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My Southern Family

Ann ASHBY

10 Jan 1745 - ____

ID Number: I48579

  • RESIDENCE: Stafford Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 10 Jan 1745, Stafford Co. VA
  • RESOURCES: See: [S125] [S1956] [S2530]
Father: Robert ASHBY
Mother: Mary Elizabeth FARROW


Family 1 : George E. Benjamin FARROW
  1. +Sarah "Sally" FARROW

                                                          _(RESEARCH QUERY) ASHBY _
                                                         |                         
                          _Thomas ASHBY _________________|
                         | (1675 - 1752) m 1706          |
                         |                               |_________________________
                         |                                                         
 _Robert ASHBY __________|
| (1715 - 1792) m 1735   |
|                        |                                _________________________
|                        |                               |                         
|                        |_Rosanna BERRY? _______________|
|                          (1689 - 1797) m 1706          |
|                                                        |_________________________
|                                                                                  
|
|--Ann ASHBY 
|  (1745 - ....)
|                                                         _________________________
|                                                        |                         
|                         _Nimrod FARROW "the Immigrant"_|
|                        | (1700 - ....)                 |
|                        |                               |_________________________
|                        |                                                         
|_Mary Elizabeth FARROW _|
  (1720 - 1754) m 1735   |
                         |                                _________________________
                         |                               |                         
                         |_______________________________|
                                                         |
                                                         |_________________________
                                                                                   

Sources

[S125]

[S1956]

[S2530]


INDEX

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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Capt. Francis S. BARTOW C.S.A.

6 Sep 1816 - 22 Jul 1861

ID Number: I91191

  • TITLE: Capt.
  • RESIDENCE: Savannah, Chatham Co. GA
  • OCCUPATION: CSA Oglethorpe Light Infantry
  • BIRTH: 6 Sep 1816, Savannah, Georgia
  • DEATH: 22 Jul 1861, KIA by Lincoln's Army at 1st Battle of Manassas, Virginia
  • BURIAL: Laurel Grove cemetery, Savannah, Georgia
  • RESOURCES: See: notes Bio

Notes


Biographical Sketch of General Francis S. Bartow


" It is meet that the record of the officers and soldiers of Savannah, whose deeds on the many battlefields of the South illustrated the prowess of Southern chivalry, should commence with a biographical sketch of the life of General Francis S. Bartow, whose heroic and lamented death upon the plains of Manassas called for and received the admiration and encomiums of both friends and foes.


Francis S. Bartow, son of Theodosius Bartow, was born in Savannah on the 6th of September, 1816. He graduated at Franklin College at Athens, Ga. in 1835 with the highest honors of his class. He then became a student in the law office of Messrs. Berrien & Law of Savannah and afterward attended the Law school at New Haven, Conn. Here he completed his studies and shortly afterward was admitted to the bar and became a member of the well-known law firm of Law, Bartow and Lovell of Savannah. His first forensic effort was in a great bank case in which he greatly distinguished himself by the logical force and clearness of his argument and the power of his eloquence.


His political career commended with the celebrated Harrison campaign in 1840 in which he took an active and influential part in the support of General Harrison, the Whig candidate for President. He was afterward elected to the State Senate and served several times in the House of Representatives. During the later political contests he was not connected with political life. In 1860, when the impending storm produced the commotion in the political atmosphere, telling of the approaching revolution, his clear-seeing intellect convinced him that it must be resisted or his State would be crushed and with that boldness and earnestness characteristic of him he placed himself in the very vanguard and there remained until he consecrated his devotion to the new born Confederacy by a generous outpouring of his life blood.


He was the unanimous choice of the people of Chatham County to represent them in the State convention which carried Georgia out of the Union, and among that body of able and patriotic men none more than he contributed to place his native State in the noble attitude of resistance to Federal thralldom. He was selected by the convention to represent the State in the Confederate Congress, which met in Montgomery, Alabama and chosen chairman of the Military committee. While there, when differences of opinion arose regarding the course of action necessary to keep pace with the rapid march of mighty events, he boldly stood forward for firm and immediate action - bold and undaunted when the time came for him to act; modest and retiring under all other circumstances.


