Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

My Southern Family

Mary

1824 - AFT 1880

ID Number: I94536

  • RESIDENCE: Limestone Co. AL
  • BIRTH: 1824, Alabama
  • DEATH: AFT 1880
  • RESOURCES: See: 1880 Census

Family 1 : HARGROVE

Notes


Household: 1880 Census Limestone Co. Alabama
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
Mary HARGROVES Self W Female W 56 AL Keeping House VA VA
Robert Lee HARGROVES Son S Male W 22 AL Farming VA AL
Mary HARGROVES Dau S Female W 20 AL At Home VA AL

Sources


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Mary C. BASS

ABT 1837 - ____

ID Number: I15098

  • RESIDENCE: Bullitt Co., KY
  • BIRTH: ABT 1837, KY
  • RESOURCES: See: [S429]
Father: Etheldred D. BASS
Mother: Matilda MCDONALD



                                             _(RESEARCH QUERY) BASS\BASSE\BAAS\BAYSE _
                                            |                                         
                       _Matthew BASS _______|
                      | (1770 - 1840)       |
                      |                     |_________________________________________
                      |                                                               
 _Etheldred D. BASS __|
| (1806 - 1844) m 1836|
|                     |                      _________________________________________
|                     |                     |                                         
|                     |_Elizabeth?__________|
|                       (1780 - ....)       |
|                                           |_________________________________________
|                                                                                     
|
|--Mary C. BASS 
|  (1837 - ....)
|                                            _________________________________________
|                                           |                                         
|                      _Josephus MCDONALD __|
|                     | (1776 - ....)       |
|                     |                     |_________________________________________
|                     |                                                               
|_Matilda MCDONALD ___|
  (1813 - ....) m 1836|
                      |                      _________________________________________
                      |                     |                                         
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |_________________________________________
                                                                                      

Sources

[S429]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Hattie Elizabeth DAWSON

26 Jul 1892 - 6 Nov 1963

ID Number: I11777

  • RESIDENCE: Lenoir Co. NC
  • BIRTH: 26 Jul 1892, Wayne Co. North Carolina
  • DEATH: 6 Nov 1963, Lenoir Co. North Carolina
  • BURIAL: LaGrange Cemetery, LaGrange, North Carolina
  • RESOURCES: See: [S393]

Family 1 : Alonza Logan DUDLEY
  1. +William Earl DUDLEY
  2. +Cicero Alonza DUDLEY II
  3. +Hazel Dell DUDLEY
  4. +Sallie Elizabeth DUDLEY
  5. +James Lawrence DUDLEY I
  6. +Julian Clay DUDLEY I
  7. +Dora Ruth DUDLEY
  8. +Evelyn Frances DUDLEY

Sources

[S393]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


George Lamotte DEHORITY


!LIVING

INDEX

Capt. George Weedon GRAY

13 May 1748 - 2 Dec 1823

ID Number: I63077

  • TITLE: Capt.
  • OCCUPATION: Rev War
  • RESIDENCE: Stafford Co. VA; Jefferson Co. KY
  • BIRTH: 13 May 1748, Stafford Co. Virginia
  • DEATH: 2 Dec 1823, Jefferson Co. Kentucky
  • RESOURCES: See: notes [S2320]

Family 1 : Mildred Rootes THOMPSON

Notes


George Weedon Gray, Capt. Rev.S., b: May 13, 1748 in Prob b.1740, Stafford CO, VA - enlisted from Culpeper, VA for Rev Serv; d: December 2, 1823 in Jefferson CO, KY.

