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Mack C. ALVIS

25 Dec 1875 - 6 Nov 1936

ID Number: I10211

  • OCCUPATION: Farmer
  • RESIDENCE: Hawkins Co. TN & McLean Co. IL
  • BIRTH: 25 Dec 1875, Hawkins Co. Tennessee
  • DEATH: 6 Nov 1936, Downs, McLean Co, IL
  • BURIAL: Hopewell Cem, Downs, McLean Co, IL
  • RESOURCES: See: [S321] [S837]
Father: Wiley Blount ALVIS C.S.A.
Mother: Mary Elizabeth KENSINGER


Family 1 : Mary Elizabeth VAUGHAN
  1.  Mamie ALVIS
  2.  Cora ALVIS
  3.  Dean ALVIS
  4. +Glenn F ALVIS
  5.  Josie ALVIS
  6.  Gladys Marie ALVIS
  7.  George ALVIS
  8.  Earl ALVIS
  9.  Florence H ALVIS
  10.  Eugene ALVIS
  11.  Alma ALVIS

Notes


1910 McLean Co., IL census
#129-131 Mc Alvis 36 9 yrs md T T T Farmer
Mary E. 35 5 children-5 living T T T


Mayme 7 IL
Cora 6 IL
Dean 5 IL
Glenn 2 IL
Josie 8/12 IL


                                                       _Charles Dabney ALVIS I_+
                                                      | (1777 - 1861) m 1806   
                             _William Anderson ALVIS _|
                            | (1810 - 1900) m 1829    |
                            |                         |_Rebecca ARNALL ________+
                            |                           (1784 - 1830) m 1806   
 _Wiley Blount ALVIS C.S.A._|
| (1842 - 1913) m 1866      |
|                           |                          ________________________
|                           |                         |                        
|                           |_Elizabeth JOHNSON ______|
|                             (1815 - 1867) m 1829    |
|                                                     |________________________
|                                                                              
|
|--Mack C. ALVIS 
|  (1875 - 1936)
|                                                      ________________________
|                                                     |                        
|                            _________________________|
|                           |                         |
|                           |                         |________________________
|                           |                                                  
|_Mary Elizabeth KENSINGER _|
  (1846 - ....) m 1866      |
                            |                          ________________________
                            |                         |                        
                            |_________________________|
                                                      |
                                                      |________________________
                                                                               

Sources

[S321]

[S837]


INDEX

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Nathaniel Grey T HART

8 May 1734 - 22 Jul 1782

ID Number: I69248

  • RESIDENCE: Hanover Co. VA; Orange; Caswell, Cos. NC; Hart's Sta Boonesborough, KY
  • BIRTH: 8 May 1734, Hanover Co. Virginia
  • DEATH: 22 Jul 1782, killed by indians in Kentucky
  • RESOURCES: See: notes [S2644] [S3719]
Father: Thomas HART II
Mother: Susannah RICE


Family 1 : Sarah SIMPSON
  1.  Susannah HART
  2. +John HART

Notes


From: http://www.airtanker.com/mcnally/index.html
Nathaniel Hart, fifth son of Thomas Hart and Susannah Rice, was born in Hanover County, Virginia on May 08, 1734. In 1760, he married Sarah Simpson, daughter of Colonel Richard Simpson. Together, they had nine children.


On December 10, 1762, Lord Granville's agent issued a grant of 259 acres of land in Orange County, on Wat's Fork of County Line Creek to Nathaniel Hart. After Caswell County was cut out of Orange County in 1777, Nathaniel Hart obtained three grants of land in Caswell County, as follow: 640 acres on the north side of former line, 300 acres on the south side of former survey, and 500 acres on both sides of Herler's Creek, October 1, 1778. Nathaniel Hart built a large and handsome house, widely known throughout that region as the 'Red House', which served both as private residence and tavern.


Nathaniel engaged actively in agricultural pursuits; and also took a part, as representative citizen, in public affairs. In 1762 he was commissioned a coroner for Orange County, North Carolina and in 1769 he was added by the Governor's Council to the commission of peace dedimus. During the War of the Regulation, a wide spread revolt of the common people against unjust treatment and exploitation by court officials under the Crown, he and his two brothers, Thomas and David, served in the field under Governor Tryon. He commanded a company of the Orange County Regiment of Militia in the campaign against the insurgents which ended in the defeat of the Regulars and the end of the war, at the battle of Alamance.


For the next few years he was engaged in mercantile business at several points in the Chatham-Orange-Caswell County region. Associated in business with him, under the firm name of Hart & Luttrell, was John Luttrell, a prominent resident of Chatham County, who was married to Susanna, daughter of John Hart, Nathaniel's older brother.


