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German Immigrant Ancestors
in Syracuse and Onondaga County, New York



The German Pioneer Association



The German Pioneer Association was a society established by German immigrants in Onondaga County on 18 June 1892. Approximately one month later the group sponsored a parade and festival unlike anything Syracuse had ever seen. The purpose of the gala day was to honor the sacrifices and accomplishments of the local German-American citizens who had settled and contributed to the area over the course of the previous 85 years.

This Association held two more annual meetings in 1893 and 1895. Anyone who knows more about the history and/or accomplishments of this organization, or who might be able to contribute photos to this website, please email me.

The following article, submitted here by Norman C. Staub, Sr. (Email: normanssr@att.net), appeared on page 4 of the Syracuse Standard on Thursday, 21 July 1892, the day after the parade and festival. It gives a detailed description of the day, and includes many names of German immigrant settlers in Onondaga County. I would like to express my grateful thanks to Dr. Staub for sharing this research here with us all.

The photocopy of the article we referred to was very difficult to read. I apologize for any surnames I have not been able to decipher correctly. I have added editorial comments, including possible alternate spellings of surnames whenever known [in brackets].


Surnames appearing in the article: Here's a list at the bottom of this page

Read more about "The German Pioneer Festival"
in Geschichte der Deutschen in Syracuse und Onondaga County (1897)
on this website

Here's an additional article naming the early German settlers of 1830-1857 that appeared in the 20 July 1892 issue of the Syracuse Union (German-language newspaper)






RARE OLD GERMANS

The Pioneers Celebrate Their Coming to America.

SUCCESSFUL IN MANY PURSUITS

The City Has Its Holiday Clothes on in
Honor of Its German Citizens and
Their Part in the Town’s Progress


Yesterday was not a national holiday in Syracuse but it had the appearance of one. The city was clothed in its holiday dress, half the residents were on the streets in their gayest clothes and the people generally seemed to be more or less especially interested. This unusual display was made in honor of the Pioneer Germans who selected yesterday as the day for a grand celebration and re-union. The pioneers may be credited with being favorites of Old Probabilities for a more perfect day for the celebration could not have been selected. It was just such a day as the occasion deserved. The programme as arranged was carried out to the minutest detail, and the celebration was an unqualified success in every particular. The parade was a grand affair and brought thousands of people into the streets. All the hacks that could be had were provided for the 300 pioneers and there were several private carriages in the line. The committee on carriages were unable to secure additional conveyances and about 20 members of the German pioneer association were left behind. Only those Germans who have been residents of the country 35 years or more are eligible to membership in the association, which is to be a permanent organization.

No parade that has ever been given in this city excited more interest than that of the German pioneers. On no previous occasion of a like character has there been a more liberal display of the Stars and Stripes. Nearly every house or building along the long line of march was gayly decorated and in certain localities the decorations were gorgeous. While the greater demonstration was on the north side, the people of the south side recognizing the importance and the significance of the event displayed their colors out of respect for the German citizens. Over 10 miles was covered by the procession of carriages and the parade lasted three hours. Some of the streets had been sprinkled for the parade. In several places this banner was hung out: "Your sons honor you." In various parts of the city little girls dressed in white with red, white and blue sashes stood on the lawns and waved American flags as the procession passed.

The procession began to move at 2:30 o’clock. Each carriage bore a red white and blue shield upon which was printed the number of the year the occupants came here. Chief Marshal Michael Auer and his aides were at the head of the line followed by Maurer’s band in a large band wagon, gayly decorated. Next came the officers of the association and representatives of the press. Marshal Auer, wearing a fine sash of the Swiss colors and a white helmet, gave directions to his assistant marshals, who wore white helmets and sashes of red, white and black—the German colors. The assistant marshals, who rode on spirited horses were Joseph Hecker, George Schattle, Charles Umbrecht, Charles Listman [or Listmann], Fred Auer, Thomas Saile, Jacob Klein, John Bachtold, Louis Albeter [or Olbeter?], William Fage, John V. Becker, Conrad Loos, Fred W. Willwerth, Jacob Grassman [or Grassmann], Charles Hatch [or Hotch], Charles Sulbert [Stilbert?], Joseph Zimmerman [or Zimmermann], Jacob Endres, Nicholas Endres and John Hamm.