Sources

[S2320]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Caroline JACOB

ABT 1807 - ____

ID Number: I78615

  • RESIDENCE: Charles Co. MD
  • BIRTH: ABT 1807, Charles Co. Maryland
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2993]

Family 1 : William J. W. COMPTON
  1.  Emily (Emma) Jacobs COMPTON
  2. +Edward Vernon COMPTON
  3. +Evelina COMPTON
  4.  Josephine COMPTON
  5.  Alice Wilson COMPTON
  6.  Lucinda COMPTON

Notes


Renouncation by Caroline COMMPTON of Anne Arundel Co., dated 29 Nov 1843 of William COMPTON's Will


I, Caroline Compton, widow of William J. W. Compton of Anne Arundel County, deceased, do hereby refuse to administer on the Estate of said deceased and do therefore renounce all my right, title and claim to said amdinistration desiring at the same time that Letters of Administration may be granted to John Tillman of the County aforesaid, as witness my hand this Twenty Ninth day of November, Eighteen Hundred and Forty Three.


Signed Caroline Compton


(Anne Arundel County Register of Wills MSA #C153 - TTS #1, pp. 483-484 (MDHR 13, 809, 1-13-12-20):
----------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------
Contibuted by: Evelyn Windhaus
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdbaltim/wills/will052.htm

Sources

[S2993]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


William Cager JUSTICE Sr.


!LIVING

INDEX

Robert MITCHELL

ABT 1850 - ____

ID Number: I69332


Family 1 : Della PENN

Sources

[S586]

[S2490]

[S2669]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Gen. James Ewell Brown "JEB" STUART

6 Feb 1833 - 12 May 1864

ID Number: I50473

  • TITLE: Gen.
  • OCCUPATION: C.S.A. one of the great cavalry commanders of America
  • RESIDENCE: of "Laurel Hill" Patrick Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 6 Feb 1833, Laurel Hill Plantation, Patrick Co.Virginia
  • DEATH: 12 May 1864, from wounds at battle of "Yellow Tavern" 11 May 1864, near Richmond, VA
  • BURIAL: Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, VA
  • RESOURCES: See: Bio Notes [S2059]
Father: Archibald STUART
Mother: Elizabeth Letcher PANNILL


Family 1 : Flora St. George COOKE

Notes


"His ancestry is traced on his father's side to Archibald Stuart. Known as "Jeb," Stuart was probably the most famous cavalryman of the Civil War. A Virginia-born West Pointer (1854), Stuart was already a veteran of Indian fighting on the plains and of Bleeding Kansas when, as a first lieutenant in the 1st Cavalry, he carried orders for Robert E. Lee to proceed to Harpers Ferry to crush John Brown's raid. Stuart, volunteering as aide-de-camp, went along and read the ultimatum to Brown before the assault in which he distinguished himself. Promoted to captain on April 22, 196 1, Stuart resigned on May 14, 1861, having arrived on the 6th in Richmond and been made a lieutenant colonel of Virginia infantry.
His later appointments included: captain of Cavalry, CSA (May 24, 1861); colonel, 1st Virginia Cavalry (July 16, 1861); brigadier general, CSA (September 24, 1861); and major general, CSA July 25, 1862). His commands in the Army of Northern Virginia included: Cavalry Brigade (October 22, 1861 - July 28, 1862); Cavalry Division July 28, 1862 - September 9, 1863); temporarily Jackson's 2nd Corps (May 3-6, 1863); and Cavalry Corps (September 9, 1863 - May 11, 1864). After early service in the Shenandoah Valley, Stuart led his regiment in the battle of 1st Bull Run and participated in the pursuit of the routed Federals. He then directed the army's outposts until given command of the cavalry brigade. Besides leading the cavalry in the Army of Northern Virginia's fights at the Seven Days, 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and the Wilderness, Stuart was also a raider. Twice he led his command around McClellan's army, once in the Peninsula Campaign and once after the battle of Antietam. While these exploits were not that important militarily, they provided a boost to the Southern morale. During the 2nd Bull Run Campaign, he lost his famed plumed hat and cloak to pursuing Federals. In a later Confederate raid, Stuart managed to overrun Union army commander Pope's headquarters and capture his full uniform and orders that provided Lee with much valuable intelligence. At the end of 1862, Stuart led a raid north of the Rappahannock River, inflicting some 230 casualties while losing only 27 of his own men. At Chancellorsville he took over command of his friend Stonewall Jackson's Corps after that officer had been mortally wounded by his own men. Returning to the cavalry shortly after, he commanded the Southern horsemen in the largest cavalry engagement ever fought on the American continent, Brandy Station, on June 9, 1863. Although the battle was a draw, the Confederates did hold the field. However, the fight represented the rise of the Union cavalry and foreshadowed the decline of the formerly invincible Southern mounted arm. During the Gettysburg Campaign, Stuart, acting under ambiguous orders, again circled the Union army, but in the process deprived Lee of his eyes and ears while in enemy territory. Arriving late on the second day of the battle, Stuart failed the next day to get into the enemy's rear flank, being defeated by Generals Gregg and Custer.


