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My Southern Family

(RESEARCH QUERY) CARY

____ - ____

ID Number: I47930

  • RESIDENCE: VA
  • RESOURCES: See: notes

Family 1 :
  1.  Miles CARY
  2. +Mary CARIE
  3. +Elizabeth CARY
  4.  Polly CAREY
  5. +Margaret CAREY
  6.  Albert CARY

Notes


Some loose Carys Grouped here for Research purposes - relationship of kids on this card to each other is not determined yet, but each ones descendants are. searching for kinship if any to each other for the kids on this card. please write jbass@digital.net.
1800 Tax List for Chesterfield Co. VA:
Cary, Edward 06
Cary, Himp 06
Cary, Mary 06
Cary, Miles 08
Cary, Peter M 07
Cary, Robert 08
Cary, William 06


English Origins of American Colonists, p. English Origins of AMERICAN COLONISTS
[p.1] CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES CONTRIBUTORY TO AMERICAN GENEALOGY.
[p.35] CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES CONTRIBUTORY TO AMERICAN GENEALOGY. BY J. HENRY LEA AND J. R. HUTCHINSON.
page 41
The five and twientieth daye of June, 1659, I LUKE JOHNSON of Virginia, Planter, being weake in bodie. My funerall charges shall not exceed twentie markes. To my loving unckle John Turton of West Bromwich, co. Stafford, gent, and to James Carie, Citizen and Salter of London, 20s. each. Elizabeth, wife of said James Carie, 20s. Friends Mr John Banester and Elizabeth [p.41] his wife 40s. each for rings. I give and bequeath unto my godson John Banester, son of John Banister of Yorke River in Virginia, planter, one cowe. I give and bequeath unto my godson Robert Bryen, son of Robert Bryen of Virginia, planter, one cowe. Residuary legatee: Anne my wife. Executors: my uncle John Turnton and my friend James Cary. Witnesses: Richard Morton, Pr: Stedman, servant to Thomas Russel, scr. Proved 1 Aug., 1659, by the executors named. (P.C.C. Pell, 450.)


It seems probable that the James Carie, citizen and salter, named in the above will, was a cousin or other near relative of Miles Cary, the well known founder of the family of that name in Virginia, who was killed in the fight with the Dutch at Point Comfort, 10 June, 1667. Miles Carey was descended from William Cary, Mayor of Bristol in 1546, who left a prolific family of merchants and adventurers, many of whom found their way to America during the 17th century. A James Cary, first cousin of Miles, was of New England at this period,Stow MS., 670, fo. 229-30, in Brit. Musuem.* but evidently not the James named in the will.



Sources


INDEX

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Frances Jane DICKINSON

ABT 1850 - young

ID Number: I41675

  • RESIDENCE: VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1850
  • DEATH: young
  • RESOURCES: See: [S180]
Father: Asa Dupuy DICKINSON
Mother: Sarah Cabell IRVINE



                                              _____________________
                                             |                     
                        _Robert DICKINSON ___|
                       | (1767 - 1818)       |
                       |                     |_____________________
                       |                                           
 _Asa Dupuy DICKINSON _|
| (1816 - ....) m 1846 |
|                      |                      _James DUPUY ________+
|                      |                     | (1758 - 1823) m 1782
|                      |_Mary Purnall DUPUY _|
|                        (1786 - ....)       |
|                                            |_Mary PURNALL _______+
|                                              (1763 - 1828) m 1782
|
|--Frances Jane DICKINSON 
|  (1850 - ....)
|                                             _____________________
|                                            |                     
|                       _____________________|
|                      |                     |
|                      |                     |_____________________
|                      |                                           
|_Sarah Cabell IRVINE _|
  (1825 - ....) m 1846 |
                       |                      _____________________
                       |                     |                     
                       |_____________________|
                                             |
                                             |_____________________
                                                                   

Sources

[S180]


INDEX

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Hannah Ludwell LEE

6 Feb 1728 - 1782

ID Number: I32392

  • RESIDENCE: Westmoreland Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 6 Feb 1728, Machodoc or Stratford Hall, Westmoreland Co. VA
  • DEATH: 1782, Peckatone, Westmoreland Co. Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: [S965] [S1856] [S2128] [S1956]
Father: Thomas LEE of Stratford
Mother: Hannah Philippa Harrison LUDWELL


Family 1 : Gawin CORBIN of "Peckatone"
  1. +Martha "Patty" CORBIN

Notes


After husband died Hannah lived with Dr. Richard Lingan Hall, who had taken care of Gawin during his illness. "Hannah Lee Corbin was a proponent of women's rights." Didn't marry Dr. Hall due to strict conditions of Corbin's will. Child: Elisha Hall CORBIN b: 1763.