The firing of 35 guns on Clinton square was the signal for the procession to move. The mayor and other city officials reviewed the parade from the balcony of the Empire House. Large firecrackers and small cannons were discharged along the line of march which was from Turn Hall through North Salina street to West Genesee to Geddes, to Gifford, to Oswego, to Grace, to Delaware, to West Onondaga, to South avenue to Tallman, to South Salina, to Jackson to Mulberry, to Cedar to Lemon, to East Genesee, to Warren, to James, to Catherine, to Butternut, to Park, to Kirkpatrick, to First North, to Danforth, to Alvord, to Turtle, to Lodi, to Ash, to Townsend, to Isabella, to North Salina, to Turn Hall, where it was dismissed.

The officers of the association are: President, George P. Hier; vice-president, Charles Simon; secretary, John L. Roehner; treasurer, Jacob Knapp.

The following is a correct list of the pioneers who were in line:

1830—George Stevens [or Stephens], Charles Walter.

1831—Egbert Schemel, Justus Schnauber, John C. Whitney.

1832—Peter Miller, August Bosler [Boesler], Nic. [Nicholas or Nicolas] Schaefer.

1833—George P. Hier, John P. Hier, Michael Meiser [Meizer?].

1834—Charles Wisehoon [Weishuhn].

1835—Martin Knauber.

1836—Jacob Lucksinger [or Luchsinger].

1837—C. H. Hart.

1839—Fred Wilworth [Willwerth?], Ignatius Fissinger [or Fiesinger].

1840—Herman Afferdick, John Bierhardt, Charles [Eckel?], Anthony [Kendel?], Martin [Yann?], John Osbelt, George Holzman [or Holzmann], Peter Hook.

1841—Lambert Reidel.

1842—John F. Voshall, Michael Finkler, Henry Korb.

1843—Gustav Sniper, Joseph Sniper, Phillip Schilly.

1844—Peter Behm, S. Rosenbloom [or Rosenblum], John Scharoun [or Scharon or Schroum]

1845—Peter Ohneith [Oneth?], L. Henry Danziger, John H. Knobel, John C. Schoen, John Griesinger, George Thomas, John West

1846—Jacob Keim, D. J. Hamburger [or Heimburger], Hector R. [or B.] Johnson, Phillip Lann [or Laun], Julius Jacobs, Hon. Charles Simon, Herman Schneider.

1847—Peter Drumm, Frederick Humbert, Louis Harbach, Charles Klink, Emil C. [Laas?], C. F. Miller, Nicholas Peters sr, Charles Umbrecht, Thomas Saile, George Schattle, Francis Scharer, Michael Braun, Herman Trost.

1848—France’s [Francis?] Baumer, Christian Cook [or Koch], Christian Freeoff [or Freehoff or Fruehauff], John Gebhardt, Frank Kraus, Frank Maurer, Martin Nutz, William Funda, Jacob Schwarz, Jacob Schneider, Anthony L. Schmidt, W. W. Woese, Adam Weitzel [or Wetzel], Bernhard Went [or Wente], Moses Lichtenberg, Julius Woese, Jacob Miller, Chris Walter, Joseph A. Hofmann, Ernst [Held?], Adam Grub, Cassimeor [Casimir] Trondle [or Troendle], Charles F. Ygeyer [Yaeger? or Meyer?], Jacob Brand, David Marquard [or Marquart], Jacob [Henosberg? or Henocsberg?].

1849—Jacob L. Barker, John [Esser?], Bernhard G. Keller [Keiler?], Charles Guth, Charles N. Hatch [or Hotch or Hoch], John J. Klotz, Charles Stroh, Jacob Marshall [or Marschall], Adam Yackel, Jacob Yackel, Phillip [Zenner?], Fred Brand, Henry Genzel, G. Genzel, George Zeit [Zett], Jacob C. [Hamel? or Hammel], Abe Weis [or Weiss].

