disappointment.


Preferring to ignore the Taylor/­Smith feud, on July 18 President Davis placed Taylor in command of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana and promoted him to lieutenant general, thus making him one of only three non-West Pointers who achieved such high rank in the South. From September 1864 until war's end Taylor struggled to defend his department, receiving scant cooperation from state governors, legislatures, and local militia units, while also contending with Jefferson Davis's poor coordination of the Confederacy's cumbersome bureaucracy, especially its divisive departmental system. Fortunately, Taylor enjoyed the benefit of Nathan Bedford Forrest's superb cavalry, which resisted federal incursions and supported the embattled Army of Tennessee by raiding enemy supply lines. Forrest showed genuine admiration for Taylor's leadership, remarking candidly, "He's the biggest man in the lot. If we'd had more like him, we would have licked the Yankees long ago." In January 1865 Taylor briefly assumed command of the shattered ranks of the Army of Tennessee after Gen. John Bell Hood'sqv catastrophic defeats at Franklin and Nashville several weeks earlier. As the Southern cause rapidly disintegrated during the spring, Taylor saw his own department gutted by Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson's massive cavalry raid through Alabama and Maj. Gen. Edward R. S. Canby'sqv triumphant siege of Mobile. Taylor had "shared the fortunes of the Confederacy," as he later recalled, having "sat by its cradle and followed its hearse." Indeed, the war had inflicted harsh personal sacrifices: he lost his plantation to destruction and confiscation by federal soldiers; his two young sons died of scarlet fever as wartime refugees; and his wife suffered so severely that she lapsed into a slow decline that ended with her premature death in 1875.


After surrendering his department to Canby on May 4, 1865, Taylor took up residency in New Orleans and tried to revive his finances by securing a lease of the New Basin Canal from the state. He also garnered the support of a wealthy New York City attorney, Samuel Latham Mitchell Barlow, one of the Democratic party's most effective powerbrokers. At Barlow's bidding Taylor negotiated with presidents Andrew Johnson and Ulysses S. Grant and also lobbied members of Congress, all in an attempt to advance democratic principles, mainly by gaining lenient treatment for the South. Increasingly distrustful of Radical Republicans, Taylor finally cursed Reconstructionqv as a loathsome evil, with Johnson as its inept victim and Grant as its corrupt handmaiden. The continual racial and political strife, much of which Taylor witnessed personally in New Orleans, gradually pushed him along with many other genteel conservatives into a reactionary position that lent tacit approval to the corrupt, blatantly violent backlash by Southern white Democrats against freedmens' efforts to assert their new voting rights under Republican sponsorship. Shortly after his wife's death in 1875, Taylor moved with his three daughters to Winchester, Virginia. Intimately involved in New Yorker Samuel J. Tilden's Democratic presidential campaign in 1876, Taylor vainly attempted to influence congressional maneuverings in the wake of the disputed election returns, a national crisis ultimately diffused by the pervasive breakdown of solidarity among Democratic leaders. On April 12, 1879, Taylor died at Barlow's home in New York City, succumbing to severe internal congestion resulting from his long battle with rheumatoid arthritis. Although Taylor had never demonstrated strong religious convictions, an Episcopal clergyman was present to minister to him. He was buried in a family crypt in Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans. Only a few weeks before his death he completed his memoirs, Destruction and Reconstruction, one of the most literate and colorful firsthand accounts of the Civil War era. From: http://www.angelfire.com/va3/valleywar/people/taylor.html






[S176]


