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Charles Daniel "Charlie" Sloan1

Male
b. 25 September 1878, d. 4 March 1918


Father William Chester Sloan1 b. circa 1854, d. 18 January 1881
Mother Delilah Spurlin1 b. 24 May 1858, d. 14 July 1943
Pop-up Pedigree

Family Maude May Auringer b. May 1880, d. 15 December 1949
Marriage* 29 December 1897  Eldora, Hardin Co., IA, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XJN7-HRS
Groom's Name: Charles Daniel Sloan
Groom's Birth Date: 1877
Groom's Birthplace:
Groom's Age: 20
Bride's Name: Maude May Auringer
Bride's Birth Date: 1878
Bride's Birthplace:
Bride's Age: 19
Marriage Date: 29 Dec 1897
Marriage Place: Iowa, United States
Groom's Father's Name: William Sloan
Groom's Mother's Name: Delilah Spurlin
Bride's Father's Name: Freeman V. Auringer
Bride's Mother's Name: Mollie I. Middleton
Groom's Race:
Groom's Marital Status:
Groom's Previous Wife's Name:
Bride's Race:
Bride's Marital Status:
Bride's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I10048-2
System Origin: Iowa-EASy
Source Film Number: 1034940
Reference Number: p 2
Collection: Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992, Principal=Maude May Auringer1,2 
Children  1. Doris Leourence Sloan b. 12 May 1900, d. Dec 1965
  2. Vera B. Sloan b. 1902
  3. Orva F. "Orvie" Sloan b. 12 Mar 1903, d. 18 Sep 1918
  4. Asa William "Ace" Sloan b. 3 Jun 1905, d. 7 Oct 1989
  5. Delilah M. "Lila" Sloan b. 1911, d. 1979
  6. Charles E. Sloan b. 9 Apr 1913, d. 13 Jun 1969
  7. Bernice M. Sloan b. c Jun 1915