"Of the three Hart Brothers (Thomas, David & Nathaniel) who were copartners in the Transylvania Company, the pioneer and way-breaker was Captain Nathaniel Hart. Guided by Daniel Boone, Thomas Price, Henderson and Hart visited the Cherokee chieftains at the Otari towns. As a result of the consultations, the old chieftain, Atta-Kulla-Kulla, a young buck, and a squaw, were appointed 'to attend said Henderson and Hart to North Carolina, and there examine the Goods and Merchandise which had been by them offered as the Consideration of the purchase.' In the records, in German, of the Moravians at Salem, North Carolina, occurs this interesting entry, as translated into English:


'In November 1774 three Cherokee Indians -a Chief, another man, and a woman, -spent the night in Bethabara, attended the evening meeting, and seemed to desire our friendship. They were under the guidance of several white gentlemen. The most pleasant part of it was that it again looks as though there would be peace with the Indians.'


In the conduct of the Great Treaty to use the peculiar term the negotiations leading to the vast purchase at the Sycamore Shoals of the Watauga River, March 15-17, 1775, Judge Henderson was assiduously and efficiently aided by his partners William, Thomas and Nathaniel Hart and John Luttrell, experienced business men." (Henderson)


Henderson, assisted by Richard Callaway and Daniel Boone, laid off 54 lots and the pioneers drew lots for them. Nathaniel took no part in these matters and in the location of the big fort. "He chose a spot for settlement a half mile away from the stockade; and he and his brother David, devoted almost their entire attention to building a cabin, as did also William Calk and his party, in April, 1775. Later in the year, Nathaniel Hart was assigned in the books of the Transylvania Company, 640 acres on the creek know as Hart's Fork in present Madison County.


During the next four years, Nathaniel Hart took the most intense interest in his Kentucky property and during the seasons for planting, cultivating, and harvesting of crops, he spent his time on improving the lands which had been allocated to him. His family continued to reside at the Hart home, the Red House, in Orange [later Caswell] County. During the period 1775-1780, he traveled back and forth between Boonesborough and North Carolina or Virginia, fourteen times. Every year, until his death in 1782, he raised a crop of corn." (Henderson)


It is believed that Nathaniel had sometime occupied cabin No. 14 at the southeast corner of the stockaded fort; for on Judge Henderson's design for it, cabin No. 14 is labeled, "Cabins for Hart and Williams".


When most of the men at Boonesborough were rescuing the Callaway girls and Daniel Boones daughter from the Indians, a party of fourteen Cherokees threatened the fort; but unable to accomplish anything against it, burned the cabin of Nathaniel and David Hart, located on a hill about a half mile from the fort, and destroyed some five hundred apple scions which had been brought out from the settlement. After his cabin was burned, Nathaniel lived with the family of Richard Callaway until he removed his family to Kentucky in 1780.


"Owing to the difficulties of cultivating the soil while exposed to the dangers of Indian attack, it became necessary to organize a little company or corporation at Boonesborough in the spring of 1779. Eighteen men, with Nathaniel Hart, George Madden, and Robert Cartwright as trustees, banded together on April 15, 1779, for the purpose of making a crop of corn. A set of rules, six in number, was drawn up; and among these rule were the following: that each member shall appear every morning at the beat of the drum or at other notice; that every morning two or more men shall reconnoiter the grounds under cultivation which shall remain constantly under armed guard; and that constant attention to the cultivation of the crop shall be obligatory.


The concerted action of this company produced beneficent results; for during the dreadful winter of bitter cold and severe hardship, known as the Hard Winter (1779-1780), corn was excessively scarce and the price rose to as much as $200 per bushel at Boonesborough." (Henderson)


Following is one of few letters of Nathaniel Hart, written to his wife, who was wintering at the home of Colonel John Donelson of Beaver Creek.


