Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

My Southern Family

Soozi ALVIS


!LIVING

INDEX

William FORBES

1758 - 7 Nov 1820

ID Number: I91864

  • RESIDENCE: VA and Anderson Co. SC
  • BIRTH: 1758, Virginia
  • DEATH: 7 Nov 1820, Pendleton, Anderson Co. South Carolina
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: SDZN-7L)

Family 1 :
  1. +Alanson FORBES

Notes


William FORBES (AFN: SDZN-7L) Birth: 1758 Virginia Death: 7 Nov 1820 Pendleton, Anderson County, South Carolina Spouse: Margaret WARNOCK (AFN: SDZN-8R)

Sources


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Bennett HAIE\HAY

ABT 1589 - AFT 1629

ID Number: I54119

  • RESIDENCE: Stepney Co. Middlesex, ENG
  • BIRTH: ABT 1589, London, Middlesex, England
  • DEATH: AFT 1629, Stepney Co. Middlesex, England
  • RESOURCES: See: [S494] [S1956]

Family 1 : Francis TALIAFERRO
  1. +Robert TALIAFERRO I "the Immigrant"
  2.  Anne TALIAFERRO

Notes


Src:"Batholomew Taliaferro, Some Descendants", by James Thomas Rowland, R.R. Books, Augusta, GA, 1997. 12491.FTW

[S1956]

Sources

[S494]

[S1956]

[S1956]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Jeanne Marie Louise HOUE

ABT 1790 - ____

ID Number: I43885

  • RESIDENCE: France
  • BIRTH: ABT 1790
  • RESOURCES: See: [S747]

Family 1 : Louis Cherot BOISLINIERE
  1.  Louis Charles Cherot BOISLINIERE

Sources

[S747]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Mary MANNING

ABT 1640 - ____

ID Number: I27964

  • RESIDENCE: Norfolk Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1640
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1045] [S2832]

Family 1 : Roger HODGES "the Immigrant"
  1.  Thomas HODGES
  2.  Roger HODGES Jr.
  3. +Joseph HODGES Sr.
  4.  Richard HODGES
  5.  Benjamin HODGES
Family 2 : Edward DAVIS

Sources

[S1045]

[S2832]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Capt. William MCBRIDE

ABT 1744 - 19 Aug 1782

ID Number: I66660

  • TITLE: Capt.
  • RESIDENCE: Augusta or Fauquier Co. VA & KY
  • BIRTH: ABT 1744, prob. Augusta Co. VA
  • DEATH: 19 Aug 1782, Indian massacre at Blue Licks
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2522]

Family 1 : Martha LAPSLEY
  1.  Mary "Polly" MCBRIDE

Notes


"Polly( or Mary) McBride's father, Capt. Wm. McBride,was killed by Indians at the massacre of Blue Licks, Aug 19,1782. He was one of two commissioners who built the road over Cumberland Mountain in 1779. He raised a company of militia and saw service under George Rogers Clark at the Falls of the Ohio, prior to his disaster at Blue Licks.


Wm & his brother, Francis and 1 son of Daniel Boone were among the 100 men killed. The McBride's were scalped. His will lists 6 children & wife Martha.Other sources list a daughter, Margaret S. (b.10/25/1768), m. Jacob Scott in 1788.?? Will: Lincoln Co KY Will Bk A p7, p174
Children:
2 Sarah MCBRIDE b: 15 AUG 1766 + James PRIESTLY
2 William jr MCBRIDE b: 20 APR 1771 d: ~1844 + Jane(Jenny)Haggin
2 Lapsley MCBRIDE b: 17 JUNE 1773 d: 1813 + Elizabeth SMART
2 Martha MCBRIDE b: 18 OCT 1775 d: 10 JAN 1850 + Stephen ARNOLD d: 1814
2 Elizabeth Floratelle MCBRIDE b: 18 AUG 1778 + John LITTLE
2 Mary(Polly) MCBRIDE b: 19 AUG 1781 + Elijah EMBREE b: 15 JAN 1774 d: 1815"


[S2522]

Sources

[S2522]

[S2522]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Hrolf Nefja NORGE

ABT 0820 - ____

ID Number: I18681

  • RESIDENCE: Norway
  • BIRTH: ABT 0820
  • RESOURCES: See: [S596]

Family 1 :
  1. +Ragnhild Hrolfsson Hilda NORGE

Sources

[S596]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Lillian PARKER


This person is presumed living.