Note*   Charlie was shot to death when he stepped out of his car Mar. 4, 1918.2 
Name Variation   Valentine Sloan3 
Birth* 25 September 1878  KS1,4,2 
Census 1880  1880 Federal Census, Iowa, Clarke County, Doyle Township, Hopeville, ED: 45, Series: T9, Roll: 333, Page: 212A, June 9
(enumerated with father, William Sloan)
11, 18, 20, Sloan, Valentine, W, M, 1, , Son, 1, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Kansas, Ohio, Iowa3 
Marriage* 29 December 1897  Eldora, Hardin Co., IA, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XJN7-HRS
Groom's Name: Charles Daniel Sloan
Groom's Birth Date: 1877
Groom's Birthplace:
Groom's Age: 20
Bride's Name: Maude May Auringer
Bride's Birth Date: 1878
Bride's Birthplace:
Bride's Age: 19
Marriage Date: 29 Dec 1897
Marriage Place: Iowa, United States
Groom's Father's Name: William Sloan
Groom's Mother's Name: Delilah Spurlin
Bride's Father's Name: Freeman V. Auringer
Bride's Mother's Name: Mollie I. Middleton
Groom's Race:
Groom's Marital Status:
Groom's Previous Wife's Name:
Bride's Race:
Bride's Marital Status:
Bride's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I10048-2
System Origin: Iowa-EASy
Source Film Number: 1034940
Reference Number: p 2
Collection: Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992, Principal=Maude May Auringer1,2 
Census* 1900  1900 Federal Census, Iowa, Grundy County, Felix Township, ED: 42, Series: T623, Roll: 434, Page: 260B, June 7
Sheet 4B
84, 82, 82, Sloan, Charles, Head, W, M, Sept, 1878, 21, M, 2, , , Kansas, Unknown, Iowa, , , , Farmer, 0, , Yes, Yes, Yes, R, , F, 77
85, 82, 82, Sloan, Maud, Wife, W, F, May, 1880, 20, M, 2, 1, 1, Iowa, New York, Indiana, , , , , , , Yes, Yes, Yes, , , ,
86, 82, 82, Sloan, , D, W, F, May, 1900, 0/12, S, , , , Iowa, Kansas, Iowa, , , , , , , , , , , , ,4 
Census 1905  Home Twp., Turner Co., SD, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMH9-6Y6
Name: Chas Sloan
Age: 26
Estimated Birth Year: 1879
Gender: Male
Race: W
Birthplace: Iowa
Marital Status: Married
Residence: South Dakota, United States
Years in State: 3
Estimated Arrival Year in State: 1902
Years in United States: 26
Estimated Arrival Year in the United States: 1879
Father's Birthplace:
Mother's Birthplace:
Film Number: 2281908
Digital Folder Number: 4245274
Image Number: 3521
Card Number: 152
Collection: South Dakota State Census, 1905
5 
Census 1910  1910 Federal Census, South Dakota, Turner County, Parker Township, ED 412, Series: T624, Roll: 1489, Page: 71A, April 30
Sheet 6A
20, 67, 68, Sloan, Charles D, Head, M, W, 31, M1, 12, , , Kansas, , Iowa, , , English, Farmer, General Farm, Emp, , , Yes, Yes, , O, M, F, 56, , ,
21, 67, 68, Sloan, Maude M, Wife, F, W, 30, M1, 12, 4, 4, Iowa, New York, Indiana, , , English, None, , , , , Yes, Yes, , , , , , , ,
22, 67, 68, Sloan, Doris L, Daughter, F, W, 9, S, , , , Iowa, Kansas, Iowa, , , English, None, , , , , Yes, Yes, Yes, , , , , , ,
23, 67, 68, Sloan, Vera B, Daughter, F, W, 7, S, , , , S Dakota, Kansas, Iowa, , , English, None, , , , , Yes, Yes, Yes, , , , , , ,
24, 67, 68, Sloan, Orvie F, Son, M, W, 6, S, , , , S Dakota, Kansas, Iowa, , , , None, , , , , Yes, Yes, Yes, , , , , , ,
25, 67, 68, Sloan, Asa W, Son, M, W, 4, S, , , , S Dakota, Kansas, Iowa, , , , None, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
26, 67, 68, McIntosh, Bailey L, Hired Man, M, W, 34, S, , , , Ilinois, Tennessee, Tennessee, , , English, Laborer, Farm, W, No, 52, No, No, , , , , , , ,6 
Census 1915  Parker Twp., Turner Co., SD, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMHP-VK3
Name: Chas D Sloan
Age: 36
Estimated Birth Year: 1879
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birthplace: Kansas
Ethnicity: Irish
Marital Status: Married
Year Married: 1897
Wife's Maiden Name: Maude Auringer
Residence: South Dakota, United States
Years in State:
Estimated Arrival Year in State:
Years in United States:
Estimated Arrival Year in the United States:
Naturalized:
Religion: Baptist
Father's Birthplace: Ohio
Mother's Birthplace: Iowa
Film Number: 2283909
Digital Folder Number: 4245938
Image Number: 00744
Sheet Number: 554
Collection: South Dakota State Census, 19157 
Death* 4 March 1918  Turner Co., SD8,2 
Burial* after 4 March 1918  Rosehill Cemetery, Parker, Turner Co., SD, Inscription: Sloan
Charles D
Sept. 25, 1878
Mar. 4, 19182

News/Obit* after 7 March 1918  The remains of the late Charles D. Sloan and Rollo A. Piatt arrived here on the early morning train, C. & N.W., from North Dakota last Friday. The former from Hazelton and the latter from Bismarck where he died in a hospital.

The New-Era gave a brief account of the death of both men, and the tragic manner in which they met death. Both were shot by Clarence White, Mr. Sloan dying instantly, and Mr. Piatt a few hours afterwards in a Bismarck hospital, where he had been taken after he had been fatally shot. White shot each three times at short range. Below we are giving White's confession of the murders. The other side we are unable to give as both Sloan and Piatt are unable to speak, but, Charles Sloan must of had just cause to have remonstrated with White, or he would not of done so. We who knew him so long and highly respected him, feel certain he was acting on principle. Piatt was probably stricken by grief that he was prompted to punish White for the awful deed he had done.

The funeral was held at the city hall here at 2 P.M. on Friday. Rev. Parker-Smith officiated, assisted in prayer by Rev. Nels Fanebust. The attendance was large, nearly filling every seat in the large building. The sympathy of the community for the bereaved ones was deep and abiding. The esteem for the dead was universal. The floral offerings from relatives, church friends, and others were large.

The Baptist Choir sang "Nearer My God To Thee" "We Need Thy Consolation" and "Abide With Me." Rev. Smith spoke from Ecclesiastes - -. Interment was made in the family lots in Rosehill Cemetery.

Mr Sloan left a wife and seven children, aged respectfully from 18 months to 18 years. Mr. Piatt leaves a young wife. Mrs. Delilah Piatt of Parker was the mother of Charles and Rollo - Charles by her first husband, deceased many years. Mrs. Elmer Benson of Hazelton, North Dakota is the oldest of the now fatherless Sloan children.