Boonesborough 30th Decm. 1779


My dear Salley


You will I fear think how that I after all the promises made to return to you in six weeks, if possible, have already spent ten weeks and cannot possible leave this place in less than two weeks from this time. And yet my Dear you may believe me when I assure you that I have done all that was in the power of man to doe, the six weeks was run out before I could git to this place and when my horses was so poore and low that I had not one in the world able to travele. I have now got them in away to thrive a little, and if please God I can git in a situation to preform the journey, will be with you about the last of January. I had sot a resolution when Capt. Pain left me to return by the way of Cumberland, but the extream coldweather, together with nakedness of myself and people and the poverty of my horses has obliged me to decline that notion and intrust my affairs to Col. Moore and Col. Henderson who are to go down about the time I set of Inn...My people tho allmost quight naked has had (I thank God) but few complaints among them. I have till now been very well myself and even now have no other complaint that a bad cold -I got no cattle all out except three, two of which dyed by eating Laurel and the other was lost I know not how -Altho I expect it will be very difficult wintering of them being reduced very low by their journey, as for our sheep I think we have but about one half of them to show and the wolf very severe on them. I expect to save very few or none of them and as for our horses Wm. Shearing I suppose told how they were situated when he left me and I expect (though am not sure) that I have lost my best mare and colt since -My cornfields I found in very bad order being near or quight half destroyed by the creatures and vermin and what remains is yet lying in heeps in the field exposed to weather and vermin yit I think we shall save enough to serve us here and spare some to go round to Cumberland which I shall indeavour to contrive there by the time we get down -I shall refer you to Majr. Shelby for the news of this place and I would recommend it to you to apply to him for his advise and assistance in the management of your affairs espetially that of procuring provisions which you I know must have been bad off for. I am in haste & much thronged with Company this morning which occasions me to cut my letter short, which I beg you'l excuse and believe me to be yours, Most Sincerely Natl. Hart


Nathaniel Hart appeared before the peripatetic land court set up by Virginia and showed his improvement of land and raising a crop of corn in the year 1775. A certificate was immediately issued by the court for 1,400 acres. Later, in 1780, another certificate was issued by the court at Harrodsburg for an additional 1,400 acres. A 1,000 acre tract of land received by Richard Henderson was subsequently purchased by Nathaniel.


The move from the Red House to French Lick proved to be a wearisome and long-delayed undertaking. Nathaniel took his men servants, his 75 head of cattle, as many sheep, and 30 head of horses. Each head of this stock received a bell. He calculated that every animal that got into the cane without a bell would be lost. The bill for the bells alone amounted to 30 pounds. It is said that in passing through Wythe, the number of these bells attracted the attention of the people, for three miles from the road. A number of negroes and cattle belonging to brother Thomas were also taken by Nathaniel.


He remained only a few days at French Lick and then pressed on to Williamsburg to secure at the land office the warrants for his Kentucky lands. Deterred by the insecurity of the Transylvania Company's claim to the Cumberland Country and the imminent dangers from hostile Indians were determined to break up the feeble settlement at the French Lick, he determined not to settle there and in the autumn of 1780 brought his family to Boonesborough.


Until burned by vandals in 1989, Harts log home, one mile from Boonesborough, was still standing but not occupied. It was reputedly the oldest remaining log house built outside the fort. It was composed of two square log pens separated by a frame dogtrot, with an ell at the rear. V-notches at the corners connect the logs beneath the weatherboards. (O'Malley)
photo taken in 1987.


"Hart's Station, at White Oak Spring, located in the Kentucky River bottom about one mile above Boonesborough, had been settled in 1779 by Nathaniel Hart and others, and here a small fort was built. The principal persons who lived at this fort were Nathaniel Hart's family, Lawrence Thompson's family, Henry Duree, Albert Voris, Daniel Duree, John Banta, Samuel Duree, Frederick Ripperdan, Peter Cosshort, and Paul Banta. Many of them were killed by Indians soon after coming to the country. Hart's Station in 1782, with perhaps one hundred souls in it, was reduced in August to three fighting men. This was the period when Bryant's Station was also besieged.


This field of young tobacco is located just east of the site of Nathaniel Hart's log house. No remains of the burned house could be found.


Nathaniel Hart was not to escape the Indian killings. Confirmation of his death, which actually took place on July 22, 1782, is given Jesse Benton in a letter to Thomas Hart:


Your brother Nat. Hart, our worthy & respected friend; I doubt is cutt off by the savages, at the time, & in the manner, as first represented, to wit, that he went out to hunt his horses, in the Month of July or Augt. it is supposed the Indians in ambuscade, betwixt Boonsbo. & Knockuckle, intended to take him prison, but killd. his horse & at this same time broke his thigh, that the savages finding their prisoner with a thigh broken, was under necessity of puting him to death by shooting him through the heart, at so small a distance as to powder burn his flesh. He was Tom-Hawked, Scalped & lay two days before he was found & buried. This account has come by difrent hands, & confirmed to Col. Henderson by a letter from an intimate friend of his at Kenruck.


