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My Southern Family

GRUFFYDD Llywelyn ap Madog Lord of Glyndfrdwy

ABT 1280 - ____

ID Number: I52785

  • RESIDENCE: Denbighshire, Wales
  • BIRTH: ABT 1280, Of Rhuddallt, Rhiwabon, Denbighshire, Wales
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: 92D3-VK) [S1905]

Family 1 : ELIZABETH le STRANGE

Notes


Gruffydd ap Madoc VYCHAN

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[S1905]


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Gen. William BARKSDALE C.S.A.

21 Aug 1821 - 3 Jul 1863

ID Number: I91481

  • TITLE: Gen.
  • RESIDENCE: of Rutherford Co. TN and Columbus, Lowndes Co. MS
  • OCCUPATION: CSA "Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade."; MS US Congressman 1853-1861; Atty and editor of Columbus (Miss) Democrat
  • BIRTH: 21 Aug 1821, Smyrna, Rutherford Co. Tennessee
  • DEATH: 3 Jul 1863, KIA mortally wounded by Lincoln's Army at Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
  • BURIAL: Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Mississippi
  • RESOURCES: See: notes
Father: William BARKSDALE Sr.
Mother: Nancy Hervey LESTER


Notes


Brigadier General William Barksdale, C.S.A.
Longstreet's Corps, McLaws's Division
13th, 17th, 18th and 21st Mississippi Infantry
At Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2nd, 1863


by George K. Welsh, III http://www.falmr.org/barksd.htm.


Born: August 21, 1821, Smyrna, Rutherford County, Tennessee
Died: July 3, 1863, Gettysburg Pennsylvania, age 41
(or d. 2 Jul 1863 within Union lines)


General William Barksdale was born in Smyrna, Rutherford County Tennesse on August 21, 1821, the son of William Barksdale, and Nancy Hervey Lester. His Grandfather had removed his family from Virginia to Tennessee in 1808 and his father was a soldier in the War of 1812.


When William had reached the age of 16, he and his 3 brothers, Harrison, Fountain and Ethelbert left their family home and attended the University of Nashville, after which he studied law at Columbus Mississippi, being admitted to the Bar prior to his 21st Birthday.


He began the practice of Law, but within a year tired of it and became the editor of the Columbus (Miss) Democrat, a staunchly States Rights, Pro slavery publication. Barksdale often used the paper as a soapbox for his own strongly secessionist views.


He enlisted in the Army during the Mexican War and soon rose to the rank of Captain and assistant - commissary of volunteers in the 2nd Mississippi Regiment from January of 1847 until August of 1848. Barksdale's natural love of the military was evident on several occassions during that time, such as the one recalled by Reubin Davis, also of Mississippi, whom he would later defeat for a Congressional seat.


"Barksdale appeared on the scene in his shirt sleeves at a battle line at which I was present", said Davis. "When I asked why he was there at the front instead of in the Quartermaster's office, and why he was so dressed, he responded 'I thought you lads were in for some warm work presently, and,as it is a hot day, I thought I could do better without my coat!'"


Upon his return to Mississippi after the war, Barksdale soundly defeated Reubin Davis and General Alexander Bradford for Democratic Congressman in 1853, and was as soundly re-nominated in 1855, when the Know Nothing Party was at it's peak. He was re-elected serving in Congress until 1861, when he resigned his seat after proclaiming Mississippi's secession from the Union on January 12.


Upon his return to Mississippi from Washington, Barksdale was made quartermaster general of the Mississippi Army, from March of 1861 until he entered the Confederate service as colonel of the 13th Mississippi regiment, organized in Virginia. His regiment saw action early in the war at Manassas, and Edwards Ferry, and he commanded his regiment in the action before Richmond. In April, 1862 General Griffith of the Mississippi Brigades recommended his colonel for promotion to Brigadier General from rank, but the appointment was not made.


At the battle of Savage Station, Griffith was mortally wounded, and Barksdale was given the command in Griffith's absence. The Mississippians gained a reputation for cool level-headed and reliable service under the command of Barksdale thru the Pennisular campaign. In July, McLaws recommended his promotion with the additional endorsement of General Lee, who said of his command at Malvern Hill that Barksdale "displayed the Highest qualities of the soldier - Seizing the colors himself, and advancing under a terrific fire of artillery and Infantry." In August the appointment was finally made, and Barksdale was assigned to the brigade to which his old regiment, the 13th , belonged.


Barksdale commanded his brigade in all of the ensuing battles of the Army of Northern Virginia, with the exception of Second Manassas, when he was at Harper's Ferry defending the Confederate installations there.


Barksdale's Mississippians arrived into the field near Gettysburg well past midnight on July 2,1863. The Mississippi Brigades made Camp at Willoughby Run at about 9 o'clock on the morning of July 2nd, with Colonel E. P. Alexander and the Washington Artillery. According to Longstreet, Lee had not yet formalized his plans for an engagement at this time, having not yet heard from his Cavalry, nor was he totally aware of the strength or movements of the enemy, since his latest intelligence on the Union forces was from a Federal despatch which was captured during the night of July 1st.


After copious reconnaissance, formulation of a plan and issuance of orders was finally achieved. Pursuant to those orders, the Divisions took their places of defense as follows:


"The Confederate Left was covering the North and East curve of the enemy's line. Johnson's division near Culp's hill, Early and Rode's extending the line to the right through Gettysburg: Pender's division on the right of Rode's; the other divisions of the Third Corps resting on Seminary Ridge, with McLaws's division and Hood's three Brigades near General Headquarters"


In what he would later classify as a time - saving effort, Longstreet ordered the rear division to double on the front, which brought Anderson's regiments in line with the outpost guard of Sickles. Anderson's division was positioned from right to left in the following order of Brigades: Wilcox, Perry, Wright, Posey and Mahone.


