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German Immigrant Ancestors
in Syracuse and Onondaga County, New York



German Churches


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Introductory Notes:

Church records are an important source for genealogists and local and family historians seeking documented facts about their ancestors. Not only can church records, when found, yield proof of dates and events such as births, baptisms, and deaths--they can also tell us much about the values held and spiritual lives led by our ancestors and those with whom they associated within their church.

Among the great shocks encountered by some of the German immigrants who arrived in the U.S. was the realization that there was no state-sponsored church here as there was in their Old World homeland. If they were to continue their religious practices and traditions within a church, the complete support of that church usually fell to them, as individuals, as it never had before.

This responsibility often included, especially in the early "pioneer" years, the costly goal of building a meeting place and paying the salary of a permanent resident pastor. Often at great personal sacrifice (including sometimes the mortgaging of their own modest homes to pay for the construction of the church) were these goals achieved. With this in mind the historical descriptions of the German churches which so carefully include the cost of the church building are not so much a boast of material affluence as they are the simple acknowledgement of real achievement of faith and sacrifice in action.

Father Adelbert Inama, a Tyrolean native and first pastor of the first Catholic church parish founded in Syracuse (St. Mary's of the Assumption, founded in the 1840's, the forerunner of today's Assumption Catholic Church), wrote: "You cannot imagine what unconditional obedience and unlimited confidence the good-hearted Germans give me...people who have not been in a Catholic church since they came to America, 12 or more years ago." As the German immigrants gathered into communities in Onondaga County, a major problem was the lack of priests and ministers to attend to their spiritual needs. Struggling to establish a church that would serve as the center of their social as well as their religious life, the early German pioneers had to be persistent in seeking religious leadership.

Likewise the stories of dissention within the German congregations reflect not so much contentiousness in the German spirit as they do the great disparity between the German-speaking individuals who arrived in the U.S.--they came from many different parts of what today is lumped together as "Germany" and beyond. As Father Inama wrote, "The German Catholics here are not, like the Irish, peas from the same pod. But, in the same place, there will be people from Lorraine, Alsace, the Palatine, Baden, Prussia, Franconia, etc. It is difficult to bring so many heads under one roof." This observation proved to be true for Protestants as well as Catholics, and could be amplified by including the Swiss, the Tyroleans, and other German-speaking immigrants who felt an allegiance to their own distinct regions and religious practices.

Thus, despite their common language, the German immigrants of Onondaga County often seemed as much foreigners to each other as they were to their English-speaking neighbors. They were doing their best to find common ground together in their religious lives, and given their disparate traditions and needs and the new freedom they found in America to determine their own religious lives, they exercised that freedom, sometimes with great zeal.

The following (still incomplete) list of churches in the Syracuse area is included here because these churches had, at one time, a connection to the German community. Where available I have included links to further historical information, as well as partial extracts I took (unsystematically) from the Syracuse city directories between the years 1882-1935 (Syr.CD).

I am updating this list whenever I receive new tidbits and factoids. Contributions and corrections from knowledgeable readers and researchers are gratefully welcomed—anything you think would fit in here and would help other researchers. Email me.

See also the email messages from contributors at the bottom of this page.

Unless otherwise noted below, general starting points for seeking church records are:

Catholic: Between 1842 and 1893, ten Catholic churches were established in the Syracuse diocese area. Many old Syracuse Catholic Church records, if no longer at the churches, are now at the Diocese Archives, 240 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, NY 13201-0511, Telephone (315)470-1493; Website: The Catholic Diocese of Syracuse, NY.

Evangelical Lutheran: Genealogy Help from the ELCA Archives, 321 Bonnie Lane, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007; Telephone: (847) 690-9410; email archives@elca.org

Evangelical Lutheran Church archives for upstate New York are held at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia, email mtairyarchives@ltsp.edu

Other/General: Microfilmed church records may also be available at the Onondaga County Public Library, the Onondaga Historical Association, and at the various local family history centers and the Salt Lake City headquarters of the Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons; website at http://www.familysearch.org/).

Article: "Lessons From the Church Register" by Michael John Neill, Ancestry Daily News, 2/15/2006

Website: German Immigrants in American Church Rrecords: http://germanimmigrants.org/




ASSUMPTION CHURCH/
CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION/
HIMMELFAHRTSKIRCHE (KATHOLISCHE)


Originating as St. Mary’s of the Assumption Church (see below), this is the large Roman Catholic church administered by the Franciscan Fathers (still in operation today) that served the mostly-German community of Syracuse’s "North Side" circa 1870-1950. Its twin spires have been a landmark on North Salina Street since 1872 (the current building was erected in 1865 at the cost of $125,000). The first bishop of the diocese, Patrick A. Ludden, was consecrated here in 1887. Also administers the large Assumption Cemetery (Catholic).

Church of the Assumption (Roman Catholic) - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpt from Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, von 1840-1850, 1897

Church of Assumption [Catholic] organized 1843 [Syr.CD 1882-1883].
"Church of the Assumption – St. Mary’s, N. Salina nr Isabella. Org. 1843. Erected 1865. Brick, cost $140,000; seats 2,000. Franciscan Fathers in charge." [page 1001, Syr.CD 1898].
Roman Catholic: Church of the Assumption - 814 N. Salina. Rector, Bernard Schweitzer; S.S. Supt., the Rector; Sexton, Andrew Korthas. [page 29, Syr.CD 1906].

See also Historical Sketch of the Parish…1845-1945, by Church of the Assumption, 86 pp. LN48 Sy8C5caa DYNIX#218061, at the Onondaga County Public Library: http://www.onlib.org/web/lh/index.htm

Photos/Views

Former Locations:
Present Location: 812 North Salina St., Syracuse, NY Parish Center phone: (315) 472-1564
Assumption Cemetery: 2401 Court St., Syracuse, NY 13208; (315) 454-3841
For records: Write or call the Parish Center; enclose a donation and self-addressed stamped envelope.