It is believed that the Lisle family graveyard, which lies north of the house and across the road from the Hart House, contains the burial sites of Nathaniel Hart and his family. (O'Malley)


Of all the proprietors of the Transylvania Company, Nathaniel Hart stands out as a resolute, determined settler of the wilderness, who each year left his secure home in Caswell County, NC, to develop his Kentucky lands, to raise a crop of corn, and to take part in the defense of the wonderful new country." (Henderson)



Sarah Simpson (Wife) b. 24 Feb 1743/44 in Fairfax Co., VA
Marriage: 25 DEC 1760
Children:
1. Keziah Hart b. 18 Mar 1762 in Caswell Co., NC
2. Susannah Hart b. 18 Feb 1764 in Caswell Co., NC
3. Simpson Hart b. 30 Apr 1768 in Caswell Co., NC
4. Nathaniel Hart Jr b. 30 Sep 1770 in Caswell Co., NC
5. John Hart b. 5 Feb 1772 in Caswell Co., NC
6. Mary Ann Hart b. 7 Apr 1775
7. Cumberland Hart b. 17 Jul 1776
8. Chinoe Hart b. 25 Oct 1779 in Boonesborough, VA
9. Richard Green Hart b. 29 Jun 1782 in Boonesborough, KY


                                                           _(RESEARCH QUERY) HART ______
                                                          |                             
                       _Thomas HART I "the Immigrant"_____|
                      | (1660 - ....)                     |
                      |                                   |_____________________________
                      |                                                                 
 _Thomas HART II______|
| (1700 - 1755) m 1730|
|                     |                                    _____________________________
|                     |                                   |                             
|                     |___________________________________|
|                                                         |
|                                                         |_____________________________
|                                                                                       
|
|--Nathaniel Grey T HART 
|  (1734 - 1782)
|                                                          _Edward RICE "the Immigrant"_+
|                                                         | (1636 - ....)               
|                      _Thomas RHUYS RICE "the Immigrant"_|
|                     | (1656 - 1711)                     |
|                     |                                   |_Mary WOOTEN? CLAIBORNE? ____
|                     |                                     (1635 - 1709)               
|_Susannah RICE ______|
  (1700 - ....) m 1730|
                      |                                    _____________________________
                      |                                   |                             
                      |_Marcy HEWES? _____________________|
                        (1664 - 1722)                     |
                                                          |_____________________________
                                                                                        

Sources

[S3719]

[S2644]

[S3719]


INDEX

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Henry HAWKINS

ABT 1670 - ____

ID Number: I81848

  • BIRTH: ABT 1670, Charles Co. Maryland
Father: Henry HAWKINS "the Immigrant"
Mother: Eleanor COLE



                                    __
                                   |  
                                 __|
                                |  |
                                |  |__
                                |     
 _Henry HAWKINS "the Immigrant"_|
| (1627 - 1699) m 1663          |
|                               |   __
|                               |  |  
|                               |__|
|                                  |
|                                  |__
|                                     
|
|--Henry HAWKINS 
|  (1670 - ....)
|                                   __
|                                  |  
|                                __|
|                               |  |
|                               |  |__
|                               |     
|_Eleanor COLE _________________|
  (1640 - 1675) m 1663          |
                                |   __
                                |  |  
                                |__|
                                   |
                                   |__
                                      

Sources


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Norman Thomas HIGGINBOTHAM


This person is presumed living.

INDEX

Stephen (HOLLIDAY) HOLLADAY

8 Sep 1760 - ____

ID Number: I33869

  • RESIDENCE: King William (Now Caroline) Co. VA & Clark Co. KY
  • BIRTH: 8 Sep 1760
  • RESOURCES: See: [S894] [S1286]
Father: Joseph HOLLADAY I
Mother: Elizabeth LEWIS


Family 1 : Ann HICKMAN

Notes


Had issue:
1st. Elliott, born in Kentucky, 1786, died 1869, married Rachel Johnson.
2nd. Jemima, born 1788, died 1812, married Elizah Harris.
3rd, James, died unmarried.
4th, Joseph, born 1791, married Sarah Woodfolk.
5th, Lewis, born 1793.
6th, Elizabeth,born 1795, died 1833, married John Huston.
7th, Waller, born 1797, married 1843, Sarah A. Dunahoo, widow of Joseph H.Whittington. [S1286]

