Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

GRO Payments

Updated 28 Dec 1999

The following postings were submitted by Ellen Naliboff
"Mary & Gus Ellis"
John & Kathy Hartmann
to Rootsweb Shamrock mailing list and posted here with their kind permission.

Ellen Naliboff
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999 17:50:03 -0800

Civil registration of births, marriages and deaths began in Ireland in 1864. Before that you must use other sources to find/verify information, see Helpful Hints for Successful Searching by Maura Petzolt
Using Civil Registration Records in Ireland by Maura Petzolt

Registration of non-Catholic marriages began in 1845 in Ireland. Registration of births, marriages and deaths, regardless of religion, began January 1, 1864. The obligation to register these events rested on the public and failure to do so carried hefty fines. Certificates for births, marriages and deaths for all of Ireland until 1922 are housed in Dublin. Belfast has the records for Northern Ireland from 1922 to present. Clues to family history and genealogy are found in the civil records. The occupation or title give clues to the family’s lifestyle. The family historian may also use occupational clues to find additional information, either in general or specific to the family. Guild records, apprenticeship records, military regimental records, land records, borough records, and other sources may be useful. Probate, peerage books, and land records are sources if there is a title involved. If the birth or death occurred in the workhouse look for records under the Irish Poor Law.

Birth certificates include the date and place of birth; the name; the sex; the name, surname and residence of the father; the name, surname, maiden surname of the mother; the rank, profession or occupation of the father; and the name and qualifications of the informant, usually a family member. A given name was not obligatory, so some entries are Kelly, Male or Clarke, Female. The FHLC holds microfilm copies of the index and certificates for 1864-1955.

Marriage certificates include the date and place of marriage; groom’s name, age, marital status, occupation or title, and residence; bride’s name, marital status, age, occupation or title, and residence. The names of the fathers of both parties and their occupations or titles are given which makes them particularly relevant to genealogy. The church and the names of two witnesses are also listed. Witnesses to the marriage are commonly family members and may add clues to family linkages. Full age indicates that the person was at least 21 years old.

Registration of non-Catholic marriages began in 1845 in Ireland. Registration of births, marriages and deaths, regardless of religion, began January 1, 1864. Certificates for births, marriages and deaths for all of Ireland until 1922 are housed in Dublin. Belfast has the records for Northern Ireland from 1922 to present.

General Register Office, Joyce House, 8-11 Lombard St. East, Dublin 2 Open 9:30-12:30 and 2:15 - 4:30

Fees are payable in Irish punts and cash (Irish, Sterling, US dollars) for any amount.

A photocopy of an entry will contain the same details as a certificate but is not suitable for administrative matters. However, it is ideal for genealogical purposes. Photocopy (including search fee) is Irpunts 3.00 and Certificate (including search fee) is Irpunts 5.50. If more than one certificate relating to the death of the same person is required an additional fee of 4.00 Irpunts should be sent for each extra certificate.

What is required for search: Name in full, date of event, place of event, age of deceased, occupation of deceased, whether single, married, widow.

quote.yahoo or travelocity.com/converter to get the currency exchange rate for the day.


Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999 23:04:02 -0800
From: "Mary & Gus Ellis"

BDM records at the Latter Day Saints FHC or FHL

Indexes to at least 1921 (By year until 1877 and divided by quarters (Mar,June,Set,Dec) from 1878

Civil Registration Microfilms


Births:-	1864 - 3/1881;  1900 - 1913;  1930 - 1955
Marriages:-	1845 - 1863 (COI only);   1864 - 1870
Deaths:- 	1864 - 1870
Using the indexes you can find:- Surname, Given name, Reg. Dist., Year, Quarter, Volume No., Page No.

If you send this information to the GRO, a photocopy of the Registration entry only costs Irish Punts 1.50 as no search is required.

Given the US$ is now very strong the current exchange rate is only about US$1.94 per Punt 1.50
Gus Ellis


Date: Sun, 12 Dec 1999 11:40:07 -0800
From: John & Kathy Hartmann

Thank you to everyone who repsonded to my query about methods of paying GRO fees.

The concensus is that they will accept US$-denominated personal checks but not credit cards. Checks should be made payable to "The Register General". They also accept Postal Orders, Euro and Stirling checks/cheques. They do not have a public e-mail address. One person established an Irish bank account and drew drafts on it for payment. Mailing cash has also worked, but seems a bit risky.

One person requested a list of fees, which are as follows, along with today's US$ equivalent.


1. Certificates            Including particular search fees    Extra copies
    birth 			IR 5.50 ($US7.08)                IR 4.00 ($US5.15)
    death	                   "                              "
    marriage			   "                              "
    short birth			IR 3.50 ($US4.50)                IR 2.00 ($US2.57)

2. Search Fees by applicant in the public office Particular 5yrs / entry IR 1.50 ($US1.93) General [(< 6 hours for b & d, < 6 days marriage IR 12.00 ($US12.45)] copy fees not included - NB The GRO does not perform searches. This is the cost of searching in person. 3. Photocopy of an entry in the Register IR 3.00 ($US3.86) When reference information is provided IR 1.50 ($US1.93) certificate authentication IR 1.50 ($US1.93)

Note check exchange rates - rates quoted are Dec 1999.

The GRO is concerned with civil registration matters only, and does not engage in genealogical research. Records of marriages other than Roman Catholic date back to 1st April 1845. Records of births, deaths, and Roman Catholic marriages date back to 1st January 1864.

A photocopy of an entry will contain the same details as a certificate. A photocopy is not suitable for administrative purposes but is ideal for genealogical purposes.

Thanks again for your responses.
John



Back to the Cork Page