During the session of Congress he announced his intention to go to Virginia with his company, the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, of which he had been elected captain in 1857. He offered the company's services for the war to the President through Governor Brown, who refused to give his permission for them to leave, and Bartow then offered its services directly to the President, who accepted them. He returned to Savannah and on the 21st of May, 1861, with his company, departed for the seat of war. His departure was made the occasion of a most scurrilous attack from Governor Brown (which was published in the papers throughout the State), charging him with disobedience of orders, with unlawfully carrying off the muskets belonging to the State, and of unpatriotic motives. Bartow's reply (published in the Savannah Morning News), was made in the following frank, manly, and dignified manner, triumphantly vindicating his motives and conduct:


CAMP DEFIANCE, HARPER'S FERRY, )
June 14th, 1861 )


TO GOVERNOR JOSEPH E. BROWN:
Sir --- I received your letter of the 21st of May ult., while at Richmond. Since the date of its reception I have been so constantly engaged in the duties of the service I have undertaken that I have found no time which could be devoted to an acknowledgment of your communication. I now write amidst the hurry and confusion of the camp, being about to march from this point, we trust, to meet the enemy.


I have little time and less inclination to reply in detail to the insolent missive you thought proper to publish in my absence. Respect, however, for the good opinion of the people of Georgia induces me in a few words to set right my conduct, which you have taken so much pains to asperse and to correct the mis-statements and false imputations with which your letter abounds.


You say that I have "commenced my military career by setting at defiance the orders of the officer upon whom the Constitution of my State has conferred the right to command me." I am not aware that you have any such right, unless I were actually enlisted in the service of the State of Georgia, in a contingency which, under the Constitution, would give the State the right to raise and maintain troops.


I commenced my military career, as you are pleased to term it, under the flag of the Confederate States and I recognize not you, but the President of the Confederate States as the officer upon whom the Constitution (to which Georgia is a party) "has conferred the right to command me." It is true that I tendered, under instructions from my company, their services to the Confederate States through you, in the first instance; this, however, was simply because the President had adopted that mode of obtaining troops as a matter of public convenience and not because there ever was any Constitution or law which required him to appeal to the State Executives; still less is there any ground for your assertion that the rights of the States are violated by the President receiving troops directly, with the intervention of the Governors.


You labor, and have constantly labored, under the impression that you are the STATE OF GEORGIA. I beg leave to protest against this conclusion, in which I assure you I can never concur. By the Constitution of the Confederate States, to which Georgia has agreed, the Confederate Government is alone chargeable with questions of peace and war, and has the exclusive right, except in case of invasion, to raise and maintain armies. The Congress, and not the Governors of the States, are empowered to raise these armies: and as the constitution is broad and unqualified in this grant of power, the Congress is unrestricted in the mode in which it shall be exercised. The President of the Confederate States is the Commander-in-chief of these armies, thus raised for a common cause and the Governors of States have not, so far as I am aware, any jurisdiction or power over this subject, except so far as patriotism may induce them to cooperate with the General Government in times of great emergency and danger. Your conclusion, therefore, that "the act of Congress under which I go is a palpable encroachment upon the rights of States" does not in the least disturb me. Neither upon reason nor authority do I consider the opinion of much value. I think most people will prefer the judgment of the Confederate Congress and the President of the Confederate States who gave the act their deliberate sanction.


You have fallen into another error upon this subject. You say " that I proceeded to the Confederate Congress, of which I am a member, and that a bill was passed, you suppose chiefly by my influence, which authorized the President to receive military forces over the head and independent of State authority." You further say that "under this act I was accepted into service without your consent and permitted to leave Savannah and go to Virginia." I assure you, in passing, that I shall never think it necessary to obtain your consent to enter the service of my country. God forbid that I should ever fall so low.


But to your charge. I know not to what act you refer as the one under which I was accepted into service; but I will inform you that the act under which I serve is entitled "An act to raise additional forces to serve during the war." This act, to the best of my remembrance, contains no allusion to State authority, nor does it allude in any part to the Governors of States. It is simply an act authorizing the President to accept the services of volunteers for the war, and to appoint their field officers, and in these two respects alone, it differs from other acts under which volunteers have been accepted. This bill was introduced into Congress by the Hon. Mr. Wigfall, of Texas, without any consultation with me, referred to the Military committee of which I was chairman, perfected by it and passed by the Congress. It met the approval of the most distinguished leaders of the States Rights school in the Congress, and was regarded by Congress as the best means to raise an efficient army, so absolutely required by the wicked invasion set on foot by the North. Mr. Wright of Georgia introduced a bill which does authorize the President, without calling upon the Governors of the States, to accept the services of volunteers at the times he may prescribe; but with this bill I had no connection, nor am I in service under its terms, nor had I any agency in procuring its introduction or enactment.