[S1856]


                                                                        _Richard LEE "the immigrant"_______+
                                                                       | (1613 - 1664) m 1641              
                                     _Richard LEE _____________________|
                                    | (1647 - 1714) m 1674             |
                                    |                                  |_Anne CONSTABLE OWEN? _____________+
                                    |                                    (1615 - 1706) m 1641              
 _Thomas LEE of Stratford___________|
| (1690 - 1750) m 1722              |
|                                   |                                   _Henry CORBIN "the Immigrant"______
|                                   |                                  | (1629 - 1675) m 1645              
|                                   |_Laetitia CORBIN _________________|
|                                     (1657 - 1706) m 1674             |
|                                                                      |_Alice ELTONHEAD __________________+
|                                                                        (1627 - 1685) m 1645              
|
|--Hannah Ludwell LEE 
|  (1728 - 1782)
|                                                                       _Philip LUDWELL of the Carolinas___
|                                                                      | (1638 - 1704) m 1668              
|                                    _Philip LUDWELL II of Greenspring_|
|                                   | (1672 - 1726) m 1697             |
|                                   |                                  |_Lucy Burwell HIGGINSON ___________+
|                                   |                                    (1632 - 1675) m 1668              
|_Hannah Philippa Harrison LUDWELL _|
  (1701 - 1750) m 1722              |
                                    |                                   _Benjamin HARRISON II of Wakefield_+
                                    |                                  | (1645 - 1712)                     
                                    |_Hannah HARRISON _________________|
                                      (1678 - 1731) m 1697             |
                                                                       |_Hannah CHURCHILL? ________________
                                                                         (1651 - 1698)                     

Sources

[S965]

[S1856]

[S2128]

[S1956]

[S1856]


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Alice Garland MARKHAM

ABT 1850 - ____

ID Number: I85738

  • RESIDENCE: of VA and TX
  • BIRTH: ABT 1850
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3161]
Father: John Garland MARKHAM
Mother: Alethian HINES


Family 1 : Thomas SMITH

Notes


i. Alice Garland5 Markham She married Hon. Thomas Smith.(173) He was Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives. [S3161]

                                                  _Bernard MARKHAM ____+
                                                 | (1737 - 1802) m 1767
                         _George MARKHAM ________|
                        | (1783 - ....) m 1818   |
                        |                        |_Mary HARRIS ________+
                        |                          (1740 - 1825) m 1767
 _John Garland MARKHAM _|
| (1819 - ....) m 1849  |
|                       |                         _John GARLAND _______
|                       |                        |                     
|                       |_Fannie Taylor GARLAND _|
|                         (1791 - 1853) m 1818   |
|                                                |_____________________
|                                                                      
|
|--Alice Garland MARKHAM 
|  (1850 - ....)
|                                                 _____________________
|                                                |                     
|                        ________________________|
|                       |                        |
|                       |                        |_____________________
|                       |                                              
|_Alethian HINES _______|
  (1820 - ....) m 1849  |
                        |                         _____________________
                        |                        |                     
                        |________________________|
                                                 |
                                                 |_____________________
                                                                       

Sources

[S3161]

[S3161]


INDEX

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Julia MCNEALY

ABT 1830 - ____

ID Number: I89059

  • RESIDENCE: of Lynchburg, VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1830
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3304]

Family 1 : Jubal Anderson EARLY C.S.A.
  1.  Joseph Emerson EARLY
  2.  Florence Annie EARLY
  3.  Robert EARLY
  4.  Jubal L. EARLY

Sources

[S3304]