And here are two tidbits of info passed on to me:

"Church of the Assumption baptisms celebrated between 1844 and 1860 are also now fully indexed in the December, 2006 issue of the Central New York Genealogical Society's journal, "Tree Talks" (160 pages, over 2,000 baptisms, primarily of Germans, but including some Irish and French baptisms from Syracuse and the surrounding area as well). The typical entry in this index contains the date of the baptism at Assumption Church, the name of the baptized person, the parents, the sponsors and the officiating priest, but often also includes birth date and residency or place of origin. Original spellings and diacritical marks have been meticulously transcribed by Mr. F. Richard Barr. Send a $25.00 check or money order payable to the Central New York Genealogical Society to: CNYGS - Publications, P.O. Box 104, Colvin Station, Syracuse, NY 13205."

"Church of the Assumption marriages celebrated between 1844 and 1864 are also now fully indexed in the December, 2007 issue of the Central New York Genealogical Society's journal, "Tree Talks" (72 pages, nearly 800 marriages, primarily of Germans, but including some Irish and French marriages from Syracuse and the surrounding area as well). The typical entry in this index contains the date of the marriage at Assumption Church, the names of the bride and groom, the parents, the witnesses and the officiating priest, but often also includes ages and residency or place of origin. Original spellings and diacritical marks have been meticulously transcribed by Mr. F. Richard Barr. Send a $15.00 check or money order payable to the Central New York Genealogical Society to: CNYGS - Publications, P.O. Box 104, Colvin Station, Syracuse, NY 13205."

See also: Assumption Cemetery.



ATONEMENT LUTHERAN CHURCH/
THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE ATONEMENT


This church has served the South Side of the City of Syracuse (including those of German heritage) since 1904. The congregation first gathered in a private home until its first pastor, the Rev. Edwin Tucker, was called and property was purchased on Brighton Avenue. Since then the church has built three buildings requiring two relocations and is currently located off South Salina Street. Pastor John M. Joslyn and his son, Pastor Paul Joslyn, presided over family marriages, funerals, and confirmations during their successive pastorates from 1923-1968.

The Atonement Lutheran Church website: http://www.alcsyracuse.org/

Evangelical Lutheran Churches listed: Lutheran Church of the Atonement [Syr.CD 1910].

Former Location: Brighton Ave., Syracuse
Present Location: 116 W. Glen Ave., Syracuse, NY 13205; telephone (315) 492-9065.
For records: contact the church



EPISCOPAL-METHODIST CHURCH (GERMAN)/
BISCHOEFLICHE METHODISTEN-KIRCHE


Organized in Syracuse in 1891.

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1880-1896, 1897

Former Locations: Butternut Street, Syracuse
Present Location:
For records write to:



EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER

Organized in 1892. It joined with Mt. Tabor to become the Evangelical Church of the Resurrection in 1956.

Evangelical Church of the Redeemer - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

http://www.ststephensyracuse.org/about-us/our-history/ - Brief history, from St. Stephen Lutheran Church's website

Evang. Luth. Church of the Redeemer, 713 Catharine. [page 27, Syr.CD 1906].
[Also listed in 1910].
Lutheran churches: Evangelical Lutheran Church of The Redeemer - 713 Catherine. Pastor, Uriah J. Klingensmith; Sec., E. Taylor; Treas., C. Kreischer. [page 28, Syr.CD 1912].

Former Location: 713 Catharine St., Syracuse, NY; moved to 876 Dewitt Street, Syracuse 1929-1956
Present Location: Congregation merged; building at 873-876 Dewitt Street, Syracuse, NY
For records write to: The parish records for this congregation are on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION

Organized in 1956 from the combined Mt. Tabor and Redeemer congregations. In 1979 it joined with St. John's to become St. Stephen Lutheran Church (still active).

From the history page of the website of present-day St. Stephen Lutheran Church, http://www.ststephensyracuse.org/about-us/our-history/.

Former Location: 873-876 Dewitt St., Syracuse, NY (present-day location of St. Stephen Lutheran Church)
For records write to: The parish records for this congregation are on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



EVANGELISCHEN GEMEINSCHAFT of Salina/Liverpool

First Protestant German church congregation in Liverpool, incorporated 27 February 1849 (started as a mission by Salem's Church in Syracuse).

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Nachtrag, 1897

Salem Church of the Evangelical Association of North America, Town of Salina - Excerpt from History of Onondaga County, by Prof. W. W. Clayton, 1878

Former Location:
Present Location:
For records write to:



FIRST ENGLISH LUTHERAN CHURCH

Society organized in 1879. First Lutheran church in the city to hold services in the English language (rather than German). Many members from St. Peter's were among First Lutheran's early congregation.

First English Lutheran Church - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Evangelical Lutheran Churches listed: First English Lutheran [Syr.CD 1910].

Former Location:
Present Location: James Street, Syracuse
For records:



FIRST GERMAN BAPTIST CHURCH

Organized on 28 June 1877 with 30 members, this church was an outgrowth of the German Mission of the First Baptist Church of Syracuse.

First German Baptist Church - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1870-1880, 1897

Former Location: Catharine St., Syracuse; chapel on Lodi St. near Ash
Present Location:
For records write to:



FIRST WARD GERMAN CHURCH/
FIRST EVANGELICAL CHURCH


1844-1960’s.

First Ward German Church, a/k/a First Evangelical Church - See Albert J. Flint’s submission of 100th Anniversary memorial booklet.