You go on to say "that I must be presumed to be the leading spirit in procuring the passage of this bill, and I was the first to avail myself of its benefits by accepting a high command under it." You remark "that it is said I am to have a colonel's commission." Now, sir, the facts are, that under the former bill, by which twelve months' volunteers were raised for the war, the President had as much power to accept them directly as he had under this act, for the war; and it is a mere matter of discretion with him under both acts whether he will or will not use the intervention of State Executives; and yet, while stepping out of the way to stab me in the back, you seem criminally ignorant of what you ought to know.


You have also insinuated in this charge and elsewhere in your letter that I have been misled by motives of personal ambition. The attribution of low motives of conduct to others is most frequently the result of long familiarity with such principles of action. It is dangerous for any man to attribute motives lest he fall under the condemnation of "bearing false witness against his neighbor". In relation to myself I desire to say but little. I prefer to be judged by my actions. It is not true that I availed myself of the benefits of the act of Congress to which you refer by seeking a high command under it. I offered service and was accepted as captain of my company, without any pledge or understanding, directly or indirectly, that I was to have any other commission. My present office of Colonel of this regiment has been conferred upon me through the voluntary confidence of the President and through the wish, as I have reason to believe, of every officer and private under my command. I have desired no office, preferring, for many reasons, to remain at the head of my company, between which and myself there has existed a deep-seated attachment, and it was only by their consent that I agreed to command the regiment. My reasons for entering the service are very simple. I had labored as much as any man in Georgia to effect the secession of the State; I had pledged myself to meet all the consequences of secession. I am bound, therefore, in honor, and still more strongly by duty, to be among the foremost in accepting the bloody consequences which seem to threaten us. My life can be as well spared as any other man's and I am willing and ready to devote it. You taunt me with deserting my home and the defense of my fireside "to serve the common cause in a more pleasant summer climate." I wish you were here to witness the realities of this service you deem so pleasant. It would cure you, I think, of some of your malicious propensities. You taunt me with having imposed upon others the duty of defending the post which I have deserted and yet when you penned this you knew that you had steadily refused to call the volunteer troops of Savannah into service of any kind and that you had called "many of our bravest young men from other parts of the State to fill our places" and defend our homes, while we were permitted to rest in inglorious ease. The volunteer troops of Savannah are now in service, not through you, but by the direct order of the Commander-in-chief of the Confederate forces. All that you say upon this subject is Jesuitical, designed to subserve a purpose rather than narrate the truth. I have the same right to judge that you have as to the probability of an attack upon Savannah. There is scarcely a seaboard city along the Atlantic coast that has not its representatives here in Virginia. Why should Savannah be an exception? Surely one company could be spared, at least, to show that her heart beat true to the common cause and that her youth were ready to court danger upon the very frontiers of the war. Such a spirit is not what you have characterized it. It is probably above your comprehension, but the generous and noble-hearted of my native State will know how to appreciate it.



And now as to my arms. I did not ask you to arm and equip me. I had already received from the late government of the United States, through you, arms and equipments which cost the State of Georgia nothing. They were delivered to me and you took my bond for their safe keeping, unless destroyed in the public service. You have threatened me with the penalty of that bond. Take it if you can get it. That is your remedy. If I have been wrong in taking the arms away from Georgia, I am a trespasser and of course responsible. I think the power you claim to disarm companies once armed and under bonds, at your will, is, to say the least of it, doubtful. As I have already said, in a former letter, I would not make this issue if I could find any way to avoid it. I would rather yield than have a controversy with any man where the public interests are involved. But situated as I was, I prefer disobedience, if you please, rather than to jeopardy the honor and safety of one hundred men confided to my care. You seem to think I am arrogant in claiming our humble share in representing the State of Georgia on this field of action. You say that you are not aware of the State authority by which I am called to represent the State of Georgia in Virginia. You make here again, your common error, of supposing that you are the State of Georgia. --- a mistake in which I do not participate. You will not be permitted to alienate from us the esteem and affection of those we leave behind and whom we love so dearly. I am sorry that you have undertaken so ungracious a task.