INDEX

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Emma Eoline QUIN

17 Feb 1852 - ____

ID Number: I30022

  • RESIDENCE: Pike Co. MS
  • BIRTH: 17 Feb 1852
  • RESOURCES: See: [S478]
Father: Hugh Murray QUIN
Mother: Deliah BEARDEN


Family 1 : Luke Ward CONERLY C.S.A.
  1.  Preston CONERLY
  2.  Adalee CONERLY
  3.  Idalee CONERLY

                                                 _Peter QUIN Sr.___________________+
                                                | (1750 - 1824) m 1776             
                       _Peter QUIN Jr.__________|
                      | (1787 - 1835)           |
                      |                         |_Judith ROBINSON _________________
                      |                           (1760 - 1840) m 1776             
 _Hugh Murray QUIN ___|
| (1819 - 1900) m 1842|
|                     |                          _ MOORE __________________________
|                     |                         | (1770 - ....)                    
|                     |_Martha Catherine MOORE _|
|                       (1794 - 1864)           |
|                                               |_ MURRAY _________________________+
|                                                 (1770 - ....)                    
|
|--Emma Eoline QUIN 
|  (1852 - ....)
|                                                __________________________________
|                                               |                                  
|                      _Jeremiah BEARDEN _______|
|                     | (1800 - ....)           |
|                     |                         |__________________________________
|                     |                                                            
|_Deliah BEARDEN _____|
  (1828 - 1866) m 1842|
                      |                          _(RESEARCH QUERY-MS-LA) HAMILTON _
                      |                         |                                  
                      |_Rachal HAMILTON ________|
                        (1800 - ....)           |
                                                |__________________________________
                                                                                   

Sources

[S478]


INDEX

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Edmund RUFFIN C.S.A.

5 Jan 1794 - 18 Jun 1865

ID Number: I99230

  • OCCUPATION: president and commissioner of the Virginia State Agricultural Society.
  • RESIDENCE: Prince George Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 5 Jan 1794, Evergreen, Prince George Co. Virginia
  • DEATH: 18 Jun 1865, Marlbourne, Hanover Co. Virginia
  • BURIAL: Marlbourne, Hanover Co. Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: Bio [S2283]
Father: George RUFFIN
Mother: Rebecca COCKE


Family 1 : Susan H. TRAVIS

Notes


Edmund Ruffin born Jan. 5, 1794, Prince George County, Va., U.S.
died June 18, 1865, Amelia County, Va.


the father of soil chemistry in the United States, who showed how to restore fertility to depleted Southeast plantations. He was also a leading secessionist for decades prior to the U.S. Civil War.


Edmund Ruffin's Famous Last Words
On June 18, 1865 Edmund Ruffin, a pre-eminent Southern nationalist "fire-eater" who had been one of the leading antebellum proponents of Southern secession, chose to commit suicide rather than submit to the subjugation of Yankee bayonet rule. Defiant to the bitter end, this fiery Southern patriot penned these famous last words in his diary just minutes before taking leave of the Yankee tyranny that had descended upon Dixie...


"I here declare my unmitigated hatred to Yankee rule -- to all political, social and business connection with the Yankees and to the Yankee race. Would that I could impress these sentiments, in their full force, on every living Southerner and bequeath them to every one yet to be born! May such sentiments be held universally in the outraged and down-trodden South, though in silence and stillness, until the now far-distant day shall arrive for just retribution for Yankee usurpation, oppression and atrocious outrages, and for deliverance and vengeance for the now ruined, subjugated and enslaved Southern States!


...And now with my latest writing and utterance, and with what will be near my latest breath, I here repeat and would willingly proclaim my unmitigated hatred to yankee rule--to all political, social and business connections with Yankees, and the perfidious, malignant and vile Yankee race."