Former Location: 823 Park St., Syracuse
Present Location: None
For records write to: Unknown/lost



FRIEDENS CHURCH
GERMAN EVANGELICAL FRIEDENS CHURCH (LUTHERAN)
DEUTSCHEN EVANGELISCHEN FRIEDENS KIRCHE
FRIEDENS EVANGELICAL AND REFORMED LUTHERAN CHURCH
FRIEDENS EVANGELICAL AND REFORMED CHURCH OF CHRIST
FRIEDENS UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST


This church was founded January 1, 1900 by the former pastor, Rev. Johannes Schaefer, and 119 members of St. Peter’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church. Rev. Schaefer had been pastor at St. Peter's for 16 years, but had instituted changes, including the abolition of the sale of beer at church picnics and entertainments, which resulted in his being dismissed by the majority pro-beer faction. The dissenters started their own new church ("Friedens" is German for "Peace"), which met in Syracuse buildings for about a year. A lot at the corner of Lodi and Ash Streets was secured in March 1900 and the Friedens church building was constructed in 1901, with plans drawn up by renowned Syracuse architect Archimedes Russell. The cornerstone was laid July 7, 1901 and the building was rapidly completed. The church was dedicated November 17, 1901, the organ was installed in 1904, and the two bells were installed and dedicated in September 1907. Rev. Schaefer injured his foot in 1910 and contracted blood poisoning which led to his resignation from the congregation in 1911. He installed his successor, Rev. William F. Bauer, on the evening of his farewell sermon in November 1911. Rev. Bauer served the congregation as pastor until 1942, followed by Rev. Warner H. Siebert (1942-1949), Rev. Ralph L. Rebman (1949-1960), Rev. John Perl (1960-1968), Rev. Charles L. Briem (1968- ), and Rev. Virginia Anderson (part-time, c. 2000-2011).

Services at the church were originally conducted in the German language. English services of worship were introduced in 1913, and in 1924 English became the offical language at the 10 o'clock Sunday service, with a German service conducted at 11 a.m. By 1937 the transition to English services was complete, although on one Sunday each month a German service was offered for the benefit of the old-time German members.

In 1934 Friedens became a member of the Evangelical and Reformed Church when the Evangelical Synod of North America and the German Reformed Church of the United States joined together. In 1970 the church became Friedens United Church of Christ.

[For more information, see 75th anniversary: People and Progress, 1900-1975 by Friedens United Church of Christ (Syracuse, N.Y., 1975; 132 pages), held at the Onondaga County Public Library Local History Department in downtown Syracuse.]

Friedens Church [Lutheran]– Ash c. Lodi. Org. Jan., 1900. Rev. Johannes Schaefer, pastor. [p. 79, Syr.CD 1900].
German Evangelical Friedens Church – Ash c. Lodi, erected 1901, cost $15,000. Pastor, Johannes Schaeffer, settled in 1884; S.S. Supt. [Sunday School Superintendent], the pastor. [page 45, Syr.CD 1901].
German Evangelical Friedens Church – Ash cor. Lodi, erected 1900, cost $16,000; Pastor, Johannes Schaefer, settled in 1884; S.S. Supt., the Pastor; Sexton, Peter Gronau. [page 44, Syr.CD 1903].
German Evangelical Friedens Church - 415 Ash cor. Lodi… [page 27, Syr.CD 1906].

Closed 2011.

Photos

A list of members and/or friends of Friedens Church who died 1900-1924

Former Location: 415 Ash at the corner of Lodi, Syracuse, NY
Present Location: Building is there, congregation has dissolved.
For records write to:



GERMAN EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF KIRKVILLE

Seeking more information on this church.

EARLY HISTORY OF MINOA'S METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, including mention of the German Evangelical Church (of Kirkville?): http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyononda/CHURCH/METHEPMI.HTM

Former Location:
Present Location:
For records write to:



GERMAN PROTESTANT CHURCH OF LIVERPOOL

Incorporated 24 February 1857 after a split from St. Paul's Church of Salina; this congregation was short-lived and soon rejoined St. Paul's.

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Nachtrag, 1897

Former Location:
Present Location:
For records write to:



HOLY TRINITY CHURCH (CATHOLIC)/
DREIFALTIGKEITS-KIRCHE (KATHOLISCHE)


Third German Catholic parish in Syracuse, organized in 1890; Park Street, on the former picnic ground and park known as Fiddler's Green.

Excerpt from
Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, von 1880-1896, 1897

Excerpt from History of the Diocese of Syracuse, submitted by Michael Hallatt

Photos, postcard

Former Location: 501 Park Street, Syracuse, NY
The last mass was held at Holy Trinity Church on 14 February 2010. This church has now merged with St. John the Baptist Church at 406 Court Street, Syracuse.
For records write to: the church or the Catholic Diocese of Syracuse, 240 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, NY 13201-0511, Telephone (315)470-1493.



IMMANUEL'S CHURCH OF THE TOWN OF CLAY

First church in Onondaga County established by a congregation of Germans; oldest Lutheran congregation in Onondaga County; oldest congregation in what is today known as Clay. First worship meetings in 1823. First church building erected 1831-1832; congregation incorporated 9 November 1833. Present church building erected in 1916 in Clay, on Route 31, between Baldwinsville and Bridgeport, NY.

Excerpt from
Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Nachtrag, 1897

Photos and more history

Former Location: Dutch Settlement (about one mile north of Town of Clay, on VerPlank Road near Caughdenoy Road)
Present Location: Immanuel Lutheran Church of Clay, 4947 State Route 31, Clay, NY 13041
Telephone: (315) 699-7268
For records: Contact the church



MT. TABOR EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH/
TABOR-GEMEINDE (EVANGELISCH LUTHERISCHE)


Formed by Pastor Alexander Oberländer, former pastor of Zion's Church, in 1893. In 1896 care of the congregation passed to his son, Fridolin E. Oberländer. Mt. Tabor later merged with Redeemer in 1956 to become Resurrection Lutheran Church, and later still Resurrection and St. John’s merged (1979) and today exists as St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church.

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1880-1896, 1897

A brief history of Mt. Tabor from the St. Stephen Lutheran Church website

Mt. Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church – 128 Spring. Rev. Fridolin E. Oberlander, pastor. Sunday School Supt., M. Strohmayer. [p. 79, Syr.CD 1900].
Mt. Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church – 1010 Butternut, erected 1901, cost $20,000. Pastor, Fridolin E. Oberlander; S.S. Supt., the pastor; sexton, J. George Knobel. [page 45, Syr.CD 1901].
Mt. Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church - 212 Butternut, erected 1868, cost $25,000. Pastor, Fridolin E. Oberlander; S.S. Supt., the pastor; Sexton, J. George Knobel. [page 44, Syr.CD 1903].
Mt. Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church - 1010 Butternut [page 28, Syr.CD 1906].
Evangelical Lutheran Churches listed: Mt. Tabor [Syr.CD 1910].
Mt. Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church - 1008-1012 Butternut. Pastor, W.L. Scheding. [page 44, Syr.CD 1928]