                                                                                _Zachary TAYLOR Sr._______+
                                                                               | (1707 - 1768) m 1737     
                                                       _Richard TAYLOR ________|
                                                      | (1744 - 1829) m 1779   |
                                                      |                        |_Elizabeth LEE ___________+
                                                      |                          (1709 - 1745) m 1737     
 _Zachary "Old Rough and Ready" TAYLOR 12th PRESIDENT_|
| (1784 - 1850) m 1810                                |
|                                                     |                         _William Dabney STROTHER _+
|                                                     |                        | (1726 - 1808) m 1752     
|                                                     |_Sarah Dabney STROTHER _|
|                                                       (1760 - 1822) m 1779   |
|                                                                              |_Sarah BAYLY _____________+
|                                                                                (1720 - 1774) m 1752     
|
|--Richard TAYLOR C.S.A.
|  (1826 - 1879)
|                                                                               _Walter SMITH II__________+
|                                                                              | (1720 - 1748)            
|                                                      _Walter SMITH III_______|
|                                                     | (1747 - 1804) m 1774   |
|                                                     |                        |__________________________
|                                                     |                                                   
|_Margaret Mackall "Peggy" SMITH 1st Lady of the USA__|
  (1788 - 1852) m 1810                                |
                                                      |                         _James John MACKALL ______+
                                                      |                        | (1717 - 1772) m 1736     
                                                      |_Ann MACKALL ___________|
                                                        (1753 - ....) m 1774   |
                                                                               |_Mary HANCE ______________
                                                                                 (1720 - ....) m 1736     

Sources

[S176]

[S500]

[S554]

[S721]

[S765]

[S176]


INDEX

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Marie TRABUE

29 Nov 1744 - ____

ID Number: I11559

  • RESIDENCE: Goochland Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 29 Nov 1744, Goochland Co. VA
  • RESOURCES: See: [S180] [S351] [S441]
Father: Jacob TRABUE
Mother: Mary (Marie) WOOLDRIDGE


Notes


No further record, prob. died young.

                                                                    _Anthoine TRABUC ________________________________________+
                                                                   | (1629 - ....) m 1646                                    
                            _Anthony TRABUE\TRABUC "the Immigrant"_|
                           | (1669 - 1724) m 1704                  |
                           |                                       |_Bernarde CHIBAILHE _____________________________________+
                           |                                         (1629 - ....) m 1646                                    
 _Jacob TRABUE ____________|
| (1705 - 1767) m 1731     |
|                          |                                        _Moyses (Moses or Moise) VEREUL\VERRUEIL "the Immigrant"_+
|                          |                                       | (1650 - 1701) m 1677                                    
|                          |_Magdalene VEREUL\VERRUEIL ____________|
|                            (1683 - 1731) m 1704                  |
|                                                                  |_Magdalena PRODON (PRODHOMME) ___________________________+
|                                                                    (1660 - 1722) m 1677                                    
|
|--Marie TRABUE 
|  (1744 - ....)
|                                                                   _________________________________________________________
|                                                                  |                                                         
|                           _John WOOLDRIDGE "the Immigrant"_______|
|                          | (1678 - 1757) m 1705                  |
|                          |                                       |_________________________________________________________
|                          |                                                                                                 
|_Mary (Marie) WOOLDRIDGE _|
  (1712 - 1789) m 1731     |
                           |                                        _Edward OSBORNE _________________________________________+
                           |                                       | (1646 - 1697) m 1676                                    
                           |_Martha OSBORNE? ______________________|
                             (1688 - 1757) m 1705                  |
                                                                   |_Tabitha PLATT __________________________________________+
                                                                     (1660 - 1692) m 1676                                    

Sources

[S180]

[S351]

[S441]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Martha TURNER?

ABT 1790 - ____

ID Number: I25051

  • RESIDENCE: Monroe Co. GA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1790
  • RESOURCES: See: [S834]

Family 1 : John STANDARD
  1.  Benjamin T. STANDARD
  2.  Philadelphia STANDARD
  3. +Kimbrough STANDARD
  4.  Elizabeth STANDARD
  5.  George H. STANDARD
  6.  James Fleming STANDARD
  7.  Lucretia STANDARD
  8.  Martha Ann STANDARD
  9.  Henry STANDARD

Sources

[S834]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.