INDEX

Jacob SOULE Sr.

ABT 1700 - ____

ID Number: I56489

  • RESIDENCE: MA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1700
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2056]
Father: James SOULE
Mother: Lydia THOMPSON


Family 1 :
  1. +William SOULE
  2. +Jacob SOULE Jr.

                                             _George SOULE Sr. "the Immigrant"_+
                                            | (1593 - ....) m 1626             
                       _John SOULE Sr.______|
                      | (1632 - 1707)       |
                      |                     |_Mary BECKETT ____________________+
                      |                       (1602 - 1676) m 1626             
 _James SOULE ________|
| (1659 - 1744) m 1693|
|                     |                      _Moses SIMMONS II "the Immigrant"_+
|                     |                     | (1604 - 1691) m 1637             
|                     |_Rebecca SIMMONS ____|
|                       (1637 - ....)       |
|                                           |_Sarah CHANDLER? _________________
|                                             (1622 - 1675) m 1637             
|
|--Jacob SOULE Sr.
|  (1700 - ....)
|                                            __________________________________
|                                           |                                  
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |__________________________________
|                     |                                                        
|_Lydia THOMPSON _____|
  (1670 - ....) m 1693|
                      |                      __________________________________
                      |                     |                                  
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |__________________________________
                                                                               

Sources

[S2056]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Col. Algernon S. TAYLOR C.S.A.

____ - ____

ID Number: I79264

  • TITLE: Col.
  • OCCUPATION: CSA resigned USA Marines 1861
  • RESIDENCE: of Alexandria, VA
  • DEATH: near Baltimore, Maryland?
  • BURIAL: Confederate Hill, Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland
  • RESOURCES: See: notes

Notes


Nephew of Zachary Taylor. http://www.toad.net/~steves/index#_Hlk47492641


"May 14, 1860 - A Marine Detachment, commanded by Capt. Algernon S. Taylor, from the Washington Navy Yard, participated in the ceremonies that welcomed the first Japanese Embassy personnel to Washington.


January 5, 1861 - Secretary of the Navy Touncey ordered that Ft. Washington, on the Maryland side of the Potomac River just south of Washington, DC, be garrisoned "to protect public property." Forty U.S. Marines from the Washington Navy Yard, fully equipped for 15 days, under the command of Capt. Algernon S. Taylor, were sent to the fort, a vital link in the defense of the Nation's Capitol, by either land or water.


April 12, 1861 - Under secret orders from Sec. of the Navy Welles, Ft. Pickens, FL, was reinforced by landing troops of the 1st U.S. Artillery and one hundred and ten U.S. Marines, commanded by 2/Lt. John C. Cash"
A Chronological History of the United States Marine Corps during the Civil War
Src: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4198/history.htm


"The 17th Virginia Infantry was organized at Manassas Junction in June 10, 1861. It was composed of ten companies, many of which began as prewar volunteer militias. The volunteers were from Alexandria, Fairfax, Fauquier, Loudoun, Prince William, and Warren Counties.


The core of these volunteers were four companies organized on February 18, 1861 as a volunteer militia battalion. The Mount Vernon Guard, Alexandria Riflemen, Old Dominion Rifles, and the Alexandria Artillery were attached to the 175th Regiment (Alexandria), Virginia Militia. On April 2, the General Assembly passed an act authorizing a battalion be raised in the city of Alexandria with three companies of infantry and one of artillery. On April 4, Captain Montgomery Dent Corse, of the Old Dominion Rifles was unanimously elected to command the battalion as a Major.