--Edmund Ruffin


Children:
2 Edmund Ruffin b: 1814 d: 1876 + Mary Cocke Smith b: 1816 d: 1857 + Jane M. Ruffin b: 1829 d: 1893
2 Agnes Ruffin b: Abt 1817 + T S Beckwith b: Abt 1817
2 Julian C Ruffin b: Abt 1819 + Charlotte Meade b: Abt 1819
2 Mildred Ruffin b: Abt 1821 + B B Sayre b: Abt 1821
2 Charles Ruffin b: Abt 1823 + H. Harrison b: Abt 1823
2 Calx Ruffin b: Abt 1825


Helen Kay Yates "Family Graveyards in Hanover County, Virginia 1995", compiled & published by Helen Kay Yates
Americans of Royal Descent, by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia 1883
Title: Americans of Royal Descent, by Charles H. Browning, Philadelphia 1883


Edmund Ruffin, whose long white hair made him immediately recognizable to contemporaries, was born in 1794 and educated in Virginia, including a brief period at the College of William and Mary. For most of his life, Ruffin was a farmer and a renowned agricultural reformer. Experiments on his farm convinced him that fertilizers, crop rotation, drainage, and good plowing could revitalize the declining soil of his native state. From the 1820s onward, Ruffin published his findings, edited an agricultural journal, lectured, and organized agricultural societies. In the 1850s, he became president and commissioner of the Virginia State Agricultural Society.
Increasingly, however, Ruffin turned his attention in the 1850s to politics, especially the defense of slavery and secession. Although he had earlier expressed some doubts about slavery and opened the pages of his agricultural journal to arguments about colonization, by the 1850s Ruffin had become a staunch proponent of slavery and of the racial inferiority of blacks. He joined the ranks of fire-eating southern radicals advocating a separate southern nation to protect slavery and the southern way of life. Secession became as great a reform cause as agricultural improvement. Both would rejuvenate the South.


Ruffin's desire to push the secessionist movement towards a confrontation with the North brought him to Charleston during the Sumter crisis. He intended to take his stand with the Confederacy, and he hoped events would drive his native state, Virginia , out of the Union. His ardent southern nationalism made him a hero of southern radicals. He was invited to attend three secession conventions, and given the honor of firing one of the first batteries against Fort Sumter.


As the Confederacy's fortunes ebbed during the war, however, Ruffin grew distraught. Plagued by ill health, family misfortunes, and the rapid collapse of Confederate forces in 1865, Ruffin proclaimed "unmitigated hatred to Yankee rule," and on June 1 7, 1865, committed suicide. His act, sometimes considered the "last shot" of the Civil War, become identified with the Confederacy's defeat and a symbol of the lost cause. His suicide was interpreted as an expression of the southern code of honor, the refusal to accept a life in defeat.
----------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------
Bibliography: Allmendinger, Ruffin; Craven, Ruffin; J. G. deR. Hamilton, "Edmund Ruffin," DAB, 16: 214-16. http://www.tulane.edu/~latner/Ruffin.html


Edmund Ruffin - geologist, agricultural reformer
(and, he fired the first shot at Fort Sumter)



----------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------








Edmund Ruffin was an agricultural reformer, proslavery ideologue, and Southern nationalist. Born into a prominent Tidewater Virginia planter family, Ruffin earned wide acclaim during the first half of the nineteenth century as the preeminent agricultural reformer in the Old South.


When his inherited lands on the James River proved unresponsive to traditional ameliorative practices, Ruffin, in 1818, inaugurated a series of experiments with marl, a shell-like deposit containing calcium carbonate which neutralized soil acidity and enabled sterile soils to become once again productive.


When the results proved highly effective, he published his findings, first in An Essay on Calcareous Manures (1832) and then in his celebrated agricultural journal, the Farmers' Register. After conducting an agricultural survey of South Carolina at the request of Governor James H. Hammond, Ruffin acquired a new tract of land on the Pamunkey River, naming it appropriately Marlbourne, and proceeded to transform it into a model estate. Subsequently, he was instrumental in reviving the Virginia State Agricultural Society and was four times elected president of that body.


"The principles of agriculture are the same everywhere in all countries, - but their application often require special modifications. It is so in this State. The use of our native fertilizers for example, in the various kinds of marls, call for special rules of application. These are to be found out only by close observation and much experience. An immense saving in money depends upon their proper application, as to time, from composition and the condition of the soil to which they are to be applied."


The following is a selection from his work: Agricultural, Geological, and Descriptive Sketches of Lower North Carolina, and the Similar Adjacent Lands.Printed at the Institution for the Deaf & Dumb & the Blind, Raleigh - 1861.