You say "that at present I am beyond the reach of State authority and State lines, so far as I am concerned, are obliterated. How long this may remain so," you say, "depends upon the developments of the future." I trust, if God spares my life, that I shall set foot again upon the soil of Georgia and be well assured that I no more fear to meet my enemies at home that I now do to meet the enemies of my country abroad.


With due respect. I have the honor to be, your most obedient


FRANCIS S. BARTOW.


Soon after his arrival in Virginia he was appointed Colonel of the 8th Georgia regiment and at the first battle of Manassas he was commanding a brigade composed of the 7th, 8th, 9th and 11th Georgia and the 1st Kentucky regiments. During the engagement only the 7th and 8th Georgia regiments were engaged. During the forepart of the battle his command suffered heavily and at noon, when it became necessary for the left of our army to fall back to its original position, occupied early in the morning, his regiments also retired. During this movement General Bartow road up to General Beauregard, the general commanding, and said: "What shall now be done? Tell me, and if human efforts can avail, I will do it." General Beauregard, pointing to a battery at the Stone Bridge, replied: "That battery should be silenced." Seizing the standard of the 7th Georgia regiment, he led the van in the charge. A ball wounded him slightly and killed his horse under him. Still grasping the standard, and rising again, he mounted another horse and waving his cap around his head, cheered his troops to come on. They followed. Another ball pierced his heart and he fell to the ground, exclaiming to those who gathered around him, "THEY HAVE KILLED ME, BUT NEVER GIVE UP THE FIELD," and expired. His dying injunction was obeyed. His command proceeded on the charge and silenced the battery under the protection of which the enemy had hurled the missile of death into the heart of one whose fall plunged a struggling nation into mourning.


The deceased was as marked in character as distinguished for talent. He was ardent in friendships - sincere and ingenious in his professions --- of a lofty sense of honor --- chivalric in the tone of his sentiments --- patriotic in his ambition --- brave by nature and constitution --- generous in his impulses --- most zealous in his devotion to truth --- deeply imbued with the religious sentiment and cherished a reverential regard for all of the institutions of religion. His style of oratory was bold, earnest and impassioned. As a criminal advocate, his eloquence was of a high, thrilling order; and his efforts in important criminal trials established for him a fame which will live with the memory of his beloved and honored name. He was astute as a lawyer and profound in his legal attainments. His literary attainments were varied and extensive, while his familiarity with the classics was intimate. His perception and love for the beautiful in art and nature were keen and warm --- his imagination was rich and glowing and his thoughts were always fervid.


In July, 1861, Hon. T. R. R. Cobb, before the Congress of the Confederate States of America, in session in Richmond, Virginia, pronounced an eloquent eulogy upon General Bartow, after which the following resolutions were offered and unanimously adopted:


Resolved, That Congress has heard with unfeigned sorrow of the death of the Honorable Francis S. Bartow, one of the delegates from the State of Georgia; that the natural exultation for a glorious victory achieved by our arms is checked by the heavy loss sustained by the Confederacy in the death of one of her most efficient counselors; and that, as his colleagues, we feel a peculiar loss to ourselves, in one who had won our esteem and gained our affection.


Resolved, That with pleasure we record our admiration of his heroic defense on the field of battle of the action of Congress in which he participated so largely, and find some consolation for his death in the conviction that his noble self-sacrifice will serve to establish the work which he so boldly aided to begin.


Resolved, That we appreciate the loss which Georgia, his native State, has sustained in the death of one of her noblest sons, and that we tender to the bereaved family the sympathy of hearts, to some extent, stricken by the same blow which has crushed their own.