At this point, in the absence of Cavalry for intelligence, General Hood was ordered to send his scouts in advance of the double line of deployment , which brought McLaws on the right of Anderson with Hood's division on McLaws' right., directly across from the Peach Orchard, so that Hood almost enflanked Sickle's left.


While waiting across from the Peach Orchard, Barksdale repeatedly requested of McLaws and Longstreet permission to charge "that little battery across the way, " referring to the 9th Massachusetts Battery at the Trostle house. He was told to wait. Chafing at the bit, he implored Longstreet "Give me just five minutes, and that battery and it's guns will be ours". Longstreet's reply was "Just hold on, we'll all be going in presently".


Colonel E.Porter Alexander and the Washington artillery had been brought up onto the line of McLaws's to provide artillery support for the impending infantry advance to the Federal batteries and infantry regiments of Sickle's corps placed on a line against the Emmitsburg road from the fields before the Roundtops to the Cemetery facing Cemetery Ridge. Alexander's report states that "About 4 p.m. I placed five batteries in action against a heavy artillery and infantry force of the enemy about 500 yards distant in a Peach Orchard on the Emmetsburg [sic] pike. After a spirited engagement of a half hour, the enemy's guns were silenced and the position was immediately carried by the infantry and the enemy fell back to its position on the mountain where our infantry gallantly pursued him. The sum total of my losses were killed, 19, wounded 114. There were also 2 killed and 3 wounded of a detachment of 8 gallant Mississippians at Captain Moody's guns, who volunteered to help maneuver them on very difficult ground." The "difficult ground" most likely refers to bringing these batteries into position from the Pitzer woods behind the Confederate line to this position about 500 yd's. from the Peach Orchard.


It was during the cannonade which Alexander described that Barksdale repeatedly requested permission to advance to "that little battery" in the Peach Orchard. The fiery Mississippian was certain that his men would show the same mettle they had shown at Fredericksburg the previous December, and could hold off the entire Army of the Potomac if necessary. Every time McLaws would near the Mississippians, Barksdale would assure him that the Federal battery could "be taken in five minutes."


McLaws was in a quandary of his own , due to the apparently severed communication between Longstreet and Lee, the result of difference of opinion in the order of battle for the day. As any good soldier, McLaws wanted to please his superior, and would not presume to issue an order without the knowledge that this was Longstreet's wish, yet Longstreet inquired as to his plans. Added to this, Barksdale's impetuous nature and desire for ending the nagging inconvenience of the Federal Battery in the Peach Orchard had him asking repeatedly of Mc Laws for permission to charge the battery. Longsteet rode to Mc Laws line and Barksdale saw the opportunity to lobby for his cause. He emplored "General, I wish you would let me go in, I could take that battery in five minutes!" "Wait a little," Longstreet responded, "We shall all be going in presently."


Finally, as J.C. Lloyd of the 13th Mississippi remembered it, "Directly in our front, only a few steps, are Generals Longstreet, McLaws, Barksdale, and our beloved Colonel Carter, with their glasses, taking a last look over the field". At this point, two men of the 17th Mississippi were ordered forward to remove the rails from a fence, so the line could charge unbroken across the field.


Barksdale called all of the commanders of his regiments together to issue the orders he had just formulated with Longstreet and Mc Laws, and,referring to the Federals some 600 yards in front, said "The line in front must be broken. To do so, let every Officer and man animate his comrades by his personal presence in the front line." Barksdale mounted a fine White charger, and rode across the rear of his line as the drums beat assembly, and each officer moved to the front and called his line to attention.


The brigades were lined from the left with the 18th, then the 13th, 17th and the 21st on the right. Barksdale emerged from the rear of his Brigade and rode to the left passed the 21st and 17th, and stopped in front of his old regiment, the 13th, awaiting the arrival of Captain G.B. Lamar, McLaws' aide de camp, to issue the direct order to advance from his divisional commander.


Harry Pfanz in Gettsyburg-The Second Day remarks that "Perhaps McLaws sent Lamar to Barksdale after it was apparent that his brigade was delayed: no one said. But when Lamar reached Barksdale with the order to go forward, the news made the general's face 'radiant with joy'. Barksdale ordered his four regiments over the wall. (Had they gone beyond the wall too soon they would have masked Moody's and Gilbert's batteries and exposed themselves to Federal fire unnecessarily.)"


Lamar recalled that,as he received the order, Barksdale was "radiant with joy. He was in front of his men with his hat off, and his long, white hair reminded me of the white plume of Navarre."


Pvt. T. M. Scanlon of the 17th Mississippi recalls Barksdale's speech to his men prior to the charge: "These were his commands: Halt! Front! Order Arms! Load! Fix Bayonets! The entrenchment 500 yards in front of you at the red barn, and that park of artillery as well as the cone mountain (Little Round Top), which is covered with riflemen screened by huge boulders, and beside that entrenched line there is another 200 yards beyond which we are also expected to take. This is an heroic undertaking and most of us will bite the dust making this effort. Now if there is a man here that feels this is too much for him, just step two paces to the front and I will excuse him. We will proceed to within 75 yards of the entrenchment withholding our fire. There you will receive the command, Halt! Ready! Fire!, after which, without command you will charge with the bayonet."


Barksdale then snapped out his order " Attention, Mississippians! Battalions forward! Dress to the colors and Forward to the foe! Onward, Brave Mississippians, for Glory,!" and rode out to lead the charge, as far as fifty yards in front of his men.


