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Sir THOMAS BOYD 3rd Baron of Kilmarnock

____ - ____

ID Number: I103793

  • TITLE: Sir
  • RESIDENCE: Scotland
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS
Father: THOMAS BOYD 2nd Baron of Kilmarnock


Family 1 : ALICE GIFFORD of Yester
  1. +THOMAS BOYD 4th Baron of Kilmarnock

                                                                             __
                                                                            |  
                                       _ROBERT BOYD 1st Baron of Kilmarnock_|
                                      | (.... - 1333)                       |
                                      |                                     |__
                                      |                                        
 _THOMAS BOYD 2nd Baron of Kilmarnock_|
|                                     |
|                                     |                                      __
|                                     |                                     |  
|                                     |_____________________________________|
|                                                                           |
|                                                                           |__
|                                                                              
|
|--THOMAS BOYD 3rd Baron of Kilmarnock
|  
|                                                                            __
|                                                                           |  
|                                      _____________________________________|
|                                     |                                     |
|                                     |                                     |__
|                                     |                                        
|_____________________________________|
                                      |
                                      |                                      __
                                      |                                     |  
                                      |_____________________________________|
                                                                            |
                                                                            |__
                                                                               

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Gen. Patrick Ronayne CLEBURNE C.S.A.

17 Mar 1828 - 30 Nov 1864

ID Number: I74916

  • TITLE: Gen.
  • OCCUPATION: CSA; Capt. of Yell Rifles, Phillips Co. AR; lawyer; Local high ranking Mason
  • RESIDENCE: Ireland and 1849 Helena, Phillips Co. AR
  • RELIGION: Irish Protestant
  • BIRTH: 17 Mar 1828, County Cork, Ireland
  • DEATH: 30 Nov 1864, KIA Battle of Franklin, Tennessee
  • BURIAL: cemetery of Saint John's Church, Maury Co. TN [375851]
  • RESOURCES: See: notes

Notes


Enlisted at Helena, Arkansas where he raised a company called Yell Rifles.


"In a letter to his family in 1861 he wrote that "I am with the South in death, in victory or defeat. [Like most Southrons, he said] I never owned a Negro and care nothing for them, but these people have been my friends and have stood up to me on all occasions. In addition to this, I believe the North is about to wage a brutal and unholy war on a people who have done them no wrong, in violation of the constitution and the fundamental principles of the government. They no longer acknowledge that all government derives its validity from the consent of the governed." http://www.westga.edu/~cscott/general.html.


"The words of Irish-born Confederate Major General Patrick Cleburne from his January, 1864, letter which proposed the emancipation and enlistment of Black Southerners into the Confederate Army possess great irony:


"Every man should endeavor to understand the meaning of subjugation before it is too late...It means the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy; that our youth will be trained by Northern schoolteachers; will learn from Northern school books their version of
the war; will be impressed by the influences of history and education to regard our gallant dead as traitors, and our maimed veterans as fit objects for derision...


....It is said slavery is all we are fighting for, and if we give it up we give up all. Even if this were true, which we deny, slavery is not all our enemies are fighting for. It is merely the pretense to establish sectional superiority and a more centralized form of government, and to
deprive us of our rights and liberties."


According to History of a Great Island, by Rev. Henry Dennehy, Patrick Ronaynes Cleburne was born at Annbrook House, Glenmore, Great Island in County Cork. His father was a doctor and his mother was one of the Berry-Hill Ronaynes who built the home. Enlisting in the 41st Regiment of Foot after failing a medical exam, Cleburne's unit was charged with maintaining order in a country racked by potato famine. The lessons he learned would serve him well.


Cleburne moved to America in 1849 and practiced law in Arkansas. In 1862 he received a commission as brigadier general in the Confederate Army. One of two foreign born officers to attain the rank of major general in the Confederate armed forces, he was recognized as a skilled combat officer and distinguished himself in many battles.


At Chattanooga he repelled Sherman's attack in spite of being outnumbered 4 to 1. During the retreat from that battle he won the Battle of Ringgold Gap although Hooker had 3 men for his 1. He repeatedly faced Sherman's advancing troops during the Atlanta Campaign. After Cleburne's troops absorbed the Union assault at Pickett's Mill, he was moved to the Confederate left and was involved in the skirmishing along the Dallas line. During the Nashville Campaign he succeeded to the command of Hardee's Corps. On his way north during this campaign, Cleburne stopped at a church in Maury County, Tennessee, and by local tradition was heard to comment at the cemetery of Saint John's Church that, "it is almost worth dying for to be buried in such a beautiful place." Cleburne was killed in battle a few days later at Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30, 1864 and buried here until later disinterred.