Charles D. Sloan was thirty-nine years old September 28 last; was born near Jewel, Kansas, located on a farm near Parker in 1901, where he was in the front rank among farmers, stock growers, and citizens till he sold his farm about two years ago and moved on a large farm near Hazelton, North Dakota.

Rollo A. Piatt was born near Union, Iowa, April 6, 1886 and located near Parker in 1904, coming from Wissington Spring. Two years ago he sold out here and a little later went to Hazelton and managed the Standard Oil and Gasoline business thereafter until his death. He was a useful and respected citizen.

Near relatives of the deceased men present from a distance at the funeral were widow and older children of Mr. Sloan; The widow of Mr. Piatt; Freeman Auringer, father-in-law of Mr. Sloan of Hazelton; Mrs. Geo. Gifford, (nee Eva Piatt), of Wessington Spring, South Dakota; S. D. and Andrew Spurlin of Union, Iowa, and Zach Spurlin (cousins) and Leonard Spurlin, (cousin) of Nevis, Minnesota; S.C. Clark of Sioux Falls, South Dakota and Mrs. Cash Warren of Gilmore, Iowa, father, brother and sister respectively of Mrs. R. A. Piatt.

March 7, 1918 Double Murder on Hazelton Streets
Clarence White Takes Two Lives As Toll For Settlement of Family Row

The most horrible tragedy that has ever been enacted in the history of Hazelton took place on Main Street early Monday morning, resulting in the death of two of our most prominent citizens at the hands of a gunman. Chas. D. Sloan was instantly killed and R. S. Piatt mortally wounded in the shooting affair. Clarence White, a former employee of Sloan did the shooting.

Shortly before nine o'clock Monday morning Chas. D. Sloan, a farmer living four miles southeast of Hazelton, came into town for the purpose of taking in a carload of hogs at the stockyards which he had previously purchased from farmers in the vicinity. He had just stopped his car in front of the Home Cafe when White walked out to the car and a few words were exchanged between the two men. White then went back to the sidewalk and Sloan pulled off his overcoat and threw it into the car then started toward the sidewalk, at the same time calling White some name and it is alleged said he would tramp him (White) into the earth. White then drew his gun and began firing at Sloan. He fired four shots in rapid succession into Sloan's body, two of which lodged in the stomach, one in the top of the head and one which severed an artery in the throat. Sloan sank to the ground and expired in less than five minutes.

Immediately after the shooting and before the crowd collected White walked down the street and into Klabunde's store where it is supposed he reloaded his gun.

R.S. Piatt, agent for the Standard Oil Company here, and a half brother of Sloan soon appeared upon the scene and after he had taken in the situation, ran to his home a half block away and went gunning for White in order to avenge his brother's death. He procured the gun, went down the alley and as he was coming across the street from the Bank of Hazelton to the Malloy corner, saw White standing near the latter corner in conversation with R.K. Batzer. It was clearly Piatt's intention to get up close and shoot his victim at short range, but when about forty feet away the two men discovered him and the enraged man fired from that distance. The shot, while coming close did not find it's mark, but sped across the street where it went through the window of the Andrus Hotel, or Hazelton Cafe, as it is now called, burying itself in the inside wall of the building. White then ran into the Hazelton Mercantile store and Piatt followed. Alone inside the store the two gunman fought a desperate duel, the shots coming thick and fast for a few minutes until Piatt's gun was empty, according to the story, he however, started immediately to reload and at this juncture White is said to have advanced and as Piatt continued to load and in order to save himself, White alleges, he shot his victim in the head and body.

Dr. Winchester hurried to the scene and at first thought there might be a chance for the wounded man. His wounds were hurriedly dressed and he was rushed aboard the train which had just pulled in, and taken to the Bismarck hospital.

After the second shooting White held his gun aloft and said he was willing to give himself up to the authorities. Constable Mikalson took him in charge until Sheriff Meinhover and State's Attorney Cameron could get here from Linton.

The awful tragedy created intense excitement in the village, and for a time murmurs of lynching were heard but the cooler heads soon quelled this talk and the excitement somewhat quieted down, although business for the day was practically demoralized, and nothing was talked of but the dual murder.

There were several eyewitnesses to the shooting of Sloan and the second shooting affair there was perhaps forty or fifty people who were in the streets and heard the bombardment within the Mercantile store.

It seems the whole affair is a comparatively recent one and everyone not intimately acquainted with the principals supposed they were all very close friends. Not a great deal is known as to the true facts that led up to the tragedy, but the story goes that since losing his hand in a ensilage cutter about a year ago the relations between White and Sloan had gradually become strained, although not seriously so until a few days ago.