The Great Dismal Swamp
This great swamp, more than any other seen, has much the largest proportion of "juniper land," or surface on which the juniper, or white cedar, thrives best, and is, or has recently been, the principal or exclusive, forest growth. The thrifty, and extensive or general growth of juniper indicates the wettest and most miry (or sponge,") soil, which is always the most peaty, or most exclusively of vegetable formation.


These trees are the most valuable for timber, in shingles especially, and such land is perfectly worthless for draining ** and cultivation, because of its almost entire vegetable composition.


Such land, and such forest growth, before its last and complete destruction by fire, made up the larger portion of the main body of the swamp, and nearly all of its interior land. This soil is deep, and is said to lie on a bottom of sand.


Near to the outer margin, and bordering on the surrounding firm land, and between Suffolk and Elizabeth river, the swamp soil is not more than from one foot deep (nearest the outside) to three feet further in, with a more clayey bottom earth, and the forest growth is of black gum, or cypress mixed with gum.


Lands of this kind only, and in small proportion, even of this kind, have been drained, cultivated, and found of abiding productiveness. It is through the outer edge of the swamp, and of the portion the least swampy, that the Seaboard railroad passes, for a few miles only, and in which, the hastily passing traveller, if not informed, would not suspect that he was then in the great Dismal Swamp.


The Norfolk and Petersburg railroad, in 1856, in the course of construction, passes through another and larger line of the swamp, and more towards its interior - but still mostly over the outer and thinner deposit, of vegetable soil, and almost wholly through gum forest. The former route I examined through, on foot - and also the latter, so far as it was then accessible - and for a distance said to present a fair sample of the ground of the whole route through the swamp. The recent excavation and embankment for this railroad has served to open the soil and its foundation much better to examination. The soil (nearly all covered by gum trees, and therefore of the most earthy and solid constitution of all the swamp,) so far as seen is but two and a-half to three feet deep before arriving at solid and real earth below. Both these conditions, of soil and sub-soil, seem to afford more desirable materials than would have been available farther in the swamp. Still, I infer that much even of this embankment must rot away, and that the level of the newly raised surface for the road will sink in proportion.


The most important and interesting route, for examination, and also for the facility and pleasure of the conveyance, is along the Jericho canal, dug and used for transporting shingles from the interior of the swamp, and the lake, to the landing, at a tide-water creek, near Suffolk, empyting into Nansemond river, where the large sea-vessels are loaded. The canal is closed at the end near the creek, and its level is there more than twenty feet above low tide water. The canal was dug twelve feet wide, four deep, and is ten miles long to Lake Drummond, and perfectly straight nearly throughout. A regulating lock at the junction with the lake serves to keep the water in the canal at a uniform height when long droughts may have sunk the water in the lake two feet or more lower than usual. The canal water is level from the lake to the landing, and the water being supplied from the swamp has a gentle current from the central portion of the canal towards both its extremities.


The firm land near the landing on both sides of the canal varies from one to two, and for a little space is from three to four feet higher than the swamp surface. The true swamp is soon reached, and from the remaining eight miles or more, along the canal, its margin, formerly a raised bank, is at most, but a few inches higher than the water in the canal, and also the water generally overspreading the neighboring swamp surface. The tow-path for the men propelling the boat merely afforded better footing by being trodden and consolidated, and by poles having been laid along for the boatmen to tread upon, where the more depressed surface was covered by water. The peaty earth thrown out of the canal, when it was dug, must have made a broad and high embankment, of which scarcely anything now remains, nearly all having rotted away, and so disappeared. This sufficiently indicates how worthless is, and how short would be the very existence of, such soil, if drained and cultivated, and thus made liable to go into complete decomposition.


After an early and abortive effort to drain and cultivate some of the land, all the subsequent labors of the principal proprietors of the swamp, The Dismal Swamp Land Company,* have been directed exclusively to the very profitable work of getting shingles, and other timber. The proprietorship and the objects of this company both operate to oppose and obstruct any attempts of other individual proprietors of other portions, for draining the better margin lands. And still more is this obstructed by the construction of the Dismal Swamp canal for navigation, which, by its high level, operates to dam and raise the water upon a large portion of the surface of the swamp.