1850—Joseph Hofher, Isaac Lowenthal, Phillip Maurer sr, Jacob Nann [or Naun], Michael Auer, Frederick Auer, Oliver Schnaverly [or Schnabele], J. L. Thurwachter, Nicholas Drumm, Simon Lowenthal, Anthony Wasmer, Michael [Blaich?] August [Reinhard?], Daniel Braun, Adam Flinger [or Filsinger], William Bartlett, Joseph Schneider.

1851—Conrad Altenbrand [or Altenbrandt], Augustus Blum, David [Hassel?], Philipp Stohrer, John Kohl, Jacob Kohl, Ernest G. Rapp, William Ruescher, Robert [Gusteen?] [or Gustäen], Herman Reis, Charles Klotz [or Kotz], Jacob Hummel [or Hammel], Jacob Schaefer, Gabriel Traub.

1852—William Friedel, Conrad Fichter, John Hummel [Hammel?], Valentine Herman, Benedict Hottinger, Valentine Katz, August Baker, Alois Weber, Jacob Knapp, Frank Lang, Charles Meyer, John F. Miller, Gottlieb Nies, John Oswald, Fred J. Pellenz, Gisbert Pellenz, Erasmus Pellenz, Charles Allmang, Jacob Allmang, George Acker, John Barth, Peter Brang, Louis [Bajus?], Christ [Servatius?], Isaac Danziger, Henry Dotterer, Nicholas Enders, William Reinheimer, John Spaeth, Louis Schillinger, Joseph Wallier, John Wirth, Fred Walsch, Jacob Schweizer, J. J. Klein, John G. Heisner, Fred Schneider, Jacob Kramer, John M. Luther, John F. Walter, Joseph Sauer, John Roiler, Lorenz Schmitt, August Becker, Morris Emm, Louis Davis, Daniel [Ripple?].

1853—[Anthon?] [Anton or Anthony?] Aman, Henry C. Allewelt, John H. Christman, D Deuschle, Peter Eddinger, Joe Friedel, William Gehm, John Heindorf, C. G. Haenley, Charles Kleeman, Henry Klein, John Pauli, Frank Steg, Gottlieb Sanwald, Jacob Schug, Valentine Schilly, Rev. C. F. Stube, Charles Schug, George C. Young, Adam Young, Ernest Young, George Young, Lois [Alois?] Sessler, William [Dferlam?], B. G Waschner.

1854—William Fage, Joseph Blachler, Andrew Becker, S. Bernhardt, David Danziger, Christian Eng, Fred Erhardt, August Fink, Fred Gehring, Sam Harris, John Gang, John Gler [Glur?], Mathias Groom, Nicholas Himpler, Joseph Hecker, Emanuel Hoffman, August Falker, John S. Kaufmann, Charles Krebs, Nicholas Latterenr [Latterner?] jr, Louis Leiter, Laurenz Groom, Adam Metzger, John Roehner, Sigmund Rheinhardt, Anthony Schmitt, August Schmingler, Abram Weis, Fred Werzberger, Joseph Sehl, Charles Stilbert, [Cassian?] Meyer, Phillip Yackel, Henry Schoeneck, William Blehler [Biehier?], Fred Kaufman, William Deuschle, Daniel Latterner, Ignatius Sawmiller, John A. Weis, M. Huehnerwadel, Henry Goettel, Christian Basle [Basic?], Jacob Theben, John Humm.

1855—Daniel Ackerman, Fred Gerni, Peter Gehris [Gehres], Jacob F. Hanek [Hanck?], Fred Terlinden, Phillip Kappesser, Phillip Greenwald, Stephen Greenwald, John Wiegand, Peter Kappesser, Ed Miller, Anton Manz.

1856—William Gehring, August Hoehn, George Klosheim, Jacob Grassman, Daniel Rippel, Peter Raab, Jacob Sturmer, Nicholas Miller, Charles Moerie [Moerle?].

1857—Christian Emerich, Conrad Loos, Jacob Stolz, Peter Weber, R. P. Zobel, Frank Eagle, Robert W. Goers, Adam Young, George Schilly, Conrad Miller.