According to White's story, told shortly after the shooting, it is gathered that Sloan had recently attempted to give White some friendly advice in regard to a family affair in which a woman was involved and that White immediately became angered and threatened to shoot Sloan. The row gradually took on more aggressive proportions until it was finally decided by all concerned that the affair should be settled up on Monday, and it was also partly for this purpose that Sloan came to town that morning. However, before this could be done the men lost their tempers and the result was the horrible tragedy that will always be remembered as the worst in the history of Hazelton.

White, who hails from Kentucky, was said to be a crack shot with the revolver and had often practiced shooting with the young fellows of the vicinity. The gun he used to kill his two victims Monday morning was a .22 calibre target pistol taking a 22-long shell. The gun Piatt used was a .41 Colts.

After getting Mr. Piatt to the Bismarck hospital and making an examination Dr. Winchester held out no hope for his recovery, although it was at first hoped he would become strong enough to stand an operation. When the operation was performed sometime after reaching the hospital it was found that five bullets had lodged in his body and that as a result there was thirty-two holes in the intestines where the bullets had torn their way through. One bullet, the one which had penetrated the left eye, and lodged between the lobes of the brain just back of the temple, and it was necessary to relieve the pressure on the brain before the operation on the other wounds could be performed. One bullet went through the arm and one through the shoulder. The operations, however, were of no avail and the wounded man passed away about midnight Monday.

A peculiar fact in the fracas in the Mercantile store White came out unscathed. He had taken up his position on the freight elevator about midway down the store, and used the 4 by 6 frame of this structure as protection, and of course, had a decided advantage over Piatt, who was directly in front of the glass doors in the front of the store. Only one of White's shots apparently went wild of its mark. This bullet went through the lower casing of the display bench in the front window and came out through the basement window. It seems most of Piatt's shots were rather wild, and almost every shot can be traced by the holes in showcases, boxes on the shelves and in the beams of the elevator. One bullet lodged in the floor only a few feet from where Piatt stood, and it is supposed he fired this shot as he fell to the floor.

Piatt's wounds discredit the general story that he was reloading his gun at the time the last and fatal shot was fired because the wound in the eye was either shot in the back as he turned to go out the door or that he reloaded while dodging the bullets. The former seems to be the opinion of many. It is believed he then turned to face White and it was then the latter put the bullet into his brain.

Piatt's gun showed no evidence of his having attempted to reload it as all six of the empty shells were in the weapon when it was picked up by the bystanders. It is therefore now believed that the killing of Piatt was done after his own weapon had become useless, and that Whit's story of his trying to get Piatt to give up is a part of the attempt to cover up the crimes.

Mrs. Piatt hearing of the first tragedy came over on the street and was a witness to her husband going for his gun and also when the first shot was fired at White in the street. She fainted and was mercifully spared hearing the fusillade of shots that were fired inside the store. After the shooting she was able to go to Bismarck on the train with her husband but for a time after arriving was in a serious condition as a result of the great shock.

A coroner's inquest was held Monday evening over the remains of Chas. Sloan and after all the evidence had been taken and several witnesses examined, the jury, - - - - - brought in the verdict that C.D. Sloan came to his death by bullets discharged from a gun in the hands of Clarence White, said gun being a revolver. At the time there was no question as to Piatt's case, as it was purely a case of self defense on White's part, and Mr. Piatt had brought upon himself the results that proved disastrous to him. In his crazed condition he simply threw his life away.

All three men mixed up in the shooting are very well known in this vicinity, and all were considered to be honest, good square men who were a credit to the community, and men whom everybody would not hesitate to trust. They were all men who had quick tempers but who seem to get over their tempers quickly, and it was an awful shock to the neighborhood when the affair was pulled off. Mr. Sloan came here a little over two years ago, purchasing the Roy Hewitt farm, and was a man of keen business ability and an exceptionally successful farmer and stockman. For over a year he has been engaged in buying stock and shipping to the St. Paul and Chicago markets. In this he was also very successful. It is said he carried about $40,000 life insurance, which will leave his family in fairly comfortable circumstances. Besides the widow, he leaves six children at home and a married daughter, Mrs. Elmer Benson, to mourn his loss; Rolla S. Piatt came here from South Dakota about two years ago and became the agent for the Standard Oil Company, at which he has been very successful. He was one of the best liked men in the village and took a great interest in anything that was for the benefit of the town or the surrounding country. He was a member of the Hazelton Fire Department being as assistant chief, and also a member of the Hazelton Home Guard. There are no children, and besides the widow he leaves several brothers and half-brothers, who live in South Dakota.