The oldest company, the Mount Vernon Guard, was organized on June 21, 1842, but always observed July 4 as their anniversary. The first time they probably appeared in uniform was in October 1842 when the passed in review before President Tyler.


The Alexandria Riflemen were organized on March 10, 1856. Originally choosing the name "Alexandria Sharp Shooters", they quickly reconvened their meeting when some realized how the initials would look painted on the back of their knapsacks. The change of name to "Alexandria Riflemen" was unanimous. They were organized, with the Mount Vernon Guard, into a volunteer battalion under the command of Major Turner Wade Ashby. Ashby had been a lieutenant in Capt. Corse's company during the Mexican War.


The Old Dominion Rifles was organized on December 6, 1860. Organization was complete by January 7, 1861 with the election of Corse as captain and Arthur Herbert as lieutenant.


The Alexandria Artillery was formed in 1850 as the Mechanical Artillery. The new name was adopted in 1856.


The battalion went on active duty soon after the Ordinance of Secession was passed on May 23. Two companies of Irish citizens of Alexandria were added to the battalion on April 25, 1861--an artillery company, the Irish Volunteers, and a light infantry company, the Emmett Guards. Two Fairfax County cavalry companies joined the battalion, as well--the Chesterfield Troop and the Fairfax Cavalry, known also as the Washington Home Guard.


Before the end of April, three more companies were attached to Corse's command at Alexandria:


On April 24, the 80 men of the Loudoun Guard arrived from Leesburg and went to quarters at Tennesson's old restaurant on Cameron Street. The light infantry company was organized early in November, 1859 by Capt. Charles B. Tebbs. They were attached to the 57th Regiment (Loudoun County), Virginia Militia.


The Fairfax Rifles had been formed at Fairfax Court House by Capt. William H. Dulany on December 1, 1859 as the Fairfax Rifle Rangers and attached to the 60th Regiment (Fairfax County) Virginia Militia. James W. Jackson was an early member of the 60th Militia before moving to Alexandria to become the co-proprietor of the Marshall House. The Fairfax Rifles joined Corse under the command of Lt. William A. Barnes on April 25, 1861 and were assigned to barracks on Prince Street, near Fairfax Street.


Capt. Robert H. Simpson, a teacher, organized the Warren Rifles in Front Royal. In early 1860, the graduate of VMI attached the Rifles to the 149th Regiment (Warren County) Virginia Militia. The company marched to Winchester on April 18, 1861 to enroll for active service. From there, they proceeded by rail to Harpers Ferry. Ordered to Alexandria to escort a shipment of captured arms, they stopped at Front Royal and arrived in Alexandria on April 26. They were quartered on the north side of Cameron Street, between Fairfax and Royal Streets.


***By April 27, Corse's command was designated as the Sixth Battalion of Virginia Volunteers under Lt. Col. Algernon S. Taylor. The native of Alexandria was commissioned in the Provisional Army of Virginia and was the nephew of former President Zachary Taylor.


On May 3, the battalion took an all night train ride from the Orange and Alexandria station to the Culpeper Court House sixty miles away. When they discovered an error by a telegraph operator, who wrote "Battalion" instead of "Battery," they returned on the morning train less the Alexandria Artillery.


Receiving travel orders on May 5, the battalion left by train at 11 p.m. This time they reached only Springfield Station, ten miles away, when they found the orders were a mistake. By noon on the 7th, they were back in Alexandria. This time, Colonel Taylor was questioned by authorities as to his premature evacuation of the city. He reported the withdrawal was due to the inefficient condition of a large part of his battalion and the vulnerability of his exposed and indefensible position. Taylor wrote that the two Irish companies, totaling about 240 privates, were armed with altered flintlocks without cartridges or caps. The Mount Vernon Guard had new muskets, but 52 of the 86 privates were without accouterments, 15 without arms, and very few had much ammunition. The 53 Warren Rifles had minie rifles with nine rounds each while the 85 rank and file of the Old Dominion Rifles had minie rifles with an average of five rounds and four caps each. Although Taylor's report did not include the Alexandria Rifles, another made about the same date reported the 69 men had 50 muskets and no ammunition. The 40 privates of Captain Ball's cavalry company had carbines and sabers but a limited amount of ammunition. Captain Powell's Fairfax Cavalry numbered 30 with only 22 mounts and only a few Colt revolvers.