The procession was over at 5:30 o’clock and the pioneers then filed into Turn Hall and took seats at the banquet tables in the order of their seniority as German Americans. The band occupied the platform during the two hours of banqueting and played several selections. Leopold Job, the caterer, had everything in readiness when the pioneers entered the hall. Speeches were made both in German and English during the feast. Charles Simon, vice-president of the association, presided in an able and dignified manner. John L. Roehner made a few remarks in German then read letters of regret from prominent citizens. This was received from ex-Mayor George P. Hier, the president of the association:

Charles Simon, Vice-president, City:
Dear Sir—Owing to illness and the advice of my physician it will be impossible for me to return to Syracuse in time to participate in the celebration and festivities of the 20th. I regret this very much indeed, and can assure you that my heart and full sympathy will be with my countrymen and friends. I sincerely hope you will have a large turnout, and that all will enjoy the festivities and that the day may be made memorial and as one of joy and renewed comradship of our Pioneer German-American citizens. Kindly convey my regrets to our associates, and assuring you and them that were it possible I would be with you on the 20th. I again express my deepest regrets in not being [able] to do so, and hope that you will use every effort to have the affair a grand success, and feeling assured that it will be so, I beg to remain,
Yours truly,
GEORGE P. HIER.

John Roehner, Esq.:
As the son of German pioneers who have enjoyed the blessings of American freedom, I rejoice with you upon this memorable occasion, and express the hope that the members of your association may long be spared to indulge in pleasant reminiscences of the fatherland, amid prosperity and happiness assured by true American citizenship.
Cordially yours,
LOUIS MARSHALL.

Mr. Roehner, Secretary of the association of German Pioneers of Onondaga County:
Dear Sir: As I have to forego the pleasure of meeting with my fellow pioneers at the banquet tonight, I beg you to express to them in my name, a sentiment, to which, no doubt, all will cheerfully respond.
Let us honor the memory of our mothers, by rising silently, who have given us the priceless boon of our German mother tongue.
This is the bond, which binds us to our old homes across the ocean, to our kindred still living there, to the noble art and science of the dear old fatherland with its rich literature and history.
With all loyalty and faithfulness to the laws and institutions of this, our adopted country, let us pledge ourselves to honor and preserve in our homes and families the rich inheritance of our mothers, our German language!
ERNST HELD.

Letters of regret were also received from Rev. Father Bonaventure Zoller, pastor of the Church of the Assumption, and Rev. Alexander Oberlander. Father Zoller, who was born of German parents in Albany, congratulated the pioneers and wished them long life and continued success and prosperity. John L. Roehner then made the following historical remarks:

"The early history of our German settlement dates back to 1797-1800. Little is known about those early arrivals: it is presumed, however, that most of them wandered their way westwards, others may have died among the wild Indians. The first pioneer of whom we have a slight record seems to be a German named Mang. American neighbors of him say that he came here in 1817, but that is not proven. Mang seemed to be a highly educated man, had many books, learned the language easily, conversed with the Indians in their own tongue and suddenly disappeared. His nearest neighbors of German birth were Christian Usenbenz and Philip Benz, who came shortly after his arrival in 1820. The next pioneer seems to be Peter Hasenfras, who was followed by the father of old John Graff, 1826: then comes the list of our happy society as we see ourselves to-day in person and as you find the corrected list of each name who joined our ranks published by to-morrow.