His sobriquet(nickname) was "Stonewall Jackson of the West". It would have been more accurate to call Jackson "Pat Cleburne of the East". Fighting on the western front Cleburne generally got less glory than generals in the east. Fighting under Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Johnston, and John Bell Hood, arguably the most incapable succession of commanding officers, Cleburne repeatedly demonstrated his abilities. Fighting for the losing side he got less attention and coverage than the Union generals. But Cleburne fought for a cause(states rights), and one in which he firmly believed.


One other event affected how he was viewed during and after the war. Stationed at Tunnel Hill, Ga. after the defeat at Chattanooga, Cleburne, leading a group of commissioned officers, proposed drafting Negroes into the Confederate Army in return for their emancipation. He reasoned that in one stroke they could increase the size of the army and eliminate a reason for the Federals to fight. While it is doubtful that the resolve of President Lincoln would have been altered (he was fighting to preserve the Union, not to end slavery), the proposal caused quite a backlash in the south and possibly affected the length of the war. When Jefferson Davis decided to remove Johnston from command during the Battle of Atlanta, he selected John Bell Hood over Pat Cleburne in part because of this proposal.


Today no statue exists for this icon of the Confederacy and many of the battlefields on which he fought are unprotected. His stand at Missionary Ridge, the rearguard action at Ringgold Gap, bloody Pickett's Mill... "


"Through the Patrick Cleburne Society, we hope to rectify this oversight, and preserve for future generations not only the battlefields where Cleburne's Division won immortality, but the story of the man who led it." http://ngeorgia.com/people/cleburnep.html.


"Life has always been a small matter with me when duty points the way," wrote Patrick R. Cleburne to his brother on the eve of war in 1861. Newly elected Captain of a company of militia called the Yell Rifles raised in Phillips County, Arkansas, his words would become synonymous with his conduct over the next four years.


Patrick Cleburne Society
P.O. Box 157 1113 Murfreesboro Rd, Franklin, Tennessee 37064
info@patrickcleburne.com


Patrick Cleburne Links on this site: http://ngeorgia.com/books/cleburne.html


"Moved by the exigency in which our country is now placed, we take the liberty of laying before you, unofficially, our views on the present state of affairs....We have now been fighting for nearly three years, have spilled much of our best blood, and lost, consumed, or thrown to the flames an amount of property equal in value to the specie currency of the world. Through some lack in our system the fruits of our struggles and sacrifices have invariably slipped away from us and left us nothing but long lists of dead and mangled. Instead of standing defiantly on the borders of our territory or harassing those of the enemy, we are hemmed in today into less than two-thirds of it, and still the enemy menacingly confronts us at every point with superior forces. Our soldiers can see no end to this state of affairs except in our own exhaustion; hence, instead of rising to the occasion, they are sinking into a fatal apathy, growing weary of hardships and slaughters which promise no results....


Every man should endeavor to understand the meaning of subjugation before it is too late. We can give but a faint idea when we say that it means the loss of all we not hold most sacred - slaves and all other personal property, lands, homesteads, liberty, justice, safety, priode, manhood. It means the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy; that our youth will be trained by Northern schoolteachers; will learn from Northern school books their version of the war; will be impressed by the influences of history and education to regard our gallant dead as traitors, and our maimed veterans as fit objects for derision....


...The President of the United States announces that 'he has already in training an army of 100,000 negroes as good as any troops,' and every fresh raid he makes and new slice of territory he wrests from us will add to this force. Every soldier in our army already knows and feels our numerical inferiority to the enemy....Our single source of supply is that portion of our white men fit for duty and not now in the ranks. The enemy has three sources of supply: First, his own motley population; secondly, our slaves; and thirdly, Europeans whose hearts are fired into a crusade against us by fictitious pictures of the atrocities of slavery, and who meet no hinderance from their Governments in such enterprise, because these Governments are equally antagonistic to the institution. In touching the third cause, the fact that slavery has become a military weakness, we may rouse prejudice and passion, but the time has come when it would be madness not to look at our danger from every point of view, and to probe it to the bottom. Apart from the assistance that home and foreign prejudice against slavery has given the North, slavery is a source of great strength to the enemy in a purely military point of view, by supplying him with an army from our granaries; but it is our most vulnerable point, a continued embarrassment, and in some respects an insidious weakness....Like past years, 1864 will diminish our ranks by the casualties of war, and what source of repair is there left us?....