Resolved, That in testimony of our respect for his memory, the Congress do now adjourn." http://www.rootsweb.com/~gachatha/1868-8.htm


" The Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Captain Francis S. Bartow, requested, but did not receive permission,1 to go to Virginia, and departed without it on the 21st of May, being escorted to the cars by the volunteer companies of the city and a large concourse of citizens, who wished the company God speed, little dreaming that in a few short weeks they would, while rejoicing over a great victory, be also mourning the loss of its late gallant captain and a number of its no less gallant members. But so was it to be. The telegraph, on the 22d of July, 1861, brought the news of the great victory at Manassas, at the same time telling of the deaths of General Francis S. Bartow and a number of his old command, who had fallen in the thickest of the fray.


The remains of Bartow were brought from the field and forwarded to this city via Charleston, at which place, in honor to his memory, the public buildings were draped in mourning and the remains escorted through the city by the military and the citizens, the whole community vieing with one another in showing respect to the fallen brave. The remains arrived in the night of the 27th of July, and were escorted from the depot to the Exchange by the Oglethorpe Light Infantry (company B) and detachments from the other city companies, all under command of Captain F. W. Sims, the Chatham Artillery firing minute-guns as the escort moved. On the 28th the funeral of the deceased took place, and was the most solemn and imposing spectacle ever witnessed in Savannah. At three o'clock P. M. the military escort, consisting of all the city companies and detachments from the troops stationed in the vicinity, formed on the Bay and escorted the remains to Christ church, which was thronged in every part with citizens. The funeral services were conducted by Right Reverend Stephen Elliott, Bishop of Georgia; after which the remains were carried to Laurel Grove cemetery, where with military honors they were consigned to their final resting place. The universal expression of sadness was truly impressive, and proved how sincerely the entire community deplored the loss of one who was not less loved in life than honored in his glorious death."
http://www.rootsweb.com/~gachatha/1868-7.htm


"The Oglethorpe Light Infantry was organized on the 8th of January, 1856, the first captain being John N. Lewis. Francis S. Bartow was elected captain in 1857 and was in command when the company assisted in seizing Fort Pulaski on the 3d of January, 1861. The company left for Virginia on the 21st of May, 1861, having been reorganized previous to starting. The lieutenants then were: J. J. West, Hamilton Couper and A. F. Butler. Captain Bartow was promoted to brigadier-general and killed at Manassas. Lieutenant West became captain but resigned shortly afterward and Lieutenant Couper was elected captain. Captain Couper died in 1862 and Lieutenant Butler succeeded to the captaincy, remaining in that position until the surrender of the company at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. The lieutenants during service were: J. L. Holcombe (promoted to major and killed at Jonesboro), Fred. Bliss, S. W. Branch, P. B. Holmes, E. Starke Law. This company was the first company in the South to offer its services for the war and served in all the battles of the army of Northern Virginia and was with Longstreet's corps when it made its celebrated circuit of the Confederacy. It formed part of the 8th Georgia regiment, which was so highly complimented by General Beauregard for its bravery during the first battle of Manassas. Previous to the company's departure for Virginia in 1861 the number of volunteers had increased its ranks beyond the maximum number and another company, known as the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, company B, was organized under Captain F. W. Sims, Lieutenants Henry C. Freeman, Benjamin T. Cole and James Lachlison. The company was captured at Fort Pulaski and on being exchanged reorganized and served under Captain James Lachlison, jr., Lieutenants H. A. Elkins, Joshua C. Bruyn and James Simmons. Captain Sims, shortly after his exchange, was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and assigned to duty in Richmond, Va. This company formed part of the 1st Georgia regiment and participated with it in the various battles around Charleston and those fought by the army of the West."


Sources


INDEX

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Maria BIBB

1856 - ____

ID Number: I74671

  • RESIDENCE: Amherst Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 1856
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS
Father: Joshua BIBB
Mother: Mary Elizabeth CHRISTIAN


Family 1 : Joseph WHITE

                                                   _Martin Thomas BIBB Sr._+
                                                  | (1759 - 1822) m 1795   
                             _Levi BIBB __________|
                            | (1796 - 1882) m 1820|
                            |                     |_Nancy CASH ____________+
                            |                       (1770 - 1858) m 1795   
 _Joshua BIBB ______________|
| (1818 - 1920) m 1840      |
|                           |                      ________________________
|                           |                     |                        
|                           |_Lucinda CLEMENS ____|
|                             (1800 - ....) m 1820|
|                                                 |________________________
|                                                                          
|
|--Maria BIBB 
|  (1856 - ....)
|                                                  ________________________
|                                                 |                        
|                            _____________________|
|                           |                     |
|                           |                     |________________________
|                           |                                              
|_Mary Elizabeth CHRISTIAN _|
  (1820 - ....) m 1840      |
                            |                      ________________________
                            |                     |                        
                            |_____________________|
                                                  |
                                                  |________________________
                                                                           