The swamp forests, where preserving their original appearance, or where they have not been deformed or utterly destroyed by great fires present scenery of solemn grandeur and of rare and peculiar beauty. The forests of gum and cypress have not been much damaged by fires or by the labors or improvements of man, and the trees usually remain of their proper great sizes, and venerable appearance, closely shading the wet, black and level soil.


The junipers do not grow large, or they are so slightly fixed in their soil of semi-fluid mire, that they are overturned by storms before they reach large size. But when making the general cover, and though none may exceed twelve inches in diameter, a more beautiful forest growth cannot be conceived. These trees are evergreen, very like the cedar in general appearance, but taller, more slender, with long and straight and bare trunks, supporting tops of tapering, flexible, and graceful horizontal branches. Standing thick as they do naturally, the tops of the trees unite to form one wide-spread canopy of green, supported by thousands of visible slender and perfectly straight columns. The silent gliding of the traveller's boat on the black and still water of the canal, and for miles together in silence and solitude through such forests as these, or of the gigantic gum and cypresses, and thence entering upon the bosom of the broad and beautiful central lake-all serve to present a combination of the gloomy sublime and the beautiful of Nature, that is rarely equalled elsewhere.


Agricultural, Geological, and Descriptive Sketches
of Lower North Carolina, and the Similar Adjacent Lands
by Edmund Ruffin, 1794-1865
http://www.beachonline.com/ruffin.htm


                                             _Edmund RUFFIN ____________________+
                                            | (1713 - 1790)                     
                       _Edmund RUFFIN ______|
                      | (1744 - 1807)       |
                      |                     |_Annie SIMMONS ____________________
                      |                       (1718 - 1749)                     
 _George RUFFIN ______|
| (1765 - 1810)       |
|                     |                      _WILLIAM SKIPWITH Knt. 6th Baronet_+
|                     |                     | (1707 - 1764)                     
|                     |_Jane SKIPWITH ______|
|                       (1745 - ....)       |
|                                           |_UNNAMED___________________________
|                                                                               
|
|--Edmund RUFFIN C.S.A.
|  (1794 - 1865)
|                                            _(RESEARCH QUERY) COCKE ___________
|                                           |                                   
|                      _John COCKE _________|
|                     | (1740 - ....)       |
|                     |                     |___________________________________
|                     |                                                         
|_Rebecca COCKE ______|
  (1770 - ....)       |
                      |                      ___________________________________
                      |                     |                                   
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |___________________________________
                                                                                

Sources

[S2283]


INDEX

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John SOMERVELL III

24 Nov 1780 - 25 Feb 1831

ID Number: I16471


Family 1 : Frances Anderson TAYLOR
  1. +Mary Goodloe SOMERVELL
  2. +William Alexander SOMERVELL
  3.  Catherine Taylor SOMERVELL
  4.  Willis Lewis SOMERVELL
  5.  Thomas Taylor SOMERVELL
  6.  Joseph John SOMERVELL
  7.  Richard Bullock SOMERVELL

Notes


Aka: John Sommerville. They had 9 children.

[523265]
or 14 Dec 1804

Sources

[S96]

[S500]

[S721]

[S2442]

[S2715]


INDEX

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Pleasant TINSLEY

ABT 1800 - ____

ID Number: I37759

  • RESIDENCE: of Madison Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1800
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1367]
Father: William TINSLEY
Mother: Frances WILLIS


Notes


Spouse: Eveline ?.

                                             _Edward TINSLEY Sr.__+
                                            | (1704 - 1782) m 1724
                       _Edward TINSLEY Jr.__|
                      | (1730 - 1798) m 1760|
                      |                     |_Margaret TAYLOR ____+
                      |                       (1705 - 1782) m 1724
 _William TINSLEY ____|
| (1768 - 1844) m 1795|
|                     |                      _John BUFORD ________+
|                     |                     | (1707 - 1787) m 1735
|                     |_Elizabeth BUFORD ___|
|                       (1740 - 1803) m 1760|
|                                           |_Judith EARLY _______+
|                                             (1710 - 1781) m 1735
|
|--Pleasant TINSLEY 
|  (1800 - ....)
|                                            _____________________
|                                           |                     
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |_____________________
|                     |                                           
|_Frances WILLIS _____|
  (1772 - ....) m 1795|
                      |                      _____________________
                      |                     |                     
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |_____________________
                                                                  