Our country has already some friends in England and France, and there are strong motives to induce these nations to recognize and assist us, but they cannot assist us without helping slavery, and to do this would be in conflict with their policy for the last quarter of a century, England has paid hundreds of millions to emancipate her West India slaves and break up the slave-trade. Could she now consistently spend her treasure to reinstate slavery in this country? But this barrier once removed, the sympathy and the interests of these and other nations will accord with our own, and we may expect from them both moral support and mateiral aid....This measure will deprive the North of the moral and material aid which it now derives from the bitter prejudices with which foreigners view the institution, and its war, if continued, will henceforth be so despicable in their eyes that the sources of recruiting will be dried up. It will leave the enemy's negro army no motive to fight for, and will exhaust the source from which it has been recruited. The idea that it is their special mission to war against slavery has held growing sway over the Northern people for many years, and has at length ripened into an armed and bloody crusade against it....Knock this away and what is left" A bloody ambition for more territory, a pretended veneration for the Union, which one of their own most distinguished orators (Doctor Beecher in his Liverpool speech) openly avowed was only used as a stimulus to stir up the anti-slavery crusade, and lastly the poisonous and selfish interests which are the fungus growth of the war itself. Mankind may fancy it a great duty to destroy slavery, but what interest can mankind have in upholding this remainder of the Northern war platform?


The Constitution of the Southern States has reserved to their respective governments the power to free slaves for meritorious services to the State. It is politic besides. For many years, ever since the agitation of the subject of slavery commenced, the negro has been dreaming of freedom, and his vivid imagination has surrounded that condition with so many gratifications that it has become the paradise of his hopes. To attain it he will tempt dangers and difficulties not exceeded by the bravest soldier in the field....The slaves are dangerous now, but armed, trained, and collected in an army they would be a thousand fold more dangerous; therefore when we make soldiers of them we must make free men of them beyond all question, and thus enlist their sympathies also....


It is said that Republicanism cannot exist without the institution. Even were this true, we prefer any form of government of which the Southern people may have the molding, to one forced upon us by a conqueror....It is said slavery is all we are fighting for, and if we give it up we give up all. Even if this were true, which we deny, slavery is not all our enemies are fighting for. It is merely the pretense to establish sectional superiority and a more centralized form of government, and to deprive us of our rights and liberties."


The idea of the Confederacy considering enlisting blacks isn't quite so far fetched as it seems today. Early in the War, for example, it was reported in the Southern press that some mixed race, free men had offered to organize regiments composed of their peers. Uniformed, black musicians served from the start of the War. In addition, there have recently appeared in various publications reports of various individual slaves serving as personal servants, laborers, or cooks who picked up guns and fought and black or mixed-race individuals who enlisted in the Confederate army.


Ultimately, a number of Confederate soldiers, including General Robert E. Lee, advocate the enlistment of blacks. On 15 March, 1864, for example, several commissioned offcers in Thomas' Brigade (14th Georgia) asked General Thomas to forward a request that almost all the enlisted men had agreed to which proposed "...that negroes in the counties of Georgia which our companies hail from be conscribed [sic] in such numbers and under such regulations as the War Department may deem proper....


...When in former years," they explained, "for pecuniary purposes, we did not consider it disgraceful to labor with negroes in the field or at the same work bench, we certainly will not look upon it in any other light at this time, when an end so glorious as our independence is to be achieved. We sincerely believe that the adoption throughout our army of the course indicated in the above plan, or something similar to it, will insure a speedy availability of the negro element in our midst for military purposes and crate, or rather cement, a reciprocal attachment between the men now in service and the negroes highly beneficial to the service..." On 18 March, 1865, General Thomas approved and forwarded this proposal.


According to Ervin L. Jordan, Jr. in his book, Black Confederates and Afro-Yankees in Civil War Virginia, after the Confederate Congress approved of the enlistment of blacks--something General Robert E. Lee had been advocating for a good while--a few black units participated in minor engagements.


A complete copy of General Cleburne's proposal to enlist blacks can be found in The Gray and the Black, The Confederate Debate on Emancipation by Robert F. Durden.


"If this cause that is so dear to my heart is doomed to fail, then I pray heaven may let me fall with it, while my face is turned toward the enemy and my right arm battling for that which I know to be right." -- Patrick R. Cleburne in a address to his troops on 2 October, 1864.
http://www.westga.edu/~cscott/general.html.