Sources


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Matilda BONNER

7 Nov 1808 - BEF 1877

ID Number: I3536

  • RESIDENCE: of Greene Co. GA & Washington Co. AL
  • BIRTH: 7 Nov 1808
  • DEATH: BEF 1877
  • RESOURCES: See: [S153] [S2153]
Father: Jordan BONNER Sr.
Mother: Rachel MOON



                                             _Henry BONNER IV_____+
                                            | (.... - 1766)       
                       _Thomas BONNER ______|
                      | (1744 - 1804) m 1767|
                      |                     |_Sarah LUTEN ________
                      |                       (1710 - 1750)       
 _Jordan BONNER Sr.___|
| (1768 - 1841) m 1796|
|                     |                      _John JONES _________+
|                     |                     | (1720 - ....)       
|                     |_Margaret JONES _____|
|                       (1750 - 1804) m 1767|
|                                           |_____________________
|                                                                 
|
|--Matilda BONNER 
|  (1808 - 1877)
|                                            _____________________
|                                           |                     
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |_____________________
|                     |                                           
|_Rachel MOON ________|
  (1770 - ....) m 1796|
                      |                      _____________________
                      |                     |                     
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |_____________________
                                                                  

Sources

[S153]

[S2153]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Mary Elizabeth CORDER

18 May 1820 - 27 Jun 1900

ID Number: I46209

Original Submitter (General Source): [S1669]
  • RESIDENCE: Rappahannock and Warren Cos. VA and Hampshire Co. WVA
  • BIRTH: 18 May 1820, Culpeper Co. VA
  • DEATH: 27 Jun 1900, Hampshire Co. WV
  • RESOURCES: See: [S1669] [S1710]
Father: Alexander CORDER
Mother: Elizabeth ARNOLD


Family 1 : Aylette Reynolds Yates COMPTON
  1.  Canard Howard COMPTON
  2.  Edward Howard COMPTON
  3.  James Horace COMPTON
  4.  Zachariah John COMPTON
  5.  Aylett Newton COMPTON
  6.  George Washington COMPTON
  7.  Richard Harrison COMPTON
  8.  Anthony Alexander COMPTON
  9.  Middleton Warfield COMPTON
  10.  Marcus Lafayette COMPTON
  11.  Henry Clay COMPTON
  12.  Mary COMPTON

Notes


[compton2.ftw] Mary's brother, Elder John Corder, was a preacher in the Old School Baptist Church. daughter of Alexander Corder and Elizabeth Arnold.

                          __
                         |  
                       __|
                      |  |
                      |  |__
                      |     
 _Alexander CORDER ___|
| (1800 - ....)       |
|                     |   __
|                     |  |  
|                     |__|
|                        |
|                        |__
|                           
|
|--Mary Elizabeth CORDER 
|  (1820 - 1900)
|                         __
|                        |  
|                      __|
|                     |  |
|                     |  |__
|                     |     
|_Elizabeth ARNOLD ___|
  (1800 - ....)       |
                      |   __
                      |  |  
                      |__|
                         |
                         |__
                            

Sources

[S1669]

[S1669]

[S1710]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



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© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Madison Yancey GAINES

ABT 1800 - ____

ID Number: I33605

  • RESIDENCE: Laurens Co. SC & Tipton, TN
  • BIRTH: ABT 1800
  • RESOURCES: See: [S979]
Father: William Larkin GAINES
Mother: Elizabeth Stevens POWELL