German Evangelical Lutheran Protestant Tabor Orphan Home [Syr.CD 1887-1888]. See Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1880-1896, 1897

Obituary of Pastor W.L. Scheding

Former Locations: 128 Spring St. (near Butternut); 1008-1012 Butternut St., Syracuse, NY
Present Location:
For records write to: Some records for Mt. Tabor are held by the Onondaga County Public Library: http://www.onlib.org/web/lh/index.htm. The parish records for this congregation are also on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



REDEEMER - See EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER



RESURRECTION - See EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION



ST. CECILIA'S CHURCH, SOLVAY (ROMAN CATHOLIC)

1001 Woods Rd
Solvay, NY 13209-1544
Parish Office: (315) 488-3221
Email: stcecilia@cnymail.com
Homepage: http://www.stcecilias.com/

According to Rita Cominolli's book, Smokestacks Allegro (1990), the Village of Solvay prior to 1903 was considered part of an Irish parish, Saint Patrick's of Syracuse. The cornerstone of Saint Cecilia's church was laid in the spring of 1905 at the corner of Woods Road and Second Street on land donated by the Solvay Process Company. The Gothic-style red brick and limestone building was dedicated 2 December 1906 by Bishop Patrick A. Ludden. Rev. O'Shea was its first pastor, followed by Rev. James P. McGraw, another Irishman, in 1914.

Marriage records from Saint Cecilia's (1903-1940) reflect a turnover of the community from Irish to Tyroleans/Trentini. As the Tyroleans (both German-speaking and Italian-speaking) moved into Solvay to find work at the Solvay Process Company's plant, the Irish tended to move out, relocating primarily to West Syracuse (Tipperary Hill). According to Cominolli, Irish surnames dominate the St. Cecilia records until 1913, and then in 1914 Tyrolean names (Tarolli, Armani) begin to appear. "Between 1916 and 1919, the records contain fairly equal numbers of Tyroleans and Irish, who were by then intermarrying. After 1921, Tyrolean and Southern Italian names far outnumber Irish names."

Contact the church for more information.



ST. JOHN’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (GERMAN)

First German Protestant congregation in Syracuse, began meeting in 1838 at the First English Presbyterian Church. Incorporated 1 January 1840 with 40 families. Dissention within the congregation resulted in families leaving to form St. Peter’s Evangelical Church (in the fall of 1843), the Evangelical Lutheran Zion’s Church (in 1863), and St. Mark’s church (1885).

In 1945 the congregation of St. Peter's church rejoined St. John's (and was known as St. John's and St. Peter's Lutheran Church). In 1965 the Evangelical Lutheran Zion's Church rejoined St. John's and St. Peter's and the church was then known as St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. In 1979 St. John's and Resurrection combined to become St. Stephen Lutheran Church, still active today.

Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpts from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1840-1850 and Von 1860-1870, 1897

A brief history of St. John's from the St. Stephen Lutheran Church website

St. John’s Lutheran Church - Union St. cor. Butternut [Syr.CD 1882-1883].
Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. John - 418 Prospect av. cor. Butternut. [page 27, Syr.CD 1906].
[Also listed in 1910].

Former Locations: S.E. corner Butternut & Prospect, Syracuse, NY
Present Location: extinct
For records write to: The parish records for this congregation are on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



ST. JOSEPH’S GERMAN CHURCH (CATHOLIC)

1881-1962. Established by German-speaking immigrants on Syracuse’s south/west side, many of whom formerly worshipped at Assumption Church. By 1943 the parish priest said, "German in the Church name has lost all significance." When St. Joseph’s was closed in 1962 (due to proximity to other parishes), their records were transferred to St. Lucy’s (5th Ward) on Gifford St.

St. Joseph’s (German) Church - submitted by Elizabeth Batcharie Kaufmann.

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1880-1896, 1897

Former Locations: 500 block of Seymour St., Syracuse
Present Location: extinct
For records write to: St. Lucy's Catholic Church, 432 Gifford St., Syracuse, NY (315) 475-7273



ST. MARK’S/
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN ST. MARK’S CHURCH


Dissention within the congregation of St. John’s caused this church to be organized with about 60 families in 1885. (Believed to have lasted for about ten years?)

Evangelical Lutheran St. Mark’s Church - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpts from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1860-1870 and Von 1880-1896, 1897

"St. Mark’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church – Lock c. Burnet. Org. Jan. 1, 1895 [sic; 1885?]. Erected 1852. Brick, cost $20,000. Seats 600. Rev. E.G. Holz, pastor. Sunday School – Rev. E.G. Holz, Supt. Meets 9:15 a.m." [page 91, Syr.CD 1896]. No listings in 1898 and 1900 Syracuse City Directories.

Former Locations: Corner of Lock and Burnet Streets, Syracuse; Butternut & Prospect Streets?
Present Location:
For records write to:



ST. MARY’S OF THE ASSUMPTION GERMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, Town of Salina

The forerunner of Assumption Church on North Salina Street (see above). First Mass said in 1845; Father Inama appointed first pastor. He wrote that the German Catholics "...were good-hearted, pius, God-fearing people, whose greatest sorrow lies in the fact that they have little opportunity to practice their religion or to have their children instructed." The church members were mostly from Lorraine, Alsace, Baden and Wurtenberg [sic], "...common people but excellent religiously...they are cheerful and like it here very well." Francis Baumer, a native of Bavaria, became schoolmaster at Assumption School in 1848. He was the founder of the religious wax candle company that still exists in Syracuse today (Will & Baumer). (See "Germans--Strong Spiritual Life" by Virginia Reichert Millert, The Catholic Sun, 26 November 1986.)

St. Mary’s German Catholic Church, Town of Salina - Excerpt from Onondaga; or Reminiscences of Earlier and Later Times, Vol. II, 1849

Excerpt from Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1840-1850, 1897

Former Locations: North Salina Street, Town of Salina
Present Location: (Assumption Church) 812 North Salina St., Syracuse, NY Parish Center phone: (315) 472-1564
For records write to:



ST. PAUL’S/
ST. PAUL’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH


German congregation incorporated in 1882 on Syracuse's southwest side (Ward 13) with church building erected the following year. Records cover period from 1882-1958 (year the congregation ended?).