Within minutes the Brigades had crossed this farmland up and down a series of gentle swales which lay in front of the skirmish lines of the Pennsylvanian regiments of Brigadier General Charles A. Graham, and the rifled guns of the New Jersey Light, 2nd battery under the command of Captain A.Judson Clark.


The Mississippians showed their veteran strength and determination as they swept forward, through the fire of the artillery rending huge gaps through them that would immediately close as the Mississippians drew together and forward through the fields. Barksdale's men simply overran the Federal troops going forward to the Peach Orchard, capturing at least fifty Union Infantry men, including General Graham.


By this time, Barksdale and his men had reached the Emmitsburg road and, gaining the high ground, Barksdale wheeled the 13th, 17th and 18th to the left up the road, as the 21st continued deeper into the Peach Orchard then followed the line to the left.


In front of the 21st, Colonels Holder and Griffin of the Mississippians (17th and 18th) implored Barksdale to stop and reform, to which Barksdale replied "NO! Crowd them now, We've got them on the run! Move your regiments!"


Barksdale barked at his men in a gruff authoritarian manner "Advance, advance! Brave Mississippians, one more charge and the day is ours!" This statement brought cheers from his men, according to J.S. McNeily, who chronicled the charge at the Peach Orchard in Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade at Gettysburg: Most Magnificent Charge of the War in 1913. He goes on : "Barksdale moved bravely on, the guiding spirit of the battle."


When he was wounded in the area of Plum Run, North and East of the Trostle Farm, he saw his courier, W.R.Boyd and said "I am killed! Tell my wife and children that I died fighting at my post." At that time, Boyd was wounded in the leg, which made it impossible for him to assist his General. He left Barksdale's side with the Federals closing in on them from less than fifty yards. As Boyd was retreating, his horse was shot out from under him. Boyd closed in on Barksdale again, and was told that, if he could get to a battery of the Washington Artillery which had moved to a distance of about 250 yards away, to "order them to the front."


Boyd was successful in so doing, and attempted to return to Barksdale's side, but could only get within 40 yards of where the General lay. Boyd closes his report by saying "The last words of this ardent patriot, gallant man and dying hero that ever fell upon the ears of his own countrymen should nerve and incite them to his highest standards of duty. The ordeal through which his brigade passed in this fight may be judged when it is told that of the 1,420 bayonets carried into it, 730 were lost in Killed, Wounded and Missing."


Barksdale and his Mississppi Brigade had severed the Union line, but could not hold this position, or advance to establish stronger defenses, due to failure of Wofford and Semmes to follow the Mississippians through at the point of the break in the federal line, and due to the almost limitless refreshment of the Union forces under Hancock which battled the Confederate lines.


Barksdale had boasted upon entering Pennsylvania on June 24th that his men had not been bested previously, nor would they be now. His optimism extended throughout his charge, and, as he lay mortally wounded on a make shift surgeon's table at the Hummelbaugh farm he warned the blue clad officers and surgeons that "Hancock had better watch his back, Old Peter has a surprise for you in the morning!"


Mason: Barksdale was a member of Columbus Lodge, #5, Columbus, Mississippi




13th Infantry Regiment
HISTORICAL NOTES:
This regiment was ordered to Corinth and enlisted in the Confederate service May 13-15, 1861, for twelve months. The date of organization of the Thirteenth Regiment is May 14, 1861, William Barksdale being elected Colonel. Soon afterward the regiment was ordered to Union City, Tenn., where it remained attached to the army under General Polk until ordered to Lynchburg, whither the regiment started July 14. Immediately on reaching Lynchburg they were ordered to Manassas, and reached the railroad junction during the night of July 20 and the morning of the 21st, the day of the battle. As soon as possible they were advanced to the field, with much marching and countermarching in the intense heat and stifling dust. The orders were to report to General Longstreet, but for convenience they were attached to Jubal A. Early's brigade, which was stationed in the rear of Beauregard's line on Bull Run, near McLean's ford. The famous battle of the 21st was brought on by the Federals attacking on the Confederate flank, behind the run. This battle raged from ten o’clock, and General Early did not get orders to participate in it until two, when he immediately marched to the scene of conflict. "This brigade," Beauregard reported, "was marched by the Holtham house across the fields to the left, . . . and under a severe fire into a position in line of battle near Chinn's house, outflanking the enemy's right. At this time the enemy had formed a line of truly formidable proportions. The woods and fields were filled with their masses of infantry and cavalry. It was a magnificent spectacle as they threw forward their cloud of skirmishers on the slopes of the ridge for another attack. But as Early formed his line Elzey's brigade and other regiments advanced, almost simultaneously, with great spirit from their various positions. At the same time, too, Early resolutely assailed their right flank and rear." It was then the rout began.


Casualties: 6 wounded in the Thirteenth.


After this the regiment was assigned to the brigade tinder Gen. N. G. Evans, including the Seventeenth and Eighteenth, stationed in the vicinity of Leesburg. October 20 they marched from Goose Creek to Fort Evans, on the Potomac. October 21 a force of the enemy crossed the river from Maryland, under Colonel Baker, and after the first encounter had been sustained by a company of the Seventeenth Mississippi, four detached companies, including Fletcher's of the Thirteenth became warmly engaged and drove back the Federal advances. While the other regiments met the Federal advance from Ball's Bluff and achieved a famous victory, Barksdale's remaining nine companies held back the other columns of the enemy at Edwards ferry, remaining there after the others had gone back to Leesburg with the Federal prisoners. Next day Barksdale attacked the Federals who had crossed the river on his front and drove them to the river with heavy loss. The loss of the regiment was 4 killed, 2 wounded, 1 missing. Eckford's and Randall's companies were the advance line in this engagement. The Attala men, under Fletcher, were distinguished in the Ball's Bluff battle, several of them being among the first to reach a Federal battery, which was captured.