                                                        _James GAINES I______+
                                                       | (1719 - 1786) m 1731
                             _Henry GAINES ____________|
                            | (1737 - 1830) m 1756     |
                            |                          |_Mary PENDLETON _____+
                            |                            (1717 - 1803) m 1731
 _William Larkin GAINES ____|
| (1778 - 1854) m 1798      |
|                           |                           _Richard GEORGE _____+
|                           |                          | (1709 - 1773) m 1734
|                           |_Ann (Martha Ann) GEORGE _|
|                             (1735 - 1801) m 1756     |
|                                                      |_Elizabeth Ann MAYO _+
|                                                        (1715 - 1782) m 1734
|
|--Madison Yancey GAINES 
|  (1800 - ....)
|                                                       _Benjamin A. POWELL _+
|                                                      | (1702 - 1769)       
|                            _William POWELL __________|
|                           | (1750 - 1816) m 1776     |
|                           |                          |_Sarah BLEDSOE ______+
|                           |                            (1730 - ....)       
|_Elizabeth Stevens POWELL _|
  (1778 - 1854) m 1798      |
                            |                           _____________________
                            |                          |                     
                            |_Nancy BOBO ______________|
                              (1758 - 1807) m 1776     |
                                                       |_____________________
                                                                             

Sources

[S979]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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Mary Susan GATEWOOD

15 Oct 1846 - Sep 1883

ID Number: I58750

  • RESIDENCE: KY & TN & Lamar Co. TX
  • BIRTH: 15 Oct 1846, Kentucky
  • DEATH: Sep 1883, Paris Lamar Co. Texas
  • RESOURCES: See: [S2162]
Father: Benjamin Dudley GATEWOOD
Mother: Susan Mary MAXEY


Notes


Married William Long. Child: 3 Lena TERREL b: Abt 1878


                                                   _Henry GATEWOOD III_______________+
                                                  | (1752 - 1822) m 1772             
                             _Henry GATEWOOD IV___|
                            | (1781 - 1824) m 1805|
                            |                     |_Phildelphia "Delphia" PEMBERTON _+
                            |                       (1754 - 1797) m 1772             
 _Benjamin Dudley GATEWOOD _|
| (1821 - 1902) m 1841      |
|                           |                      _Moses QUISENBERRY _______________+
|                           |                     | (1748 - 1805) m 1768             
|                           |_Amy QUISENBERRY ____|
|                             (1780 - 1855) m 1805|
|                                                 |_Mary GATEWOOD ___________________+
|                                                   (1745 - 1814) m 1768             
|
|--Mary Susan GATEWOOD 
|  (1846 - 1883)
|                                                  __________________________________
|                                                 |                                  
|                            _____________________|
|                           |                     |
|                           |                     |__________________________________
|                           |                                                        
|_Susan Mary MAXEY _________|
  (1825 - 1849) m 1841      |
                            |                      __________________________________
                            |                     |                                  
                            |_____________________|
                                                  |
                                                  |__________________________________
                                                                                     

Sources

[S2162]


INDEX

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John HIGGINBOTHAM

1865 - ____

ID Number: I83954

  • RESIDENCE: E. Feliciana Parish, LA
  • BIRTH: 1865
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3079]
Father: John Jacob "Jake" HIGGINBOTHAM C.S.A.
Mother: Milly KENT?



                                                                                 _James HIGGINBOTHAM _______+
                                                                                | (1775 - 1825) m 1797      
                                         _John Brown "Johnnie" HIGGINBOTHAM ____|
                                        | (1802 - 1879) m 1825                  |
                                        |                                       |_Mary BROWN _______________+
                                        |                                         (1778 - 1857) m 1797      
 _John Jacob "Jake" HIGGINBOTHAM C.S.A._|
| (1835 - ....)                         |
|                                       |                                        _(RESEARCH QUERY) CARROLL _
|                                       |                                       |                           
|                                       |_Charity Love (Lovie Charity) CARROLL _|
|                                         (1811 - 1868) m 1825                  |
|                                                                               |___________________________
|                                                                                                           
|
|--John HIGGINBOTHAM 
|  (1865 - ....)
|                                                                                ___________________________
|                                                                               |                           
|                                        _______________________________________|
|                                       |                                       |
|                                       |                                       |___________________________
|                                       |                                                                   
|_Milly KENT? __________________________|
  (1835 - 1939)                         |
                                        |                                        ___________________________
                                        |                                       |                           
                                        |_______________________________________|
                                                                                |
                                                                                |___________________________
                                                                                                            

Sources

[S3079]


INDEX

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Isaac JACKSON "the immigrant"