Both Mr. Sloan and Mr. Piatt are men such as the community can ill afford to loose, and their deaths coming as they did at the hands of an assassin has wrought up the intense feeling against White that while at first slow to take root, now is very pronounced in the vicinity.

The murderer, Clarence White, has always been considered a fine man and was well liked by the people of the neighborhood. He has always been gentlemanly and had the confidence of all those who were acquainted with him. He was in the employ of Sloan on the farm, coming here with the family when they moved from South Dakota and remained in their employ until the accident a year ago which caused him to loose his left hand. The accident happened at the Fred Smith farm near Sloan's place while they were cutting ensilage. White getting his hand caught in the machine, and tearing off the hand. There is a story going the rounds to the effect that it was over the accident that the trouble started, it being claimed that White was promised damages for the injury and that the damages were not forthcoming, but in view of the other developments in the case this story is inclined to be wrong. There is a story going the rounds to the effect that Mr. Sloan did not have anything to do with the settlement. White was not man whom anyone would have suspected of ever being the principal in a foul; cowardly murder.

During the fracas Monday, White seemed to have a very steady nerve, nor did this desert him after the affair was over. he is said to have made the remark that he was awfully sorry for having to shoot Piatt but that he didn't care so much about Sloan. He admitted it all and was willing to take whatever punishment the court might mete out. For the past three months he has been employed in the pool hall at Linton and only came up to Hazelton for a day or two's visit last Saturday. The opinion is now that he came up here for the express purpose of settling up scores and that he had planned the thing out so they would not seem to be to his discredit.

When the death of the husband and father was imparted to the Sloan family Monday afternoon, it was of course a most severe shock to them, but they had expected that there would be some trouble between Mr. Sloan and Mr. White when they tried to settle up their differences, although there was no thought that they would take such a serious turn.

The exact facts as to the true cause of the trouble are not definitely known to local People, but will probably all come out in the trial, when the fact of whether it was premeditated murder or not will be disclosed. White was taken to Linton and locked in the county jail, but as there were no other prisoners, it was decided to take him to Bismarck and put him in the Burleigh County jail, which was done yesterday.

The remains of Mr. Sloan were taken to McKenzie Wednesday morning and the remains of Mr. Piatt were also brought down to McKenzie. From there both bodies were taken to Parker, South Dakota, where interment will be made.

O.F. Sloan a brother of the murdered men, came up from Parker Tuesday evening and took charge of the disposal of the bodies. Funeral arrangements will be completed when the bodies arrive at Parker. There were no services here.

LATE DEVELOPMENTS IN THE CASE

As the excitement dies down and full realization of the whole affair become more clear in the people's minds and as the facts and evidence begins to come out, there is no doubt in most people's mind but what White had planned to murder Sloan in cold blood in order to shield himself in the case with the woman.

White's supposedly air-tight story is being torn down shred by shred as the true facts come to light and public sentiment is turning to be very bitter against White.

His story that he had carried the gun with which the shooting was done for some months has no foundation, for it has now become an established fact that the gun was bought in a local store only a day or two before the tragedy. It also develops that he had hinted to local people that he was going to "get" the man who was his worst enemy. Also it is said that White went out along the road early Monday morning, near the trees just on the south border of town, where he waited for some time, supposedly for Sloan to come along, and that it was his intention to "pick him off" at a distance.

Another development in the case is that Mr. Sloan's cattle were poisoned by an unknown person or persons last Saturday evening, the poison having been put in the ensilage. Mr. Sloan heard a rig drive into his yard at about nine o'clock Saturday evening, he went to the door but could see no one. A few minutes later he heard the rig drive rapidly away, and he again went to the door. Next morning when he fed his cattle they all became sick, and it is probably that he suspected White. However, as yet there is no direct evidence to connect White with the poisoning.

Looking back over the conversations which White had with local people Saturday and Sunday, and circumstances following, it would look as though he was spreading propaganda, as it were, for the story he intended to tell after the shooting.9 

Citations
  1. [S987] Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992.
  2. [S626] Find-A-Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com.
  3. [S100] 1880 U.S. Federal Census , 1880 U.S. Federal Census.
  4. [S246] 1900 U.S. Federal Census , 1900 U.S. Federal Census.
  5. [S1144] South Dakota 1905 State Census, 1905 , LDS Microfilm.
  6. [S73] 1910 U.S. Federal Census , 1910 U.S. Federal Census.
  7. [S1145] South Dakota 1915 State Census, 1915 , LDS Microfilm.
  8. [S247] 1920 U.S. Federal Census , 1920 U.S. Federal Census.
  9. [S1159] Unknown compiler.


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