The winter camp was at Catoctin Mountain, near Leesburg. The regiment was assigned to the Mississippi brigade organized under Gen. Richard Griffith, who took command at a brigade review at Camp Carolina December 9, 1861.


After the retreat to Culpepper and transfer to Yorktown, the regiment was reorganized for three years of the war, April 26, 1862. They were not in battle on the Yorktown line or during the retreat, and though under fire at Seven Pines, were not actively engaged.


Before the seven days' battles before Richmond, June, 1862, Griffith's brigade included with the Thirteenth, the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Twenty-first, and was part of Magruder's division, which first went into battle on the 29th, on the railroad near Savage Station. In the opening of this action General Griffith was mortally wounded, and his place was taken by Colonel Barksdale. The Thirteenth was employed during this battle as reserve for McLaw's division.


At the battle of Malvern Hill, July 1, the brigade was formed in line of battle in a wood, under fire of batteries and gunboats, after which, at about six o'clock in the evening, they made a charge, attempting to carry the Federal batteries. Here Lieutenant-Colonel Carter was wounded, and Major McElroy took command. Colonel Barksdale praised the conduct of Major Inge, Adjutant-General, and Captain Costin, Aide-de-Camp. Major Watts and Hawkins, of the brigade staff, were required to attend the dying General. The Thirteenth gained an advanced position and held it for nearly an hour without support.


The loss of the Thirteenth in both engagements was 28 killed and 107 wounded.


McElroy, promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, commanded the regiment in the Maryland campaign September, 1862. With McLaw's division they diverged from Lee's column to cooperate with Jackson's corps in the capture of Harper's Ferry.


On the 12th Barksdale's and Kershaw's South Carolina brigade began to scale the Maryland heights, Major J. M. Bradley commanding the pickets on the left of the line, skirmishing with the Federal troops on the mountain. Next day Kershaw attacked the entrenched line in front and Barksdale on the flank and rear, and possession of the mountain was secured after severe fighting. The Thirteenth was left on the mountain as a garrison when the brigade moved to Brownsville to meet an expected attack, and thence to join the main army. They reached the battlefield of Sharpsburg after the battle had been raging for several hours. The brigade had been on constant duty for five or six days, marching throughout two nights, and many of the men had succumbed to fatigue. The brigade went into battle with less than 900 men and officers, formed line of battle in an open field swept by a terrible fire of artillery, advanced and drove the enemy from a wood in front, and held that position, the Thirteenth and Eighteenth defeating a flank attack. McElroy, though wounded, remained in command of his regiment. Surgeon Austin was honorably mentioned for faithful attention to the wounded. The regiment, taking 202 into battle, lost 6 killed, 54 wounded, 2 missing.


At Fredericksburg, December 11, 1862, Colonel Carter marched his regiment to Carolina Street at five o'clock in the morning, where they remained until four P.M. to support the Seventeenth at the river side. Ten sharpshooters were sent to assist Colonel Fiser, but no other service was required of the regiment. But they were all the time under a very heavy and destructive fire from the Federal batteries. After the enemy effected a landing, the Thirteenth, holding Princess Anne Street, by a determined fight held them back for two hours. Capt. G. L. Donald, in command of several companies, was commended by the Colonel. Capt. J. L. Clark was killed by a solid shot early in the morning. Capt. T. W. Thurman was dangerously wounded and captured. Lieut. J. M. Stovall, missing, was supposed to be dead. The total loss was 7 killed, 59 wounded


14 captured.


April 29, 1863, part of the Federal army crossed the Rappahannock at Deep Run, and Barksdale's brigade was left with Early's division to observe them, while the remainder of Lee's army moved toward Chancellorsville. Early was moving in the same direction when the Federal troops made another crossing at Fredericksburg. Barksdale had a line of three miles to cover, with the Thirteenth on the right. After a desperate resistance against the entire Federal advance, Barksdale's line was broken, when he moved the Thirteenth and Seventeenth in position to check the enemy and protect the rear, which they did, with the aid of artillery. The loss of the regiment was 7 killed and 43 wounded. They were quartered at Fredericksburg until June 3, when they began the march to the valley and Pennsylvania.


At Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1863, the Thirteenth, in Barksdale's brigade, fought in the battle against the south wing of the Federal army. At six in the evening, when Sickles still held the peach orchard after a terrific fight, McLaws ordered an assault, and the storming columns of Barksdale and Wofford, "yelling like demons, black with smoke and lusting for hand-to-hand conflict," soon opened a gap in the line of blue. The Federals fell back toward and across Plum Run, toward the base of Round Top, and the onslaught was continued. "Barksdale, conspicuous on horseback, led his Southern riflemen, who singlehanded had barred the passage of the whole Federal army at Fredericksburg, right into the hostile masses, where he fell mortally wounded, and whence the remnants of his gallant troops cut their way back with difficulty through the enveloping masses of Blue infantry." (Battine's "Crisis of the Confederacy.") Barksdale's loss in killed and wounded was the heaviest of any brigade in Longstreet's corps and the heaviest of any in Lee's army, except two North Carolina Brigades and Davis' Mississippi brigade. The loss of the Thirteenth was 28 killed, 137 wounded, of whom 86 were left in the field hospital when the army retreated.


