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Ezra Meyer Solomon1

Male
b. 20 March 1920, d. 9 December 2002


Family Janet Lorraine Cameron b. 28 September 1919, d. 14 November 2002
Children  1. Catherine Shan Solomon b. 1958
  2. Janet Mingulay "Ming" Solomon b. 1960
  3. Lorna C. Solomon b. 1964

Birth* 20 March 1920  Rangoon, Burma, India1,2 
Marriage* 7 May 1949  Chicago, Cook Co., IL, Principal=Janet Lorraine Cameron1 
SSN* 9 December 2002  https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V942-Z6L
first name: Ezra
middle name: M
last name: Solomon
name suffix:
birth date: 20 March 1920
social security number: 358-26-1236
place of issuance: Illinois
last residence: Santa Clara, California
zip code of last residence: 94305
death date: 9 December 2002
estimated age at death: 82
Collection: Ezra M Solomon, "United States Social Security Death Index"3 
Death* 9 December 2002  Stanford, Santa Clara Co., CA3,2 
News/Obit 21 December 2002  Ezra Solomon -- former Stanford economics professor

Former Stanford University professor Ezra Solomon, an economist who served in the Nixon administration and wrote a seminal book that ushered in the modern age of financial management, has died at age 82.

Professor Solomon, whose lectures often began, "When I was an economic adviser to President Nixon . . .," -- making students snap to attention -- suffered a stroke Dec. 9 at his Stanford home.

Colleagues said it would be difficult to overstate how Professor Solomon, an affable man known for his sharp wit and sonorous voice, shaped the world of finance. His 1963 book, "The Theory of Financial Management," revolutionized how the field was viewed and taught. Forty years later, scholars still consider it a seminal text.

"In the '40s and well into the '50s, finance was largely descriptive as taught in most schools," said James Van Horne, the A.P. Giannini Professor of Banking and Finance at Stanford. "Ezra helped move the field toward a more rigorous theory-based foundation, a more mathematical expression. Ezra was at the forefront of the evolution in finance."

Equally adept in political and academic circles, Professor Solomon served on President Nixon's Council of Economic Advisers from 1971 to 1973. During that time, the president suspended the gold standard for the dollar and imposed wage and price controls in an effort to remold the world economy.

"A lot of people go to Washington and wind up thinking they can give political advice," said George Shultz, former U.S. secretary of state and a colleague of Professor Solomon's when both taught at the University of Chicago.

"Ezra stuck to economic advice and agreed with the fundamentals. He was a gifted economist, with real wit, and had a wonderful, candid, clear way of expressing himself."

Professor Solomon was born and raised in Rangoon, Burma. He earned a degree in economics from the University of Rangoon in 1940.

During World War II, when Japan occupied Burma shortly after his graduation,

Professor Solomon and his family fled to India. He joined the Burma Division of the British Royal Navy and was named commander of a gunboat.

He left the service in 1947 to accept a fellowship at the University of Chicago, where he joined the faculty of the Graduate School of Business and became a naturalized U.S. citizen. He earned his doctorate in 1950.

The university was at the time known for its economists who emphasized the importance of regulating the money supply to control the economy, but Professor Solomon was known for his analytical, nontraditional thinking.

Professor Solomon remained at Chicago until 1965, when he was persuaded to come to the Stanford business school by then-dean Ernest Arbuckle. Arbuckle named Professor Solomon founding director of the International Center for the Advancement of Management Education, which invited faculty from business schools in developing nations to study at Stanford. Once the program was firmly established in 1963, Professor Solomon resumed teaching and was named Stanford's first Dean Witter Distinguished Professor of Finance.

"He became a leader in transforming (Stanford's) Graduate School of Business, then a parochial West Coast school, into a world-class academic institution," said economist and longtime colleague Gerald Meier.

In his 30 years at Stanford, Professor Solomon wrote 13 books and scores of papers. For many years, beginning in 1965, he was also the managing editor of Prentice-Hall's series of books, "Foundations of Finance."

"Ezra had a tremendous impact on several generations of finance scholars and faculty," said Robert L. Joss, dean of the Graduate School of Business. "He touched so many lives."

Professor Solomon is survived by three daughters, Catherine Shan Solomon of Newark, Ming Solomon Lovejoy of Eureka, Mont., and Lorna Solomon-Oyarce of Stanford; and five grandchildren.

A memorial service is pending.

Memorials may be made to the Burma-America Fund, 160 West End Ave. Suite 18J, New York, NY, 10023; or to the Ezra Solomon Faculty Fund, in care of Stanford Graduate School of Business, 518 Memorial Way Room 235, Stanford, 94305-5015. Donations should be payable to Stanford University.

Published in the San Francisco Chronicle (CA) - December 21, 20022 
News/Obit* 21 December 2002  EZRA SOLOMON , STANFORD PROFESSOR DEVELOPED FIELD OF FINANCE STUDY

Former Stanford business school professor Ezra Solomon, who laid the foundation for modern financial management, has died. He was 82.

Mr. Solomon, who died of a stroke at his Stanford campus home Dec. 9, published his best-known book, ''The Theory of Financial Management,'' in 1963.

''In the '40s and well into the '50s, finance was largely descriptive as taught in most schools. Ezra helped move the field toward a more rigorous theory-based foundation, a more mathematical expression. Ezra was at the forefront of the evolution in finance,'' said James Van Horne, the A.P. Giannini professor of banking and finance at Stanford.

Mr. Solomon, who was a member of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Nixon administration, served industry and government throughout his 30-year career.

He was born March 20, 1920, in Rangoon, Burma. He received a degree in economics from the University of Rangoon in 1940. Mr. Solomon won a fellowship for overseas graduate study, which brought him to the University of Chicago in 1947.

Mr. Solomon is survived by three daughters, Catherine Shan Solomon of Newark; Ming Solomon Lovejoy of Eureka, Mont.; and Lorna Solomon-Oyarce ofStanford; and five grandchildren. A memorial service is planned for this winter.

Published in the San Jose Mercury News (CA) - December 21, 20022 

Citations
  1. [S1490] Unknown compiler.
  2. [S323] News Bank.
  3. [S129] SSDI Death Index,.


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