St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1880-1896, 1897

See also The fortieth anniversary book of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Syracuse, New York, by Rev. F. C. Ellerman, 1922, 119 pp. LN48 Sy8C5Ls DYNIX#84328, at the Onondaga County Public Library: http://www.onlib.org/web/lh/index.htm

St. Paul’s Evang. Luth. Ch. - Germ. Org. 1882 [Syr.CD 1882-1883].
St. Paul’s Evang. Luth. Church - German - Cor. Oswego and Shonard Streets. Org. 1882. Erected 1883. Is built of wood and cost $7,000; will seat about 300. [Syr.CD 1887-1888].
St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church (German), Oswego, cor. Shonnard street. Org. 1882. Erected 1883. Is built of wood and cost $7,000; will seat about [300?]. Pastor Rev. George Merschroth. Deacons: Jacob Kreischer, Otto Koehler, Peter Braun,.… Librarian, Chas. Kies. [pages 118-119, Syr.CD 1891-1892].
"St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church - (German) Oswego, cor. Shonnard. Organized 1882. Erected 1883. Is built of wood and cost $7,000; will seat about 300. Rev. George Merschroth, Pastor; Philip Kies, Weard Van Lengen, John Keener, Elders; Jacob Kreischer, Otto Koehler, Peter Braun, Deacons; C. Schramm, E. Hurst and Louis Green, Trustees; Phil. Kies, Pres.; Otto Koehler, Sec.; W. Van Lengren, Treas.; Miss E. Guckert, Organist. The officers, Pres., Sec. and Treas., are elected annually in January. Sunday School – Rev. G. Merschroth, Supt.; John Wilhelm, Asst. Supt.; Wilhelm Bosack, Sec.; C. Schramm, Treas.; Geo. Boessing, Librarian; Fred Kies, Asst. Librarian. Meets 9:15 a.m." [page 115, Syr.CD 1892-1893].
St. Paul’s - J. Kreischer, O. Koehler, P. Braun, Deacons [page 126, Syr.CD1893-1894].
St. Paul’s - no elders or deacons or representatives listed [p. 112, Syr.CD 1895].
St. Paul’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church - Oswego c Shonnard. Organized 1883. Erected 1883. Wood, cost $7,000; seats 300. Rev. G. Merschroth, supt, meets 9:15 a.m. [page 79, Syr.CD 1900].
St. Paul’s German Evangelical Lutheran Church - Oswego cor. Shonnard [301 Shonnard], erected in 1882, cost $6,000. Pastor, George M. Merschroth, settled in 1885; S.S. Supt., the Pastor; Sexton William Reoffel. [page 44, Syr.CD 1903].
St. Paul’s German Evangelical Luth. Ch. - 301 Shonnard [page 28, Syr.CD 1906].
Evangelical Lutheran Churches listed: St. Paul’s German [Syr.CD 1910].

Photo of St. Paul's Church, 1883

St. Paul's Confirmation class of 1896
St. Paul's Confirmation class of 1899

Obituary of Rev. Georg Merschroth

Newspaper clipping on church ceremony honoring Catharina and Philipp Kies, 1914

Former Locations: 301 Shonnard, corner of Oswego, Ward 13 (south-west side), Syracuse, NY
Present Location: defunct
For records write to: The original church record books (baptisms, marriages, confirmations, deaths, in two volumes, 1882-1913 and 1913-1958) are held by the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



ST. PAUL’S GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH of Salina

A small congregation organized in 1852 (incorporated 31 January 1854) in the area that today is known as Liverpool.

St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Town of Salina - Excerpt from History of Onondaga County, 1878

Excerpt from Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Nachtrag, 1897

Former Locations: Vine and Third Streets, Salina, NY
Present Location: Liverpool, NY 13088
For records write to:

[Some of this church's German records are available on microfilm from the LDS Salt Lake Library/FHC, misleadingly labeled as being from St. Paul's, Syracuse.]



ST. PETER’S/
ST. PETER’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH/
GERMAN EVANGELICAL ST. PETER’S CHURCH


Three years after St. John’s congregation was formed, a dissenting group split off and formed St. Peter’s, incorporated in August 1843. Later other dissenters would split off from St. Peter’s. In 1860 a new church building was erected after the older one was burned in a fire. In 1880 the church was remodeled, with new towers and chimes installed. In the 1880’s St. Peter’s, then located at the corner of Butternut and Prospect Ave., boasted the largest Sunday School in the city, with a membership of over 500 pupils and fifty teachers.

Pastor Emil Henckell served there from June 1874 to November 1883. In March 1884 Pastor Johannes Schafer began serving the congregation. He and 119 members of the congregation left in 1900 to form Friedens Church.

In 1945 the congregation of St. Peter's church rejoined St. John's and was thereafter known as St. John's and St. Peter's Lutheran Church. Following various other mergers of congregations in 1965 and 1979, the church today is known as St. Stephen Lutheran Church.

German Evangelical St. Peter's Church (Syracuse) - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpts from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1840-1850 and Von 1860-1870, 1897

A brief history of St. Peter's from the St. Stephen Lutheran Church website

See also Centennial History of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Syracuse, 1843-1943, by Bertha M. Rothe, 39 pp. LN48 Sy8C5Lr DYNIX#84327, at the Onondaga County Public Library: http://www.onlib.org/web/lh/index.htm

St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran Church - 301 Butternut, erected 1860, cost $65,000. Pastor, Carl Zinssmeister, settled in 1900; S.S. Supt., Charles Flachsland; Sexton, John Brehmer. [page 44, Syr.CD 1903].
St. Peter’s Evangelical Luth. Ch. - Butternut, cor. Prospect av. [page 28, Syr.CD 1906].
Evangelical Lutheran Churches listed: St. Peter’s [Syr.CD 1910].

An example of a baptismal certificate given by St. Peter’s Church in 1884, signed by Pastor Johannes Schaefer.