After the return to Virginia the regiment participated in the movement of Longstreet's corps by way of Richmond and South Carolina to Atlanta and North Georgia, reaching Ringgold after the battle of Chickamauga was begun. By a night march they arrived on the field on the morning of September 20 and went into battle in support of General Hood, who broke the Federal line. Their last fighting that day was at Snodgrass Hill, where the victory was completed at dusk. Casualties, 1 killed, 7 wounded.


Advancing toward Chattanooga they were on duty during the siege until November 4, when they left the base of Lookout Mountain for the campaign in East Tennessee. They crossed the Tennessee River, skirmished at Campbell’s Station November 16, and were in line for the siege of Knoxville about November 20. Under the command of Colonel McElroy, with the Seventeenth Regiment, and supported by three Georgia regiments, all under the command of Gen. B. G. Humphreys, they made the famous assault upon Fort Loudon, November 29, 1863. After working their way through a tangled abatis, they charged the works, through a wire netting and a deep ditch, and clambered up a parapet ten or twelve feet high, slippery with ice. Some of the officers and men gained the summit of the parapet but they were shot down and dragged others down in falling. All the time they were under a furious fire from another part of the fort. Here Kennon McElroy was killed. "The loss of the heroic McElroy is irreparable," wrote General Humphreys . "He was shot at the angle of the wall at the head of his regiment," wrote General Longstreet. "He was a man of very fine courage, united to a self-possession on all occasions, with a knowledge of his duties and a natural capacity for command which inspired confidence and made him always conspicuous."


After leaving Knoxville the brigade was sent, December 16, to Clinch Mountain Gap, where a body of the enemy fled at their approach. Major Donald, commanding the Thirteenth, was sent in pursuit, and he captured the camp and outfit of the One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana, which was very welcome.


The winter quarters were at Russellville, Tenn., whence they moved in the last of March to Bristol. At Gordonsville, Va., May 3, they received orders to join General Lee on the Rappahannock. May 6, with the advance of Longstreet's corps, they went into battle in the Wilderness, Major Donald commanding, winning new renown on that bloody field. They were in almost constant action and frequent battles throughout the campaign of 1864, at Spottsylvania Courthouse, May 8-12; at, Hanover Junction, May 27; at Cold Harbor early in June, and at Petersburg June 19. In the latter part of July they were sent from the Petersburg lines to support Early in the Shenandoah Valley, where they were in the engagements at Berryville, Charlestown, Rockfish Gap, and Cedar Creek.


In the Wilderness battles the regiment had 18 killed, 61 wounded, 12 missing. Among the severely wounded were Lieut. William Davis (Company C), Captain Currie, Lieut. R. C. Kelly (Company I).


The returns, in October, after this battle show Major Donald in command of the brigade.


At the battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, the brigade was conspicuous in taking the Federal position in the early part of the battle. When the return attack was delivered by Sheridan the brigade met the advance coolly and with an effective fire. It was not until their flank was exposed by the panic in other commands that they yielded.


November 20 they returned to Richmond and during the winter they were posted at Garnett's farm and on the Darbytwn and Newmarket roads. April 1-2 they marched through Richmond and began the retreat to Appomattox Courthouse.


In the final returns the remnant of the heroic Thirteenth was commanded by Lieut. W. H. Davis.


FIELD OFFICERS:


Colonels -- William Barksdale, promoted as Brigadier-General June 27, 1862, killed at Gettysburg July 2; J. W. Carter killed at Gettysburg July 2; Kennon McElroy, killed at Knoxville. Lieutenant-Colonels -- M. H. Whitaker, to reorganization; J. W. Carter promoted; Kennon McElroy, promoted; John M. Bradley, died of wounds; A. G. O'Brien. Majors -- Isham Harrison, to reorganization; Kennon McElroy, promoted; J. M. Bradley, wounded at Gettysburg, promoted; G. L. Donald. Adjutants -- E. A. Miller, E. P. Harman. Surgeons -- J. T. Gilmore, promoted as Brigade Surgeon; L. M. Austin, died; John Clopton, transferred; S. Baruch. Assistant Surgeons -- A. C. Anderson, A. N. Ballinger J. C. Shinks, M. McManning, H. D. Green. Quartermaster -- J. H. Turner, promoted to brigade staff. Commissary -- D. P. McAllum, R. C. Topp. Chaplain -- Farish, T. S. West. Ensign -- A. T. Harvey.


BATTLES:


Appomattox


ROSTERS:
Company A -- [Co. B first year] Winston Guards (raised in Winston County, MS)
Company B -- [Co. C first year] Wayne Rifles, aka Wayne Guards (raised in Wayne County, MS)
Company C -- [Co. F first year] Kemper Legion (raised in Kemper County, MS)
Company D -- [Co. E first year] Newton Rifles (raised in Newton County, MS)
Company E -- [Co. A first year] Alamutcha Infantry (raised in Lauderdale County, MS)
Company F -- [Co. G first year] Lauderdale Zouaves (raised in Lauderdale County, MS)
Company G -- [Co. I first year] Secessionists (raised in Clarke County, MS)
Company H -- [Co. K first year] Spartan Band (raised in Chickasaw County, MS)
Company I -- [Co. D first year] Minute Men of Attala (raised in Attala County, MS)
Company K -- [Co. H first year] Pettus Guards (raised in Lauderdale County, MS)


BIBLIOGRAPHY


REFERENCES:
Howell, H. Grady. For Dixie Land I'll Take My Stand
Rowland, Dunbar. Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898
http://www.researchonline.net/mscw/unit95.htm.
The Civil War in Mississippi
http://www.researchonline.net/mscw/msstart.htm


(History Channel 17 Feb 2004 "April 1865" had scences of Gen. Barksdale's charge at Gettysburg)