Book: "Stonewall of the West Patrick Cleburne and the Civil War" by Craig L. Symonds; University Press of Kansas, available on Amazon.com. ISBN 0-7006-0820-6


"His youngest half-brother Christopher Cleburne "Kit", age 23, KIA 10 May 1864 at a skirmish at Dublin, Kentucky and was a Lieutenant in the 5th Kentucky Cavalry, a part of John Hunt Morgan's command, CSA. Kit fell "while gallantly leading his men in a charge on the enemy". Morgan had recently promoted the young officer to acting Captain, and despite his youth his peers considered him "one of the most promising young officers in the army". "

[375851]
later disinterred.

Sources


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Bennie Lee DICKERSON


!LIVING

INDEX

Charles HALL


This person is presumed living.

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Sarah HENRY

8 Sep 1757 - 1846

ID Number: I101423

  • RESIDENCE: Botetourt, VA and Fayette Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 8 Sep 1757, Lancaster Co. Pennsylvania
  • DEATH: 1846, Fayette Co. Kentucky
  • RESOURCES: See: notes [S1615]

Family 1 : Abraham BOWMAN
  1.  Mary "Polly" BOWMAN
  2. +Abraham "Abner" BOWMAN II
  3.  John BOWMAN
  4.  William BOWMAN
  5.  George H. BOWMAN
  6.  Sarah BOWMAN
  7.  Elizabeth BOWMAN

Notes


Widow Bryan. Marriage 1 David Bryan.


[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 9, Ed. 1, Tree #2985, Date of Import: 11 Jun 1997]


Source: The Bowmans, a Pioneering Family by John W. Wayland "Mrs (Bryan)Bowman was born Sarah Henry, in PA Sep 8, 1757. By her first marriage she had a son, David Bryan, born April 30, 1779. Her first husband, David Bryan, is believed to have been the son of David Bryan who died in Botetourt Co in 1767, whose widow married Col. John Bowman. David Bryan who died in 1767, had, when he made his will in 1766, sons William and David."
Sarah was the sister of Patrick Henry.HFG (I don't see this as fact, Patrick had a sister Sarah who m. Thomas and Englishman).

Sources

[S1615]


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Burrus Agustus HIGGINBOTHAM

19 Jun 1851 - 8 Jan 1907

ID Number: I30853

  • RESIDENCE: Yalobusha, MS & Mccoy, Kaufman, TX
  • BIRTH: 19 Jun 1851, MS
  • DEATH: 8 Jan 1907, Mccoy, Kaufman, TX
  • BURIAL: Mccoy, Kaufman, TX
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1194] [S1195]
Father: Joseph James HIGGINBOTHAM
Mother: Nancy WRIGHT


Family 1 : Maggie E. CRAVER
  1. +Grundie E. HIGGINBOTHAM

Notes


(AFN: 39NN-N0)

                                                                                _Joseph HIGGINBOTHAM __+
                                                                               | (1761 - 1817) m 1788  
                              _Lindsey HIGGINBOTHAM ___________________________|
                             | (1794 - 1865) m 1817                            |
                             |                                                 |_Frances HIGGINBOTHAM _+
                             |                                                   (1765 - 1830) m 1788  
 _Joseph James HIGGINBOTHAM _|
| (1821 - ....) m 1846       |
|                            |                                                  _James HIGGINBOTHAM ___+
|                            |                                                 | (1775 - 1825) m 1797  
|                            |_Elinor (Eleanor) HIGGINBOTHAM __________________|
|                              (1800 - 1864) m 1817                            |
|                                                                              |_Mary BROWN ___________+
|                                                                                (1778 - 1857) m 1797  
|
|--Burrus Agustus HIGGINBOTHAM 
|  (1851 - 1907)
|                                                                               _______________________
|                                                                              |                       
|                             _(RESEARCH QUERY) WRIGHT of NC;SC;GA;AL;LA;MS;TX_|
|                            |                                                 |
|                            |                                                 |_______________________
|                            |                                                                         
|_Nancy WRIGHT ______________|
  (1823 - ....) m 1846       |
                             |                                                  _______________________
                             |                                                 |                       
                             |_________________________________________________|
                                                                               |
                                                                               |_______________________
                                                                                                       

Sources

[S1194]

[S1195]


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Agnes MCNEALY

ABT 1725 - BEF 1760

ID Number: I205

Father: James MCNEALY "the Immigrant"
Mother: UNNAMED


Family 1 : James MCCANTS Esq.
  1. +David MCCANTS Sr.
  2. +Thomas MCCANTS Sr.
  3. +Jean (Jane\Jain) MCCANTS
  4. +Mary Elizabeth MCCANTS
  5. +Nathaniel MCCANTS
  6.  Samuel MCCANTS
  7. +Alexander MCCANTS Sr.