Former Locations: N.W. corner Butternut & Prospect; later moved to "opposite" corner; 301 Butternut, corner of Prospect Ave., Syracuse, NY
Present Location:
For records write to: Some records (baptisms, marriages) for some years exist at the Onondaga County Public Library: http://www.onlib.org/web/lh/index.htm. The parish records for this congregation are also on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



ST. STEPHEN LUTHERAN CHURCH

The current-day successor church (organized in 1979) to the following historically German congregations in the Syracuse area: St. John's, St. Peter's, Zion, Mt. Tabor, Redeemer, and Resurrection.

History of St. Stephen Lutheran Church from the Church's website at http://www.ststephenlc.com/

Present Location: 873 Dewitt St., Syracuse, NY 13203-1003; Telephone (315) 479-9912

For records write to: The parish records for all of the former congregations are available on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.



SALEM'S CHURCH
(EVANGELISCHE/EVANGELISCHEN GEMEINSCHAFT)
(the "ROBBER CHURCH")


Incorporated 9 September 1844, first meetings held in a home on Montgomery Street, Syracuse. First church built of wood on southeast corner of Cedar and Grape Streets, was moved by stealth ("robbed") by part of the congregation in 1850, relocated to Lock Street and East Belden Avenue. Next church built at corner of Laurel and Lock Streets in 1869, cost $25,000.

"In 1856 the second congregation of the Evangelischen Gemeinschaft was created, but was not incorporated until 8 November 1859. The members of this congregation consisted of those who had opposed the relocation of the Salem Church and who had since been without a church. Their building is [1897] located at the corner of Grape and Jackson Streets."

Excerpts from the 1897 book Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1840-1850 and Von 1850-1860; photo, page 225



TABOR-GEMEINDE - See MT. TABOR



TRINITY CHURCH - See HOLY TRINITY CHURCH



WOODLAWN EVANGELIST CHURCH

1891-1896. Originally established by Germans on the Huntley Tract in Syracuse.

Excerpt from Gechichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1880-1896, 1897

Former Locations: Huntley Tract, Syracuse
Present Location:
For records write to:



ZION'S/
EVANGELISCHE ZIONS-KIRCHE


1847-1850.
"The German Evangelist Zion’s Church was incorporated on 4 March 1847. Meetings were first held in the old No. 5 schoolhouse which stood on the corner of Lock Street obliquely across from the present-day St. John’s Academy. The first Trustees were: Georg König, Konrad Scheidemann and Philipp Drumm. Georg Saul was the first and only minister. They had sometime later a small wood chapel on Ash Street near Townsend. In 1850 the congregation dissolved itself and Pastor Saul opened a book and music agency in the Noxon Block on North Salina Street."

Excerpt from Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1840-1850, 1897



ZION’S/
THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN ZION’S CHURCH


Dissention within the congregation of St. John’s resulted in this church being organized in 1863. In 1965 it reunited with St. John's. Following other mergers of congregations the successor church today is St. Stephen Lutheran Church.

The German Evangelical Lutheran Zion’s Church - Excerpt from Onondaga’s Centennial, 1896

Excerpt from Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse, Von 1860-1870, 1897

A brief history of Zion's from the St. Stephen Lutheran Church website

Zion’s Evangelical Luth. Church - 212 Butternut [page 28, Syr.CD 1906].
Evangelical Lutheran Churches listed: Zion [Syr.CD 1910].

Former Locations: 212 Butternut, corner of Prospect, Syracuse, NY
Present Location:
For records write to: The parish records for this congregation are on microfilm at the Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia, 7301 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794, Telephone (215) 248-6383, http://www.ltsp.edu/lutheran-archives-philadelphia.





Email messages:






Sender: Joan Coleman
Email: akarose@cox.net
Date: 9 January 2005

As far a I know [the Lutheran Church of Atonement] is still in existance. I used to go to Roosevelt Jr. High which is right across the street from the church. Had confirmation class there. My whole family attended (heavy German ancestry) Bobenhausen, Schrieber, Ropers....Pastor Joslyn presided over family marriages and funerals....I still have the Bible presented to me by Pastor Joslyn on my confirmation...



Sender: Rick Hermle
Email: rickh@a-znet.com
Date: 2 September 2002

Of the three Evangelical Lutheran Churches in that part of Syracuse, it is my understanding that St. John's was the first church to be built (on the southeast corner of Prospect Ave. and Butternut St. - assuming Prospect ran North/South). St. John's was considered the most orthodox of the three churches located there (St. John's, southeast corner; St. Peter's, northeast corner; Zion's, southwest corner). Then they got to scrapping amongst themselves and the resulting new faction built St. Peter's (which is the one that burned, I think). St. Peter's was considered a reformed church. Somewhere along the line I picked up the notion that St. Peter's was very strong in Religious Education of the youngsters. Then there was some more scrappin' at St. John's and some at St. Peter's and out of this Zion was built (on the southwest corner). Zion's was even more reformed.

A bunch from St. Peter's who felt that Zion's wasn't reformed enough built a church on Lodi St. This church was named Friedan's E. U. B. (Evangelical United Brotherhood). This church is still in existance and still has congregation. My guess is that it no longer has any resemblance to Lutheranism, but that is just a guess.

As the German population started to disperse, St. Peter's merged with St. John's. (By the time I got to sing in the choir at St. John's, St. Peter's had merged with St. John's and got to be known as "Johnny & Pete's by the brewery" - Haberle's, of course.) After Pastor Pankow left, S.J. & S.P. merged with Zion's and the congregations voted to rename the congregation St. John's. Then as the congregation continued to dwindle they merged with Resurrection to beome St. Stephan's.

There was another Lutheran church, Mt. Tabor, farther up Butternut (near Park Street, I think) that merged with Reformation Lutheran Church (on Dewitt St.) to become Ressurection Lutheran Church. I also sang in the choir at Ressurection when Pastor Weiscotten was there.

First English came into being as it was the first Lutheran church in the city to hold services in English. I am led to understand that many members of the St. Peter's congregation were among the early members of First English Lutheran Church.