During Grant's drive on Richmond in the spring of 1864, Stuart halted Sheridan's cavalry at Yellow Tavern on the outskirts of Richmond on May 11. In the fight he was mortally wounded and died the next day in the rebel capital. He is buried in Hollywood Cemetery there. Like his intimate friend, Stonewall Jackson, General Stuart soon became a legendary figure, ranking as one of the great cavalry commanders of America. His death marked the beginning of the decline of the superiority which the Confederate horse had enjoyed over that of the Union. Stuart was a son-in-law of Brigadier General Philip St. George Cooke of the Federal service; his wife's brother was Brigadier General John Rogers Cooke of the Confederacy." (Davis, Burke, JEB Stuart: The Last Cavalier) http://www.civilwarhome.com/stuartbi.htm


The Life and Campaigns of Major-General J.E.B. Stuart By H.B. McClellan
Chapter I.--Ancestry, Boyhood And Youth. "He writes thus to his mother from Fort Leavenworth, in 1857:-- I wish to devote one hundred dollars to the purchase of a comfortable log church near your place, because in all my observation I believe one is more needed in that neighborhood than any other that I know of; and besides, "charity begins at home." Seventy-five of this one hundred dollars I have in trust for that purpose, and the remainder is my own contribution. If you will join me with twenty-five dollars, a contribution of a like amount from two or three others interested will build a very respectable free church. What will you take for the south half of your plantation ? I want to buy it.


A near relative writes: -- I well remember his speaking thus to his brother in 1863: "I would give anything to make a pilgrimage to the old place, and when the war is over quietly to spend the rest of my days there."


At the age of fourteen years James Stuart was placed at school in Wytheville; and in August, 1848, he entered Emory and Henry College. During a revival of religion among the students he professed conversion, and joined the Methodist Church. Throughout his after life he maintained a consistent Christian character. Ten years later, in 1859, he was confirmed in the Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop Hawkes, in St. Louis. The reasons for this change in his church connections were simple and natural. His mother was an Episcopalian, and had early instilled into him a love for her own church. His wife was a member of the same communion. He found, also, that a majority of the chaplains in the United States Army at that time were Episcopalian divines, and he considered that his opportunities for Christian fellowship and church privileges would be increased by the change. His spirit toward all denominations of Christians was as far removed as possible from narrow sectarianism.
In April, 1850, James Stuart left Emory and Henry College, having obtained an appointment as cadet in the United States Military Academy at West Point, on the recommendation of the Hon. T. H. Averett, of the Third District of Virginia. During his career as cadet, Stuart applied himself assiduously to study, and graduated thirteenth in a class of forty-six members. He appears to have been more ambitious of soldierly than of scholarly distinction, and held in succession the cadet offices of corporal, sergeant, orderly sergeant, captain of the second company, and cavalry sergeant; the last being the highest office in that arm of the service at the Academy. General Fitzhugh Lee speaks thus of this period:--


I recall his distinguishing characteristics, which were a strict attention to his military duties, an erect, soldierly bearing, an immediate and almost thankful acceptance of a challenge to fight from any cadet who might in any way feel himself aggrieved, and a clear, metallic, ringing voice.