The authorities in Richmond and Potomac Department headquarters at Culpeper Court House were evidently not satisfied with Taylor's report. He lost his command on May 10. His replacement was Colonel George Hunter Terrett, who had resigned from the U. S. Marine Corps on April 22 and had been commissioned as a colonel in the Provisional Army of Virginia by May 7, 1861. Major Corse had served as assistant general under Taylor and continued in that capacity under the new commander. ******


The arrival of the gunboat Pawnee at Alexandria caused quite a bit of excitement. Concern arose over the increased possibility of an enemy advance from Washington. Guards were placed at the foot of Cameron Street to keep an eye on the blockading steamer. Those not on guard duty were regularly at drill by squad, by company, and by battalion—occasionally under the command of Colonel Terrett.


On May 18, another Irish company, the O'Connell Guard, was organized under Captain Stephen W. Prestman and composed largely of railroad workers. The Alexandria Gazette of May 23 carried an appeal for ladies to help make uniforms for the new company.


It was also on May 23, 1861 that the polls opened in Alexandria for the purpose of voting on ratification of the ordinance of secession. Only 106 voted in opposition, while 983 ratified the ordinance. By 2 a.m. on the 24th, Union troops had crossed the Potomac River bridges into Virginia. Steamers carrying the 11th New York Fire Zouaves under Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth arrived at the foot of King Street. As the Zouaves landed, pickets fired shots warning of the enemy's approach and began falling back toward the city. At about 3 a.m., Captain Simpson rushed to his Warren Rifles: "Wake up, boys! They are coming! By George, they are across the bridge!"


Lieutenant Reigart B. Lowry, U. S. Navy, left the Pawnee about 4:30 a.m. to meet with Colonel Terrett and demand the surrender of Alexandria. The surrender was refused and Terrett announced he would evacuate the city. He ordered the battalion to assemble at Lyceum Hall and await further orders. Learning of the enemy approach by Washington Street, the battalion was ordered to depart by way of Duke Street at about 6:50 a.m. The Old Dominion Rifles were almost captured at Peyton's Grove when they were late getting the order. Captain Herbert managed to get his riflemen up to the retreating column as it moved westward on Duke Street and avoided their capture. As they evacuated the city, they were told that James Jackson had killed Col. Ellsworth and was, himself, killed instantly by Cpl. Francis Brownell while attempting to retrieve the Confederate flag Ellsworth had removed from the roof of the Marshall House. Just west of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad depot, Terrett's command stopped several trains returning from the Springfield Station. The entire command boarded trains and traveled 27 miles to Manassas Junction."
Src: http://www.fairfaxrifles.org/history.html


"January 12, 1861 - Capt. Josiah Watson, USMC, of the Pensacola Navy Yard receives orders from Capt. James Armstrong, USN, to form up his U.S. Marines at the main gate, ready for immediate service, fully armed and equipped. Pro-Secessionist Navy Officers, stationed at the Pensacola Navy Yard, orders the Marine Guard to let the rebel forces pass and take procession of the Yard.


January 14, 1861 - U.S. Marines manned howitzers preparatory to the defense of the Washington Navy Yard.


January 16, 1861 - Capt. Algernon S. Taylor, in command of Fort Washington, wrote Marine Commandant Col. John Harris, regarding the "defenseless and pregnable" condition of the fort. Taylor requested reinforcements, commenting that he did "not wish to be placed in a position to detract form the high character of my Corps."
Src: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4198/history.htm




Sources


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.