["]For this occasion let us recall in memory those earlier comrades who toiled and lived with us and among us. They may be dead for the world, but not for us at this present moment. I read to you those who came between 1820-30: N. Bucher, Lorenz Becker, Gabriel Blumer, Peter Conrad, John Graff, Theodore Keifer, Jacob Feil, Peter Fisselbrand, Andrew Fesselmeyer, Charles Herbst, Joseph Mesmer, George Obermutter [or Obermutier or Obermather?], Jacob Pfohl, Mathias Rauch, J. Reinschmitt, Lorens [Lorenz?] [Roessel?], John Yorkey, Caspre [Casper] Snyder, J. Snyder, Nicolas Sharer, Joseph Walter, George Zimmerman. Pioneers who arrived after 1840, now dead. Jacob Amos, H. Ackerman, William Baumgras, Max Blust, N. Beckmann, Henry Behm, Louis Becker, M. Cramer, John Demong, H. Diepold, Dr. Elsner, Abe Eckel, Philip Eckel, Joseph Fanth, L. Ficken, William Fickelser [Fleckeiser? ], Rev. Fix, Michael Fehrenz, H. Goetz, Daniel Gilcher, Abe Gilcher, William Goettel, Dr. Gellhar, Benedict Haberle, Jacob Haberle, Michael Heitz, Louis Haagen, Christ Hey, John Hisley, Adam Klink, Peter Klink, Jacob Kelsen, Charles Kuntz, M. Kurtz, Adam Listman, John Listman, William Muhlhauser, Matthew Muhlhauser, Charles Meebold, F. Michaels, Peter Reap, George Seeland, John Schven, Joseph Schven, Edmund Schneider, J. Stadler, Jacob Schug, Fred Schug, T. Saile, Xavier Spang, Dr. Maas, Dr. Solomon, Dr. Evers, Dr. Leonard Saxer, I. N. Sax, Daniel Samsel, Jacob Samsel, Rev. Soldau [Soldan], John Thurwachter, Rev. Weiskotten, H. Trost, J. Vogel, George Zett and Jacob Levi.

"The first elected officer in Syracuse was Andrew Fisselmeyer as marshal of the town. Among the first fire companies was No. 2 mostly all Germans, with Peter Conrad, Philip Eckel, Peter Miller, Peter Oneth, as captains. Let us not forget the old Hook and Ladder boys with Edmund Schneider, Joseph Fanth [Fauth?] and other pioneers at the head. The first social singing society, called the Saengerbund, was directed by B. Haberle as leader. The first theater was opened by Dr. Maas, assisted by many of our present member pioneers. Old Papa Woese followed him in the heroic sacrifice of time and money to hold the fort for civilization and higher education.

"As to work done by our pioneers in improving society let me mention the names of fellow citizens present: Prominent among them Anton Aman, Henry Genzel, Valentine Schilly, Christian Freeoff, W. Schmanz, F. Yaeckel, together with those departed like B. Haberle, Jacob Haberle, John Heimlich. This building in which we celebrate to-day, the headquarters of German societies,--our Turn Hall, bespeaks the truth of what I say.

["]Pioneers in the line of religion, my friends, should have at this time an honorable mentioning. First above all George Saul. He not only made himself useful as a civilian, as musician, as teacher, as politician, as a literary man, for he started the first German newspaper, the present Syracuse Union, in 1853; he also was one of the pioneer reverends, preaching the gospel in 1847, already in the Evangelical Zion’s church. Before him we record as far back as 1838, Rev. Julius Kempe. Soon after that, 1841, Rev. C. F. Rechenberg, of the St. John’s Lutheran church. August Hammerer preached in St. Peter’s Church in 1846. Then comes Rev. Gothtieb [Gottlieb] Fix in 1852; Rev. F. W. Wieskotten in 1855; Rev. Dr. Charles Soldam [Soldan], an old dear friend of mine, in 1860; Rev. F. J. Thomson—all honest workers in their faith.

["]The first German Catholic church was built in 1843 by Rev. Adelbert Juama; he was succeeded by Rev. Theodore Noethen 1849; he by Father Schweninger, he by Father Simon Sanderl and Rev. Joseph Raffeiner—all of them have gone to their eternal rest. Since then the pulpit of the Church of Assumption has been successively presided over by the following reverends: J. Miller, Joseph Lutz, Leopold Mozygemba, O. M. C. (deceased), Ed De Pan [Pau?], Rev. Alphons Zoeller, Norbert Stoller, Fidelis Dehm, afterwards Bishop of Jassy, (all dead); Father Lessen, Leonard Reich, Alex Rassbauer, Francis Neubauer, Louis Miller and the present general, Father Bonaventure Zoller.