Sources

[S1367]


INDEX

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Eliza Jane WARWICK

1851 - ____

ID Number: I80371

  • RESIDENCE: Bath Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 1851, Bath Co. Virginia
  • RESOURCES: See: [S125]
Father: James W. WARWICK
Mother: Elizabeth Jane GATEWOOD


Family 1 : John W. STEPHENSON

Notes


Eliza Jane WARWICK (James W. WARWICK1) was born 1851 in Bath County, Virginia. She married John W. STEPHENSON 7 NOV 1878 in Warwickton, Bath County, Virginia. He was born 1852 in Highland, Virginia.

                                                        _____________________
                                                       |                     
                            ___________________________|
                           |                           |
                           |                           |_____________________
                           |                                                 
 _James W. WARWICK ________|
| (1813 - 1880) m 1844     |
|                          |                            _____________________
|                          |                           |                     
|                          |___________________________|
|                                                      |
|                                                      |_____________________
|                                                                            
|
|--Eliza Jane WARWICK 
|  (1851 - ....)
|                                                       _William GATEWOOD ___+
|                                                      | (1745 - 1825) m 1799
|                           _Francis Warwick GATEWOOD _|
|                          | (1800 - 1863) m 1822      |
|                          |                           |_Jane WARWICK _______+
|                          |                             (1779 - 1839) m 1799
|_Elizabeth Jane GATEWOOD _|
  (1823 - 1880) m 1844     |
                           |                            _Charles BEALE ______
                           |                           | (1770 - ....)       
                           |_Margaret Skillern BEALE __|
                             (1804 - 1894) m 1822      |
                                                       |_____________________
                                                                             

Sources

[S125]


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Franklin D. WEAVER

20 Jun 1821 - ____

ID Number: I14101

  • RESIDENCE: Wilkes and Newton Cos. GA
  • OCCUPATION: farmer
  • BIRTH: 20 Jun 1821
  • RESOURCES: See: [S345]
Father: Isham D. WEAVER
Mother: Mary Ardis BRADLEY


Family 1 : Harriett RAKESTRAW
  1.  Isham WEAVER
  2.  Ann Elizabeth Anneliza WEAVER
  3.  Francis WEAVER
  4.  James WEAVER

Notes


Alias: Frank Weaverr. CENSUS: 1850 Census for Newton Co., GA

[S345]


                                                              _Samuel III WEAVER _____+
                                                             | (1690 - 1769) m 1737   
                       _David WEAVER ________________________|
                      | (1745 - 1813) m 1769                 |
                      |                                      |_Françoise L'ORANGE ____+
                      |                                        (1700 - 1769) m 1737   
 _Isham D. WEAVER ____|
| (1791 - 1878) m 1820|
|                     |                                       ________________________
|                     |                                      |                        
|                     |_Masinbird SHOEMAKER _________________|
|                       (1745 - 1825) m 1769                 |
|                                                            |________________________
|                                                                                     
|
|--Franklin D. WEAVER 
|  (1821 - ....)
|                                                             ________________________
|                                                            |                        
|                      _John Ardis BRADLEY II________________|
|                     | (1773 - 1828) m 1798                 |
|                     |                                      |________________________
|                     |                                                               
|_Mary Ardis BRADLEY _|
  (1799 - 1867) m 1820|
                      |                                       _Francis MERIWETHER ____+
                      |                                      | (1737 - 1803) m 1760   
                      |_Margaret Jameson "Peggy" MERIWETHER _|
                        (1776 - 1819) m 1798                 |
                                                             |_Martha Gaines JAMESON _+
                                                               (1743 - 1818) m 1760   

Sources

[S345]

[S345]


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Cletus O. WRIGHT

ABT 1900 - ____

ID Number: I793

  • BIRTH: ABT 1900
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1361]

Family 1 : Wilma Carmen SINGLETON

Sources

[S1361]


INDEX

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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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