The reader must not suppose from this description that Stuart was an advocate of the duel. The difficulties referred to were of such a character as are always liable to occur between boys at school, especially where, under a military organization, boys bear authority over boys. Another fellow-cadet gives the testimony that Stuart was known as a "Bible-class man," but was always ready to defend his own rights or his honor; and that the singular feature of his encounters with his fellow-students was, that his antagonists were physically far superior to him, and that although generally worsted in the encounter, Stuart always gained ground in the estimation of his fellows by his manly pluck and endurance. What his conduct was under these circumstances may be inferred from the following extracts from letters written by his father, who was a man of prudence and of honor. Under date of June 15, 1853, Archibald Stuart thus writes to his son:--


I am proud to say that your conduct has given me entire satisfaction. I heard, it is true (but no thanks to you for the information), of the little scrape in which you involved yourself; but I confess, from what I understand of the transaction, I did not consider you so much to blame. An insult should be resented under all circumstances. If a man in your circumstances gains credit by submitting to insult as a strict observer of discipline, he loses more in proportion in his standing as a gentleman and a man of courage.


Again on January 5, 1854, he writes :--


I have received your letter, and much regret that you have been involved in another fighting scrape. My dear son, I can excuse more readily a fault of the sort you have committed, in which you maintained your character as a man of honor and courage, than almost any other. But I hope you will hereafter, as far as possible, avoid getting into difficulties in which such maintenance may be demanded at your hands.


The relations existing between the father and son, as revealed by their correspondence during Stuart's cadet-ship, were of the most admirable character. Mutual affection was founded on mutual respect. As the time of graduation approached, the minds of both were greatly exercised over the important question of a choice of profession; and while the father seems to have preferred that his son should adopt the profession of arms, he throws the responsibility of the decision on his son, as the one most interested in, and the one most capable of making, a wise decision. The religious element in Stuart's character seems to have had a decided influence at this crisis of his life, and he was doubtless led to his decision by that Providence in which he trusted, and which was even then preparing him for his after life. During his last year at West Point he writes thus to his father:--


I have not as yet any fixed course determined upon after graduation; still I can't help but regard it as the important crisis of my life. Two courses will be left for my adoption, the profession of arms and that of law; the one securing an ample support, with a life of hardship and uncertainty,--laurels, if any, dearly bought, and leaving an empty title as a bequeathment; the other an overcrowded thoroughfare, which may or may not yield a support, -- may possibly secure honors, but of doubtful worth. Each has its labors and its rewards. In making the selection I will rely upon the guidance of Him whose judgment cannot err, for "it is not with man that walketh to direct his steps."


After Stuart had fairly embarked on his military career his father writes thus:--


Before I conclude I must express the deep solicitude I feel on your account. Just embarking in military life (a life which tests, perhaps more than any other, a young man's prudence and steadiness), at an immense distance from your friends, great responsibility rests upon your shoulders. It is true that you have, to start with, good morals fortified by religion, a good temper, and a good constitution, which if preserved will carry you through the trial safely. But the temptations of a camp to a young man of sanguine temperament, like yourself, are not to be trifled with or despised. I conjure you to be constantly on your guard, repelling and avoiding the slightest approach towards vice or immorality. You have to go through a fiery ordeal, but it is one through which many great and pious men have gone unscathed. But the greater portion have not escaped unscorched, and many have perished. Your military training at West Point will strengthen you greatly in the struggle. By it you have been taught the necessity of strict subordination to superiors, and of kind and conciliatory manners toward equals; and I trust that you will carry those lessons into practice now that you have exchanged the Academy for the camp.


Words of wisdom are these; words which the young man laid close to his heart. No stain of vice or immorality was ever found upon him."