Notes


Possible different spellings; Monneally, Munerlyn.
McNealy (not McKnealy) was taken from a badly damaged will of James McNealy who among others named James McCants.
Agnes Munerlyn McKneely married to James McCants, Esq.
Agnes Donnelley/Dannelley married to James McCants, Esq.?
Dannelleys/Donnelleys were in the Pee Dee area of SC abt 1736-1744. [S13]

                                    __
                                   |  
                                 __|
                                |  |
                                |  |__
                                |     
 _James MCNEALY "the Immigrant"_|
| (1700 - 1764)                 |
|                               |   __
|                               |  |  
|                               |__|
|                                  |
|                                  |__
|                                     
|
|--Agnes MCNEALY 
|  (1725 - 1760)
|                                   __
|                                  |  
|                                __|
|                               |  |
|                               |  |__
|                               |     
|_UNNAMED_______________________|
  (1700 - 1764)                 |
                                |   __
                                |  |  
                                |__|
                                   |
                                   |__
                                      

Sources

[S11]

[S13]

[S306]

[S316]

[S317]

[S985]

[S13]


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Jacob PRILLAMAN I

1721 - 1796

ID Number: I91436

  • RESIDENCE: Henry Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 1721
  • DEATH: 1796
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3391]

Family 1 : Walburga HELM
  1. +Daniel P. PRILLAMAN
  2. +Barbara PRILLAMAN

Notes


1 Jacob Prillaman b: 1721 d: abt 1796 + Walpurga Helms b: abt 1735
Children:
2 Anne Prillaman
2 Jacob Prillaman II b: 1752 d: abt 1840 + Barbara Snidow b: 1752 d: bef 1796 + Sarah Bradley
2 John Prillaman b: ABT. 1754 d: ABT. 1842 + Lucy Wilson b: ABT. 1768 d: 1853
2 Daniel P. Prillaman b: 5 Dec 1758 d: 6 Jan 1854 + Ann O'Briant b: 9 Feb 1758 d: 1850
2 Barbara Prillaman b: 1764 d: 1848 + Christian Martin + Philip Snidow b: 1756

Sources

[S3391]


INDEX

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Vande Lee RICKEY


!LIVING

INDEX

Sarah SMART

ABT 1820 - ____

ID Number: I66232

  • RESIDENCE: Coffee and Warren Cos. TN and AL and TX
  • BIRTH: ABT 1820
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2319]

Family 1 : Edmund PENDLETON
  1.  Margaret "Anna" PENDLETON
  2.  George Cassety PENDLETON C.S.A. Lt. Gov. Texas
  3.  William PENDLETON
  4.  Samuel PENDLETON
  5.  Edmund PENDLETON
  6.  Alice PENDLETON
  7.  Octavia PENDLETON
  8.  David PENDLETON
  9.  Daughter PENDLETON

Sources

[S2319]


INDEX

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Anna THORNTON

15 Jun 1685 - ____

ID Number: I34174

  • RESIDENCE: Gloucester Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 15 Jun 1685
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1084] [S2097]
Father: William THORNTON III
Mother: Elizabeth FITZHUGH



                                                               _WILLIAM II THORNTON of "The Hills"____+
                                                              | (1585 - 1660)                         
                        _William III THORNTON "the Immigrant"_|
                       | (1620 - 1708) m 1648                 |
                       |                                      |_Frances ROBINSON _____________________
                       |                                        (1600 - 1650)                         
 _William THORNTON III_|
| (1649 - 1727) m 1671 |
|                      |                                       _John ROWLAND "the Immigrant"__________
|                      |                                      | (1614 - ....)                         
|                      |_Elizabeth ROWLAND ___________________|
|                        (1627 - ....) m 1648                 |
|                                                             |_______________________________________
|                                                                                                     
|
|--Anna THORNTON 
|  (1685 - ....)
|                                                              _(RESEARCH QUERY) FITZHUGH of Virginia_
|                                                             |                                       
|                       _John FITZHUGH _______________________|
|                      | (1624 - ....)                        |
|                      |                                      |_______________________________________
|                      |                                                                              
|_Elizabeth FITZHUGH __|
  (1652 - 1688) m 1671 |
                       |                                       _______________________________________
                       |                                      |                                       
                       |______________________________________|
                                                              |
                                                              |_______________________________________
                                                                                                      

Sources

[S1084]

[S2097]


INDEX

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Raymond WHITELY


This person is presumed living.

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