["]While all of the German settlers took an active part in building up this city of salt and cultivating the land we live on, some of them can really be called pioneers in originating and improving our industry. So we find our member, Prof. Ernst Held, the first teacher in home music. The first music band consisted of George Saul, Anton Drescher, C. Trautman, John Winter. The first restaurant was opened by Michael [Heiz?], Charles Kraus and Charles Strob. The first military company was started by Pioneer John Springer, George Saul and Capt. Lorenz Roessel. The first decorating artists can be called F. Schulz, Henry C. Allewelt, A. Ertle, and William Baumgras. One of the pioneer civil engineers is our member, Emil C. Laas. In the salt business old man Schneider-Schneider [sic], George Zimmerman, Jacob Kelsen, Peter Miller, Herman A. Merman, Michael Braun, should not be forgotten, with our always happy pioneer, Charles Wisehoon and G. Walter, as cooper bosses.

"The first pioneer in brewing lager beer perhaps was David Goebtel, who as the saying goes, made beer for his customers in a wash kettle. And his invention was soon copied by Jacob Pfohl and Easterly, George Zett, Michael Heiz and Benedict Haberle, until it became one of the largest and richest industries in this city. Pioneer Jacob Amos, a green butcher boy when landed here, proved himself a successful miller. Pioneer Peters, the hard-working cartman for Jaycox and Green, rose to one of the foremost merchants in town. Theodore Dissel, the young office boy in Yates’ clothing establishment, worked himself up to the rank of a millionaire before his early death. That poor student, Joseph A. Hofmann, carried the sawbuck on his shoulders to earn by sawing wood for six shilling a cord the bread for himself and his beloved young woman, occupies to-day the position of being a wealthy man in society.

"Our honorable president for this evening can be proud of the name as pioneer in shoemaking. Anthony Will, one of the happiest young men that ever came to this country with his father, poor and struggling hard against misery first along, until fortune favored him with one of the most prosperous businesses in the wax candle manufactory. He died early but rich. It would take too long to rehearse the many incidents and circumstances of the life of our pioneers. Happily we count by a good deal more ups than downs, and as a majority we may be thankful for the blessings received in our adopted home—America forever."

On motion of Peter Drum [Drumm], Joseph A. Hofmann, the editor and publisher of the Central Demokrat, was chosen as secretary. Mr. Drumm then introduced the following resolution which was adopted:
We, the German Pioneer association of Onondaga county, in this our first festival gathering, on the 20th day of July, 1892, having had a grand and glorious time and being about to adjourn, desire in some measure to give public expression of our sincere recognition and appreciation of the very great work of those who more than any other contributed to making the meeting a success. Therefore be it

Resolved, that we most cheerfully concede and attribute to our officers and the committee in charge, the honor of this very very successful and grand inauguration of our Pioneer German-American festival; and especially would we acknowledge our indebtedness and return our thanks to our faithful brother and secretary, John L. Roehner, who has so conscientiously and indefatigably performed the duties of his office, and to whose untiring efforts are so greatly due the joys of this day.

After the adoption of the resolution Secretary Hofman made a short, but eloquent speech. He went back to the old times when the Germans were as a unit, met socially and enjoyed themselves as best they could. He hoped that in the future the Germans would be closely associated, one with another as they were years ago.

A resolution was passed extending the thanks of the association to the citizens who decorated their places of business and residences along the line of march.

George Schattle [Schuttle?] followed with an enthusiastic speech. He regarded the day as a real good German day and believed that all the participants in the re-union were enjoying it. He described at some length the tedious journey that the pioneers had in coming to this country. When they arrived here they found themselves alone; there was nobody to meet them. It is different now. There are German settlers in every town and city in the Union and a reception is awaiting every German who comes to this country. In speaking of the importance of the Pioneer association, Mr. Schuttle [Schattle?] said that he had met friends today that he had not seen in 20 years. It was a happy day for him, he said, and he hoped that the Germans would get closer to one another in the future.