                                                   _Thomas I (HOLLIDAY\HALLIDAY) HOLLADAY _
                                                  | (1648 - 1701) m 1670                   
                       _John Marshall HOLLADAY II_|
                      | (1676 - 1742)             |
                      |                           |_Elizabeth SEVILLE _____________________
                      |                             (1650 - ....) m 1670                   
 _Joseph HOLLADAY I___|
| (1726 - 1795) m 1747|
|                     |                            ________________________________________
|                     |                           |                                        
|                     |_Ann Elizabeth LEWIS ______|
|                       (1688 - ....)             |
|                                                 |________________________________________
|                                                                                          
|
|--Stephen (HOLLIDAY) HOLLADAY 
|  (1760 - ....)
|                                                  ________________________________________
|                                                 |                                        
|                      _Henry or Harry LEWIS _____|
|                     | (1700 - ....)             |
|                     |                           |________________________________________
|                     |                                                                    
|_Elizabeth LEWIS ____|
  (1727 - 1795) m 1747|
                      |                            ________________________________________
                      |                           |                                        
                      |___________________________|
                                                  |
                                                  |________________________________________
                                                                                           

Sources

[S894]

[S1286]

[S1286]


INDEX

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John Williford JONES


This person is presumed living.

INDEX

Capt. HENRY DUDLEY SUTTON Knt.

1517 - 1568

ID Number: I12581

  • TITLE: Capt.
  • OCCUPATION: Knighted At Hampton Court On 11 Oct 1551.
  • RESIDENCE: England
  • BIRTH: 1517
  • DEATH: 1568
  • RESOURCES: See: [S504] [S810] [S1033] [S2186]
Father: JOHN Dudley SUTTON 3rd Lord Dudley
Mother: CICELY de GREY


Family 1 : Daughter of Christopher ASHTON
  1. +ROGER DUDLEY

Notes


Sir Henry was named by his grandmother, Cecily, Marchioness of Dorset, in her will, dated 6 May 1527. He was a monastic auditor under Cromwell in 1535, and a soldier in Ireland in 1536 under his uncle Leonard Grey. He was a soldier in Scotland, say 1540-3. He fought valiantly at the siege of Boulogne in 1544, and was Captain from early 1545 when Edward Fiennes, Lord Clinton, was Chief Captain. He was Vice Admiral of the Narrow Seas 1552-3 when Edward Fiennes was Admiral. he was knighted at Hampton court on 11 oct 1551.


He was a close associate of his second cousin, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, and was arrested on 25 July 1553 for complicity (with among others his father-in-law) in the rebellion of Robert's father, John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland.


Henry Dudley was jailed in the Tower of London, and received a pardon from Queen Mary on 18 Oct 1553. He was exiled in French service 1556-1563, but was in English service as "Capt. Dudley" in 1563, receiving an annuity later the same year from Queen Elizabeth "for his service". In 1567 he obtained from the Queen a year's protection from his creditors (renewed for two years in 1568). Sir Henry Dudley died between 1568 and 1570. No will, administration of estate, of Inq.p.m. has been discovered.


                                                                                _EDMUND SUTTON Lord Dudley, Knt.____________+
                                                                               | (1425 - 1483)                              
                                      _EDWARD VII SUTTON 5th Lord Dudley, K.G._|
                                     | (1459 - 1532) m 1480                    |
                                     |                                         |_JOYCE TIPTOFT _____________________________+
                                     |                                           (1430 - 1470)                              
 _JOHN Dudley SUTTON 3rd Lord Dudley_|
| (1495 - 1553) m 1501               |
|                                    |                                          _WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY of Boston, Knt._________+
|                                    |                                         | (1430 - 1463)                              
|                                    |_CECILY WILLOUGHBY ______________________|
|                                      (1463 - ....) m 1480                    |
|                                                                              |_JOAN STRANGEWAYS __________________________+
|                                                                                (1434 - 1483)                              
|
|--HENRY DUDLEY SUTTON Knt.
|  (1517 - 1568)
|                                                                               _JOHN de GREY 7th Lord Ferrers of Groby_____+
|                                                                              | (1432 - 1461) m 1452                       
|                                     _THOMAS de GREY Lord of Groby, K.B. K.G._|
|                                    | (1452 - 1501) m 1474                    |
|                                    |                                         |_ELIZABETH (WOODVILLE) WYDEVILLE ___________+
|                                    |                                           (1437 - 1492) m 1452                       
|_CICELY de GREY ____________________|
  (1496 - 1554) m 1501               |
                                     |                                          _WILLIAM IV BONVILLE 6th Lord of Harrington_+
                                     |                                         | (1440 - 1460) m 1458                       
                                     |_CECILY BONVILLE of Harrington___________|
                                       (1461 - 1530) m 1474                    |
                                                                               |_KATHERINE de NEVILLE of Salisbury__________+
                                                                                 (1435 - 1503) m 1458                       

Sources

[S504]

[S810]

[S1033]

[S2186]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

HTML created by GED2HTML v3.6-WIN95 (Jan 18 2000) on 05/29/2005 09:03:10 PM Central Standard Time.