At this point, I guess places to look for records would be Onondaga County Public Library, Onondaga Historical Society, St. Stephan's Lutheran Church (on Dewitt Street), First English Lutheran Church (on James Street) and possibly even Frieden's Evangelical and Reformed United Church of Christ, 1501 Lodi St., Syracuse, NY (315) 471-0972.

I have tried to construct a path of religious migration to help you search for your ancestors. Hope this is of some help.



Sender: Michael Hallatt
Email: mhallatt@twcny.rr.com
Date: 4 July 2002

While doing some research on one of the branches of my family, the Schneiders, I came across this article in an old book at the Onondaga County Public Library, Downtown Branch, at their Local History section. It describes the beginning of Holy Trinity Church. It seems my g-g-grandparents played a role in getting the church started. Both of them--Frederick Schneider and Mrs. Frederick Schneider (the former Anna Herbst)--were born in Germany. My grandmother, Grace Marie (Schneider) Hallatt is the daughter of Ludwig Schneider, who is one of the children of Frederick and Anna Schneider. --Mike Hallatt

In June, 1890, a number of German Catholic families living in the neighborhood of Round Top and members of the Church of the Assumption parish, organized themselves into a society, purchased a part of Kaiser's Grove, and began thereon the erection of a small church. Thus was inaugerated Holy Trinity, third German parish of Syracuse. These families, some of whom lived three or four miles from the parent church, first petitioned their pastor, the Rev. Bonaventure Zoller, O.M.C., for a neighborhood school that their little ones might have proper religious training without the disadvantage of having to travel considerable distances each day to procur it. The first effort in this direction was made by Mrs. Frederick Schneider, who went to Father Zoller with her request and was him referred to the Bishop. Bishop Ludden, interested by her story, advised that if necessity existed for a school, a church also was needed. She left under instruction to prepare a list of the Catholic families living in the district comprising the bounds of the present parish. Pleased with the gracious consideration of the Bishop and enthused at the prospect of a church of their own, these pious people gathered to perfect an organization.

The first men to identify themselves with the movement were Frederick Schneider, husband of its initiator, Gabriel Buschle and Frederick Foederer. An informal meeting was called for June 22, 1890. This was held in Saile’s Hall, Butternut street, Mr. Schneider presiding. According to the wish of the Bishop, a census had been taken and this showed two hundred and eighty-six families living within the proposed and of these forty-four were of Irish or French descent. A committee consisting of John Baier, Gabriel Buschle, William Kopf, Albert Belge and Anton Schmitt carried this list to Bishop Ludden and begged his consent for the erection of a church and school. A favorable reply was returned to a meeting held July 6 and thereupon a resolution was passed authorizing the purchase from Dennis McCarthy of three lots on Park street, a plot measuring 120 x 130 feet. A building committee was appointed with the following officers: Frederick Schneider, president; Jacob Amend, vice-president; Albert Belge, recording secretary; John Baier, financial secretary; John Vaeth, treasurer. On the Board of Trustees were Frank Burgmeier, Gabriel Buschle and Martin Foederer. All these officers were elected for six months but on October 26th other officers were elected as follows: John Baier, president; Dominic Kraus, vice-president; Albert Belge, recording secretary; Jacob Mathes, financial secretary, and Frederick Schneider, treasurer. The latter resigning April 14, 1891, William Kopf was appointed in his place. The new trustees were Martin Foederer, George Straub and Karl Belge. Meanwhile the people busied themselves in gathering money by collections and entertainments. It was decided January 11, 1891, to erect a two-story frame building, 42 x 20 feet, to serve as church and school. J. Hemmer & Sons were given the contract which called for an expenditure of $5,738.

On April 22, 1891, thirteen members were elected as trustees, the church having been incorporated under the name of Holy Trinity Church Society, viz: Peter Noetcher, John Biermann, Gabriel Buschle, Joseph Glath, Peter Becker, Frederick Schneider, William Kopf, John Spiegel, Dominic Kraus, Joseph Renk, Frank Schuckmeier, Joseph Brilbeck and Michael Rauch. Joseph Glath was elected president.

The church was finished in October but before its dedication a fair, the first one given for the benefit of the new congregation, was held in it. This netted a sum of $1,412.97. About this time a priest, Father Bayer, who had come from the west, was sent by the Bishop to take charge of the new parish but he remained only a month. The church was not ready for services and his only official act was the baptism of Lauretta Zimmer, the first child of the parish.

Meanwhile the church was receiving its furnishings. Pews were bought for $416.00. St. John the Evangelist church donated its large and beautifully carved wooden main altar of Gothic style. Another donation were the two large large iron statues of the Sorrowful Mother and of St. John the Evangelist. They once stood as ornaments in a private park on James street and were rescued from the scrap heap at Dunning’s foundry. Another relic is the little church-bell. For years it had called the children in the neighborhood of Magnolia street to the public school. When finer quarters had been prepared for the children, the old school building had been sold and with it the bell. It remained in its little tower until the people of Holy Trinity parish secured it from its owner as a donation to their church.

In November, 1891, the Bishop put the new parish in charge of the Rev. John Reuland. The first mass was said privately on November 12. On the following Sunday, November 15, 1891, the building was blessed by the Very Rev. John J. Kennedy, Vicar General, the Bishop being away at the time. Father Aloysius Heller of St. Joseph’s (German) church came with his altar boys to assist. He brought with him the ostensorium of St. Joseph’s church and this was used in giving the first sacramental blessing.

Father Reuland is still pastor of the church. He was born in 1852 in Consdorf, Grand Duchy of Luxemburg. After finishing his classical and theological studies in his native country he was ordained to the priesthood in 1877. His first appointment was as an assistant at a mission where he served for four years and during four other years he held a teaching position in a State Agricultural College. After these eight years of service he accepted appointed as missionary to the German Immigrants at Castle Garden, NY, P.P. Cahensly, as secretary of St. Raphael’s Society for the Protection of German Emigrants, having applied to the Bishop of Luxemburg for a priest to take charge. This was in 1885. For six years he worked in this mission and not without success as is proved by the Leo House for Catholic German immigrants, 6 State street, New York, which was established through his efforts. These six years had been years of hardship and struggle and the post was gladly relinquished when he learned through Rev. Peter Scmitt of Rome of the new parish in Syracuse and of the Bishop’s willingness to appoint him as its pastor. With Father Reuland’s advent a parochial residence was purchased for $1,900.00. It is the Jasper street house still owned by the congregation, and is located to the rear of the church lot. On November 8th a meeting was held at the Bishop’s house and the transfer of the church property, which was held by a private church corporation, was made to the Board of Trustees of the diocesan regulation, consisting of the Rt. Rev. Bishop, the Vicar-General, Father Kennedy, Rev. John Reuland, pastor, and Joseph Glath and Peter Becker of the old board.