"Look at the Germans to-day," said he. "They are hardly acquainted with one another. Some of them will deny that they are Germans. That wasn’t so in the old days."

August Falker was the next speaker and his remarks aroused great enthusiasm among the 300 pioneers. He said that the success of the celebration warranted the pioneers in congratulating themselves. Said he: "An organization which started with few members and which has grown to the proportions exhibited to-day is remarkable and creditable to the Germans. I hope the organization will be perpetuated."

Mr. Falker showed the German pioneers connections with the industries and institutions of the city and asked the significance of this festival.

"What is the purpose of this gathering. It is simply a festival that we are permitted to enjoy after 85 years’ residence in this country. That is the privilege indeed, but I think there is something back of it. No one will deny that we stand here as adopted citizens of this country, but there is still a feeling that we should go back to the Fatherland, where we emigrated years ago and say we are Germans. There is still a link of friendship attached to the country of your birth. We found the true hand of friendship awaiting us in this country and while we have been identified with the American industries and institutions success has attended us. The Second, Fourth, Fifth, Seventh and Twelfth wards abound in German citizens and the nucleus of the population of those wards originated with our fathers. Let us perpetuate their teachings. [The Germans] have distinguished themselves in every profession and will perpetuate the name of the German. I hope that we will join hands one year from to-day."

Speeches were also made by Francis Baumer and Jacob Lowenthal. The motion was made that the German Pioneer association be continued as an organization and it was adopted by a unanimous vote.

At 8:00 o’clock the pioneers adjourned to Turn Hall garden where they were joined by their wives.

The pioneers spent the evening pleasantly with their wives in Turn Hall garden. Fine speeches were made by Jacob Knapp, Christian Freeoff and L. H. Danziger. In relating his experience in this country Mr. Knapp said that he came here a poor boy without education. He followed the example of Christian Cook and George P. Hier, "Work my boy, work." Fred Gehring entertained the audience with popular songs. The dancing pavilion was crowded during the evening. The Gondolier Social club, 18 in number, contributed largely to the entertainment.

The bells in the tower of the Church of the Assumption tolled yesterday afternoon as the procession passed. The college adjoining the church in North Salina street was appropriately decorated.

In the parade was a carriage carrying the four Pellenz brothers. They have all been residents of Syracuse over 35 years.






Surnames found in this article, and possible alternate spellings:


Acker
Ackerman
Afferdick
Albeter, Olbeter
Allewelt
Allmang
Altenbrand, Altenbrandt
Aman
Amos
Auer
Bachtold
Bajus
Baker
Barker
Barth
Bartlett
Basle, Basic
Baumer
Baumgras
Becker
Beckmann
Behm
Benz
Bernhardt
Biehier, Biehler
Bierhardt
Blachler
Blaich
Blehler
Blum
Blumer
Blust
Bosler, Boesler, Bösler, Bozler
Brand
Brang
Braun
Bucher
Christman
Conrad
Cook, Koch
Cramer
Danziger
Davis
Dehm
Demong
De Pan, De Pau
Deuschle
Diepold
Dierlam, Dferlam
Dissel
Dotterer
Drescher
Drumm, Drum
Eagle
Easterly
Eckel
Eddinger
Elsner
Emerich, Emrich
Emm
Enders, Endres
Eng
Erhardt
Ertle
Esser
Evers
Fage
Falker
Fanth
Fehrenz
Feil
Fesselmeyer
Fichter
Fickelser, Fleckeiser
Ficken
Fink
Finkler
Fisselbrand
Fisselmeyer
Fissinger, Fiesinger
Filsinger, Flinger
Fix
Freeoff, Freehoff, Fruehauff, Frühauff
Friedel
Funda
Gang
Gebhardt
Gehm
Gehres, Gehris
Gehring
Gellhar
Genzel
Gerni
Gilcher, Gilger
Gler, Glur, Glar
Goebtel
Goers
Goettel, Göttel
Goetz
Graff
Grassman, Grassmann
Greenwald
Griesinger
Groom
Grub, Group
Gusteen, Gustäen
Guth
Haagen
Haberle
Haenley, Hänley
Hamburger, Heimburger
Hamel, Hammel, Hummel
Hamm
Hammerer
Hanck, Hanek
Harbach
Harris
Hart
Hasenfras
Hassel
Hatch, Hoch, Hotch
Hecker
Heimlich
Heindorf
Heisner
Heitz
Heiz
Held
Henocsberg, Henosberg
Herbst
Herman
Hey
Hier, Heir
Himpler
Hisley
Hoehn, Höhn
Hofher
Hofmann, Hoffman
Holzman, Holzmann
Hook, Huck
Hotch, Hoch, Hatch
Hottinger
Huehnerwadel, Hühnerwadel
Humbert
Humm
Hummel, Hammel
Jacobs
Job
Johnson
Juama
Jung, Young
Kappesser, Kapesser
Katz
Kaufmann, Kaufman
Keifer
Keim
Keller, Keiler
Kelsen
Kempe
Kendel
Kleeman
Klein
Klink
Klosheim
Klotz, Kotz
Knapp
Knauber
Knobel
Koch, Cook
Kohl
Korb
Kotz, Klotz
Kramer
Kraus
Krebs
Kuntz
Kurtz
Laas
Lang
Lann, Laun
Latterner, Latterenr
Leiter
Lessen
Levi
Lichtenberg
Listman, Listmann
Loos
Lowenthal
Luchsinger, Lucksinger
Luther
Lutz
Maas
Mang
Manz
Marquard, Marquart
Marschall, Marshall
Maurer
Meebold
Meiser, Meizer
Merman
Mesmer
Metzger
Meyer
Michaels
Miller
Moerie, Moerle, Mörle
Mozygemba
Muhlhauser
Nann, Naun
Neubauer
Nies
Noethen, Nöthen
Nutz
Oberlander
Obermutter, Obermutier, Obermather
Ohneith, Oneth
Olbeter, Albeter
Osbelt
Oswald
Pauli
Pellenz
Peters
Pfohl
Raab
Raffeiner
Rapp
Rassbauer
Rauch
Reap
Rechenberg
Reich
Reidel
Reinhard, Rheinhardt
Reinheimer
Reinschmitt
Reis
Rheinhardt, Reinhard
Rippel, Ripple
Roehner, Röhner
Roessel, Rössel
Roiler
Rosenbloom, Rosenblum
Ruescher
Saile
Samsel
Sanderl
Sanwald
Sauer
Saul
Sawmiller
Sax
Saxer
Schaefer
Scharer, Sharer
Scharon, Scharoun, Schroum
Schattle, Schuttle
Schemel
Schillinger
Schilly
Schmanz
Schmidt, Schmitt
Schmingler
Schnauber
Schnaverly, Schnabele
Schneider, Snyder
Schoen, Schön
Schoeneck,
Schug
Schulz
Schven
Schwarz
Schweizer
Schweninger
Seeland
Sehl
Servatius
Sessler
Sharer, Scharer
Simon
Sniper
Snyder, Schneider
Soldan, Soldau, Soldam
Solomon
Spaeth, Späth
Spang
Springer
Stadler
Steg
Stevens, Stephens
Stilbert, Sulbert
Stohrer
Stoller
Stolz
Strob, Stroh
Stube
Sturmer
Terlinden
Theben
Thomas
Thomson
Thurwachter
Traub
Trautman
Trondle, Troendle, Tröndle
Trost
Umbrecht
Usenbenz
Vogel
Voshall, Vaschall
Wallier
Walsch
Walter
Waschner
Wasmer
Weber
Weis, Weiss
Weiskotten, Wieskotten
Weitzel, Wetzel
Went, Wente
Werzberger
West
Whitney
Wiegand
Will
Willwerth, Wilworth
Winter
Wirth
Wisehoon, Weishuhn
Woese
Yackel, Yaeckel, Yäckel
Ygeyer, Yaeger, Yäger
Yann
Yorkey
Young, Jung
Zeit, Zett
Zenner
Zett
Zimmerman, Zimmermann
Zobel
Zoller, Zoeller, Zöller






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