Barksdale, William (1821-1863) of Columbus, Lowndes County, Miss. Brother of Ethelbert Barksdale. Born in Rutherford County, Tenn., August 21, 1821. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1853-61 (at-large 1853-55, 3rd District 1855-61); general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Gettysburg, Adams County, Pa., July 2, 1863. Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss. See also: congressional biography.
BARKSDALE, William, 1821-1863


----------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------



BARKSDALE, William, (brother of Ethelbert Barksdale), a Representative from Mississippi; born in Rutherford County, Tenn., August 21, 1821; attended the University of Nashville; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1839 and commenced practice in Columbus, Lowndes County, Miss.; for a time was editor of the Columbus Democrat; served in the Mexican War as quartermaster of the Mississippi Volunteers; delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Baltimore in 1852; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-third and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1853, until January 12, 1861, when he withdrew; entered the Confederate Army during the Civil War as colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment of Mississippi Volunteers; promoted to the rank of brigadier general on August 12, 1862; commanded a Mississippi brigade in Longstreet’s corps; killed in the Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; interment in Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.





Bibliography


DAB; McKee, James W. “William Barksdale and the Congressional Election of 1853.” Journal of Mississippi History 34 (May 1972): 129-58; Tyson, Raymond W. “William Barksdale and the Brooks-Sumner Assault.” Journal of Mississippi History 26 (May 1964): 135-40.
http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/barkett-barlett.html.


Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies B page 815
BARKSDALE, William (brother of Ethelbert Barksdale), a Representative from Mississippi; born in Rutherford County, Tenn., August 21, 1821; attended the University of Nashville; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1839 and commenced practice in Columbus, Lowndes County, Miss.; served in the Mexican War as quartermaster of the Mississippi Volunteers; delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Baltimore in 1852; elected as a State Rights Democrat to the Thirty-third and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1853, until January 12, 1861, when he withdrew; accompanied Representative Preston S. Brooks, of South Carolina, to the Senate Chamber when the latter made an attack upon Senator Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, and made himself somewhat conspicuous in preventing the interference of others present; entered the Confederate Army during the Civil War as colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment of Mississippi Volunteers; promoted to the rank of brigadier general on August 12, 1862; commanded a Mississippi brigade in Longstreet's corps; killed in the Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; interment in Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.



                                                   _Nathaniel BARKSDALE Sr.______+
                                                  | (1720 - 1790) m 1748         
                         _Nathaniel BARKSDALE Jr._|
                        | (1760 - 1830) m 1784    |
                        |                         |_Mourning DICKENSON __________
                        |                           (1725 - ....) m 1748         
 _William BARKSDALE Sr._|
| (1787 - 1834)         |
|                       |                          _James GARDEN "the Immigrant"_
|                       |                         | (1750 - 1773)                
|                       |_Nancy "Anne" GARDEN ____|
|                         (1769 - 1835) m 1784    |
|                                                 |_Sarah WIMBISH _______________
|                                                   (1750 - ....)                
|
|--William BARKSDALE C.S.A.
|  (1821 - 1863)
|                                                  ______________________________
|                                                 |                              
|                        _________________________|
|                       |                         |
|                       |                         |______________________________
|                       |                                                        
|_Nancy Hervey LESTER __|
  (1800 - ....)         |
                        |                          ______________________________
                        |                         |                              
                        |_________________________|
                                                  |
                                                  |______________________________
                                                                                 

Sources


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Marie BARTHELEMY

11 Aug 1827 - ____

ID Number: I96848

  • RESIDENCE: LA and Amite Co. MS
  • BIRTH: 11 Aug 1827, Donaldsonville, Louisiana
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3543]

Family 1 : George MILLER
  1. +Elizabeth "Lizzie" MILLER

Sources

[S3543]


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CHATELAIN COURTENAY of Chateau Reynard

ABT 0950 - ____

ID Number: I27581

  • RESIDENCE: FR
  • BIRTH: ABT 0950, of Chateau Reynard
  • RESOURCES: See: Notes

Family 1 :
  1. +ATHON de COURTENAY

Notes


Source: book of Lord Courtenay's archivist per Patricia Triplett. The Archivist at Powderham Castle has put forth the following -
......Athon, son of the Chatelain of Chateau Reynard
.........Joscelin de Courtenay m. Isabel de Montlhery
succeeded by brother Milo de Courtenay m. Ermengarde de Nevers
......Sir Reginald de Courtenay m. Hedwige de Donjon
....... Robert de Courtenay m. Mary, daughter of Redvers, 6th Earl of Devon

Sources


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Nancy CRANFORD-CAUDEL

ABT 1850 - ____

ID Number: I75560

  • RESIDENCE: of Cooke and Grayson Cos. TX and Washita Co. OK
  • BIRTH: ABT 1850
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2873]

Family 1 : Thomas LEE C.S.A.
  1.  Mary Winnie LEE

Sources

[S2873]


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Wanda Moseley DUDLEY


This person is presumed living.