ABT 1630 - BEF 9 Mar 1700

ID Number: I35975

  • RESIDENCE: ENG & Essex Co. VA
  • BIRTH: ABT 1630, England
  • DEATH: BEF 9 Mar 1700, Essex, VA
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: GMZ0-LV) [S816] [S1429] [S2468]
Father: (RESEARCH QUERY) JACKSON of Virginia & SC & LA


Family 1 : Jane GULLOCKE
  1. +Sarah JACKSON
  2.  Thomas JACKSON
  3.  Andrew JACKSON

                                                     __
                                                    |  
                                                  __|
                                                 |  |
                                                 |  |__
                                                 |     
 _(RESEARCH QUERY) JACKSON of Virginia & SC & LA_|
|                                                |
|                                                |   __
|                                                |  |  
|                                                |__|
|                                                   |
|                                                   |__
|                                                      
|
|--Isaac JACKSON "the immigrant"
|  (1630 - 1700)
|                                                    __
|                                                   |  
|                                                 __|
|                                                |  |
|                                                |  |__
|                                                |     
|________________________________________________|
                                                 |
                                                 |   __
                                                 |  |  
                                                 |__|
                                                    |
                                                    |__
                                                       

Sources

[S816]

[S1429]

[S2468]


INDEX

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Henry LANGSTON "the Immigrant"

1638 - ____

ID Number: I96558

  • RESIDENCE: England and Nansemond Co. VA
  • BIRTH: 1638, Brewerton, Cheshire, England
  • RESOURCES: See: LDS (AFN: 1CR9-D1N)

Family 1 :
  1. +Jesse LANGSTON

Notes


Spouse unknown. son of Anthony Langston Birth: 1575 Death: 16 Nov Brewerton, Cheshire, , England.

Sources


INDEX

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Betsy PAYNE

ABT 1797 - ____

ID Number: I87275

  • RESIDENCE: KY
  • BIRTH: ABT 1797
  • RESOURCES: See: [S3234]
Father: John PAYNE
Mother: Betsy JOHNSON


Notes


Betsy Payne b. About. 1797

                                             _William PAYNE I_____+
                                            | (1652 - 1698) m 1691
                       _William PAYNE II____|
                      | (1692 - 1776) m 1763|
                      |                     |_Elizabeth POPE _____+
                      |                       (1677 - 1716) m 1691
 _John PAYNE _________|
| (1764 - 1837) m 1787|
|                     |                      _____________________
|                     |                     |                     
|                     |_Anne JENNINGS ______|
|                       (1740 - 1827) m 1763|
|                                           |_____________________
|                                                                 
|
|--Betsy PAYNE 
|  (1797 - ....)
|                                            _____________________
|                                           |                     
|                      _____________________|
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |_____________________
|                     |                                           
|_Betsy JOHNSON ______|
  (1772 - ....) m 1787|
                      |                      _____________________
                      |                     |                     
                      |_____________________|
                                            |
                                            |_____________________
                                                                  

Sources

[S3234]


INDEX

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Mary TINSLEY

ABT 1650 - ____

ID Number: I39296

Father: Thomas TINSLEY I "the Immigrant"
Mother: Elizabeth RANDOLPH


Family 1 : Robert PAYNE

Notes


Mary Tinsley

                                                          __
                                                         |  
                                    _____________________|
                                   |                     |
                                   |                     |__
                                   |                        
 _Thomas TINSLEY I "the Immigrant"_|
| (1618 - 1702) m 1638             |
|                                  |                      __
|                                  |                     |  
|                                  |_____________________|
|                                                        |
|                                                        |__
|                                                           
|
|--Mary TINSLEY 
|  (1650 - ....)
|                                                         __
|                                                        |  
|                                   _John RANDOLPH ______|
|                                  | (1592 - ....)       |
|                                  |                     |__
|                                  |                        
|_Elizabeth RANDOLPH ______________|
  (1620 - 1702) m 1638             |
                                   |                      __
                                   |                     |  
                                   |_____________________|
                                                         |
                                                         |__
                                                            

Sources

[S816]

[S1429]

[S3632]


INDEX

HOMEBack to My Southern Family Home Page



EMAIL

© 1995, 1997, 1998, 2000. Josephine Lindsay Bass and Becky Bonner.   All rights reserved.

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