From June, 1890, to November 15, 1891, the sum of $2,172.86 was collected. An entertainment brought $282.87, a picnic $218.84, and the fair $1,412.97. In all $4,087.44 had been raised before the appointment of a pastor. According to a financial report, the first one in print, dated January 1, 1892, the sum of $10,578.48 had been taken in, this sum including a mortgage of $5,585. The expenses had run up to $9,484.15, leaving a balance in the treasury of $1,094.33, with $9,580.70 of debt.

During the summer months of 1892, a two-story parish house was erected at the rear end of the church building, and attached to it, at a cost of $2,024.95, the Jasper street house being turned over to the school Sisters.

In September, 1892, the school was opened with 180 children, divided into three classes. The first teachers were Franciscan Sisters from Milwaukee. Two years later these were replaced the Franciscan Sisters of Syracuse.

In 1895 the house on the west side of the church was bought for $2,400 and this serves as a more convenient convent for the Sisters. In 1899 a parish hall was built at a cost of $3,383, and in 1902 a third story was added to the pastor’s residence, thus bringing the house under the same roof as the church.

Despite the cost of all these new acquisitions and improvements the congregation kept paying off the mortgage. A fair held in February, 1903, brought the necessary means to acquit the remaining debt on the church property, a mortgage of $1,500. The church holdings are valued at $30,000. What next? A new church, of course, say the pastor and people. A building fund was started in 1904 and now amounts to to $11,000. Seven lots at the corner of Park and Second North streets were purchased in 1905 from the Father O’Hara estate for $4,100, and it is planned to erect an edifice which when completed and furnished will cost $75,000, and for all time be a monument to the zeal and piety of the people of Round Top, who, poor in the world’s goods, are rich in faith and good works. May God bless the undertaking.

Of the 286 families on the Bishop’s list only 160 became real members of the new congregation and of these not all were supporting members. Several Irish families became active members but they were lost to Holy Trinity when St. Vincent de Paul’s parish was established. Of the other families on the list about forty or fifty remained with Assumption church, although they live within the limits. The remaining fifty or sixty families are not accredited to any parish.

To-day after sixteen years of existence the number of families has increased to about two hundred and seventy. The school, which in 1892 opened with 180 children, now has an average attendance of 210 children.

The new parish limits are north and east, the open fields; west, Butternut and Third North streets; south, Lodi street and the Erie canal.

Taken from: HISTORY OF THE DIOCESE OF SYRACUSE, established 1886: Story of the Parishes, 1615 – 1909: pages 95 – 99: Edited by William P. H. Hewitt: Printed 1909, Catholic Sun Press; Wm. P. H. Hewitt, Publisher

Submitted by: Michael Hallatt




Sender: Betty Schlecht Wilson
Email: Elizwil827@aol.com
Date: 10 December 2001

Thank you for the web site. In regards to St. John's, St. Peter's and Zion's. You are correct in that these churches were originally one and then split off. They were all on the same intersection of Prospect Ave and Butternut Street. Sometime before 1950, St John's and St. Peter's merged, in the early to mid 1960's, St. John's and St. Peter's as it was called merged with Zion's. So they were finally all back together again. This church then merged with the former Mt. Tabor church. Some members went to First English, others to Atonement, but the offical church merger was between Zion's and Resurrection which was then renamed as St. Stephen's. My knowledge of the above is from my youth in the 50's and 60's when I attended St. John's and St. Peter's later being confirmed and married at Zion's after the merger. A side note to all this, is that the three Lutheran churches on one corner were once mentioned by "Ripley's Believe It or Not" in their Sunday strip that ran for years in the Sunday Comics section.

Also, the address for St. Paul's that you call the north side, is actually in Liverpool, NY 13088. (Still in the town of Salina, but this is a village address--the church is not in the confines of Syracuse itself.

It may also interest you to know that the oldest continuing Lutheran church is located in Clay, NY--Northern Onondaga County--a few minutes from Syracuse. I am not sure if it was of German origin, but I will check that out.



Sender: Ann Derner
Email: annlynnd@rma.edu
Date: 6 September 2001

My GGGrandfather Rev. William Mentz was a circuit rider Minister...if any one has a record of a visit to a church in this area, I would appreciate hearing from them.



Sender: Paul Hoffman
Email: PWH11546@aol.com
Date: 31 August 2001

One thought about your church listings. Since most of the Syracuse Germans probably came through the Port of NY and some may have married and/or had children there, you might want to refer your viewers to a great new book. THE GERMAN CHURCHES OF METROPOLITAN NEW YORY: A RESEARCH GUIDE by Richard Haberstroh, The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, 2000. Richard lists all the German Catholic and all denominations of the German Protestant churches along with operating dates, historical addresses and where the records can be accessed today.

There are two other books that are of a historical rather than a genealogical nature but are good background for NY church research: THE IMMIGRANT CHURCH: NEW YORK'S IRISH AND GERMAN CATHOLICS, 1815-1865, by Jay P. Dolan; and LITTLE GERMANY: ETHNICITY, RELIGION, AND CLASS IN NEW YORK CITY, 1845-1880, by Stanley Nadel.



Sender: Sandy Allen
Email: updated Sept. 2010: sandal1963@frontiernet.net
Date: 29 August 2001

My research has shown me that prior to building St. Joseph’s German Catholic Church on 500 block Seymour St on the west side of the city in 1882, German Catholics had to go to Assumption (which was previously St. Mary’s) on the north side of the city. When St. Joseph’s was closed in 1962, their records were transferred to St. Lucy’s (5th Ward) on Gifford St.



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