INDEX

Daniel GUERRANT

ABT 1775 - BEF 1850

ID Number: I4425

Father: Peter (Pierre) GUERRANT (GUERIN) Jr.
Mother: Mary PERROW (PERAULT)


Family 1 : Harriet LANGHORNE
  1.  George GUERRANT
  2.  Maurice GUERRANT
  3.  Jane GUERRANT
Family 2 : Elizabeth "Betsy" PUTNEY

                                                                               _Daniel GUERRANT (GUERIN) I "the Immigrant"_+
                                                                              | (1662 - ....) m 1690                       
                                        _Pierre "Peter" GUERRANT (GUERIN) Sr._|
                                       | (1697 - 1750) m 1732                 |
                                       |                                      |_Marie L'ORANGE ____________________________+
                                       |                                        (1663 - 1721) m 1690                       
 _Peter (Pierre) GUERRANT (GUERIN) Jr._|
| (1737 - 1819) m 1756                 |
|                                      |                                       _Anthony TRABUE\TRABUC "the Immigrant"______+
|                                      |                                      | (1669 - 1724) m 1704                       
|                                      |_Magdalene TRABUE ____________________|
|                                        (1715 - 1787) m 1732                 |
|                                                                             |_Magdalene VEREUL\VERRUEIL _________________+
|                                                                               (1683 - 1731) m 1704                       
|
|--Daniel GUERRANT 
|  (1775 - 1850)
|                                                                              _Charles PERRAULT\PERROW "the Immigrant"____
|                                                                             | (1667 - 1717) m 1700                       
|                                       _Daniel P. PERROW Sr__________________|
|                                      | (1702 - 1761) m 1720                 |
|                                      |                                      |_Marguerite CHASTAIN _______________________+
|                                      |                                        (1667 - ....) m 1700                       
|_Mary PERROW (PERAULT) _______________|
  (1739 - 1805) m 1756                 |
                                       |                                       ____________________________________________
                                       |                                      |                                            
                                       |_Mary Marie RENNO ____________________|
                                         (1709 - ....) m 1720                 |
                                                                              |____________________________________________
                                                                                                                           

Sources

[S180]

[S1422]

[S1484]

[S3167]


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Commodore Mathew Fontaine MAURY C.S.N.

14 Jan 1806 - 1 Feb 1873

ID Number: I63019

  • TITLE: Commodore
  • OCCUPATION: C.S.A.naval cdr and the "Pathfinder of the Seas"; founder of Oceanography
  • RESIDENCE: Fredericksburg, VA
  • BIRTH: 14 Jan 1806, Spotsylvania Co. Virginia
  • DEATH: 1 Feb 1873, Fredericksburg, Virginia
  • BURIAL: Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1503] [S2013] [S2384]
Father: Fontaine MAURY
Mother: Elizabeth BROOKE


Family 1 : Ann Hull HERNDON
  1.  Richard Lancelot MAURY
  2.  Lucy Minor MAURY

Notes


"Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, world famous founder of Oceanography, was my father's younger brother, also made his home in Fredericksburg, where he married Ann Hull Herndon, sister of Captain William Lewis Herndon, that captain who commanded the ship Central America on her last, ill-fated voyage, and who, after he had placed all the women and children and as many as possible of the men passengers safely in the boats, refused, himself, to
follow, because he would not desert his sinking ship. Dressing himself in his full uniform, he took his place upon the bridge, and as the vessel sank into the waves, her captain passed, with bowed and uncovered head, into the presence of his Maker."


Matthew Fontaine Maury, oceanographer, was also known as the "Pathfinder of the Seas" because he was the first to chart the ocean floors. There is a statue of him in Richmond, VA, and a monument to him in VA.


Books on Mathew Fontain Maury: Matthew Fontaine Maury by Charles Lee Lewis.
Format: Library Binding, 264pp. ISBN: 0405130457
Publisher: Ayer Company Publishers, Incorporated Pub. Date: January 1980


Matthew Fontaine Maury, the Pathfinder of the Seas by Charles Lee Lewis
Format: Hardcover ISBN: 0404039847 Publisher: AMS Press, Inc.


The Matthew Fontaine Maury Camp #1722 Has Accomplished The Marking Of Three Confederate Graves Within The Fredericksburg Confederate Cemetery Recently.
The Graves of Private William A. Jackson, Brigadier General Abner Monore Perrin and Major General Dabney Herndon Maury Are Now Adorned With The "Confederate Cross Of Honor." In Addition, We Have Also Marked The Grave Of "Rebel Butler" At The Spotsylvania Confederate Cemetery.
http://www.geocities.com/commanderscvcamp1722/Confederate_Cross_O f_Honor.html


Children:
2 Diana Fontaine MAURY b: 25 Jun 1837 + Spotswood Wellford CORBIN b: 22 Jan 1835
2 Elizabeth Herndon MAURY b: 25 Jun 1835 d: 1903 + William Arden MAURY
2 Richard Launcelot MAURY b: 9 Oct 1840 d: 14 Oct 1907
2 John Herndon MAURY b: 21 Oct 1842 d: 27 Jan 1863
2 Mary Herndon MAURY b: 13 Nov 1844 d: 17 Nov 1928 + James Rhodes WERTH
2 Eliza Hull MAURY b: 5 Dec 1846 d: 1881 m. Thomas WITHERS SEP 1878
2 Matthew Fontaine MAURY b: 9 Jan 1849 d: 31 Dec 1886 m.Rose ROBINSON 18 Dec 1877
2 Lucy Minor MAURY b: 8 May 1851 d: 7 Nov 1915


U.S. Naval officer and oceanographer who was the founder of the U.S. Naval Observatory; Confederate Head of Coast, harbour and river defences; Inventor of a torpedo; pioneer of wind and current charts.