John Broughton, President of the J. E. B. Stuart Birthplace Preservation Trust Inc., is pleased to announce that the largest crowd ever to attend nearly 3,000 paid attendance viewed the 12th Annual Encampment at Laurel Hill on October 5-6.otal Over $13,000 was raised before expenses for the two-day living history program at the Birthplace and Boyhood home of Confederate General James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart.


Broughton comments, "I am so proud of all of our troops who worked their fannies off to make this event a success. I wish to thank them and all those who attended especially the Board of Directors who sacrifice their time to volunteer to help preserve the birthplace of our region's most important historical figure." From http://www.jebstuart.org/news.cfm?ID=35


The 13th Annual Civil War Encampment will be held October 4-5, 2003 at the Ararat, Virginia site. The J. E. B. Stuart Birthplace Preservation Trust is a non-profit all volunteer organization with no paid staff. Donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501-c-3. For more information, Click Here.


Laurel Hill is open dawn to dusk everyday for self-guided walking tours. The property is available for group outings by contacting the organization at 276.251.1833 or at laurelhill@jebstuart.org.


WHAT'S IN A NAME ???
March 7th, 1863. In an attempt to avenge himself on Confederate cavalry commander, Fitzhugh Lee, Union General William W. Averell raids Fitzhugh's cavalry outposts. It seems that Fitzhugh Lee had upset his former West Point classmate by sending taunting messages to Averell (One such message asked Averell to bring fresh coffee with him if the Yankee infantry ever got enough nerve to cross the Rappahannock River and fight). The battle was going extremely well for Averell, in fact his men are on the brink of over running the whole Confederate force, when SUDDENLY, he receives word that Confederate JEB Stuart has arrived on the battlefield. Knowing Stuart's outstanding battle record, Averell sounds the retreat and his men hightail it back across the Rappahannock. One can only imagine the look on Averell's face when he later learns that, Stuart was indeed there...but his men weren't! Stuart had arrived alone. Just goes to show... A good name is a very handy thing. http://www.geocities.com/TimesSquare/Bunker/1048/strangeness.html



"May 11, 1864


On his way to Yellow Tavern, Virginia General, (this is about six miles north of Richmond), General "Jeb" Stuart stopped to see his wife and two children, who were visiting at a nearby plantation, Without dismounting from his horse, the General leaned down to kiss his wife hello and goodbye. This great General of the South was wounded in the Battle of Yellow Tavern on May 11th, and died from his wounds on May 12th". www.songofdixie.com




                                                    _Alexander STUART ____________+
                                                   | (1733 - 1822) m 1759         
                              _Alexander STUART ___|
                             | (1763 - 1832)       |
                             |                     |_Mary MOORE? _________________
                             |                       (1740 - ....) m 1759         
 _Archibald STUART __________|
| (1795 - 1855)              |
|                            |                      _George DABNEY of "The Grove"_+
|                            |                     | (1744 - 1824)                
|                            |_Anne DABNEY ________|
|                              (1765 - ....)       |
|                                                  |_Elizabeth PRICE _____________+
|                                                    (1745 - 1819)                
|
|--James Ewell Brown "JEB" STUART 
|  (1833 - 1864)
|                                                   ______________________________
|                                                  |                              
|                             _David PANNILL ______|
|                            | (1770 - ....)       |
|                            |                     |______________________________
|                            |                                                    
|_Elizabeth Letcher PANNILL _|
  (1800 - 1884)              |
                             |                      _William LETCHER _____________+
                             |                     | (1750 - 1780) m 1778         
                             |_Bethenia LETCHER ___|
                               (1779 - ....)       |
                                                   |_Elizabeth PERKINS ___________+
                                                     (1760 - ....) m 1778         

Sources

[S2059]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.


Jane C. THORNTON

____ - ____

ID Number: I105122

  • RESIDENCE: Green Co. KY
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3813]

Family 1 : Alexander BROWNLEE

Sources

[S3813]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.