[S2384]


                                                      _Matthew MAURY "the immigrant"_
                                                     | (1686 - 1752) m 1716          
                       _James MAURY _________________|
                      | (1718 - 1769) m 1743         |
                      |                              |_Mary Anne FONTAINE ___________+
                      |                                (1690 - 1755) m 1716          
 _Fontaine MAURY _____|
| (1761 - 1824)       |
|                     |                               _James WALKER _________________
|                     |                              | (1691 - ....)                 
|                     |_Mary "Mollie" WALKER ________|
|                       (1724 - 1798) m 1743         |
|                                                    |_Ann Tunstall HILL ____________
|                                                      (1708 - ....)                 
|
|--Mathew Fontaine MAURY C.S.N.
|  (1806 - 1873)
|                                                     _______________________________
|                                                    |                               
|                      _Richard BROOKE of Smithfield_|
|                     | (1732 - 1792)                |
|                     |                              |_______________________________
|                     |                                                              
|_Elizabeth BROOKE ___|
  (1760 - ....)       |
                      |                               _Francis TALIAFERRO of Epsom___+
                      |                              | (1707 - 1756) m 1730          
                      |_Ann Hay TALIAFERRO __________|
                        (1740 - 1782)                |
                                                     |_Elizabeth HAY ________________+
                                                       (1696 - 1758) m 1730          

Sources

[S1503]

[S2013]

[S2384]

[S2384]


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Roderick R. MCCANTS

24 May 1892 - 21 Mar 1957

ID Number: I25211

  • RESIDENCE: Prob. Williamsburg Co. SC
  • BIRTH: 24 May 1892
  • DEATH: 21 Mar 1957
  • RESOURCES: See: [S446]
Father: John Blackwell MCCANTS
Mother: Mary A.



                                                        _Alexander MCCANTS Jr._+
                                                       | (1798 - 1870) m 1819  
                           _John Thomas MCCANTS C.S.A._|
                          | (1821 - 1893) m 1835       |
                          |                            |_Martha Jones DANIEL __+
                          |                              (1801 - 1860) m 1819  
 _John Blackwell MCCANTS _|
| (1853 - 1926)           |
|                         |                             _Thomas BURROWS _______+
|                         |                            | (1785 - 1828) m 1805  
|                         |_Sarah BURROWS _____________|
|                           (1817 - 1863) m 1835       |
|                                                      |_Jane SNOWDEN _________+
|                                                        (1785 - ....) m 1805  
|
|--Roderick R. MCCANTS 
|  (1892 - 1957)
|                                                       _______________________
|                                                      |                       
|                          ____________________________|
|                         |                            |
|                         |                            |_______________________
|                         |                                                    
|_Mary A._________________|
  (1859 - 1924)           |
                          |                             _______________________
                          |                            |                       
                          |____________________________|
                                                       |
                                                       |_______________________
                                                                               

Sources

[S446]


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Thomas Bell MONROE Jr. C.S.A.

3 Jul 1833 - 6 Apr 1862

ID Number: I65389

  • OCCUPATION: C.S.A. Lawyer, Mayor Of Lexington, Editor, Sec. Of State
  • RESIDENCE: KY
  • EDUCATION: Graduated University of Louisiana at New Orleans
  • BIRTH: 3 Jul 1833, Frankfort, Kentucky
  • DEATH: 6 Apr 1862, KIA Burnsville
  • BURIAL: 6 Apr 1862, Buried on the field by Union soldiers
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2469]
Father: Thomas Bell MONROE Sr.
Mother: Eliza Palmer ADAIR


Family 1 : Elizabeth GRIER

Notes


Children: Grier MONROE.


                                                            _William MONROE II___+
                                                           | (1695 - 1760)       
                          _Andrew J. MONROE _______________|
                         | (1749 - 1836)                   |
                         |                                 |_Rachel PIPER _______
                         |                                                       
 _Thomas Bell MONROE Sr._|
| (1791 - 1865) m 1812   |
|                        |                                  _____________________
|                        |                                 |                     
|                        |_Ann BELL _______________________|
|                          (1760 - ....)                   |
|                                                          |_____________________
|                                                                                
|
|--Thomas Bell MONROE Jr. C.S.A.
|  (1833 - 1862)
|                                                           _William ADAIR ______+
|                                                          | (1719 - ....) m 1749
|                         _John ADAIR 8th Gov. of Kentucky_|
|                        | (1757 - 1840) m 1784            |
|                        |                                 |_Mary MOORE _________
|                        |                                   (1729 - ....) m 1749
|_Eliza Palmer ADAIR ____|
  (1790 - 1871) m 1812   |
                         |                                  _Henry PALMER _______
                         |                                 | (1740 - ....)       
                         |_Catherine PALMER _______________|
                           (1768 - 1854) m 1784            |
                                                           |_Ann BENOIST ________
                                                             (1740 - ....)       

Sources

[S2469]


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Mary A. WALDEN

ABT 1810 - ____

ID Number: I50415

  • RESIDENCE: NY
  • BIRTH: ABT 1810
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1484]

Family 1 : Silas W. BREWSTER

Sources

[S1484]


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Noah WEST

1749 - ____

ID Number: I48869

  • RESIDENCE: of Middleboro, MA
  • BIRTH: 1749
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1740]
Father: Charles N. WEST
Mother: Deborah WILLIAMSON



                                             _Francis John WEST Sr._+
                                            | (1631 - 1696)         
                       _Richard WEST _______|
                      | (1664 - 1727) m 1706|
                      |                     |_Susanna SOULE ________+
                      |                       (1642 - 1684)         
 _Charles N. WEST ____|
| (1720 - 1765)       |
|                     |                      _______________________
|                     |                     |                       
|                     |_Elizabeth CANNEDY __|
|                       (1683 - 1750) m 1706|
|                                           |_______________________
|                                                                   
|
|--Noah WEST 
|  (1749 - ....)
|                                            _______________________
|                                           |                       
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |_______________________
|                     |                                             
|_Deborah WILLIAMSON _|
  (1713 - 1790)       |
                      |                      _______________________
                      |                     |                       
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |_______________________
                                                                    

Sources

[S1740]


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